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Classroom Management Plan

Management Via Motivation and Mutual Respect

Sean Patrick Nash


Dual Credit Biology & Zoology • Benton High School • April 25, 2009
Table of Contents
1.
Teacher - Student Relationships! 2

a. Goal or student outcome: The students will... 2

Action steps for teacher and target dates: 2

Expectations for students: 2

2. Student Responsibility! 3

a. Goal or student outcome: The students will... 3

Action steps for teacher and target dates: 3

Expectations for students: 3

3. Rules and Procedures! 4

~ the devil’s in the details ~ 4

a. Goal or student outcome: The students will... 4

Action steps for teacher and target dates: 4

Expectations for students: 4

4. Disciplinary Interventions! 5

a. Goal or student outcome: The students will... 5

Action steps for teacher and target dates: 5

Expectations for students: 5

5. Classroom organization/Cooperative learning/ Conducting Instruction! 6

a. Goal or student outcome: The students will... 6

Action steps for teacher and target dates: 6

Expectations for students: 6

APPENDIX 7

WORKS CITED 19
1. Teacher - Student Relationships
A keystone to the other factors involved...

a. Goal or student outcome: The students will...

Students will be important partners in creating a collaborative environment both within the classroom as well as
outside of it, in online spaces we collectively own and operate. Students will also be active contributors to the
classroom network, Principles of Biology at: http:/mwsu-bio101.ning.com. Online social networks are new
interactive spaces and are classically the “turf” of younger generations. Interacting in these spaces in a profes-
sional manner is a powerful way to meet students in their world.

b. Action steps for teacher and target dates:

1) Establish clear learning goals in both syllabus and on Principles of Biology website (Syllabus discussed on
day one, and learning goals on POB website are ongoing throughout the year. 2) Support a constructivist ap-
proach to learning, in other words... connect to current student knowledge and skills, and allow choice within
the larger curricular framework. (ongoing) 3) Do not be an “absentee landlord” on the classroom social net-
work. The teacher must be an active participant on the site. If these online spaces are not nurtured, they will
become simply a new way to “hand in homework.” (ongoing) 4) Display student work as both a model of solid
performance as well as a positive affirmation for individual students (ongoing).

c. Expectations for students:

Students will actively contribute to developing and the pursuit of individual learning goals within the frame-
work of the course curriculum. Students will respond to an open approach by actively choosing educational
goals to meet. Students will be active contributors to our classroom network, not only in adding new content,
but in commenting to their teacher and their peers.

d. Supporting documents/resources:

1) Course syllabus: “PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY” (attached) 2) Classroom Management That Works by


Robert Marzano, Chapter 4 “Teacher - Student Relationships.” 3) Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts and other Web
Tools by Will Richardson. 4) Principles of Biology - classroom learning network on the Ning platform:
http://mwsu-bio101.ning.com 5) Attached images: student work displays.
2. Student Responsibility
Becoming a self-sufficient and responsible learner in our community...

a. Goal or student outcome: The students will...

...assume a share of the responsibility for the learning environment as well as learning goals for this course, and
contribute to the creation of an openly constructivist learning environment that runs two directions as opposed
to a top-down approach. My job is to identify “big picture” learning goals that address the curricular frame-
work, and then spend the bulk of my energy inspiring students to take responsibility for bringing the learning
to the classroom themselves as well as taking responsibility for their own study habits.

b. Action steps for teacher and target dates:

1) Establish a set of collaborative classroom rules. Facilitate discussion on expectations with: “GETTING TO
KNOW YOU” document on the first day. These expectations will be converted to classroom expectations (I
hate the connotations behind the term: “rules.”) and recorded onto a single PowerPoint slide. This slide can
be pulled out, copied and pasted onto the beginning of any slide show later in the year as needed- though it
rarely ever is. (establish expectations on day one, and implementation is ongoing throughout the year) Of
course, this process also goes a long way toward

c. Expectations for students:

Students will actively contribute to development of both student and teacher expectations on day one of the
course. Students will generate expectations for a model student as well as a model teacher on the “GETTING
TO KNOW YOU” document on the first day. Adherence to these expectations will be expected in both direc-
tions (student & teacher) throughout the year.

d. Supporting documents/resources:

1) First day document: “GETTING TO KNOW YOU” (attached) 2) Classroom Management That Works by
Robert Marzano, Chapter 6, pg. 76 3) Video conversation with Dr. Randy Sprick & Jim Knight of the Kan-
sas Coaching Project: http://thebigfour.ning.com/video/engaging-students-in-classroom
3. Rules and Procedures
Some things are just non-negotiable...

