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NTSB: NO SIGN OF MECHANICAL TROUBLE ON ASIANA 214

LOCAL PAGE 5

NO SIGN OF MECHANICAL TROUBLE ON ASIANA 214 LOCAL PAGE 5 ˜ CANADA NAMES NEW BASKETBALL

˜

CANADA NAMES NEW

BASKETBALL COACH

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Friday July 12, 2013 Vol XII, Edition 282

www.smdailyjournal.com

Grand jury calls school bonds ‘ticking time bombs’

School district takes issue with report,suggesting omissions and misstatements

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The San Mateo Union High School District is sitting on a ticking time bomb because of three capital appreciation bonds that will create nearly $1 billion in debt when they become due in the next several decades, according to the county’s civil grand jury.

The district, however, takes issue with the report and said the debt service obligation is significantly less. The county’s school districts have 20 out- standing CABs, of which three raised only $65 million while generating nearly a half- billion dollars in debt — more than six times the amount borrowed, the civil grand jury concluded in its report issued Thursday afternoon.

Unlike a typical bond which matures in 25 years, CABs can have terms up to 40 years and don’t require any payment until the due date. In the meantime, interest accrues and compounds which creates a mas- sive payment at the end and can prove a challenge to future borrowing. The jury stated the lengthy maturity also creates a disconnect between those who borrow the money and those who pay it back, essen-

tially meaning taxpayers are handing the final bill to children and grandchildren who never voted on the bonds to begin with. Specifically, the jury calls out three bonds issued by the San Mateo Union High School District in 2010 and 2011. The bond total of $190,109,353 will create nearly $1 bil- lion in debt when they come due between

See BONDS, Page 22

in debt when they come due between See BONDS , Page 22 SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL Children

SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL

Children touch the wool they’ve just seen sheared from a sheep at Elkus Ranch in Half Moon Bay during its annual Sheep to Shawl event.The ranch offers ways for children to see the workings of a ranch and how food and fibers are produced.

Sheep to Shawl

Elkus Ranch offers chance to see from where wool,food comes

Elkus Ranch offers chance to see from where wool,food comes By Samantha Weigel DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

By Samantha Weigel

DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

Of the numerous coastal farms along the winding hills of Half Moon Bay, the nonprofit Elkus Ranch stands out

as an educational resource. Children have the opportunity to learn first-hand how food and fibers are produced through Elkus Ranch’s edible garden tour and by interacting with farm animals. The Richard J. Elkus Ranch was once

a commercial dairy and cattle farm

spanning across 600 acres. In 1975, Richard J. Elkus donated the facility to the University of California in hopes of spreading awareness about the

See FARM Page 23

Man gets 25 years to life prison

Fatal stabbing near Mills High School in Millbrae in 2010

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

in Millbrae in 2010 By Michelle Durand DAILY JOURNAL STAFF Laungatasi Ahio The 23-year-old man who

Laungatasi

Ahio

The 23-year-old man who fatally stabbed a romantic rival near Mills High School three years ago was sentenced yesterday to 25 years to life in prison and plans to spend the time in the prison ministry helping others connect with God. Laungatasi Samana Ahio, 23, was

assured the possible life term after plead- ing no contest in May to the Aug. 4, 2010 murder of Jared Afu. On Tuesday, Ahio was formally sentenced and his defense attorney indicated his goal during incarceration, said District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.

See AHIO, Page 22

Community Development boss to step down Sept. 4

San Mateo’s Grote spent 30 years in public sector

By Bill Silverfarb

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

San Mateo’s Community Development Director Lisa Grote

announced her retirement yesterday after serving the city for three years. In her role as director, Grote oversaw the city’s Building, Code Enforcement, Economic Development, Neighborhood

Grote oversaw the city’s Building, Code Enforcement, Economic Development, Neighborhood Lisa Grote See GROTE Page 22

Lisa Grote

See GROTE Page 22

Grote oversaw the city’s Building, Code Enforcement, Economic Development, Neighborhood Lisa Grote See GROTE Page 22
Grote oversaw the city’s Building, Code Enforcement, Economic Development, Neighborhood Lisa Grote See GROTE Page 22
Grote oversaw the city’s Building, Code Enforcement, Economic Development, Neighborhood Lisa Grote See GROTE Page 22
Grote oversaw the city’s Building, Code Enforcement, Economic Development, Neighborhood Lisa Grote See GROTE Page 22

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2 Friday July 12, 2013

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“Man is not made for society,but society is made for man.No institution can be good which does not tend to improve the individual.”

— Margaret Fuller,American social reformer (1810-1850)

This Day in History

1862 President Abraham Lincoln signed a bill authorizing the Medal of Honor.

In 1543, England’s King Henry VIII married his sixth and last wife, Catherine Parr. In 1690, forces led by William of Orange defeated the army of James II at the Battle of the Boyne in Ireland. In 1909, the House of Representatives joined the Senate in passing the 16th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, allowing for a federal income tax, and submitted it to the states. (It was declared ratified in February 1913.) In 1943, the World War II tank battle of Prokhorovka between German invaders and Soviet defenders took place with no clear victor. In 1948, the Democratic national convention, which nom- inated President Harry S. Truman for a second term of office, opened in Philadelphia. In 1957, President Dwight D. Eisenhower was flown by helicopter from the White House to a secret mountaintop location as part of a drill involving a mock nuclear attack on Washington. In 1967, six days of race-related rioting erupted in Newark, N.J.; the violence claimed 26 lives. In 1973, actor Lon Chaney, Jr., 67, died in San Clemente. In 1977, President Jimmy Carter defended Supreme Court limits on government payments for poor women’s abor- tions, saying, “There are many things in life that are not fair.” In 1984, Democratic presidential candidate Walter F. Mondale announced he’d chosen U.S. Rep. Geraldine A. Ferraro of New York to be his running-mate; Ferraro was the first woman to run for vice president on a major-party tick- et. In 1988, Democratic presidential candidate Michael S. Dukakis tapped Sen. Lloyd Bentsen of Texas as his running- mate.

tapped Sen. Lloyd Bentsen of Texas as his running- mate. Comedian Bill Cosby is 76. Birthdays

Comedian Bill Cosby is 76.

Birthdays

as his running- mate. Comedian Bill Cosby is 76. Birthdays Actor Topher Grace is 35. Actress

Actor Topher Grace is 35.

Bill Cosby is 76. Birthdays Actor Topher Grace is 35. Actress Michelle Rodriguez is 35. Movie

Actress Michelle Rodriguez is 35.

Movie director Monte Hellman is 84. Singer-musician Christine McVie is 70. Actress Denise Nicholas is 69. Singer- songwriter Butch Hancock is 68. Fitness guru Richard Simmons is 65. Actor Jay Thomas is 65. Singer Walter Egan is 65. Writer-producer Brian Grazer is 62. Actress Cheryl Ladd is 62. Country singer Julie Miller is 57. Gospel singer Sandi Patty is 57. Actress Mel Harris is 57. Actor Buddy Foster is 56. Rock guitarist Dan Murphy (Soul Asylum) is 51. Actress Judi Evans is 49. Rock singer Robin Wilson (Gin Blossoms) is 48. Actress Lisa Nicole Carson is 44. Olympic gold medal fig- ure skater Kristi Yamaguchi is 42.

Olympic gold medal fig- ure skater Kristi Yamaguchi is 42. REUTERS A pack of riders makes

REUTERS

A pack of riders makes its way past Didi Senft, a cycling enthusiast better known as ‘El Diablo’(The Devil), during the 12th stage of the Tour de France cycling race from Fougeres to Tours,France.

Speier’s first bill to lower speed limit

Drivers across the country would have been forced to lower their speeds in an attempt to save gas if Congress passed a bill introduced the week of July 12, 2008 by U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo. Speier introduced her first bill, The Gasoline Savings and Speed Limit Reduction Act, which would have set a national speed limit at 60 mph in urban areas and 65 on less-populated stretches of highway. Speier’s introduction of the bill came on the heels of a similar suggestion by a Virginia senator the previous week. “Americans need relief from the ris- ing cost of gasoline now,” Speier said in a press release that week. “There is no need to wait for the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries or the oil com- panies to help us out. Every driver can affect change simply by easing up on their right foot.”

City manager resigns

Millbrae City Manager Ralph Jaeck, 63, announced his resignation the week of July 12, 2008, after four years with the city. His last day was to be Sept. 30, 2008. Jaeck came to Millbrae in October 2004 during a time of numerous challenges, particu- larly financial.

“The city’s in good shape,” said Jaeck. “We’ve had a turnaround.” A desire to spend more time with his family inspired the decision which was a surprise to Mayor Gina Papan.

“Ralph has been a tremendous asset to the workings of this city,” she said. “He has worked hard for us and at a signifi-

sonalized for San Carlos. Bianchini’s was the second loca- tion for the family which opened the first in Portola Valley in 1998.

Murder case spans two cities

A Tuesday morning shooting in Millbrae led to the discovery of dead body Thursday in Burlingame the week of July 12, 2008. Jack Chu, 27, of Millbrae, was found Thursday morning of that week slumped in a car parked in a Burlingame neighborhood near Broadway. Police were following multiple leads, but have yet to make an arrest. Burlingame police were called to investigate a dead body in white car at the intersection of Chula Vista and Sanchez avenues shortly after 9 a.m. Thursday of that week. They found Chu slumped over in the car, which matched the description of a car seen at a shooting Tuesday morning of that week in Millbrae, according to police. On Wednesday of that week, police were called to investigate an early- morning report of a shooting at Lincoln Circle in Millbrae. Witnesses reported hearing gunfire and seeing a person being pushed into a white car.

From the archives highlights stories origi- nally printed five years ago this week. It appears in the Friday edition of the Daily Journal.

week. It appears in the Friday edition of the Daily Journal. cant personal sacrifice in that

cant personal sacrifice in that he has been separated from his family. We are sorry to lose him, but we understand his strong desire to be with his family. We are grateful for his dedicated service these many years. He has been a great asset to all of us. We will miss his exceptional skills and his diplo- macy. I, personally, will miss his friendship and counsel.”

Vacant market site no more

Foodville owners in San Carlos inked a 30-year lease for the vacant Bell Market site the week of July 12, 2008, allowing the development of Bianchini’s Brothers Chris and Kevin Bianchini, owners of Foodville on Laurel Street, signed a 30-year lease that week for Bell Market which closed in November 2006. The expanded space gave the family busi- ness a chance to create a store per-

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. FOLYT
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
FOLYT
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
GUWNS
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THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Now arrange the circled letters

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A: Jumbles: Yesterday’s Answer: (Answers tomorrow) METAL CLOAK ADVENT BILLOW Lassie was a bit depressed
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The Daily Derby race winners are Eureka, No.7, in first place;Big Ben,No.4,in second place;and Lucky Star,No.2,in third place.The race time was clocked at 1:41.73.

Local Weather Forecast

Friday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the lower 60s. West winds 5 to 10 mph. Friday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the lower 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph. Saturday: Mostly cloudy in the morning.

winds 5 to 10 mph. Saturday : Mostly cloudy in the morning. Correction The article “Train

Correction

The article “Train project nears end” in the July 11 edition had incorrect information regarding street closures. San Mateo Avenue will be closed from 8 p.m. Aug. 10 to 5 a.m. Aug. 12.

