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Rogue Valley Medical Center Health Newsletter IN THIS ISSUE TomoTherapy . . . . .
Rogue Valley Medical Center Health Newsletter IN THIS ISSUE TomoTherapy . . . . .
Rogue Valley Medical Center Health Newsletter IN THIS ISSUE TomoTherapy . . . . .

Rogue Valley Medical Center Health Newsletter

Rogue Valley Medical Center Health Newsletter IN THIS ISSUE TomoTherapy . . . . . .
Rogue Valley Medical Center Health Newsletter IN THIS ISSUE TomoTherapy . . . . . .

IN THIS ISSUE

TomoTherapy

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Stroke Pediatric

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Colon Cancer

 

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Colon-healthy

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Hospice

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Calendar of Events

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Your Health Goes Green

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Calendar of Events 11 Your Health Goes Green 12 S p r i n g TomoTherapy
Calendar of Events 11 Your Health Goes Green 12 S p r i n g TomoTherapy
Calendar of Events 11 Your Health Goes Green 12 S p r i n g TomoTherapy

Spring

TomoTherapy

Bringing hope to cancer treatment in our community

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TomoTherapy Revolutionary Cancer Treatment Now at Rogue Valley Medical
TomoTherapy Revolutionary Cancer Treatment Now at Rogue Valley Medical

I t would be difficult to park your car in your garage with your eyes closed. Now imagine that someone moved the garage.

Wouldn’t you want to know where it was? Some cancers, such as prostate cancer, pose a similar problem for doctors because the cancer is in a part of the body where it can shift and move. Doctors need to know precisely where the tumor is to deliver the most effective dose of radiation. TomoTherapy, the newest form of radiation therapy for

certain cancers, gives doctors that ability, and it is now available at Dubs Cancer Center at Rogue Valley Medical Center (RVMC).

“A patient does not have to go out of town to get the best treatment
“A patient does not have to
go out of town to get the
best treatment available.”
—Jere Sandefur, MD

of the tumor. This maximizes the radiation reaching the cancer while minimizing damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. “TomoTherapy represents the best radiation approach for many cancers,” says radiation oncologist Jere Sandefur, MD. “We are going to take a scan every day on the table right before we treat the patient so we can shift the radiation right to the target.” Current treatment systems require getting a CT image of the tumor and then positioning the body at a later time and targeting the tumor based on the image. This works extremely well for most cancers but not for ones in very sensitive places such as the spine and the neck or in areas that move such as the prostate. “We were already using IMRT and CT,” Dr. Sandefur says, “but Tomo brings together all these parts into one package. We see it, then we treat it at the same time. It is clearly better, and bringing it to the Rogue Valley was something we had to do.”

it to the Rogue Valley was something we had to do.” The TomoTherapy Hi-Art treatment system

The TomoTherapy Hi-Art treatment system combines intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)—the most effective form of radiation therapy—with the image precision of a CT (computerized axial tomography) scan to guide radiation exactly to tumor areas. Patients lie on a table that moves through a donutlike opening. As they pass through, the IMRT heads spin around inside the donut, sending radiation beams at an infinite number of angles to reach the exact location

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Read more about the new TomoTherapy treatment system at www.rvmc.org, keyword: tomo

Center
Center

Previously, local patients had to travel either to Salem or to the University of California at Davis near Sacramento for TomoTherapy. Thanks to generous and ongoing community support through the Asante Foundation, this startlingly successful therapy is now available here. The cancer specialists at Dubs Cancer Center on the RVMC campus can help you decide if TomoTherapy is the right choice for you or your loved one. For more information call 1-877-789-8666.

your loved one. For more information call 1-877-789-8666 . Community Support Makes TomoTherapy Possible W

Community Support Makes TomoTherapy Possible

W hen Jed Meese needed care for his prostate cancer, he wanted the most effective treatment to give himself a winning edge. To do that, he had to travel to