~ the devil’s in the details ~

a. Goal or student outcome: The students will...

...understand the difference between expectations, which are shared and developed collectively, and rules, pro-
cedures and policies which are generally created by the district and/of building level and modified and adhered
to by me.

b. Action steps for teacher and target dates:

Create careful and specific list of non-negotiable rules and policies such as for grading practices, attendance,
etc., to place on course syllabus under the section on “Miscellaneous policies, etc.” (first day of class, but used
throughout the year). Also, list of course “expectations” mentioned in step #2 of this plan will be created in
the first two days of class, and recorded for the remainder of the year as well. I tend to consider these things
more as “expectations” as opposed to “rules” due to the collaborative nature of their creation. However, they
are expectations of positive behavior by all learners in our classroom community.

c. Expectations for students:

Simple. Students will engage in a discussion of the policies section of this document on the first two days of
class. Due to the non-negotiable of these rules and policies, this discussion is normally more about clarifica-
tion than negotiation as in step #2 of this plan.

d. Supporting documents/resources:

1) Course syllabus: “PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY” (attached) Particularly the section entitled: Miscellane-
ous policies, etc.” 2) Classroom Management That Works by Robert Marzano, Chapter 2 “Rules and Proce-
dures” pg. 13. 3) Video interview between Dr. Randy Sprick and Jim Knight entitled: “Classroom expecta-
tions,” found at: http://thebigfour.ning.com/video/classroom-expectations
4. Disciplinary Interventions
The “last resort” when the other four elements do not produce...

a. Goal or student outcome: The students will...

...be aware of the difference between working within collaborative expectations and the types of behavior that
warrant referrals beyond the four walls of our classroom. Once level four on this series of steps is reached, dis-
ciplinary intervention will be handled by building administration as per student/teacher handbook.

b. Action steps for teacher and target dates:

Disciplinary interventions are those things which happen when all of the other elements of management and
motivation do not produce results. IYou will notice the escalation in severity as you move down this list. I do
not print this lis tin DC credit biology as it has never been needed and is technically in the student handbook.
Therefore, I am using a copy of the Zoology syllabus, and particularly the last page and section about resolving
conflict. When student behavior is extreme enough to require intervention formal intervention, these inter-
ventions will generally be followed in numerical order as follows and will be ongoing throughout the school
year:

1) Student-Teacher conference
2) Morning detention with teacher
3) Parent-teacher or parent-teacher-student conference
4) Referral to disciplinary administration

c. Expectations for students:

Students will become aware of this list of interventions on day one of class. At this point, interactions are fairly
black and white. Students will respond to these increasingly invasive steps as they are warranted.

d. Supporting documents/resources:

1) Course syllabus: “*Zoology” (attached) Particularly the final section. 2) Classroom Management That
Works by Robert Marzano, Chapter 3 “Disciplinary Interventions” pg. 27. 3) Video interview between Dr.
Randy Sprick and Jim Knight entitled: “Correcting behavior - groups of students,” found at:
http://thebigfour.ning.com/video/correcting-behavior-groups-of
5. Classroom organization/
Cooperative learning/ Conduct-
ing Instruction
Building a constructivist environment for all in a cooperative and scaffolded way...

a. Goal or student outcome: The students will...