The San Mateo Daily Journal

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Publisher: Jerry Lee jerry@smdailyjournal.com

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As a public service,the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries,email information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style,clarity,length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed more than once,longer than 250 words or without editing,please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Friday July 12, 2013

3

Victim identified in fatal fire

By Bill Silverfarb

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The victim who died in the six-alarm blaze that destroyed a Redwood City apartment building and left nearly 100 people without a home early Sunday morning has been identified as Darin Michael Demello-Pine, 48, according to the San Mateo County Coroner’s Office. Pine lived on the third floor in unit no. 307. Fire officials are investigating whether the blaze started in Demello- Pine’s apartment and have ruled out arson saying it was likely an accident, perhaps from cooking. The building did not have sprinklers but an internal fire hose that firefight- ers never used. Demello-Pine was initially unac-

ers never used. Demello-Pine was initially unac- Comment on or share this story at www.smdailyjournal.com

Comment on or share this story at www.smdailyjournal.com

counted for after the building on the 500 block of Woodside Road was evac- uated early Sunday morning. Almost 40 hours after the fire was first reported, fire crews were still in the building knocking out windows and attending to hot spots as police diverted traffic away from the area. Redwood City police, fire and offi- cials with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives are investigating the fire that has left the 72-unit Hallmark House Apartments uninhabitable. The building has been red-tagged by the city. Tuesday, former residents of the complex stood in line for a chance to

recover any belongings remaining from the blaze. Much of the third floor of the com- plex was completely destroyed by the fire and the rest of the building suffered major water and smoke damage. About 25 residents were briefly hos- pitalized and another 61 were housed at the evacuation center at the Fair Oaks Community Center by the Red Cross following the fire. The county’s mobile dental clinic also helped many fire victims get new dentures that were lost during the fire, said Ann Marie Silvestri, dental direc- tor at the San Mateo Medical Center. Many of the residents also have other dental needs that the mobile dental clinic assisted them with, she said.

silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com (650) 344-5200 ext. 106

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Awoman wearing a swimsuit and flowers in her hair was jumping up and down at the intersection of San Bruno and Traeger avenues in San Bruno before 3:59 p.m. Tuesday, July 9.

SAN BRUNO

Burglary . A white Chevrolet Equinox’s window was smashed on the 800 block of El Camino Real before 5:39 p.m. Wednesday, July 10. Suspicious person. Someone reported seeing a man that broke into her sister-in-law’s on the 500 block of Huntington Avenue before 3:21 p.m. Wednesday, July 10.

Vandalism. Ablue Cadillac Deville was keyed on the 1900 block of Willow Way before 10:02 a.m. Wednesday, July

10.

Suspicious person. A man wearing a yellow coat was yelling at passersby at the intersection of Angus and Easton avenues before 8:52 p.m. Tuesday, July 9. Stolen vehicle. A red 1991 Toyota Camry was stolen on the 1200 block of El Camino Real before 6:29 p.m. Tuesday, July 9.

HALF MOON BAY

Petty theft. Amotorcycle license plate was stolen on the 300 block of Metzgar Street before noon Monday, July 8. Fraud. Awoman’s bank account was used to make fraudulent purchases in San Francisco on the 300 block of Granelli before 11:17 a.m. Monday, July 8. Fraud. A man’s cellphone account was fraudulently used to purchase a cellphone that was then delivered to a vacant home on the first block of Ventura before 11:59 p.m. Sunday, July 7.

a cellphone that was then delivered to a vacant home on the first block of Ventura
a cellphone that was then delivered to a vacant home on the first block of Ventura
a cellphone that was then delivered to a vacant home on the first block of Ventura

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LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

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Tues. – Sat. 10am to 5pm Closed Sunday & Monday DA: Teacher had child porn at

DA: Teacher had child porn at work

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A former science teacher at a private San

Mateo school for children with learning dis- abilities exchanged online messages with a 14-year-old student about masturbation and

kept at work a CD of pornographic videos of young boys, according to prosecutors. Jefferey Michael Hicks, 35, of Campbell, worked at Stanbridge Academy, a Poplar Avenue school for students with mild to moderate learning disabilities. The science and sex ed teacher was placed on administra- tive leave after another instructor discov- ered he was exchanging the inappropriate Facebook messages with the teen student, said District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe. During that time, the school head found on Hick’s desk a CD labeled “Jeff’s folder” that contained videos of child pornography, Wagstaffe said. Hicks was arrested in May and shortly after posted $100,000 bail. In court for his initial arraignment Thursday, Hicks was formally charged with one felony count of possessing child

formally charged with one felony count of possessing child Jefferey Hicks pornography and one misdemeanor count

Jefferey Hicks

pornography and one misdemeanor count of annoying a child under 18. He did not enter a plea and was denied a court- appointed attorney. He returns to court Aug. 19 to either identify his retained lawyer or for reconsideration of the appointed attorney

request. A judge also imposed a three-year no-con- tact order between Hicks and the alleged vic- tim. Aconviction of felony child pornography carries up to three years prison. Marilyn Lynch, head of Stanbridge Academy, did not return a call for comment. Hicks joined Stanbridge in 2011, accord- ing to his LinkedIn profile. He is also the founding artistic director of the nonprofit Actors Theatre Center in Santa Clara.

michelle@smdailyjournal.com (650) 344-5200 ext. 102

CITY GOVERNMENT • The Foster City Council will consider a proposal for a con- cession

CITY GOVERNMENT

• The Foster City Council will consider a proposal for a con- cession agreement for Duffy Electric Boat Rentals on the Foster City Lagoon at its next meeting. The council will also consider to approve or amend the primary argument in favor of a ballot measure to increase the city’s business license tax for the Nov. 5 general municipal election. The meeting is 6:30 p.m., Monday, July 15, City Hall, 620 Foster City Blvd., Foster City. • The San Mateo City Council will consider three resolutions at a public hearing

at

its next meeting for the approval of the Mi Rancho Market on 80 N. B St., the site

of

the former Blu and White Laundry . The council is also expected to approve a graf-

fiti removal services agreement with Graffiti Protective Coatings for $96,000 a year for a possible four-year term as it is on the council’s consent calendar. Also on con- sent, the council is expected to adopt a resolution to request “One Bay Area Grant” funding from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission for a crosswalk improvement project in the amount of $368,000. An agreement with Samaritan House to operate the Worker Resource Center on Fifth Avenue is also on the coun-

cil’s consent calendar. The council meets 7 p.m., Monday, July 15, City Hall, 330 W. 20th Ave., San Mateo.

the coun- cil’s consent calendar. The council meets 7 p.m., Monday, July 15, City Hall, 330

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Friday July 12, 2013

5

NTSB: No sign of mechanical trouble on Asiana 214

By Martha Mendoza

TH ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Investigators have found no evi- dence of mechanical problems with Asiana Flight 214, the head of the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday, put- ting the focus of the safety probe into the crash landing at the San Francisco airport squarely on the pilots. In her final briefing before the agency concludes its on-site detective work, NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman said the air- plane itself showed no signs of a breakdown, and on voice recorders, the pilots of the Boeing 777 fail to notice that their approach is dangerously low and slow until it’s too late. “There is no mention of speed until about nine seconds before impact when they’re at 100 feet,” she said Thursday. Just seconds before impact, two of the pilots call for the landing to be aborted. The airliner itself, though heav- ily damaged in the crash, had no malfunctions in any critical sys- tems, including the engines and flight-control surfaces, the autopi- lot, the autothrottles and the flight director, she said. During the first five days of the NTSB investigation, Hersman has said repeatedly that pilots Lee

investigation, Hersman has said repeatedly that pilots Lee ANDREW SCHEINER/DAILY JOURNAL The charred remains of the

ANDREW SCHEINER/DAILY JOURNAL

The charred remains of the Asiana Airlines flight 214 sits on the runway at San Francisco International Airport.

Gang-kuk, who was landing the big jet for his first time at the San Francisco airport, and Lee Jeong- Min, who was training him, were ultimately responsible for a safe landing. Investigators have stressed that nothing has been definitively ruled out and no firm conclusions reached. The NTSB team will soon head back to Washington with “a mountain of information” to ana- lyze and review, from pieces of the

airliner to interview transcripts, and agency’s final evaluation is expected to take more than a year. Two people were killed and 180 of the 307 people on board were hurt Saturday, most with minor injuries, when the airliner slammed into a seawall at the end of the runway. The impact ripped off the back of the plane, tossed out three flight attendants and their seats and scattered pieces of the jet across the runway as it spun

and skidded to a stop. The battered passengers, some with broken bones, were told over the jet’s public-address system to stay in their seats for another 90 seconds while the cockpit con- sulted with the control tower, a safety procedure to prevent people from evacuating into life-threat- ening fires or machinery. And in this accident, authorities are investigating whether one of the two Chinese teens who died

may have been run over by a fire truck rushing to the burning jet. A firefighter who scrambled aboard the jet looking for victims as fire was breaking out told inspectors the seats in that sec- tion of the aircraft were almost pristine. “He said it looked like you just fluff the pillows and turn the airplane around it can go out for its next flight” said Hersman. But that section soon erupted in flames caused by oil spilling on hot engines, although she said the fuel tanks did not rupture. Hersman clarified Thursday that the pilot trainee told investiga- tors he saw a flash of light at about 500 feet, which would have been 34 seconds before impact and the point at which the airliner began to slow and drop precipitously. She said he told investigators that the light did not prevent him from seeing his instruments, and that it may have been a reflection of the sun. The other pilots made no mention of a light, she said. While the pilots were manually flying the jet for the landing, as expected on a clear, sunny day, they told investigators they thought the airliner’s speed was being controlled by an autothrot- tle set for 157 mph. Inspectors found that the autothrottle had been “armed,” or made ready for activation, Hersman said.

Man to trial for hammer attack on brother

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

The once-committed second- striker accused of hitting his stepbrother in the head with a hammer over alleged images of his girlfriend will stand trial for attempted murder. Lawrence Lee Buffington, 47, is also charged with assault,

Lawrence Lee Buffington, 47, is also charged with assault, Lawrence Buffington assault with answer on all

Lawrence

Buffington

assault

with

answer on all charge after a pre-

struck him in the head with the

that he had found videos and

force, making

liminary hearing on the evi-

tool during an argument. The

photographs of his stepbrother

criminal

dence. He now returns to court

victim also told authorities

harming her. The woman said

threats

and

July 30 to enter a Superior Court

Buffington accused him of hav-

there was no truth to anything in

violating his

plea and possibly set a trial

ing an affair with his girlfriend

the alleged images and she had

parole.

date.

after finding a photograph.

not seen anything herself.

Buffington

Redwood City police arrested

Buffington’s girlfriend previ-

That December, Buffington

has

pleaded

Buffington in June 2012 after

ously told the Daily Journal that

was committed to Napa State

not guilty but

being told by his hospitalized

Buffington also told her immedi-

Hospital as incompetent for

was

held

to

stepbrother that the man had

ately after the confrontation

trial. He returned in June.

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LOCAL/STATE/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

More than 12,000 California inmates on hunger strike

SACRAMENTO — The number of California inmates participating in a hunger strike has dropped sharply, four days into the protest over prison conditions. California corrections officials say more than 12,400 prison inmates have skipped at least nine consecutive meals, a threshold that led the department to label the protest an extended hunger strike. The tally is down from the more than 30,000 inmates who started refusing meals this week. They are protesting conditions for gang members held in solitary confine- ment at Pelican Bay State Prison near Eureka. Additionally, more than 1,300 inmates are refusing to go to work or classes, down from about 2,300 on Monday. The department said Thursday those par- ticipating could face disciplinary action. Corrections officials also threatened to con- fiscate food some inmates have stockpiled in their cells. Two separate hunger strikes in 2011

Around the state

involved between 4,000 and 6,500 inmates.

Stop frying eggs, Death Valley officials say

DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK — It gets so hot in Death Valley that you can fry an egg with sun power. That’s what one Death Valley National Park employee did last week, when she took a frying pan to the pavement and posted the video online. Park visitors park were quick to imitate her, but they didn’t use skillets and left gooey messes. The park then issued a plea on its Facebook page to crack down on the egg-frying fiasco. Death Valley highs have been hovering around 120 degrees, and on Wednesday the park marked the 100th anniversary of the world’s hottest day on record — 134 degrees — set there in 1913. Park rangers say the egg frying has since stopped due to rain and clouds that have rolled across Death Valley.

