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Exercise

B. Identifying Kinds of Sentences

Identify each sentence below with S for simple, CD for compound, CX for complex, or CD-CX for compound-complex.

  • 1. My aunt has joined an investment club that investigates and buys stocks, and

she has made a little profit

already.

________

  • 2. The Great Barrier Reef forms a natural breakwater for the coast of northeast

Australia and attracts tourists from all over the

 

________

  • 3. Just thinking is not enough; you must think of

________

  • 4. We had gone only a little way into the cave before our flashlight went

________

  • 5. Although snow was predicted, the temperature has stayed above freezing,

so rain is falling

________

  • 6. Is the universe expanding, or is it contracting? ________

 
  • 7. After the holiday dinner is over, my brother washes dishes and I dry

________

  • 8. The last car of the poky old freight train is just now coming into

________

  • 9. Everyone who saw the movie has liked it, so I’m going

________

10. We tried hard, but the job was harder than we

________

Source :

Exercise

Dependent Clauses and Types of Sentences

Exercise Dependent Clauses and Types of Sentences Click within the small circle to the left of

Click within the small circle to the left of your choice for each answer. A javascript box will appear to tell you that your choice is correct or incorrect. After clicking "OK" within the javascript alert, you may try another answer or proceed to the next question if your first choice was correct. The phrase "prescriptively correct" means that other possibilities might be acceptable in informal writing or speech, but the prescriptively correct option would be most recommended for formal, academic writing.

1.

What is true of the following example? "Many people probably think that

politeness is simply a social lubricant."

A. It contains a prepositional phrase.
  • A. It contains a prepositional phrase.

B. It contains an adjectival clause.
  • B. It contains an adjectival clause.

C. It contains an adverbial clause.
  • C. It contains an adverbial clause.

D. It contains a noun clause.
  • D. It contains a noun clause.

E. None of the above.
  • E. None of the above.

2.

What is true of the following example? "The expanding economy of the 1920s

created new freedom for young people, who began to break away from their families and live on their own."

A. It contains a noun clause.
  • A. It contains a noun clause.

B. It contains an adverbial clause.
  • B. It contains an adverbial clause.

C. It contains a relative clause.
  • C. It contains a relative clause.

D. It contains no dependent clause.
  • D. It contains no dependent clause.

3.

What is true of the following example? "If society as a whole cannot be

rejuvenated, the individual needs to work for personal certainty."

A. It contains a noun clause.
  • A. It contains a noun clause.

B. It contains an adverbial clause.
  • B. It contains an adverbial clause.

C. It contains an adjectival clause.
  • C. It contains an adjectival clause.

D. It contains an appositive phrase.
  • D. It contains an appositive phrase.

E. None of the above. Bottom of FormTop of Form
  • E. None of the above.Bottom of FormTop of Form

4.

What is true of the following example? "He did not care about why I wanted a

dog."

A. It contains a noun clause.
  • A. It contains a noun clause.

B. It contains an adverbial clause.
  • B. It contains an adverbial clause.

C. It contains an adjectival clause.
  • C. It contains an adjectival clause.

D. It contains an appositive phrase.
  • D. It contains an appositive phrase.

E. None of the above.
  • E. None of the above.

5.

What is true of the following example? "The man whose dog you wanted is

here."

A. It contains a noun clause.
  • A. It contains a noun clause.

B. It contains an adverbial clause.
  • B. It contains an adverbial clause.

C. It contains a relative clause.
  • C. It contains a relative clause.

D. It contains an appositive phrase.
  • D. It contains an appositive phrase.

E. None of the above.
  • E. None of the above.

6.

What is true of the following example? "College students who spend four years

on their degrees generally make more money than graduates of two-year colleges."

A. It contains a restrictive noun clause.
  • A. It contains a restrictive noun clause.

B. It contains a non-restrictive noun clause.
  • B. It contains a non-restrictive noun clause.

C. It contains a restrictive relative clause.
  • C. It contains a restrictive relative clause.

D. It contains a non-restrictive relative clause.
  • D. It contains a non-restrictive relative clause.

E. None of the above.
  • E. None of the above.

7.

What is true of the following example? "You might hurt yourself if you don't

 

watch out."

A. It contains a noun clause.
  • A. It contains a noun clause.

B. It contains an adverbial clause.
  • B. It contains an adverbial clause.

C. It contains an adjectival clause.
  • C. It contains an adjectival clause.

D. It contains an appositive phrase.
  • D. It contains an appositive phrase.

E. None of the above.
  • E. None of the above.

8.