Washington state. “I am very fortunate. I could afford to leave the area. Some people can’t,” says Meese. He and his wife, Celia, are supporting TomoTherapy by donating a lead gift to the Asante Foundation. “It is very important for everybody in the area to have a top- notch hospital with cutting-edge treatments like TomoTherapy,” explains Meese. The Asante Foundation will continue to raise funds to cover its cost, says Deborah Ameen, Asante’s chief development officer. “Our Foundation Board felt that improved radiation therapy would make a difference to our community’s cancer patients and that they shouldn’t have to wait or travel hundreds of miles,” she continues. “Donors like Jed and Celia Meese give to the hospital because of their belief that philanthropy leverages partnerships among the hospital, physicians, and the community. Together we create a connection of care.” Jed put it this way: “We have been very fortunate and we like to give back. By giving to RVMC, you can make a huge difference in a lot of people’s lives.” “And we hope others do the same,” Celia adds.

Jed and Celia Meese

When It’s a Stroke, Every Second Counts
When It’s a Stroke, Every Second Counts

L eon Carrau was opening the garage door when, “Whoomp,

I just fell over.” It was a stroke. “I had no pain, but I

was angry because I couldn’t move my left hand and

I couldn’t talk,” he recalls. His wife, Jackie, dialed 9-1-1, and soon the Phoenix Fire Rescue arrived. They called Mercy Flights, who got Carrau to Rogue Valley Medical Center (RVMC), a certified Primary Stroke Center, fast. “Rapid response is the key,” says Margaret Brewer, RN, BSN, Stroke Program Coordinator. “During a stroke the flow of blood to the brain is blocked. With every passing second during a stroke, more brain function is lost.” The RVMC stroke team was ready for Carrau and quickly stabilized him and kept the blood flowing to his brain with blood thinners. After a stay in the stroke unit, he was moved to the Inpatient Rehabilitation Center (IRC), where he received more than three hours of intense therapy every day. Carrau is a documentary filmmaker who has a keen sense of detail and continuity. “And the IRC approach is very effective. They schedule you tightly up there,” he says. “They don’t mess around, and they are determined, including the CNAs [certified nursing assistants].” Today, Carrau is at home, doing his exercises every day. “I want my mobility back,” he says. “And I can do that thanks

May Is National Stroke Awareness Month
May Is National Stroke Awareness Month
Be Stroke Smart Education Classes
Be Stroke Smart
Education Classes

to the people at Rogue Valley Medical Center.” Margaret Brewer agrees: “The teamwork of emergency services, the stroke team, critical care, and the IRC is what creates success for our stroke patients.”

WHY A “PRIMARY STROKE CENTER”?

For the 220 patients treated for stroke at RVMC in 2008, it means that they had a better chance to save brain function. RVMC has met demanding

begin brain-saving treatments immediately. Only 36 percent of Americans live near a hospital designated as a stroke center. In Oregon only RVMC in Medford and three hospitals in Portland have Primary Stroke Center certification. “Our physicians have extensive specialized training, and we have established proven standard protocols that minimize the long-term effects of a stroke,” says Brewer.

MEDFORD Tuesday, May 12 5:30 to 7 p.m. Smullin Health Education Center RVMC campus Presented by Juan M. Castillo, MD, FACS Oregon Surgical Specialists, PC

YREKA Wednesday, May 20 5:30 to 7 p.m. Yreka Community Center Main Room Presented by Mark A. Eaton, MD, FACS Oregon Surgical Specialists, PC

No fee. Please register. Call 1-888-688-4920 or register online at www.rvmc.org/classes-events.

Up to 80 percent of all strokes are preventable, yet stroke is still a leading killer in the United States. Understanding how to lower your risk is lifesaving information.

treatment treatment standards standards to to fast-track fast-track patients patients suspected suspected of of stroke
treatment treatment standards standards to to fast-track fast-track patients patients
suspected suspected of of stroke stroke so so that that
HOW
doctors doctors can can
Docto
90
To register for o

HOW IS STROKE TREATED AT RVMC?

Doctors may open blocked arteries using drugs

or or a a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI),

commonly com known as coronary angioplasty.