Bald eagle chick discovered in San Mateo County

Abald eagle has hatched and is learning to fly in San Mateo County. The chick was first spotted in early June in a nest about 100 feet up a tree near Crystal Springs Reservoir. The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, which owns the watershed surrounding the reservoir, says the eagle took its first tentative flight from the nest in the first week of July. Since then the bird, which already has a three-foot wingspan, has fledged, or started flying. Watershed keeper Tim Sullivan says near- by residents should expect to see the eagle testing out its wings soon. Sullivan says the chick will likely remain in the same area as its parents for up to year.

Local briefs

10,000 pot plants found in Santa Clara County

GILROY — Authorities say they’ve found 10,000 marijuana plants growing in a Northern California state park. The plants were found Wednesday in a canyon inside Henry Coe State Park near Gilroy. The operation was first located in June. The Santa Clara County sheriff’s office says the farm probably was operated by a Mexican drug cartel. State and local authorities also found two .22-caliber pellet rifles. Since 2006, the sheriff’s office has been involved in four officer-involved shootings during pot-eradication operations on public lands.

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Funeral Etiquette Advice:

Show Up, Be Brief, Listen

By Paul Larson

Etiquette Advice: Show Up, Be Brief, Listen By Paul Larson MILLBRAE – Have you ever attended

MILLBRAE – Have you ever attended a funeral or memorial service and felt ill-at-ease, uncomfortable or awkward when talking to the family of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled through your words and condolences because you just didn’t know what to say or how to say it? Have you even decided to not approach the family for fear of saying the wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If so you are not alone. Many people in this situation want to provide some kind of comfort to the immediate family, but just don’t have the verbal tools to do so in an assuring manner. Learning “Funeral Etiquette” can be useful. Using the right words at the right time is an appropriate way to show that you care, and in situations like this can be of great help when provided correctly. Standard condolences such as “I am sorry for your loss” have become routine and generic. A personalized phrase can be welcomed such as “John touched many lives” or “I will miss John”. DO NOT ask the cause of death, offer advice or make comments that would diminish the importance of the loss such as “Oh, you’re young and can marry again”. Other ways to demonstrate your support include: 1. Listening. The family may feel the need to express their anxiety, and giving them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2. An embrace. This can show that you care without the need for words; 3. Offering your services. This shows the family that you are willing to give extra time for them: “Please

let me know if there is anything I can do to help” (be prepared to act if needed). Even if you don’t feel confident in approaching the family there are other ways to show that you care: 1. Attending the funeral and signing the Memorial Book will show the family that you took the time to be there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts to prepare for this special occasion (dark

colors are no longer a requisite for funerals, but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other attire that you’d wear to any special event are considered a way of showing you care);

3. In certain cases friends are invited to

stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings. Prior to the funeral write a few key notes and reflections which will help you organize your thoughts. Even if there is no opportunity to speak before a group you may have a chance to offer your thoughts to the family following the ceremony; 4. A personalized card or note will help you arrange your words better and can be kept by the family. If you don’t have their mailing address you can send your envelope to the funeral home and they will forward it to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a long time tradition, or making a charitable donation in the deceased’s memory will give the family a strong sense of your regards; 6. If appropriate a brief phone call can show your immediate concern, but generally this should be avoided to give the family the privacy they may need. If you ever wish to discuss cremation, funeral matters or want to make pre- planning arrangements please feel free to call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650) 588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you in a fair and helpful manner. For more info you may also visit us on the internet at:

www.chapelofthehighlands.com.

visit us on the internet at: www.chapelofthehighlands.com . REUTERS FILE PHOTO Gov.Jerry Brown initially sought to

REUTERS FILE PHOTO

Gov.Jerry Brown initially sought to eliminate the state’s $750 million enterprise zone program, which he called outdated and inefficient,but later compromised and agreed to revamp the program after pushback from businesses.

Gov. Brown signs California business incentive program

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN DIEGO — Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation on Thursday overhauling an eco- nomic development program in an effort to encourage manufacturing and job growth in California. The governor initially sought to elimi- nate the state’s $750 million enterprise zone program, which he called outdated and inefficient, but later compromised and agreed to revamp the program after push- back from businesses. “This legislation will help grow our econ- omy and create good manufacturing jobs,” Brown said in a statement after he signed AB93 and SB90 at Takeda California, a biotech firm, in San Diego. The bills will extend a sales tax exemp- tion for manufacturing and research-and- development equipment for eight years and provide hiring credits for businesses in areas with high unemployment rates. The legislation includes a tax credit to encour- age businesses to expand and retain jobs in California. Local governments opposed the bills out of worry over losing the economic develop-

ment program, but labor groups and some businesses backed the changes. Brown and supporters had said communi- ties abused the incentive program by pro- viding unneeded tax breaks to businesses that pay low wages. “The enterprise zone program represented some of the worst abuses of taxpayer money this state has seen,” California Labor Federation Executive Secretary-Treasurer Art Pulaski said Thursday in a prepared state- ment. “Instead of using taxpayer funds to create jobs, the broken enterprise zone pro- gram subsidized strip clubs, card rooms and big corporations like Walmart.” Craig Johnson, president of the California Association of Enterprise Zones, said Brown was making a “grave mistake” in signing the bills because the changes effec- tively phase out a tool to help economical- ly distressed areas. “Signing these bills eliminates the pro- gram and greatly affects millions of Californians who live in these regions as well as minorities, veterans, displaced workers, recipients of government assis- tance and others in need of jobs,” Johnson said in a statement.

displaced workers, recipients of government assis- tance and others in need of jobs,” Johnson said in

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Friday July 12, 2013

7

Jury in Zimmerman trial may consider manslaughter charge

By Mike Schneider and Kyle Hightower

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANFORD, Fla. — In an unmis- takable setback for George Zimmerman, the jury at the neigh- borhood watch captain’s second- degree murder trial was given the option Thursday of convicting him on the lesser charge of manslaughter in the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. Judge Debra Nelson issued her ruling over the objections of Zimmerman’s lawyers shortly before a prosecutor delivered a closing argument in which he por- trayed the defendant as an aspiring police officer who assumed Martin was up to no good and took the law into his own hands. “A teenager is dead. He is dead through no fault of his own,” prosecutor Bernie de la Rionda told the jurors. “He is dead because a man made Unfortunately because his assumptions were wrong, Trayvon Benjamin Martin no longer walks this Earth.” Because of the judge’s ruling, the six jurors will have three

of the judge’s ruling, the six jurors will have three REUTERS George Zimmerman wipes his brow

REUTERS

George Zimmerman wipes his brow before the state’s closing arguments in Seminole circuit court in Sanford,Fla.

options when they start delibera- tions as early as Friday: guilty of second-degree murder, guilty of manslaughter and not guilty. Zimmerman attorney Don West had argued an all-or-nothing strat- egy, saying the only charge that

should be put before the jury is second-degree murder. “The state has charged him with second-degree murder. They should be required to prove it,” West said. “If they had wanted to charge him with manslaughter

they could do that.” To win a second-degree murder conviction, prosecutors must prove Zimmerman showed ill will, hatred or spite — a burden the defense has argued the state failed to meet.

More than 150 accused in online wildlife sales

By Matthew Daly

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — More than 150 people face federal and state charges after authorities disrupted online wildlife trafficking opera- tions involving tiger, leopard and jaguar pelts, elephant ivory and live birds. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the arrests Thursday after an undercover oper- ation that included officers from 16 states, three federal agencies and three Asian countries. Items seized under “Operation Wild Web” include the pelts of

endangered big cats such as the Sumatran tiger, leopard and jaguar; live migratory birds such as the California scrub jay; whale teeth; elephant and walrus ivory; and a zebra pelt. “Our message is clear and sim- ple: The Internet is not an open marketplace for protected species,” said Edward Grace, deputy assistant director for law enforcement for the Fish and Wildlife Service. Working with counterparts in California, Texas, New York, Florida and Alaska and other states, federal officials targeted illegal wildlife sellers who oper-

ate through Craigslist, eBay and other Internet marketplaces and classified ads. Wildlife officers in Singapore, Thailand and Indonesia ran similar operations at the same time. The items were seized last August, although charges are still being brought in many cases. Six Southern California residents were charged Thursday with selling endangered species and animal parts, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Los Angeles said. “As a major platform for the illicit trade in wildlife, the Internet has become a dangerous place for animals,” said Jeff

Flocken, North American regional director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare, an advocacy group that worked with the federal task force. “Wildlife crimes are not only harmful to endangered species, they also pose serious threats to national and global security,” Flocken said. Illegal wildlife trade generates an estimated $19 billion a year worldwide and ranks fourth on the list of the most lucrative global illegal activities behind nar- cotics, counterfeiting and human trafficking, the animal welfare group said in a report last year.

Around the nation

Reid, McConnell clash harshly over nominations

WASHINGTON — Triggering an unusually personal clash, Democrats threatened Thursday to change Senate rules unilaterally if Republicans block yes-or-no votes on several of President Barack Obama’s top-level nomi- nees, including some long in con- firmation limbo. A series of showdown votes was set for next week on seven appointees. But in classic Senate fashion, as the rhetoric grew more intense, the two sides constructed an escape hatch in the form of a rare private meeting set for Monday evening where all 100 senators can seek a compromise out of public view. Majority Leader Harry Reid, D- Nev., set the day’s events in motion with a searing speech accusing Republicans of trying to deny Obama the right to have his team in place. In a chamber where senators routinely refer to one another as “my distinguished friend,” he accused the Republican leader, Sen. Mitch McConnell, of failing to live up to his commit- ments to allow votes on all but the most extraordinary circumstances. Moments later, McConnell said Reid was misquoting him and at the same time failing to honor his own word not to change the rules of the Senate unilaterally. To do so would be a violation of minority rights, he warned, subject to be repeated by any majority in the future. When the drafters of the Constitution gave the Senate the power of advice and consent on nominations, he said, “I don’t think they had in mind sit down and shut up.”

Obama’s ATF nomination sent to full Senate

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama’s nomination of B. Todd Jones to lead the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives has been sent to the full Senate. Obama picked Jones to lead the ATF following the mass shooting in December at a Connecticut ele- mentary school where 20 children and six adults were killed.

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Reporters’ notebook

C ongratulations to David Mitchell of Hillsborough, who was named as a summer 2013

White House intern. He most recently attended Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C. *** A slight correction. Last week, we men- tioned in this space that Paul Mart i n ’s American Grill was to open at the Hillsdale Shopping Center Monday, July 8. Restaurant officials now say the opening was slated for July 11. So by the time you’re reading this, hopefully you can head down there and get your fill of American classics with a fresh twist — using local and in-season ingredients. *** Crystal Cleaning Center in San Mateo’s Crystal Springs Village Shopping Center is celebrating its 50th anniversary. Started in 1963 by Violet Janks, the business is now run by Lynette Watterson, Janks’ daughter. A traditional dry cleaner, it also special- izes in wedding gown preservation and vintage clothing restoration. It has been in the same space for all 50 years. Now that’s staying power! *** The San Francisco Flower & Garden Show, America’s third largest show if its kind, has been sold to busi- ness partners Sherry Larsen of Larsen Enterprises, and Maryanne Lucas,

founder and executive director of Kids Growing Strong. They will continue to produce this annual show scheduled March 19-23, 2014 at the San Mateo County Event Center. The show was started in 1986 as a fundraiser for the San Francisco Landscape Garden Show by volun- teers for the Friends of Recreation and Parks in San Francisco. For its first 11 years (1986-1997), the show was held at Fort Mason in San Francisco. In 1997, the show’s name was changed to the San Francisco Flower & Garden Show, and moved from Fort Mason to the Cow Palace. It has been held at the San Mateo County Event Center since 2009. *** The Coastside Fire Protection District inked a seven-year deal with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, Cal Fire and approved an $8.5 million preliminary budget for fiscal year 2013-14 at a recent meeting. The deal was inked after a recall election in May caused the ouster of three board members who wanted to ditch the contract with Cal Fire and re-establish a stand-alone fire department to serve Half Moon Bay and other coastal cities.