...interact as partners in the learning experiences within our classroom.

b. Action steps for teacher and target dates:

1) Build and maintain a classroom setup that helps to foster collaborative, constructivist work. (completed) Student
knowledge in my room should be student and group-generated as much as can be possible. 2) Both the classroom setup
as well as the instructional strategies employed in my classroom are designed to allow maximum discussion and discourse
both in the classroom as well as outside of it in online spaces. Philosophy for classroom instructional framework is briefly
outlined in page 6 of 7 in the Honors Zoology curriculum outline (attached). A similar document will now be presented
for Dual-Credit Biology as well. (first two days of school)

c. Expectations for students:

Student will rise to the challenge of being active participants in their own learning goals within the framework of the
course goals handed down by MWSU and our district. Students will generally go through a bit of an adjustment period
where they adapt to not being spoon-fed. I, myself, will have to adapt to this fact by realizing that students are not always
ready for such ownership. However, based on past performance, the vast majority adapt enthusiastically within a few
weeks.

d. Supporting documents/resources:

1) Attached images: classroom setup featuring six group tables. There are no individual desks in my room. Laptop carts
that help to move student learning into a self-owned realm as opposed to being slaves to a textbook. 2) Classroom Man-
agement That Works by Robert Marzano, Chapter 2 “Rules and Procedures” pg. 13. 3) Honors Zoology curriculum
page 6 on “gradual release” (attached).
APPENDIX

Supporting documents follow:

*PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY course syllabus

*GETTING TO KNOW YOU document

*ZOOLOGY course syllabus

*CLASSROOM DESIGN IMAGES


PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY
August 27, 2008

“Men love to
wonder, and
that is the
seed of sci-
ence.”
Ralph Waldo
Emerson

A collaborative effort linking MWSU


and Benton High School via dual-credit biology
Instructor: Sean Patrick Nash

Welcome to Principles of Biology. tions within the class will be full- language course in the same time
This course is offered with the blown open inquiry within a field period. Obviously, there is just
cooperation of MWSU, and suc- of study. The approach closely too much to remember without
cessful completion of the course follows what is know as a learning taking the time to study. Be pre-
will be worth 5 credits for Biology cycle approach. This essentially pared to plan your study schedule
101 at Western. A grade of “B” means that you will play a direct so that you can review important
or higher could also be used in role as principle researcher toward ideas and concepts, read your
place of Biology 111. questions you wish to answer at book, and examine online sup-
I am excited to be your in- least five times during the course plements for a small amount of
structor for this course. There are of the year. time each day.
many really good minds involved We will briefly examine the You will find out in the first
in the frequent updates to this philosophy behind this approach two weeks that this class will in-
course. Therefore, you can expect within our first week together. For corporate many different types of
a very up-to-date experience in this and other reasons, it should learning activities such as: hands-
biology this year. As a graduate of be an interesting and fun class for on labs, demonstrations, one-to-
MWSU, and a Biology major, I all of us. one laptop computing activities,
am very proud to be involved in Principles of Biology is a course online social networking, coopera-
this endeavor. that requires in-depth study and tive learning, interactive lecture
One of the major reasons I reflection. In a one-year and large group discussion, jour-
am behind this program is the university-level biology course you nal activities, current science
inquiry-based philosophy of the may learn as many or more words reading and original biological
course. Most of the lab investiga- than if you were to take a foreign research.
PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY August 27, 2008 Online social networking:
taking the study of biology “Equipped with his five
into an online community senses, man explores the
Instructor: Each and every one of us universe around him and
calls the venture: “sci-
Throughout the course of this year, we ence.”
will be utilizing many emerging web
technologies to both broaden and Edwin Powell Hubble
deepen our experience in this class.
Educational social networking, blogging
and podcasting are tools that are begin-
ning to show great promise in schools
across the country.
Our class will heavily use a web
communications tool for networking
between members of our class as well as
with MWSU from time to time.
The URL for this site is:
http://mwsu-bio101.ning.com
As soon as possible, you will need to
navigate to this site and request access
online by filling out a profile. You will
be asked many questions designed to let
others get to know a bit about you as a
person away from school. Also, in com-
pleting your profile, you will be asked
While this networking site will feel will transfer relatively easily to a digital
several questions about class rank, test
very much like Facebook or MySpace in portfolio which can then travel with you
scores, etc. All responses to questions
daily use, it differs in two crucial ways. throughout your future studies.
such as these are completely password-
First, our networking site is content- Your connection to the learning
protected and viewable only by your in-
focused in the field of biology. There- process is a huge personal goal of mine.
structor. These questions will also be
fore, it is highly social, and yet focused on I will not be satisfied if this course is any-
marked with a lock to indicate highest
academics, bringing together the best of thing less than the most relevant and rig-
security for this information.
both worlds. Access and security to our orous experience for all of us involved.
I take your privacy seriously, and I
site is also managed by your instructor, Overall, I think you will find that this
will help you to do the same for yourself.
not by someone you don’t know from online hub for study throughout the
There are few places within our educa-
halfway around the world. course will greatly enhance collaboration
tional system today where students re-
Online discussion forums concerning between all involved. I have a deep-
ceive any instruction on issues and ethics
key course concepts and the use of we- seated belief that this approach will bring
in the use of Internet technology. In
blogs (blogging) as a new genre of con- us all together with a stronger sense of
using these tools heavily to deliver this
nective writing are important core fea- community and the awareness that
course for you, I feel that it is my mission
tures of our course network. You will comes along with genuine personal
to bring you up to speed on current issues
find that much of your work in this class growth.
concerning Internet privacy and safety.