National Nat guidelines call for angioplasty within

90 minutes of a patient’s arrival at the hospital.

At At RVMC the average is less than 60 minutes

and an often 30 minutes or less. From 2003 to

the mortality rate for angioplasty

2007, 2

patients from stroke or heart attack was

3.1 percent. The national average is 10 percent.

To register for other community health education classes, visit www.rvmc.org, keyword: classes |

5

Is Your Child Acting Out?
Is Your Child Acting Out?

J ay Reeck, MD, ENT, recalls one distraught mother who stayed with her child all night, and every time he stopped breathing she would give

him a little nudge to wake him up. It was obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a disorder that blocks the airway, causing wakeful, restless sleep. A child with OSA may stop breathing for a moment but will awaken and start to breathe again. “It really scares parents,” says Dr. Reeck, “and they should seek medical advice.” The best place to begin is with a sleep evaluation and sleep study. Rogue Valley Sleep Center in Medford, the only pediatric program in the region, is now offering sleep studies for children ages three to 17. Obstructive sleep apnea leaves adults tired and droopy all day. But it often has the opposite effect in children, causing symptoms that mimic attention- deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). “If a child is snoring, he might awaken multiple times a night and have fragmented sleep,” says Lee Harker, MD, a pediatric sleep specialist and the chair of Women’s and Children’s Services at

It Might Be a Sleep Disorder
It Might Be a Sleep Disorder

Rogue Valley Medical Center. “Poor sleep affects school performance and certainly can result in behavior problems.” If your child exhibits symptoms of OSA, he or she should be evaluated. A sleep study is the only certain way to make a diagnosis. “We can diagnose all pediatric sleep disorders,”

“We have seen remarkable turnarounds in the behavior of children treated for sleep apnea.”

Beth Mortonson

says Beth Mortonson, clinical manager of Rogue Valley Sleep Center. “And we have seen remarkable turnarounds in the behavior of children treated for sleep apnea.” Even if a sleep disorder is strongly indicated, parents should get a sleep study for their child before seeking treatment, recommends Dr. Harker.

Can It Affect My Child’s Health?

A child with OSA may have poor health and growth,

difficulty concentrating and/or developmental delay, hyperactivity, and behavioral problems. “Deep sleep releases hormones necessary for growth and building muscle,” says Annemarie Day, FNP, a pulmonary specialist. A child with sleep apnea may never reach or maintain deep sleep, preventing the release of growth hormone and making his or her heart work overtime by constantly speeding up to try to overcome the apnea so that the child can breathe.

Recent studies have shown that children with sleep apnea are particularly susceptible to complications after tonsillectomy. “With a proper diagnosis, insurance is more likely to pay for an overnight stay after a tonsillectomy,” Dr. Harker explains. “That first night can be pretty rocky. I recommend you discuss having a sleep study with your doctor. If your child has true sleep apnea, he or she should be watched overnight in the hospital after surgery.” For the child mentioned at the start of this article, a study at the Rogue Valley Sleep Center diagnosed his OSA. The pediatrician sent him to Dr. Reeck, who removed the child’s tonsils, and the OSA stopped. “It’s great to have parents come back and say, ‘Oh, my gosh, they are sleeping so well!’ It’s amazing to see their faces just light up,” says Dr. Reeck. To get a sleep study for your child, contact your physician. For more information call the Rogue Valley Sleep Center at (541) 774-5750.

for your child, contact your physician. For more information call the Rogue Valley Sleep Center at
for your child, contact your physician. For more information call the Rogue Valley Sleep Center at

|

7

Get Screened and Beat Colon Cancer
Get Screened and Beat Colon Cancer
Get Screened and Beat Colon Cancer R ogue Valley Medical Center and the American Cancer Society

R ogue Valley Medical Center and the American

Cancer Society encourage anyone at average

risk to begin screening for colon cancer

starting at age 50. According to the 2007 Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975–2004, the death rates from colon cancer dropped 4.9 percent per year in men and 4.5 percent per year in women between 2002 and 2004. These declines can be attributed to prevention and early detection of the disease through screening as well as to effective treatment. But despite the progress, colon cancer remains the third-leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS?

