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Lesson Plan: 11-12 Grade Literature

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Topic: Flannery OConners A Good Man is Hard to Find


Method: A panel discussion model based on the idea of a lit. circle, modified to intensify the depth of discussion by allowing students to take more personal ownership of their roles in the discussion. The lesson will last 1-2 50 minute class periods. Objectives: 1. Practice and explore the different approaches to a literary text. 2. Understand the text (A Good Man is Hard to Find) on an academic level. 3. Interact with peers based on a professional model. Materials: Students are provided with three items. 1. A copy of the essay or piece of literature, 2. A list of the different roles assigned to the panel members (p. 3), 3. the rubric that will be used to evaluate the discussion (p.4 ). Procedures: Before Class: 1. Hand out the materials a couple of days in advance to give them time to prepare. 2. Discuss the procedure, and assign panel roles. 3. Give a brief introduction to the author and her work. 4. Stress the that objective (a lively, robust discussion of the text) is more important than any one part of the procedures. 5. Students will read the story and do research either to develop their questions or to research their topic. 6. Panel members must write out an outline of their opening statements. 7. Audience members must type up their four questions. Beside each question they should specify which panel role the question will be directed towards. They might want to prepare extra questions in case one of their questions is asked by someone else. In Class: 1. 2. 3. 4. Seats for the six panel members should be set up facing the rest of the class. Each panel member should take about 2 minutes to introduce his approach to the text. After the introductions, students should begin asking questions. Each audience member is responsible for a. Reading the text carefully and analyzing it b. Preparing specific thought provoking, and discussion-generating questions. c. Each audience members question should be directed towards a specific panel member. Audience members and panel members can contribute to the answer of any question. The overall goal is a lively, robust discussion of the text. Each audience member must ask each panel member one question. If the discussion has been sustained with no down time, it will not negatively affect a students grade if they did not ask all four questions. During the discussion all students should take brief notes of the major points raised. But the note taking should not be done to the extent that it distracts from the flow of the conversations. One of the panel members is responsible for closing the discussion when the time is over. Page 1

5. 6. 7. 8.

Lesson Plan by: Mark Wheeler (mark.s.wheeler@gmail.com)

Lesson Plan: 11-12 Grade Literature

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After class: 1. 2. 3. 4. Take up questions and notes from the audience members. Take up opening statements and notes from the panel members. Discuss the content of the discussion. Focus on points that might be useful later in the class. Discuss the execution of the discussion. Focus on what was done well and what could have led to a more rigorous academic discussion of the text

An electronic copy (Microsoft Word file) of this document is available at the following link: https://www.dropbox.com/s/wuxwghdcl7jafe8/Lesson%20Plan%20for%20ACCS%20Conference.docx Lesson Plan by: Mark Wheeler (mark.s.wheeler@gmail.com) Page 2

Lesson Plan: 11-12 Grade Literature

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Panel Discussion Format and Roles


In our class discussion there will be six panel members and the rest of the class will be the inquisitive audience. Panel members must type an outline for the two minute overview they must give of their topic. The session will begin with the panel giving their two minute overviews. Once the overviews are finished an audience member will initiate the discussion by posing a question to a panel member. General discussion on the question and subsequent questions should follow. Each question will be discussed until there is a lull in the dialogue, and then another question must be posed by someone in the audience. Each member of the audience must contribute to the discussion in meaningful ways. Below is a list of the different experts on the panel. If you are a panel member you must study your topic in-depth. After each panel member I have given an brief discussion of the members role and/or listed some suggested questions that he should try to answer as he begins exploring his topic 1. Panel Member 1: Author-text relationship, Is the author the narrator? Is the author reliable? To what extent is the authors presence felt in the story? Is the story in any way biographical? Is the piece didactic? How confident can we be of the authors intent? This author should discuss both the authors tone and not the relationship between the tone and the mood of the work. 2. Panel Member 2: Intertextuality, What relationships can you see between this book and other books, essays or myths? Are these significant? Do you think they were intentional? Do they contribute to our understanding of the story? 3. Panel Member 3: Symbols, Motif, Archetypes, and Themes, a bit of a hodge-podge but the idea is to note things of significance that reoccur. Are there significant references to weather, seasons, or directions? You know the drill. 4. Panel Member 4: Character Development, The job of this member is to take us into the psychological depths of the characters in the story, and to explore the complexities of their relationships with each other. It is also within the scope of this members responsibility to analyze how well the author constructs and reveals the characters. 5. Panel Member 5: Style and Language, This member must analyze the authors use language specifically their use of syntax, diction, and imagery. Is their style more like Hemingway or more like Faulkner? Look for and note any instance of the five kinds of imagery that we have discussed. Are the uses of imagery purposeful or showy? Do they contribute to your experience of the work or detract from it? Is there an image that stands out to you for some reason? Can you explain why? 6. Panel Member 6: Rhetorical Purpose/ Message/ Meaning/ Selective Criticism. This members role is somewhat eclectic. This member needs arrive at a clear statement of the works purpose. They should also attempt to apply the different schools of criticism (Feminist, Marxist, Postcolonial, Deconstructionalism, and so forth) and attempt to establish which of these would be the most beneficial way to analyze the piece of literature in question. Audience members must bring a piece of paper to the discussion with at least four carefully thought out questions that will facilitate the discussion of the text. They must all engage in active listening a freely participate in the discussion. All participants should take brief notes on the papers they will turn in. Full credit will only be awarded if you make a clear effort to sustain the conversation with helpful contributions, and you make multiple clear references to specific passages from the text. Lesson Plan by: Mark Wheeler (mark.s.wheeler@gmail.com) Page 3

Lesson Plan: 11-12 Grade Literature

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Grading Rubric for Panel Discussion


Student Name # (in comments field note role and final grade)

Text: A Good Man

Date:_____________________
Work meet the requirements of each assignment (1-10)

Talley marks for meaningful, text specific, contributions (1-20)

Took initiative in moving along the conversation, bit did not monopolize the conversation. Invited less vocal members to comment. (1-10)

Showed proof of active listening. (1-10)

1. 2.

Shanna Joe

IIII IIII II 20 III 15

10 8

10 6
78

10 10

Comments:

language and imagery : You did an excellent job of contributing an and helping other participate 100

Comments: Audience : had excellent written questions but did not ask them and seemed distracted

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Comments: On a scale of 1-10 how well would you rate the fluidity and depth of the conversation ___________ __________

Lesson Plan by: Mark Wheeler (mark.s.wheeler@gmail.com)

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