The reporters’ notebook is a weekly collection of facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edition.

CIA let Sept.11 prisoner design vacuum cleaner

By Adam Goldman

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Confined to the base- ment of a CIA secret prison in Romania about a decade ago, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the admitted mastermind of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, asked his jailers whether he could embark on an unusual proj- ect: Would the spy agency allow Mohammed, who had earned his bachelor’s in mechanical engineering, to design a vac- uum cleaner? The agency officer in charge of the prison called CIA headquarters and a manager approved the request, a former senior CIA official told the Associated Press. Mohammed had endured the most brutal of the CIA’s harsh interrogation methods and had confessed to a career of atrocities. But the agency had no long-term plan for him. Someday, he might prove useful again. Perhaps, he’d even stand trial one day. And for that, he’d need to be sane. “We didn’t want them to go nuts,” the for- mer senior CIA official said, one of several who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk about the now-shuttered CIA prisons or Mohammed’s interest in vacuums.

CIA prisons or Mohammed’s interest in vacuums. Khalid Mohammed So, using schematics from the Internet as

Khalid

Mohammed

So, using schematics from the Internet as his guide, Mohammed began re-engineering one of the most mundane of house- hold appliances. That the CIA may be in possession of the world’s most highly classified vacuum cleaner blue- prints is but one peculiar,

lasting byproduct of the controversial U.S. detention and interroga- tion program. By the CIA’s own account, the program’s methods were “designed to psychologically ‘dislocate”’ people. But once interrogations stopped, the agency had to try to undo the psy- chological damage inflicted on the detainees. In Romania, the prison provided books for detainees to read. Mohammed, former officials said, enjoyed the Harry Potter series. The CIA apparently succeeded in keeping him sane. He appears to be in good health, according to military records. Others haven’t fared as well. Accused al- Qaida terrorists Ramzi Binalshibh and Abd al-Nashiri, who were also locked up in Poland and Romania with Mohammed, have had mental issues.

in Poland and Romania with Mohammed, have had mental issues. Family Owned & Operated Established: 1949
in Poland and Romania with Mohammed, have had mental issues. Family Owned & Operated Established: 1949
in Poland and Romania with Mohammed, have had mental issues. Family Owned & Operated Established: 1949
in Poland and Romania with Mohammed, have had mental issues. Family Owned & Operated Established: 1949
Family Owned & Operated Established: 1949 Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo Al Stanley consultant
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
Amy Brooks
Colin Flynn
Hal Coehlo
Al Stanley
consultant

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Friday July 12, 2013

9

After the fire

W hen a six-alarm fire broke

out in Redwood City early

Sunday morning, the

emergency response was fast and thorough. With nearly 100 people left homeless, that response soon trans- formed into an ongoing support sys- tem that gathered resources from mul- tiple sources. Many of the people who lived at the Hallmark House Apartments receive some form of public assistance and can’t just check the want ads for a new

place to live. And so the county’s Human Service Agency and housing officials jumped to action to ensure no one falls through the cracks. Staff from Supervisor Warren Slocum’s office also offered assistance as Slocum’s district is focused on the area of the fire. For this week, residents were sheltered at the National Guard Armory and provided assistance by the American Red Cross. That is not a permanent solution and many will be provided with motel vouchers until

Editorial

permanent housing is located. In the meantime, residents were allowed a few minutes to gather their belongings from the fire site and have received assistance from multiple sources. This week, free socks and shoes were lined up near the fire site while residents collected their belongings and the Legal Aid Society offered help with basic issues such as getting their rent deposits back and the remainder of their rent for the month. One of the first items of busi- ness after the fire was ensuring that displaced residents could get replace- ment prescription medication right away. Another matter of importance was finding a way to have mail deliv- ered to displaced residents. There is support available and, while it is not perfect, there are plen- ty of people willing to provide assis- tance. The real task involves continu-

ing that assistance after the cleanup is finished, the town hall meetings are over and the motel vouchers have run their course. The emergency Red Cross shelter at the Armory is closing today and the Client Service Center is moving to the North Fair Oaks Community Center on Monday. The emergency response was quick, and the secondary social service response was also quick. Slocum said he was impressed with how fast coun- ty, nonprofit and Redwood City offi- cials mobilized to offer assistance. But once the flurry of activity settles, the real work really begins and county officials, including Slocum, said they will continue to work on it. “They still need help,” Slocum said. The residents may not feel like it, but many are lucky to still be alive and have the assistance they are receiving. It’s a tough road but, as long as that support is there, they won’t be going it alone. It also brings to mind the adage, “there but for the grace of God go I.”

Letters to the editor

Agree with Dorothy, mostly

Editor, I agree with most of Dorothy Dimitre’s column “Faith-based?” in the July 10 edition of the Daily Journal. As a gay man, I have a dif- ferent view of the Pride flag. I also have thought about the appropriate- ness of the flag at government buildings, but I wonder the same thing when I see flags/banners etc. for the 49ers or the Giants which are profit-making private organiza- tions. The Pride flag is about civil rights for a segment of our popula- tion. Until our faith-based Supreme Court ensures the equal civil rights of all citizens, the Pride flag and the equal rights campaign will be neces- sary. Fortunately, in California, the transition to equality after 44 years of enormous effort and legal expense by equal rights advocates of every orientation is happening. My part- ner and I picked up our marriage license and will complete that por- tion of our journey later this month on his 80th birthday. As for the “in-your-face” parade, the answer is, don’t go. I don’t because the parade has been co-opted by politicians and corporations who want to sell something. The parade has become like Mardi Gras, an excuse for one hell-of-a-party and will likely live on in that mode because it brings an awful lot of

people with money to the city and is very good for business. The “problem in Richmond” is not the flag but the faith-based igno- rant, an epidemic problem in this country, and thus the need for the flag and continued legal action by equal rights advocates.

David Jonson

Burlingame

Zimmerman — guilty until proven innocent?

Editor, There are some who believe so passionately Zimmerman was not acting in self defense when he killed Trayvon Martin. An example of this is Jorg Aadahl’s July 10 letter to the editor, “The Zimmerman case.” Mr. Aadahl’s stated, “What difference does it make who cried for help dur- ing the fight between George Zimmerman and his murder victim, Trayvon Martin?” I don’t recall Mr. Aadahl being on the jury for this case. Last year on a television news program, a baseless assertion was spoken by U.S. Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-Fla., She essentially said, “I’m going to say it like it is. Trayvon was hunted down like a rabid dog. He was shot in the street.

He was racially profiled.” I could cite other examples of those who proclaim Zimmerman guilty, but I think Frederica Wilson’s statement is sufficient. Mr. Aadahl’s and Ms. Wilson’s statements bring to mind Proverbs 18:17, New American Standard Bible: The first to plead his case seems right, until another comes and examines him.

John Bloomstine

San Carlos

Nomination for president of the United States

Editor, I would consider nominating National Transportation Safety Board Chair Deborah Hersman for the position of the president of the United States. She was well prepared when she met with the press, had a commanding presence and is cogent in presenting material to the press. There are many superlatives that could be added to this discussion; however, the electorate should zero in and research more about her back- ground.

Jack Kirkpatrick

Redwood City

Jerry Lee , Publisher Jon Mays, Editor in Chief Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor Erik Oeverndiek,

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Other voices

Morsi’s overthrow

The Jerusalem Post

T he speed of Mohammed Morsi’s fall, just a year after his dramatic rise to power, underlines the unpredictability of Egyptian politics. For Israel

there are both dangers and opportunities in the wake of Morsi’s ouster. The renewed dominance of the military could be a pos- itive development for Israel. It is, after all, the military that monopolizes force and is a stabilizing factor. It was the Egyptian military, for instance, that was instrumental in bringing about the cease-fire between Israel and Hamas last November. It is the military that seems most likely to protect the Camp David peace agreement between Israel and Egypt. And it is the mili- tary that has a vested interest and the capabilities to maintain control in the near lawless Sinai Peninsula. The humbling of the Muslim Brotherhood’s seemingly inexorable expansion not just in Egypt but also in

Tunisia and potentially in Syria and perhaps even in Jordan is another positive development, at least in the short term. The U.S. could make its continued economic support conditional upon concrete headway toward building a more democratic, pluralistic government that does more to defend embattled minorities such as the Coptic Christian community and the smaller Baha’i and Shiite populations. More thought should be given to saving Egypt’s catatonic economy. And aid in the form of both funding and political know-how should be provided to help harness the energies expended on the streets of Cairo and channel them into political parties and insti- tutions. Unrest in Egypt has generated much unpredictability and the potential for instability and even disaster. Morsi’s fall, however, also presents new opportuni- ties and can lead to positive developments in the Middle East’s most populous country, and in the region in gen- eral. The outcome depends, at least in part, on the U.S.’s response.

Other voices

Aviation safety

The Korea Herald, Seoul, South Korea

T he crash of Asiana Airlines’ Boeing 777 jet at

call for the Korean aviation industry, which

San Francisco International Airport is a wake-up

enjoys a good global reputation for safety. In the mid-1990s, Korea’s two flag carriers — Asiana and its bigger rival Korean Air — suffered a string of fatal incidents, which led to a downgrading of the nation’s aviation safety rating in 1999. The humiliation prompted the Seoul government to undertake a comprehensive reform of its aviation regula- tory system. It revised aviation laws, increased the num- ber of government inspectors and enlisted the assis- tance of the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration to meet international safety standards. The two airlines also made painstaking efforts to upgrade their safety culture. For instance, Korean Air invited two U.S. experts to help improve its safety standards. Thanks to these efforts, Korea had no fatal air crashes for 12 years between 1999 and 2011. The long streak was broken when an Asiana freighter crashed in waters off the coast of Jejudo Island two years ago. In 2008, the International Civil Aviation Organization ranked Korea’s aviation safety standards, including its pilot training and maintenance, as the highest among its 191 member countries. This outstanding track record might have fostered a dangerous sense of complacency among airline compa- nies and regulators. For flights to dangerous airports, they need to arrange preflight sessions for the flight and cabin crew to alert them to the obstacles and ensure that they follow safe landing and takeoff procedures. Carriers should take it to heart that safety comes before anything else. It only takes one accident to wipe out years of hard effort to establish a reputation as a safe carrier.

10 Friday July 12, 2013

BUSINESS

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Stocks surge after Bernanke allays taper fear

DAILY JOURNAL Stocks surge after Bernanke allays taper fear D D o o w w 15,460.92

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15,460.92

+169.26

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+57.55

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1.3095

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1,284.70

Big movers

Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:

NYSE Bridgepoint Education Inc.,up $3.31 at $15.92 The for-profit education company said that its Ashford University was granted initial accreditation for five years. Eldorado Gold Corp.,up 65 cents at $6.69 Shares of the gold production and mining company rose as prices for the precious metal jumped. IntraLinks Holdings Inc.,up $1.13 at $9.93 The technology company said that it received notice that an investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission has ended. Nasdaq Microsoft Corp.,up 99 cents at $35.69 The software maker is reshuffling its business in order for it to innovate faster and focus on devices and services. Stein Mart Inc.,up $1.22 at $14.98 Thanks to strong sales of women’s clothing, the retailer’s June revenue at stores open at least a year climbed 6.5 percent. Destination Maternity Corp.,up $1.24 at $28.99 The maternity clothing company said that its revenue during the fiscal third quarter increased 2 percent to $141.9 million. Power Solutions International Inc.,up $6.05 at $43.50 The alternative-fuel power systems maker said a public offering of about 1.8 million shares of common stock was priced at $35 a share. Apollo Group Inc.,up $1.08 at $18.97 The for-profit education company said the accreditation of its University of Phoenix subsidiary was renewed through the 2022-2023 academic year.