You have average risk for colon cancer if you are age 50 or older or have a personal or family history of the disease. Your risk increases if you are overweight or have a diet high in red or processed meats.

“Health is the greatest of human blessings.”

Hippocrates (460 B.C.–370 B.C.)

HOW DO I GET CHECKED?

• Yearly stool blood test (FOBT) or fecal immunochemical test (FIT)

• Flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years or double-contrast barium enema every five years

• Colonoscopy every 10 years

To see how you can get screened, consult your doctor or call the American Cancer Society anytime toll-free at 1-800-ACS-2345 [1-800-227-2345]. Have you heard the phrase Health begins in the colon? The colon, or large intestine, is the final stage of the digestive tract, where a garden of beneficial bacteria help finish digesting our food and promote the absorption of vitamins, minerals, and healthy fats.

Colon-healthy Recipe

Colon cancer is the uncontrolled growth of cells lining the colon. It is imperative to get regular screening tests done for early detection. When detected

early, cancer can often be cured. You can also greatly reduce your risk of

colon cancer with some basic lifestyle choices:

• Exercise daily. Find an activity you enjoy; you’ll do it more often.

• Eat several servings of vegetables daily, including legumes such as beans, peas, and lentils.

• Enjoy fresh fruit and whole grains.

• Moderation is the key for all foods. Also, if you drink alcohol, by all means drink in moderation. This means up to one drink a day for women and two at the most for men. Wine, especially red wine, is the most healthful.

• Enjoy the sun often but for short periods and with sun block protection. A vitamin D supplement is a good idea if your vitamin D level is low.

• If you smoke, quit. Call the American Cancer Society at 1-800-ACS-2345 [1-800-227-2345] for help.

Minestrone Minestrone is a versatile and delicious Italian classic. It can be a light, fragrant
Minestrone
Minestrone is a versatile and delicious Italian classic. It can be a light, fragrant soup in
summer or a hearty warming stew in winter.
INGREDIENTS
cup cooked beans: black, garbanzo, kidney,
navy, lima, and/or pinto
1
1
onion, finely chopped
1½ cups chopped celery
Handful raw or cooked whole-wheat pasta
and/or ½ cup cooked grains: barley or wild rice
1½ tablespoons olive oil
1
cup greens: spinach or kale (optional)
4
cups chopped tomatoes or 6 ounces tomato
salt and pepper to taste
paste with 3 cups vegetable, chicken, or beef stock
½ cup chopped parsley (optional)
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon oregano
INSTRUCTIONS
2 teaspoons basil
• Sauté onion and celery in oil until soft. Add
tomatoes or stock and bring to a simmer.
Pinch fennel (optional)
• Add herbs and vegetables. Simmer for 1 hour.
1 to 2 cloves garlic, crushed
• Add beans, pasta, and grains and cook for
30 minutes.
2 cups or more chopped vegetables: carrot,
zucchini, potato, broccoli, green beans, green
pepper, cabbage, peas, corn, and/or mushrooms
• Add greens and parsley and bring to a boil.
Salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy! Serves 6.
Hospice Volunteers Provide a Caring Touch
Hospice Volunteers Provide a Caring Touch
Hospice Volunteers Provide a Caring Touch A sante Hospice is a life-enhancing support system of nurses,