My version of this course is also de-


Classroom Resources: signed to introduce basic information
beyond the book literacy, especially within the field of bi-
Instructor: Others throughout the globe ology. There is a sea of free resources for
use on the Internet. More than ever
The major topics in the course will be before, classrooms of the 21st Century
covered by the ESSENTIAL BIOLOGY should assist students in making smart,
text by Campbell, Reese & Simon, as ethical decisions about the body of
well as a multitude of other supplemen- knowledge available to them via emerg-
tary sources. Your textbook will also be ing technologies. Navigating the “infor-
accessible to you online throughout this mation superhighway” is a big task, but
course. The online resource package will with smart and simple guidelines, it is
provide you with access to a large body certainly manageable.
John Dewey:
of multimedia as well. These are things Of course, other print resources as
“Education is a social process; education is
growth; education is not a preparation for life but that go beyond the two-dimensional na- well as in-the-flesh guest speakers, will
is life itself.” ture of the traditional textbook. also provide us with a rich and well-
rounded experience.
Miscellaneous policies, etc.
PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY August 27, 2008

the devil’s in the details


You have been waiting to ask about...

Although many different types of activities will be •Taxonomy


used to assess your grade, the grading and grade •Chemistry
scale will remain consistent throughout. Approxi- •Cellular structure & function
mately 50% of the quarter and semester grades will •Cellular energetics
rest with exams and daily quiz scores. Another 40% •Cellular cycles
will depend directly on lab reports, online projects, •Molecular genetics
and other away-from-the-classroom, authentic tasks, •Population genetics
leaving the final 10% to be covered by brief daily •Biological evolution
journal writing assignments. Therefore, even if you •Homeostasis
are not the world’s best at high-stakes exams, with •Human reproduction & development
hard work you can ultimately succeed in this class. •Ecology
The course will feature approximately eight
summative exams throughout the year. Smaller One final note:
quizzes will be used on a nearly daily basis to hold
each of us accountable for learning. Most impor- I am not just your teacher during this period. I am
tantly, however, these quizzes will serve as an impor- here to help you to grow and succeed in any way I
tant gauge on how the teaching/learning process is can. If you have questions or concerns please feel
free to share them with me before or after school. I
proceeding. Student data from these assessments is
am always at school around 7:00am, and stay at least
used to adjust instruction on a daily basis. until around 4:00pm.
Any make up arrangements for exams or quiz- As an instructional coach as well at Benton, I
zes should be done prior to missing the exam for am often found throughout the building. However, I
school business. In the event of a missed exam due do have an office/staff development room on 3rd
to an emergency, the exam or quiz must be taken on floor, room #305. Contact me via e-mail at:
the first day back in class. This will not be a problem sean.nash@sjsd.k12.mo.us or via Twitter, username:
once we become accustomed to the mindset of fre- “nashworld.” Parents, also feel free to use these
quent, formative assessment. methods of communication as well as by phone
It is also important to realize that your work will during the day at 816-671-4030.
I look forward to working with you during this
be assessed both independently as well as collabora-
coming school year and in supporting you as you
tively. This instructional decision was not deter- begin your collegiate-level studies.
mined haphazardly. A high grade in this course is
essentially a guarantee of independent mastery of
key concepts and skills in biology. However, our
world is an increasingly complex place, making ef-
Sean P. Nash
fective collaboration also an essential outcome in any
reputable system of learning in 2008.
Your final score for the course will be calculated
on a very simple percentage basis as follows:
•A = 90% - 100%
•B = 80% - 89%
•C = 70% - 79% Charles
Darwin:
•D = 60% - 69% “It is not
•F = <60% the
strongest
of the
Our textbook is entitled: ESSENTIAL BIOLOGY species,
(with physiology) by Campbell, Reece and Simon. nor the
most
The online version of the text with multimedia sup- intelligent
plements and study tools can be found by navigating that sur-
vives, it is
to www.campbellbiology.com and selecting the icon the one
for the textbook identical to ours. that is the
most
General topics of study for Principles of Biology: adaptable
to
•Biology today change.”
•Nature of Science
P R I N C I P L E S O F B I O L O G Y