By Steve Rothwell

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Call it the Bernanke Boost. The stock market, which has been marching higher for a week, got extra fuel Thursday after Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said the cen- tral bank will keep supporting the economy. The Dow Jones industrial average and Standard & Poor’s 500 surged to all-time highs. And the yield on the 10-year Treasury note continued to decline as investors bought bonds. Stocks that benefit most from a con- tinuation of low interest rates, such as homebuilders, notched some of the biggest gains. The chairman made the comments in a speech late Wednesday after U.S. markets had closed, saying the econo- my needs the Fed’s easy-money policy “for the foreseeable future.” The U.S. economy needs help because unemployment is high, Bernanke said. His remarks seemed to ease investors’ fears that the central bank will pull back on its economic stimulus too quickly. The Fed is cur- rently buying $85 billion a month in

bonds to keep interest rates low and to encourage spending and hiring. Stock index futures rose overnight. Stocks surged when the market opened Thursday and stayed high for the rest of the day. “The Fed has made it unequivocally clear that they are not in any hurry to do anything,” said Alec Young, Global Equity Strategist at S&P Capital IQ. “It’s very bullish for stocks.” The S&P 500 index jumped 22.40 points, or 1.4 percent, to 1,675.02, surpassing its previous record close of 1,669 from May 21. The index rose for a sixth straight day, its longest streak in four months. The Dow rose 169.26 points, or 1.1 percent, to 15,460.92, above its own all-time closing high of 15,409 set May 28. The Nasdaq composite rose 57.55 points, or 1.4 percent, to 3,578.30, its highest level in nearly 13 years. In government bond trading, the yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.57 percent from 2.63 percent Wednesday. The yield was as high as 2.74 percent Friday after the govern- ment reported strong hiring in June. Many traders took that report as a sig- nal that the Fed would be more likely to slow its bond purchases sooner

rather than later. The Fed has also said it plans to keep short-term rates at record lows, at least until unemployment falls to 6.5 percent. Bernanke emphasized Wednesday that the level of unem- ployment is a threshold, not a trigger. The central bank might decide to keep its benchmark short-term rate near zero even after unemployment falls that low. “It’s back to the old accommodative Fed, so the markets are happy again,” said Randy Frederick, managing direc- tor of active trading and derivatives at the Schwab Center for Financial Research. The market pulled back last month after Bernanke laid out a timetable for the Fed to wind down its bond-buying program. He said the central bank would likely ease back on its monthly purchases if the economy strength- ened sufficiently. On Thursday, Advanced Micro Devices Inc. was the biggest gainer in the S&P 500 after news that the com- pany will make chips for two big gam- ing devices. The stock rose 47 cents, or 11.8 percent, to $4.45. Homebuilders, which are sensitive to the outlook for interest rates, were also among top gainers.

Retailers report strong gains for June

By Anne D’Innocenzio

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — June sales heated up for stores, in a sign that Americans likely will continue to spend during the impor- tant back-to-school shopping season. U.S. retailers reported their strongest

sales gains since January, as shoppers, enticed by warm weather and an improv- ing economy, took advantage of summer discounts. Revenue at stores opened at least a year - an industry measure of a retailer’s health - rose 4.1 percent in June com- pared with the same month a year ago,

percent in June com- pared with the same month a year ago, according to a preliminary

according to a preliminary tally of 13 retailers by the International Council of Shopping Centers. The mall trade group had expected an increase of 3 to 3.5 per- cent. The data, released Thursday, offers pos- itive signs for the back-to-school sea- son, which is the second-biggest shop-

ping period behind the winter holidays. June is when stores clear out summer merchandise to make room for goods for fall, so brisk sales mean that stores like- ly won’t be stuck with piles of summer shorts and T-shirts that they need to get rid of as the back-to-school kicks off later this month.

Microsoft reboots with sweeping reorganization

SAN FRANCISCO — Microsoft Corp. has decided its entire business needs a new oper- ating system. CEO Steve Ballmer is restructuring the company to cope with a quickening pace of technological change that has left the world’s largest software maker a step behind its two biggest rivals, Apple and Google. In an effort to catch up, Microsoft is dis- mantling a management structure that sepa- rated the company into sometimes disjoint- ed divisions and hatching a more cohesive product line-up. The new set up revolves around software, devices and services con- necting those devices to applications stored in remote data centers — a concept that has become known as “cloud computing.” The move comes amid a lukewarm response to the latest version of Microsoft’s flagship Wi ndows operating system and a steady decline in demand for personal computers as people increasingly rely on more convenient smartphones and tablets.

U.S. airlines’ on-time rating drops again in May

Summer travelers should pack plenty of patience: More flights are running late this year than in 2012.

Business briefs

The U.S. Department of Transportation says that only 79.4 percent of domestic flights arrived on time in May, down from 83.4 percent in the same month last year. Hawaiian Airlines was most likely to arrive on-time, while American Eagle, the regional-flying affiliate of American Airlines, had the worst rate. Five planes were stuck on airport tarmacs for more than three hours, which is longer than allowed by federal regulations. Cancelations ticked up slightly from a year ago.

U.S. unemployment benefit applications rise to 360K

WASHINGTON — The number of people applying for U.S. unemployment benefits rose 16,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 360,000, although the level remains consistent with steady hiring. The Labor Department said Thursday that the less volatile four-week average increased 6,000 to 351,750. The weekly applications data can be volatile in July because some automakers briefly shut down their factories to prepare for new models and many schools close. Those factors can create a temporary spike in layoffs.

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YANKEES CAPTAIN BACK: DEREK JETER SINGLED IN HIS FIRST GAME BACK SINCE BREAKING HIS ANKLE
YANKEES CAPTAIN BACK: DEREK JETER SINGLED IN HIS FIRST GAME BACK SINCE BREAKING HIS ANKLE LAST SEASON >> PAGE 12
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<< Giants secure a much-needed win, page 12
• Belize soccer players refused to fix game, page 12

Cañada tabs Reynoso as new coach

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Cañada College athletic director Mike Garcia announced Thursday the school had hired Mike Reynoso to become the new men’s basketball coach. Reynoso take over for Matt Stanley who, after two years with the Colts, headed down Interstate 280 to take over the Foothill College men’s basketball program. It was a whirlwind week. Reynoso said Stanley left for the Foothill job the first week of July. Reynoso interviewed the

position Wednesday and found out Thursday morn- ing he got the gig. “It’s good to be back at the helm of a program,” said Reynoso, a 2002 graduate of Serra. “I’ve missed it the last two years. It’s a great spot. I really understand what Cañada means to the

community.” After a four-year stint at Woodside High ended following the 2010-11 season,

stint at Woodside High ended following the 2010-11 season, Mike Reynoso Reynoso has spent the last

Mike Reynoso

Reynoso has spent the last two years as an assistant with the Colts. Reynoso believes his local connections will help him bring in the right players to fit his vision of toughness, physicalness and discipline. “I know how to lead people. I know what

I want to do. I’ve run a program before,”

Reynoso said. “I know what my base phi- losophy is because I did it for four years at Woodside. “The base philosophy is playing a physi- cal style. That’s part of who I am. That’s def- initely going to be ingrained in our philos- ophy.”

Working in Reynoso’s favor is the fact he has already been on the recruiting trail as an assistant so he won’t be as far behind the recruiting curve as a brand-new-to-the-area coach. “I definitely think the recruiting (aspect) had a big deal to do with it (getting the job),” Reynoso said. “Plus my local con- nections (from) playing and coaching around here. “I have feelers out to a lot of guys. … try- ing to get guys who I haven’t heard from in

See COACH, Page 14

get guys who I haven’t heard from in See COACH , Page 14 REUTERS America’s Cup

REUTERS

America’s Cup challengers Emirates Team New Zealand, above, and Italy’s Luna Rossa have been at odds with the regatta director over proposed safety changes.

Jury sides with Cup challengers

By Bernie Wilson

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tensions in the troubled America’s Cup could be easing after an international jury sided with challengers from New Zealand and Italy in their arguments that regatta director Iain Murray overstepped his author- ity in making rules changes following the fatal capsize of a third challenger’s catama- ran two months ago. One promising sign was that Italy’s Luna Rossa ended its boycott and headed onto

San Francisco Bay on Thursday to sail around the course alone and collect its first point of the Louis Vuitton Cup for chal- lengers. Luna Rossa’s scheduled opponent, Sweden’s Artemis Racing, remains a no- show while it works to get its second boat up to speed following the capsize on May 9 that killed Andrew “Bart” Simpson and destroyed its first boat. Simpson’s death led Murray to make 37 safety recommendations. Among them was a highly technical change to the winglets

on the rudders of the fast, space-age boats. The Kiwis and Italians protested, saying the changes were more about performance than safety. The syndicates said their boats were designed and built under the old rules and they didn’t have time to build new rudders and, perhaps more importantly, test them. They also said they felt the change gave an advantage to defending champion Oracle Team USA, which doesn’t have to race until

See CUP, Page 14

Freeman,Delabar are All-Stars; Puig still on the outside

By Jay Cohen

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

So much for Puig-mania sweeping the

country. Give this contest to Atlanta first baseman Freddie Freeman. Freeman and Toronto reliever Steve Delabar won the fan voting for the final spots in next week’s All-Star game, mean- ing Los Angeles Dodgers sensation Yasiel Puig is likely headed for a

few days off after a terrific stretch to begin his major league career. Freeman set a record with 19.7 million votes, and Puig was second. Major League Baseball did not release the vote total for Puig, but did say the Cuban defector also surpassed the previous

record for the final vote of 15.6 million for Shane Victorino in 2009. “It’s unbelievable,” Freeman said. “I’m kind of speechless. I wouldn’t be here with- out the fans and I just saw that it’s 19.7 mil- lion votes. It’s incredible and it’s just a dream come true.” Freeman was taking ground balls during batting practice before Atlanta’s home game against Cincinnati on Thursday night when general manager Frank Wren called him over and told him about his first All-Star selec- tion. The slugger is batting .307 with nine homers and 56 RBIs in 78 games. “I never, ever thought that I would make one,” Freeman said. “I just wanted to get to the big leagues and when I got here I just wanted to win ballgames. All-Star games were not on my mind. “To win this is just beyond me.” Puig will not get to play in the July 16 game at Citi Field unless he is added as an injury replacement. The outfielder is batting .394 with eight homers and 19 RBIs heading into Thursday night’s home game against

19 RBIs heading into Thursday night’s home game against Freddie Freeman See SELECTION , Page 14

Freddie

Freeman

See SELECTION, Page 14

Birthday gift: Sanders completes Ironman

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Turning 18 is a rite of passage for most teenagers. Midnight of that awesome day arrives and now you can vote. Sign your own permis- sion slips. Jump head first in adulthood. And while most teenagers ready them-

selves for that big day by dreaming of the super birthday gift, Redwood City’s Sherry Sanders isn’t your average teenager. Long before May 28, 2013 rolled around, she knew exactly what she wanted. And it wasn’t a nice new car or a big fancy party. Nope, with a click of the mouse and months of intense training, Sanders cele- brated adulthood like no one else, complet-

ing a life-long dream by finishing her first Ironman triathlon less than one month after turning 18. “My goal was really to finish,” Sanders

said. “I didn’t have a time goal in mind. And

I was happy with that. Then I looked at the people in my age and in my gender, and I was really happy with [my result].” Sanders completed the Couer d’Alene