A sante Hospice is a life-enhancing support

system of nurses, social workers, care aides,

and volunteers who help patients live well

and at home as they enter the end stages of life. In operation for more than 17 years, the Asante Hospice team consists of 27 nurses, 6 social workers, 4 care aides, and more than 45 active volunteers who served more than 750 families in 2008. “We ease the process for everyone involved, with emphasis on emotional, social, spiritual, and physical support for patients as well as their families,” says Katie Adkison, manager, Asante Hospice. “And volunteers are an important part of that emphasis.” “Volunteers share with me that they are honored to be present during someone’s end- of-life journey,” says Sally Melton, director of volunteers. “Beyond this, they often state that this shared process helps them face their own mortality and prioritize their life choices.” Hospice volunteer Lesley Nelson agrees. “I was asked by one of my clients why anyone would

choose to spend even a day of her life to sit with the dying,” she says. “My first answer was that it felt natural for me to do this at this stage in my life, being semiretired with grown children.” The complete answer, of course, is more complex, and Nelson says that every client at the end of life “informs me of something vital to my own life and my own acceptance of my own mortality.” For example, one client expanded the definition of the word friend for her. Barely able to talk, the patient whispered, “Friend, I know this is going to be a long process—can we talk?” “I’m still touched,” says Nelson, “to be a companion on a journey rather than a person separated from the dying process by the need to be addressed by a given name. It is exceedingly gratifying to grow and learn to be a friend in this way to people I might otherwise never meet.” If you or someone you know would like more information about becoming a hospice volunteer or about Asante Hospice Services, please call Sally Melton at (541) 789-6859.

Community Health Education
Community Health Education

Visit www.rvmc.org or call 1-888-688-4920 to request the Community Health Education events calendar.

BE STROKE SMART

Medford | Tuesday, May 12 | 5:30 to 7 p.m. Smullin Health Education Center, RVMC Presented by Juan M. Castillo, MD, FACS Oregon Surgical Specialists, PC

Yreka | Wednesday, May 20 | 5:30 to 7 p.m. Yreka Community Center, Main Room Presented by Mark A. Eaton, MD, FACS Oregon Surgical Specialists, PC

Breast surgery: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

Presented by Stephen Lovich, MD Medford | Tuesday, May 19 | 5:30 to 7 p.m. Smullin Health Education Center, RVMC

Is It Alzheimer’s?

Presented by Patrick Gillette, MD Yreka | Wednesday, May 27 | 5:30 to 7 p.m. Yreka Community Center, Main Room

Treating and Beating Cancer

Presented by RVMC Cancer Services Yreka | Wednesday, June 3 | 5:30 to 7 p.m. Yreka Community Center, Main Room Medford | Tuesday, June 30 | 5:30 to 7 p.m. Smullin Health Education Center, RVMC

A Closer Look at the NICU:

Taking Care of the Little Ones

Presented by Lee Harker, MD RVMC, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Medford | Tuesday, June 16 | 5:30 to 7 p.m. Smullin Health Education Center, RVMC

All classes are free. Please register. Call 1-888-688-4920 or register online at www.rvmc.org/classes-events.

If you wish to be removed from our mailing list, please contact Asante Communications and

Marketing at (541) 789-4241. Articles in the RVMC Your Health newsle er are intended for general information only and should not be construed as medical advice or instruction. For diagnosis and treatment of specific conditions, consult your physician.

Become a Part of Your Community

A sante is a community-supported organization. To support the work

we do at Rogue Valley Medical Center or Three Rivers Community Hospital, to honor someone, or to learn about planned gi s, contact the Foundation in Medford at (541) 789-5025, in Grants Pass at (541) 472-7300, or online at www.asante.org—click on make a donation.

or online at www.asante.org —click on make a donation . To make a gi , go

RVMC

RVMC Heals the Environment Too
RVMC Heals
the Environment Too

R VMC is becoming more environmentally

friendly. The hospital is using “green”

cleaning supplies, reducing plastic and

paper use in food service, making the change to paperless medical records, and developing an all-new facility plan to become LEED certified to significantly lower its use of water and energy. As part of this plan, this newsletter is now printed in a smaller size on all-recycled paper made from farmed trees, using eco-friendly soy-based inks. In doing so, every issue of the new Your Health newsletter is saving 256 cubic feet of wood while using 64 percent less energy and water and creating 74 percent less air pollution. Another benefit: this smaller size saves more than $25,000 annually in postage, freeing funds for improved patient care.

View Your Health online at www.rvmc.org, keyword: newsle er