http://mwsu-bio101.ning.com
GETTING TO KNOW YOU
NAME: _______________________________________________________

NAME YOU LIKE TO BE CALLED: ______________________________________

E-MAIL ADDRESS (please print clearly): ______________________________________

PARENT/GUARDIAN NAME(s): ________________________________________

MIDDLE SCHOOL -or- HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE TEACHERS: ______________________________

WHAT EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES MIGHT YOU PARTICIPATE IN? (sports, band, theater, clubs, etc.)

WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO IN YOUR SPARE TIME AWAY FROM SCHOOL?


(hobbies, interests, etc.)

TO THIS DATE, WHAT CLASS/SUBJECT DO YOU DO YOUR BEST WORK IN? Why do you think that is?

LIST THREE ATTRIBUTES OF A GOOD TEACHER.


Then, in your opinion, circle the most important of the three:
________________________ _________________________ _______________________

LIST THREE ATTRIBUTES OF A GOOD STUDENT:


Then, in your opinion, circle the most important of the three:

________________________ _________________________ _______________________

WHAT IS THE BEST MOVIE YOU SAW THIS PAST SUMMER? Why?

WHAT ARE THE NAMES (artist/title/etc.) OF THE LAST THREE CDs YOU PURCHASED?
P R I N C I P L E S O F B I O L O G Y

Is this glass… half empty or half full? (circle one) & explain why in the space below:

ANY OTHER IMPORTANT CLOSING THOUGHTS, IDEAS, THINGS I SHOULD KNOW AS YOUR TEACHER???
B E N T O N H I G H

*Zoology Instructors: Mr. Sean Nash


Room 307
sean.nash@sjsd.k12.mo.us

“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives.
It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.” - Charles Darwin
The Scientific Study of the Animal Kingdom

Scientific Inquiry Comparative Anatomy Evolution Classification Animal Interactions Animal Behavior
How is research What similarities exist How does a What makes an How do animals How does an animal’s
conducted in between different population adapt to organism an depend upon other behavior affect its
zoology? How can I members of the animal changes in its “animal?” animals? What is survival and chances
use scientific tools & kingdom? What do environment? What Is a hawk more closely the difference of reproduction?
methods to find the differences between factors drive the related to a human or between predator and What is a “social”
answers to my the wing of a bat and evolution of a a dinosaur? How do prey? Is having a animal? How does
questions about the wing of a bird species? we know? parasite always reproduction affect
animals? reveal about their “bad?” behavior?
history?