Ironman in Idaho, finishing the course in 14:50.10 — good for a middle-of-the-pack finish time-wise, but a No. 1 spot amongst her supporters back in Redwood City. Arecent graduate of Sequoia High School, Sanders made the pages of the Daily Journal when she was 16-years-old and completed the Escape from Alcatraz triathlon. It was

See IRONMAN, Page 14

12 Friday July 12, 2013

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Jeter singles in return to Yankees lineup

By Ronald Blum

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Derek Jeter was back, and the New York Yankees felt a whole lot better. The Yankees captain singled on

his first pitch of the season, scored

a run and went 1 for 4 with an RBI

groundout in his return from a nine-month layoff to help New York beat the Kansas City Royals 8-4 Thursday for a four-game series split. Andy Pettitte (7-6) settled down after another shaky first inning to win consecutive starts for the first time since April, and Lyle Overbay hit a go-ahead, two-run single in a four-run fifth against Ervin Santana (5-6) as New York over- came a 3-0 deficit. Jeter was the designated hitter and batted second in his first big league game since he broke his left ankle during the AL championship series opener Oct. 13. He said after the initial injury he would return by opening day, then fractured the ankle again in April during his rehabilitation and missed the first 91 games of the season. New York cut short the 39-year- old shortstop’s rehabilitation assignment in the minor leagues after just four games following injuries Wednesday night to Travis Hafner and Brett Gardner. Jeter turned on a 95 mph fastball

in the first and sent a three-hopper

up the third-base line that fell from Miguel Tejada’s throwing hand. Jeter didn’t acknowledge the crowd of 40,381, which chanted “De-rek Je-ter! De-rek Je-ter!” as he ran up the line well past first base, then returned to the bag.

Jeter’s ankle got more tests when he raced to third on Robinson Cano’s single up the middle and came home without a throw on Vernon Wells’ sacrifice fly to right. The Yankees’ all-time hits leader grounded out in the second and again in the fifth, when second baseman Johnny Giavotella made

a diving stop to prevent an RBI

single. Jeter hit a sharp grounder

to shortstop with the infield in dur-

ing the sixth. Alcides Escobar bobbled the ball as Luis Cruz scored from third, and Jeter was thrown out as he jogged up the first-base line. Jeter had not been introduced at Yankee Stadium by Bob Sheppard’s recording in 271 days, since he sprawled onto his stom- ach while trying to field Jhonny Peralta’s 12th-inning grounder up the middle, immobile on the infield dirt and yelled out in pain. He hobbled off the field on his good ankle, one arm draped around manager Joe Girardi and the other around trainer Steve Donahue. Yankees general manager Brian

around trainer Steve Donahue. Yankees general manager Brian REUTERS New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter singles

REUTERS

New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter singles in his first at-bat since breaking his ankle nine months ago.

Cashman made the decision to bring back Jeter when he was driv- ing home after New York’s 8-1 win Wednesday’s and spoke with Jeter

by phone. Jeter went 1 for 9 in his

Triple-A

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, including 0 for 3 with a throwing error dur- ing seven innings Wednesday night. “I think it’s easy to say that you

tuneup

would expect with his age and a double break that I think he’d lose a step or two or half a step, but I think he’s moving extremely well from what I’m told,” Cashman said. Girardi said Jeter is likely to start at shortstop for Friday’s series opener against Minnesota. “I think Derek would run himself out there the next 70 games if it

at

was up to him,” Girardi said. “I mean, that’s just who he is. He expects to play every day. So from that standpoint I think we have to guard against rushing him back too much, and we have to pick days off, and we have to pick DH days. In the perfect world, you have a month of spring training, but this has not been a perfect world around here this year.” Jeter did not speak with reporters before the game. A 13-time All-Star with a .313 career average, Jeter hopes to jolt a batting order that is next to last in runs in the AL. The Yankees started Thursday fourth in the AL East at 49-42. Six players have appeared at shortstop in his absence, hitting a combined .211 with two homers and 25 RBIs, according to STATS. Only Seattle shortstops had a lower batting average. New York hopes to get third baseman Alex Rodriguez back this month following January hip sur- gery and center fielder Curtis Granderson next month after his broken pinkie has healed. First baseman Mark Teixeira is out for the season following wrist sur- gery. Rodriguez began Thursday 2 for 15 (.133) with one RBI in six minor league games for Tampa and Charleston, both Class A farm teams.

Belize players declined to fix Gold Cup game

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SALT LAKE CITY — A man who allegedly offered two Belize players large sums of money to fix a CONCACAF Gold Cup match against the United States has been identified by soccer officials, and he’s believed to have tried to fix matches in other countries. In a statement Thursday, CONCACAF said

it and FIFA, soccer’s world governing body,

are investigating the bribery allegations made by Ian Gaynair and Woodrow West. The two players said they rejected the offer, made Sunday, and immediately reported it. When a CONCACAF representative showed them a photo of a man being monitored for trying to fix matches in other countries, the Belize players confirmed it was the same man who had approached them.

“So this isn’t just about our country or a one-time thing,” coach Ian Mork said after the team’s practice. “This is something much bigger.” Belize lost to the United States 6-1 on Tuesday night in the Jaguars’ first Gold Cup appearance. It faces Costa Rica here on Saturday night, and finishes Group C play next Tuesday with a game against Cuba in East Hartford, Conn. CONCACAF, which is the federation of North and Central American and Caribbean nations, said it could not comment further on the ongoing investigation. But Mork said he doesn’t believe the players were asked to fix any other games beside Tuesday’s match against the U.S. Match fixing is a global problem in soc- cer, with FIFA estimating that fixers make more than $5 billion in profits each year from manipulating matches across all sports. Stopping it is a priority, and CON- CACAF said in its statement that, together with FIFA and Interpol, it had three semi- nars with its member associations in recent months focusing on “educating, identifying and preventing match manipulation.”

Iguodala officially a Warrior

By Antonio Gonzalez

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — The Golden State Warriors are a team that the most sought-after free agents have avoided for most of the last two decades, nothing more than loveable losers with a faithful following and an ambiguous name on the NBA map. Maybe no more. Owner Joe Lacob, general manager Bob Myers, assistant GM Kirk Lacob and coach Mark Jackson already had started the process of turning around the futile fran- chise with last season’s playoff run. The foursome saw the latest evolution when they met with free agent Andre Iguodala and his agent, Rob Pelinka, in his Los Angeles office on July 1 — the first day of free agency. “Before we could say too much, he was telling us how much he admired our team, he admired our coach and our players,” Myers said. “We said, ‘Do we have to sell you on anything?”’ He said, ‘Look, I feel like this

you on anything?”’ He said, ‘Look, I feel like this is the place I want to

is the place I want to play.’ That moment was a transformative moment for our franchise.” That new perception is finally reality. The Warriors introduced Iguodala at the team’s downtown Oakland head- quarters Thursday, nearly

a week after he agreed to a four-year, $48 million deal despite more lucrative offers. Golden State believes Iguodala’s arrival puts the franchise on new footing, going from a stopping point for middling free agents to a desirable destina- tion among the NBA’s most prized players. Iguodala said he wanted to come to the Bay Area because he can connect with the franchise’s vision. He got a glimpse of that last season when the Warriors knocked out his Denver team in the first round of the playoffs. The experience left Iguodala wanting to play with “smart big men” such as Andrew

Andre Iguodala

Bogut and David Lee, promising rookie Harrison Barnes and sharpshooters Klay Thompson and Stephen Curry, whom he jokingly said is “like the second coming of Jesus Christ. He’s like the most loved man on earth right now.” “I think they were missing one piece,” Iguodala said. “And hopefully I can be that piece to get that team to where we all want to be, which is to try and win a champi- onship.” Just the process of bringing Iguodala to Golden State showed the commitment from both sides. The Warriors entered free agency with lit- tle wiggle room. Keeping their own free agents — Jarrett Jack and Carl Landry, who inked deals with Cleveland and Sacramento, respectively — seemed improbable. Signing top-tier talent? Almost laughable. Pelinka, who worked alongside Myers for years as an agent, approached the Warriors about Iguodala. At first, Myers never thought the Warriors could make a deal hap- pen.

Giants pick up rare road win

By Bernie Wilson

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN DIEGO — Pablo Sandoval hit his first home run since May 21, and All-Star Madison Bumgarner settled down to allow just four hits in seven innings as the San Francisco Giants beat the San Diego Padres 4-2 Thursday night in a matchup of the worst teams in the weak NL West. The defending World Series champion Giants, who snapped a four-game losing streak, have been in a free-fall since June 15. They had lost 19 of 24 games coming in and were a season-high 10 games under .500. They started the night two percentage points behind the Padres and ended it by jumping past San Diego into fourth place. Bumgarner (10-5) allowed two runs on three hits in the first inning and then retired 14 in a row before Carlos Quentin singled with two outs in the sixth. The lefty struck out six and walked one.

Giants 4, Padres 2

The Giants are 2-8 in July, with Bumgarner getting both wins. Sergio Romo pitched the ninth for his 21st save in 24 chances. The Padres have lost 16 of 19. Sandoval got San Francisco’s weak offense going in the fourth with a leadoff homer to right-center off Jason Marquis, his ninth. It was Sandoval’s first homer in 101 at- bats. Sandoval, who was on the disabled list from June 9-24 with a strained left foot, was 6 of 55 (.109) before that at-bat. The Giants had the bases loaded three times in the sixth and seventh innings but scored only one run. Marquis took a 2-1 lead into the sixth and struck out Buster Posey leading off the inning before loading the bases and allow- ing Kensuke Tanaka’s RBI single up the mid- dle. Marquis made way for Joe Thatcher, who got Brandon Crawford to hit into a force at

the plate. Dale Thayer came on and struck out Bumgarner to end the inning. The Giants loaded the bases again in the seventh on two singles and a hit batsman, and Thayer again got out of trouble by strik- ing out Belt to end it. San Francisco finally broke through in the eighth with two runs and three hits off Luke Gregerson (4-5), including an RBI double by Blanco that bounced over the fence in left, and Posey’s RBI single to left. Bumgarner settled down after a rough first inning in which he allowed two runs on three hits. Quentin hit an RBI double and, after Jesus Guzman was intentionally walked to load the bases, Kyle Blanks drove in a run on a fielder’s choice. Bumgarner got Logan Forsythe to line out to second to end the inning. Marquis failed for the fifth time to get his 10th victory. He allowed two runs and seven hits in 5 1-3 innings, struck out three and walked two.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Friday July 12, 2013

13

Local softball teams gearing up for nationals

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

The San Mateo Slammers 10-under B soft- ball team will be going to the Western National Championships in Peoria, Ariz. to represent Northern California. The girls from San Mateo are having an extremely successful season. They started off their season winning the Jan McPhearson Memorial Tournament over Memorial Day weekend going 6-0 in the process. The following weekend they took Davis-Dixon by storm by winning another championship.The girls continued their winning streak, taking first in the George Feely Classic in San Mateo and then the Piece of The Rock tournament in Rocklin. Going into NorCals in Sunnyvale, the Slammers were undefeated. After beating the LGSGSA Magic twice before, they faced them again in the championship game. But

the third time proved to be the charm for the Magic and the Storm unfortunately fell short losing their first game of their season 3-0. The Slammers took another champi- onship last weekend, winning the first Foster City Invitational Tournament improving their record to 30-1-1 for the summer. They have two more tournaments to play in before they head out to Arizona at the end of the month. The Slammers are coached by Vince DeFriese and Steve Galliano. The girls have not only been working hard on the field but off it to raise the funds need- ed to get their entire team to Nationals. The Slammers have a fundraising goal of $10,000 which will travel their tournament fees and travel expenses and are hoping local businesses and the community would be interested in supporting their efforts. Donations accepted and fully tax-deductable.