What is true of the following example? "A man had just married an

 

automobile."

A. It is a simple sentence.
  • A. It is a simple sentence.

B. It is a complex sentence.
  • B. It is a complex sentence.

C. It is a compound sentence.
  • C. It is a compound sentence.

D. It is a compound-complex sentence.
  • D. It is a compound-complex sentence.

E. None of the above.
  • E. None of the above.

9.

What is true of the following example? "The ape is accepted, and sits quietly

smoking a cigar and reading a newspaper, which he holds upside down."

A. It is a simple sentence.
  • A. It is a simple sentence.

B. It is a complex sentence.
  • B. It is a complex sentence.

C. It is a compound sentence.
  • C. It is a compound sentence.

D. It is a compound-complex sentence.
  • D. It is a compound-complex sentence.

E. None of the above.
  • E. None of the above.

10. What is true of the following example? "He doesn't like it, but he wants it to like him."

A. It is a simple sentence.
  • A. It is a simple sentence.

B. It is a complex sentence.
  • B. It is a complex sentence.

C. It is a compound sentence.
  • C. It is a compound sentence.

D. It is a compound-complex sentence.
  • D. It is a compound-complex sentence.

E. None of the above.
  • E. None of the above.

Exercise

Identifying Sentence Types: Resistance to Antibiotics

Click the answer button to see the answer.

  • 1. Resistance to antibiotics is a worldwide problem, but medical experts list ways to help slow resistance and keep current drugs effective.

    • a. simple

    • b. compound

    • c. complex

    • d. compound/complex

Exercise Identifying Sentence Types: Resistance to Antibiotics Click the answer button to see the answer. 1.
  • 2. When you go to the doctor with a cold or the flu, don't automatically ask for antibiotics.

    • a. simple

    • b. compound

    • c. complex

    • d. compound/complex

Exercise Identifying Sentence Types: Resistance to Antibiotics Click the answer button to see the answer. 1.
  • 3. Colds and flu are caused by viruses, and antibiotics don't work to fight them, so you should discuss other remedies with your doctor.

    • a. simple

    • b. compound

    • c. complex

    • d. compound/complex

Exercise Identifying Sentence Types: Resistance to Antibiotics Click the answer button to see the answer. 1.
  • 4. If the doctor prescribes antibiotics, follow directions and take all of the medicine.

    • a. simple

    • b. compound

    • c. complex

    • d. compound/complex

Exercise Identifying Sentence Types: Resistance to Antibiotics Click the answer button to see the answer. 1.
  • 5. Not taking the medicine as prescribed could allow the infection to re-establish itself in your body and become more resistant to the drugs later.

    • a. simple

    • b. compound

    • c. complex

  • d. compound/complex

d. compound/complex 6. Taking more than one antibiotic at once or taking left over antibiotics in
  • 6. Taking more than one antibiotic at once or taking left over antibiotics in your medicine cabinet may increase the chance of resistance.

    • a. simple

    • b. compound

    • c. complex

    • d. compound/complex

d. compound/complex 6. Taking more than one antibiotic at once or taking left over antibiotics in
  • 7. Keep current with your vaccinations; this can prevent you from getting infectious diseases and needing the antibiotics.

    • a. simple

    • b. compound

    • c. complex

    • d. compound/complex

d. compound/complex 6. Taking more than one antibiotic at once or taking left over antibiotics in
  • 8. Remember to practice personal cleanliness as simple hand washing and proper food handling can help protect you from infectious diseases.

    • a. simple

    • b. compound

    • c. complex

    • d. compound/complex

d. compound/complex 6. Taking more than one antibiotic at once or taking left over antibiotics in
  • 9. Improper use of antibiotics helps develop drug resistance, so many medicines that were strongly effective a few decades ago don't work at all in the present.

    • a. simple

    • b. compound

    • c. complex

    • d. compound/complex

d. compound/complex 6. Taking more than one antibiotic at once or taking left over antibiotics in

10. When bacteria is resistant to antibiotics, the only option may be to remove the infection with surgery.

  • a. simple

  • b. compound

  • c. complex

  • d. compound/complex

d. compound/complex 6. Taking more than one antibiotic at once or taking left over antibiotics in

11. Germs are smart, and if you use a lot of one drug in many patients, the germs will find a way to become immune to it.

  • a. simple

  • b. compound

  • c. complex

  • d. compound/complex

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12. While many factors are creating this problem of resistance, experts agree that a major cause is doctor's tendency to easily prescribe antibiotics.

  • a. simple

  • b. compound

  • c. complex

  • d. compound/complex

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