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Physical Gaming

7 ways to combine computer games and sweat

Thursday, 30 April 2009


1. iPhone, iPod Touch
• Pros
• Fun
• Cool
• Widespread
• Cash
• Slick development environment
Thursday, 30 April 2009
1. iPhone, iPod Touch
• Cons
• Costs to enroll in developer program
($99, but that gets you a lot).
• Mac only development, and you need to
learn Objective C (but learning new
languages is a good thing, right?)
• Small movements - would take a lot to
generate sweat
Thursday, 30 April 2009
1. iPhone, iPod Touch
• Firemint’s FlightTracker, whilst not a
physical game, has racked up a great deal of
downloads and attention.
• Designers should to be careful not to ‘gush’
over the platform too much, and thus
produce a heap of bad, gimmicky games.
The concepts actually need to be good, not
just clever uses of the platform.

Thursday, 30 April 2009


1. iPhone, iPod Touch

• Some favourites:
• Flight Control
• Finger Sprint
• Pocket Guitar
• Falling Balls

Thursday, 30 April 2009


1. iPhone, iPod Touch
• How?
• http://developer.apple.com/iphone
• xCode
• Get a phone or an iPod Touch (the iPods
are way cheaper and really cool if you
already have a phone but like games). iPod
Touch 8GB: $293 from JB
• Beginning iPhone Development (Mark and
LeMarche, Apress)
Thursday, 30 April 2009
2. Using the WiiMote
with Flash: WiiFlash
• Pros:
• French... it must be good...
• Free!
• Flash is familiar / easy to program
• Flash is readily available and used by loads
of people (but not free).
• A more interesting way to control Flash
Thursday, 30 April 2009
2. Using the WiiMote
with Flash: WiiFlash
• Cons
• Can be slightly flakey on my laptop
(bluetooth connectivity issues etc...)
• Very heavily associated with Nintendo
(but you can use a disguise)
• Not much else, it’s really rather good

Thursday, 30 April 2009


2. Using the WiiMote
with Flash: WiiFlash
• How?
• http://wiiflash.bytearray.org
• Download source code and examples
there
• Wiimote: $60 from JB Hi-Fi

Thursday, 30 April 2009


3. Location based game
• Make a user run around the city or an
open space to find clues or complete
aspects if the game in the real world.
• A-Lure - mobile phone mediated (via
SMS). Used website and SMS gateway to
provide clues / discovery.
• Can be connected or disconnected
though.

Thursday, 30 April 2009


3. Location based game

• There are lots:


• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Location-
based_game

Thursday, 30 April 2009


3. Location based game
• How?
• Many ways to go about this.
• Use mobile device for electronic
mediation - processing of clues
gathered from location?
• Use GPS data to provide information?
(more advanced)

Thursday, 30 April 2009


4. Arduino

• Provides a simple, cheap and geeky way


to get electronic inputs into a computer
via USB or wireless.
• Prepare to buy breadboards, resistors
and wire and visit Jaycar a lot.

Thursday, 30 April 2009


4. Arduino
The Captain’s Blog

Thursday, 30 April 2009


4. Arduino
• How
• Inputs can be captured in the Arduino
programming language and Max/MSP,
among others.
• Demos: http://hacknmod.com/hack/top-40-arduino-projects-of-the-
web/

• Info, software, downloads: http://arduino.cc

• Buy in Australia: http://www.littlebirdelectronics.com/collections/


arduino/

Thursday, 30 April 2009


5. Motion Tracking with
Max/MSP
• Max / MSP is a tool originally designed to
allow musicians to program
• It has a unique ‘patching’ interface
• It makes no sense to traditional
programmers at first
• It has great use in the installation / art
community

Thursday, 30 April 2009


5. Motion Tracking with
Max/MSP
• Projects
• Talking with Your Hands
• Residency
• A Game of Marbles

Thursday, 30 April 2009


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5. Motion Tracking with
Max/MSP
• Use free (or with free demo) external
patch libraries to allow motion
tracking:
• cv.jit - http://www.iamas.ac.jp/
~jovan02/cv/
• Tap Tools - http://
shop.electrotap.com/collections/tap-
tools

Thursday, 30 April 2009


6. Keyboard Hack
• Find an old USB keyboard and take it
to pieces.
• Build a box around it and work out
some way to actuate the keys. Pressure
pads on the floor? Big buttons on
colourful boxes?
• Try removing keys and replacing with
other electronics.

Thursday, 30 April 2009


6. Keyboard Hack
• OR
• Use a product like the I-PAC:
• http://www.ultimarc.com/ipac1.html
• This product is halfway between an
Arduino and a traditional keyboard
hack - the computer thinks it is a
keyboard

Thursday, 30 April 2009


6. Keyboard Hack
• IPAC
• Pros:
• Easy to program using Flash for
example as keyboard interactions
are well supported
• Cons:
• A bit of a ‘fumble’, but well worth
looking into.
Thursday, 30 April 2009
7. Creative use of
Mouse
• A mouse is a very accurate and
responsive infrared sensor with
multiple buttons. That sounds like an
ideal device, but a little boring...
• It is also (obvisously) completely
supported by the operating system,
which makes development a breeze.
• Think about ways to build around the
mouse? Attach it to something?
Thursday, 30 April 2009
7. Creative use of
Mouse

• Wire stuff into it’s buttons?

Thursday, 30 April 2009