Various youth teams are currently making

travel lists and getting read to head on the road to represent San Mateo County. Those interested in donating to the Slammers can send donations to San Mateo Slammers 10U

B - c/o Marianne Tuakoi P.O. Box 6255 San

Mateo, CA 94403.

San Bruno Storm

The San Bruno Storm 16-under girls’ soft- ball team is on a quest for the Western National championships held in San Diego the first week of August. The Storm took fourth place last year in Stockton and is looking to come home with the championship in 2013. The last time the 16-under team took the title was back in 2010 with a win in Hillsboro, Ore. after a third place finish in Lancaster during the 2009 tournament. The team has played in several tourna-

ments this summer and captured a first-place finish in the NorCal Western Division. The San Bruno Storm has a record of 21-0- 1 this summer.

South City Fog

After a tournament championship and a couple of runner-up finishes, the South City Fog is headed to Cooperstown, New York. The boys from South San Francisco head to the 104-team tournament — the largest in the U.S. — on July 19. The Fog will play in a guarenteed seven games. South San Francisco Fog was founded in 2000 and has sent a team to Cooperstown, New York ever since. The highest they’ve finished is second. The Fog won the Burlingame Tournament and finshed second at Santa Cruz and San Bruno.

Patriots cornerback accused of DUI in Nebraska

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Patriots corner- back Alfonzo Dennard was arrested and accused of drunk driving Thursday in Nebraska while on probation for assaulting a police officer, the second New England player to get in serious legal trouble this summer. Dennard’s early-morning arrest in Lincoln, Neb., where he was a college star for the Cornhuskers, came 15 days after Aaron Hernandez was charged with murder and three days after Patriots owner Robert Kraft said the club will “be looking at our procedures and auditing how we do things” with regard to

character reviews. “The New England Patriots are extremely disappointed to learn of Alfonzo Dennard’s arrest. We take this matter very seriously and are working to get more information on the incident,” the team said in a statement. Dennard’s arrest is his second in 15 months. He hasn’t served a 30-day jail sen- tence for the assault outside a Lincoln bar on Apr. 21, 2012. That is scheduled to begin next March. He also was sentenced to two years of probation. Hernandez, a star tight end, was arrested on June 26 and charged with murder in the killing of Boston semi-pro football player Odin

Lloyd. Hernandez has pleaded not guilty. The Patriots cut Hernandez after he was arrested and before the charges were announced. Dennard and Hernandez both were highly- touted college prospects whose draft stock dropped because of character concerns. Seven days after being charged with assault, Dennard was drafted in the seventh round last year out of Nebraska by the Patriots. They drafted Hernandez in the fourth round in 2010 after he violated the substance abuse policy at Florida. “If this stuff is true, then I’ve been duped and our whole organization has been duped,” Kraft said Monday of the case involving

Hernandez. The team did not respond to a request Thursday for Kraft’s reaction to Dennard’s arrest. The legal issues are bound to hover over the opening of training camp on July 25. Coach Bill Belichick rarely comments on such mat- ters and instructs his players to do the same. Belichick has sometimes signed players who had troubles elsewhere if he felt they could help the team win, hoping his disci- plined approach and leaders such as Tom Brady and Vince Wilfork and now-retired Patriots including Tedy Bruschi and Mike Vrabel could keep them in line.

Kittel wins Tour stage; Froome keeps lead

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TOURS, France — Germany’s Marcel Kittel overtook Mark Cavendish at the line Thursday to win the 12th stage of the Tour de France, and Chris Froome avoided a late crash in the main pack to preserve his big lead. Cavendish moved in front but Kittel gained ground and just beat him to the line to earn his second stage win in three days and third of this race. “As we say in Germany, good things come in three,” Kittel said. “It was close. I don’t know what to say. It was a real sprint today, that’s

why I’m so happy.” German riders have won five stages so far, with Tony Martin capturing Wednesday’s time trial and Andre Greipel also winning a sprint stage. “It’s a big achievement for me, my team, and for German sprinters as well,” Kittel said. Froome leads Alejandro Valverde by 3 min- utes, 25 seconds and is 3:54 ahead of two-time former champion Alberto Contador. Froome is on track to become the second British rider to win the race — Bradley Wiggins won it last year, with Froome runner-up. “At the moment I’m trying to save as much

energy as possible for Mont Ventoux at the end

of the week and then the Alps next week,” said

Froome, who dominated the first big mountain stage of the race in the Pyrenees last Saturday. The field rolled through vineyards and along- side the Chinon forest on a 136-mile route from Fougeres to Tours in the Loire valley, a

picturesque region dotted with imposing French chateaus — the spiral-towered Chateau d’Usse, which dates from the 11th century, and the 16th century Chateau d’Azay-le-Rideau, which rests on the water. About 20 riders were caught in a crash near the end, with some stuck under the bikes of

others as wheels and frames jutted out at all angles. Froome’s Sky teammate, Edvald Boasson Hagen, broke his right shoulder blade and dropped out of the tour. “It’s a real shame for Edvald and a setback for the team,” Sky manager Dave Brailsford said. “But ultimately we’re still confident that, with the riders we’ve got left, we can pull together and see the race through.” Froome was close enough to “hear the crash” but just far ahead enough to avoid it. “It’s always like that at the end before a sprint,” Froome said. “It’s scary for everyone.”

to avoid it. “It’s always like that at the end before a sprint,” Froome said. “It’s
to avoid it. “It’s always like that at the end before a sprint,” Froome said. “It’s
to avoid it. “It’s always like that at the end before a sprint,” Froome said. “It’s
to avoid it. “It’s always like that at the end before a sprint,” Froome said. “It’s

14 Friday July 12, 2013

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

IRONMAN

Continued from page 11

that accomplishment that fueled Sanders to say she wanted to complete an Ironman one day. “At some point, it became that way, but in the beginning, not so much,” Sanders said. “It’s more like, that’s a cool thing to do. But eventually, about a year ago I said, ‘I’m actually going to do this. I’m going to work really hard.’” Work hard she did. Along with her father, John Sanders, the two committed to some intense training. Sherry said having her father train alongside her — and knowing he had completed six of these such races in the past — helped her a lot. “I work harder. Work for a lot longer. And

I have different goals of what I want to accomplish in my life,” Sherry said when asked what the difference is between Sherry the Escape conqueror and Sherry, the young woman who took down the Idaho course. “I’ve worked a lot to just keep going. It’s never stopped coming. Alot of it was train- ing with my dad, so I never wanted to stop and have him see that. I thought about how

in two months, I wouldn’t have to do it any-

more and I’d have accomplished something I’ve wanted to for years.” The course began with a 2.4-mile, two- loop swim, featuring a rolling swim start, that took place in beautiful Lake Coeur d’Alene. Water temperatures ran about 60 degrees Farenheit. Sherry completed that in

1:22:42.

Then, Sherry and the other cyclists made two loops through rural northern Idaho for the 112-mile bike ride. Each loop began with a scenic ride along the shores of Lake Coeur d’Alene and then entered the rolling hills west of the lake. Sherry said the bike ride was the most trying of the three disci- plines. She completed the course in

7:11.33.

“There was never a point when I thought that I couldn’t finish,” Sherry said. “I knew

I was going to finish all day.” The day finished with the highlight of the course. Athletes ran parallel to the shore of Lake Coeur d’Alene for two loops, with one steep climb at the southern turnaround point. The 26.2-mile run took Sherry

6:01.35.

turnaround point. The 26.2-mile run took Sherry 6:01.35. FINISHERPIX Sherry Sanders rides her bike during her

FINISHERPIX

Sherry Sanders rides her bike during her first ever Ironman race. Sanders will attend Fordham University in the fall,accepting a scholarship to be part of the crew team.

U.S.beats Canada 7-0 at the World Cup of Softball

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OKLAHOMA CITY — U.S. softball coach Ken Eriksen has watched Lauren Gibson play for his team for three years and said he’s become a bit spoiled by her. In the World Cup of Softball opener on Thursday night, Gibson turned in one of those performances that Eriksen has come to love, going 2 for 3 with a home run, two RBIs, two stolen bases and three runs scored as the U.S. routed Canada 7-0 in six innings. Sara Nevins and Jessica Moore combined on a two-hitter for the U.S., which has won the last six World Cups and is 40-4 all-time in the event, one of the major tournaments on the international softball circuit. “It’s good to be positive about what went on tonight,” Eriksen said. “We’ve got to build upon it. We went out and I thought we executed well when we had to. I thought

some really, really good

so talented right now. They’ve just need to trust themselves and we’ll be in good shape.” Gibson, the Southeastern Conference player of the year at Tennessee this spring, did a little bit of everything for the U.S., which jumped ahead quickly with four runs in the first two innings and never gave Canada a chance to gain any momentum. “We see it every single day, so we don’t get excited,” Eriksen said. “In practice she’s like that, so we get spoiled, so we have to learn to appreciate it a little bit more and make sure she realizes we appreciate it. But that’s typical Gibson in this program. She gets pretty jacked up when she puts the red, white and blue on.” Gibson singled with one out in the first inning, and she and Michelle Moultrie scored on a bases-loaded single by Valerie Arioto off Canada starter Jenna Caira (0-1). Gibson and her Tennessee teammate, Raven Chavanne, successfully executed a double steal in the second, with Gibson scoring to put the U.S. ahead 4-0. Gibson said the double steal wasn’t planned, which Eriksen confirmed.

They are

CUP

Continued from page 11

the start of the 34th America’s Cup on Sept.

7.

The jury ruled that a regatta notice issued by Murray had the effect of changing the class rule and was not in accordance with the protocol. Murray was ordered to withdraw that notice. Last week, Murray said that if the jury sided with the challengers, he would have no choice but to go back to the U.S. Coast Guard to discuss the permit it issued for rac- ing on San Francisco Bay. The jury ordered Murray to make the views of all the competitors known to the Coast Guard. In a statement, Emirates Team New Zealand said it was pleased the jury “has maintained the sanctity of the AC72 Class Rule in ruling that it can be changed only by unanimous consent of the competitors and the Regatta Director.” The Kiwis added that they believe the jury’s decision “does not affect the sub-

stance of the safety plan submitted with the application to the U.S. Coast Guard for a Marine Event Permit or the excellent work the Regatta Director undertook with the Review Committee.” The Kiwis also said they’d like to help Artemis Racing, which has said it doesn’t have the proper rudders to comply with the rules.

The Kiwis said they have proposed that when Artemis is ready to race, it be given dispensation from the class rule regarding rudder elevators as long as it otherwise com- plies with the class rule and safety recom- mendations. “This would require the consent of the other competitors and we would strongly urge this be given,” the New Zealand state- ment said. “Artemis Racing is making a tremendous effort under difficult circum- stances to get back on the race track and deserve support to help them achieve this.” The Italians and regatta organizers weren’t immediately available for com- ment. Oracle Team USA said in a statement that

it respected the decision of the jury, contin-

ues to support Murray and that it believes

all teams have benefited from his review. Luna Rossa skipper Max Sirena said last week that the Italians would not race until the jury ruled, but that they would return regardless of the panel’s decision. They kept their word, refusing to show up for the regatta’s opening race on Sunday against the Kiwis. Russell Coutts, the most dominant skip- per in America’s Cup history and the CEO of Oracle Team USA, responded by calling the Italians “a bunch of spoiled rich kids dressed in Prada gear.” Luna Rossa is backed by fashion house Prada. Now, the regatta could see its first real race on Saturday, when Luna Rossa is scheduled to face Emirates Team New Zealand. The Kiwis have twice sailed around the course alone, including the race the Italians boycotted and on Tuesday when Artemis Racing was the scheduled opponent. They have shown remarkable speed, reaching nearly 50 mph on Thursday. Emirates Team New Zealand was practic- ing on San Francisco Bay on Thursday, appearing to shadow the Italians as they fin- ished their race.