Subphylum: Vertebrata (vertebrates) words than if you were to take a foreign


Course Description Class: Agnatha (jawless fishes) language course in the same time period.
Class: Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes)
Obviously, there is just too much to re-
Class: Osteichthyes (bony fishes)
Welcome to the 2007-2008 school year member without taking the time to study.
Class: Amphibia (amphibians)
and ZOOLOGY in particular. This class Class: Reptilia (reptiles) Be prepared to plan your study schedule
is one year in length, and it will cover Class: Aves (birds) so that you can review important ideas
many aspects of the science of animals. It Class: Mammalia (mammals) and concepts, read your book, and
is designed to be an in-depth, challenging memorize definitions for a small amount
course. Specific areas of study will in- The above topics will be covered by the of time EACH DAY. This is much favor-
clude: MODERN BIOLOGY text by Holt and able to really fouling your time up before
ANIMALIA SYSTEMATICS several other supplementary sources. due dates by cramming to get everything
Your textbook will also be accessible to in!
Phylum: Porifera (sponges) you online throughout this course. This
Phylum: Cnidaria (corals, anemones, jelly- means that if you have internet access at
fish, etc…) You will find out in the first two weeks
home, you may not need to lug this text that this class will incorporate many dif-
Phylum: Ctenophora (comb jellies)
Phylum: Platyhelminthes (flatworms)Phy- home! The course is also lab and activity ferent types of learning activities such as:
lum: Nematoda (roundworms) intensive. For this and other reasons, it hands-on labs, dissection labs, demon-
Phylum: Annelida (segmented worms)Phy- should be an interesting and fun class for strations, one-to-one laptop computing
lum: Molluska (mollusks) all who are enrolled. activities, cooperative learning, lecture
Phylum: Arthropoda (primarily crusta-
cea)Phylum: Echinodermata (echino- and large group discussion, video les-
derms)Phylum: Chordata (chordates) However, this is a subject that REQUIRES sons, library research, journal activities,
Subphylum: Urochordata (tunicates)Subphy- you to study. In a one-year biology and current science readings.
lum: Cephalochordata (amphioxus) course you may learn as many or more
S E Q U O I A C L U B

Biodiversity is the greatest treasure we


have... Its diminishment is to be
prevented at all cost.
~Thomas Eisner, Chemical Ecologist

As stated above, a key com- tured in the natural environ- writing assignments. There- 2) Morning detention with
ponent of this course is the ment and killed. EVERY fore, even if you are not the teacher
utilization of dissection as a specimen that we will study world’s best test-taker, with 3) Parent-teacher or parent-
tool to understand the com- this year comes from a bio- hard work you can ultimately teacher-student conference
plex systems of living things logical supply company that is succeed in this class. 4) Referral to disciplinary ad-
and to see how they all relate in the business of raising Sometime in the first few days ministration
to one another. It is IMPERA- specimens specifically for you will need to obtain a 3
TIVE that you participate in laboratory and research use. ring binder to be used for this
these labs. However, some Each animal has also been class only. This should be re- * ONE LAST NOTE *
students always will choose to carefully euthanized in the served for ZOOLOGY only.
I am not just your teacher
be the group member who most humane way possible.
during this period. I am here
“looks” and “observes” while During the first day or two we
to help you in any way I can.
another might actually do the Although many different will be forming and discussing
If you have questions or
“true” dissection work. I have types of activities will be used classroom conduct rules to be
concerns please feel free to
NO problem with this whatso- to assess your grade, the grad- followed by all of us. These
share them with me before or
ever. Along with each dissec- ing and grade scale will re- are things which will make
after school. I am always at
tion, there are many types of main consistent throughout. our jobs as student and
school before 7:00am, and
data that will need to be col- teacher go as smoothly as pos-
other than during wrestling
lected, and then recorded. It Approximately 50% of the sible. These rules will be
season, I am almost always
would not make really good quarter and semester grades posted during the first week.
available for help after school.
sense for the person holding will rely on tests and daily Should some type of a conflict
the “scalpel” to have to also quiz scores. Another 40% will arise the following plan of ac-
operate the “pen”… right? depend directly on homework tion will be followed in nu-
It is important for all of us to and lab reports and participa- merical fashion in order to
remember that these are NOT tion, leaving the final 10% to resolve it:
wild animals that were cap- be covered by daily journal 1) Student-Teacher conference
C L A S S R O O M A R R A N G E M E N T
L A P T O P C A R T S
S T U D E N T W O R K D I S P L A Y S
WORKS CITED

Marzano, Robert. “Classroom Management That Works.” Alexandria, VA: Association for Su-
pervision and Curriculum Development, 2003

Knight, “Coaching Classroom Management.”

Sprick, Randy. “Video Interview Series with Jim Knight on Effective Classroom Management.”
http://thebigfour.ning.com/video/video/listTagged?tag=management , 2009

Nash, Sean. Personal and original documents and images related to classroom management and
motivation, 2009