COACH

Continued from page 11

a while,” Reynoso said. “I want guys who fit the culture. It doesn’t matter what they did last year. If they fit the mold, we want to have them.”

Reynoso’s first year as a Colts assistant

during the 2011-12 season was a bumpy ride

as Cañada won only three games. Last year,

the Colts finished 10-16, but only 2-10 in

Coast Conference North play.

The Coast Conference North has three of the best teams in Northern California in City College of San Francisco, Foothill and Ohlone. All three won more than 20 games last season, with San Francisco going 12-0 in conference play. Reynoso understands he won’t lead the Colts to a conference title his first year. He’ll draw on his Woodside experience that

a coach has to build a foundation first. “Those first two years are building blocks,” Reynoso said. Reynoso guided the Wildcats to a pair of

15-win seasons his final two years at Woodside. The Wildcats made the Central Coast Section playoffs both years. They advanced to the quarterfinals in 2010 but lost in the first round in 2011 .

compiled a 50-52 record at

Woodside.

“We are very excited about what Mike Reynoso stands for and feel the program will continue to be filled with ‘high charac- ter’ student-athletes that represent Cañada College so well,’ Garcia said in a press release.

Reynoso

SELECTION

Continued from page 11

Colorado, helping the Dodgers shoot up the NL West standings following a slow start.

But Puig has only been in the majors for five weeks, leading some to question whether he belongs on the NL team.

The fi nal vote for the AL team also had its own share of controversy, with Tigers man- ager Jim Leyland nominating five middle relievers for the spot. There was some talk about whether the list should have included more high-profile players, since the All- Star game is essentially geared toward the fans.

Delabar won with 9.6 million votes. The right-hander is 5-1 with a 1.74 ERA in 37 appearances for the Blue Jays.

The Braves and Blue Jays had partnered up in the process, asking their fans to vote for each other’s player.

The other players on the list included righties David Robertson of the Yankees, Joaquin Benoit of the Tigers, Koji Uehara of the Red Sox and Tanner Scheppers of the Rangers.

Freeman and Puig finished ahead of San Francisco outfielder Hunter Pence, Washington shortstop Ian Desmond and Los Angeles first baseman Adrian Gonzalez.

MLB said a record 79.2 million votes were cast between the two leagues, easily cruising past the previous record of 68.6 million from 2009. Votes were cast through text message, Twitter and MLB.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Friday July 12, 2013

15

7/9 7/10 7/11 7/12 7/13 7/14 7/19 Mets Mets @Padres @Padres @Padres @Padres vs.Dbacks 7:15p.m.
7/9
7/10
7/11
7/12
7/13
7/14
7/19
Mets
Mets
@Padres
@Padres
@Padres
@Padres
vs.Dbacks
7:15p.m.
12:45p.m.
7:10p.m.
7:10p.m.
7:10p.m.
1:10p.m.
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY
NBC
CSN-BAY
NBC
7/9
7/10
7/12
7/13
7/14
7/19
7/20
@Pirates
@Pirates
vs.RedSox
vs.RedSox
vs.RedSox
@Angels
@Angels
4:05p.m.
4:05p.m.
7:05p.m.
7:05p.m.
1:05p.m.
7:05p.m.
6:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY
7/13 7/20 7/27 8/4 vs.Seattle vs.Norwich vs.Portland vs.Chivas 7:30p.m. City 7:30p.m. 8p.m. CSN-BAY 7:30p.m.
7/13
7/20
7/27
8/4
vs.Seattle
vs.Norwich
vs.Portland
vs.Chivas
7:30p.m.
City
7:30p.m.
8p.m.
CSN-BAY
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL

2013 ALL-STAR ROSTERS

AMERICAN LEAGUE

SSTTAARRTTEERRSS

Catcher — Joe Mauer,Minnesota First Base — Chris Davis,Baltimore Second Base — Robinson Cano,New York Third Base — Miguel Cabrera,Detroit Shortstop — J.J.Hardy,Baltimore Outfield — Mike Trout, Los Angeles; Adam Jones,Baltimore;Jose Bautista,Toronto Designated Hitter — David Ortiz,Boston RESERVES Catcher — Jason Castro, Houston; Salvador Perez,Kansas City Infielders — Prince Fielder, 1b, Detroit; Jason Kipnis, 2b, Cleveland; Manny Machado, 3b, Bal- timore; Dustin Pedroia, 2b, Boston; Jhonny Peralta,ss,Detroit;Ben Zobrist,2b,Tampa Bay Outfielders — Nelson Cruz,Texas;Alex Gordon, Kansas City,Torii Hunter,Detroit Designated Hitter — Edwin Encarnacion, Toronto PITCHERS x-Clay Buchholz,Boston;Brett Cecil,Toronto;y- Bartolo Colon,Oakland;x-Jesse Crain,Chicago; x-Yu Darvish, Texas; f-Steve Delabar, Toronto; Felix Hernandez,Seattle;Hisashi Iwakuma,Seat- tle;Justin Masterson,Cleveland;y-Matt Moore, Tampa Bay; Joe Nathan, Texas; y-Glen Perkins, Minnesota;Mariano Rivera,NewYork;Chris Sale, Chicago;Max Scherzer,Detroit;JustinVerlander, Detroit

NATIONAL LEAGUE

SSTTAARRTTEERRSS Catcher — Yadier Molina,St.Louis First Base — Joey Votto,Cincinnati Second Base — Brandon Phillips,Cincinnati Third Base — David Wright,New York Shortstop — Troy Tulowitzki,Colorado Outfield — Carlos Beltran, St.Louis; Carlos Gonza- lez,Colorado;Bryce Harper,Washington RESERVES Catcher — Buster Posey,San Francisco Infielders — Pedro Alvarez, 3b, Pittsburgh; Everth Cabrera,ss,San Diego;Matt Carpenter,2b,St.Louis; Allen Craig,1b,St.Louis;f-Freddie Freeman,1b,At- lanta;Paul Goldschmidt,1b,Arizona;Marco Scutaro, 2b,San Francisco;Jean Segura,ss,Milwaukee Outfielders — Domonic Brown, Philadelphia; Michael Cuddyer, Colorado; Carlos Gomez, Mil- waukee;Andrew McCutchen,Pittsburgh PITCHERS Madison Bumgarner,San Francisco; Aroldis Chap- man, Cincinnati; Patrick Corbin, Arizona; Jose Fernandez,Miami;Jason Grilli,Pittsburgh;Matt Har- vey,NewYork;Clayton Kershaw,Los Angeles;Craig Kimbrel, Atlanta; Cliff Lee, Philadelphia; Jeff Locke, Pittsburgh;AdamWainwright,St.Louis;TravisWood, Chicago;Jordan Zimmermann,Washington.

MLS GLANCE

EEAASSTTEERRNN CCOONNFFEERREENNCCEE

 

W

L

T

Pts GF GA

Montreal

9

4

4

31

31

25

Kansas City

8

5

6

30 26

19

New York

8

7

4

28 25

24

Philadelphia

7

6

6

27 29

29

Houston

7

6

5

26 20

18

New England

6

5

6

24 21

14

Columbus

6

8

5

23

23

23

Chicago

6

8

3

21

19

25

Toronto FC

2

8

7

13

17

24

D.C.

2

13

3

9

8

29

WWEESSTTEERRNN CCOONNFFEERREENNCCEE

 

W

L

T

Pts GF GA

Real Salt Lake

10 5

4

34 29

18

FC Dallas

8

3

7

31

27

22

Portland

7

2

9

30 28

17

Vancouver

8

5

5

29 29

25

Los Angeles

8

7

3

27 27

22

Colorado

7

7

5

26 23

22

Seattle

7

6

3

24 21

19

San Jose

5

9

6

21

20

32

Chivas USA

3

10

5

14

16

32

NOTE:Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— SSaattuurrddaayyss GGaammeess New England 2, San Jose 0 Houston 1, Philadelphia 0 Vancouver 2, Seattle FC 0 SSuunnddaayyss GGaammeess Sporting Kansas City 2, Chicago 1 Columbus 1, Portland 0 Montreal 1, Chivas USA 1, tie Colorado 0, D.C. United 0, tie Los Angeles 2, FC Dallas 0 FFrriiddaayy,,JJuullyy 1122 Chivas USA at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. SSaattuurrddaayy,,JJuullyy 1133 Montreal at New York, 4 p.m. Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at FC Dallas, 6 p.m. Seattle FC at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Portland, 8 p.m. SSuunnddaayy,,JJuullyy 1144 Chicago at Vancouver, 4 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

EEaasstt DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Boston

57

37

.606

Tampa Bay

53

40

.570

3 1/2

Baltimore

51

42

.548

5 1/2

New York

50

42

.543

6

Toronto

44

47

.484

11 1/2

CCeennttrraall DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Detroit

50

41

.549

Cleveland

48

44

.522

2 1/2

Kansas City

43

46

.483

6

Minnesota

37

52

.416

12

Chicago

36

53

.404

13

WWeesstt DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Oakland

54

38

.587

Texas

53

39

.576

1

Los Angeles

44

46

.489

9

Seattle

40

52

.435

14

Houston

32

59

.352

21 1/2

TThhuurrssddaayyss GGaammeess Cleveland 4,Toronto 2 Tampa Bay 4,Minnesota 3 N.Y.Yankees 8,Kansas City 4 Chicago White Sox 6,Detroit 3 Boston 8,Seattle 7,10 innings Baltimore 3,Texas 1 FFrriiddaayyss GGaammeess Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 2-6) at Philadelphia (Pettibone 5-3),4:05 p.m. Kansas City (B.Chen 3-0) at Cleveland (Kluber 6-5), 4:05 p.m. Minnesota (Diamond 5-8) at N.Y.Yankees (Kuroda 7-6),4:05 p.m. Toronto (Buehrle 5-5) at Baltimore (Tillman 10-3), 4:05 p.m. Texas (Grimm 7-6) at Detroit (Fister 6-5),4:08 p.m. Houston (Cosart 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Price 3-4),4:10 p.m. Boston (Lackey 6-6) at Oakland (J.Parker 6-6),7:05 p.m. L.A.Angels (Williams 5-4) at Seattle (J.Saunders 7- 8),7:10 p.m. SSaattuurrddaayyss GGaammeess Minnesota at N.Y.Yankees,10:05 a.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

EEaasstt DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Atlanta

53

39

.576

Washington

47

45

.511

6

Philadelphia

46

47

.495

7 1/2

New York

40

48

.455

11

Miami

33

57

.367

19

CCeennttrraall DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

L

Pct

GB

St.Louis

55

35

.611

Pittsburgh

54

36

.600

1

Cincinnati

51

41

.554

5

Chicago

41

49

.456

14

Milwaukee

37

54

.407

18 1/2

WWeesstt DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Arizona

48

44

.522

Los Angeles

45

45

.500

2

Colorado

44

48

.478

4

San Francisco

41

50

.451

6 1/2

San Diego

41

52

.441

7 1/2

TThhuurrssddaayyss GGaammeess Philadelphia 3,Washington 1 Atlanta 6, Cincinnati 5 Chicago Cubs 3, St. Louis 0 Arizona 5, Milwaukee 3 San Francisco 4, San Diego 2 Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, Late FFrriiddaayy