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Transboundary Disease and Traceability in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS)

Sununtar Setboonsarng, Southeast Asia Department Asian Development Bank


Biregional Meeting on Healthy Borders in the Greater Mekong Subregion 5-7 August 2013 Royal Orchid Sheraton Hotel Bangkok, Thailand
Disclaimer: The views expressed in this paper/presentation do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), or its Board of Governors, or the governments they represent. ADB does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this paper and accepts no responsibility for any consequence of their use. Terminology used may not necessarily be consistent with ADB official terms.

Outline
Transboundary diseases and pests agrifood systems in the GMS GMS Regional Cooperation Program in Agriculture sector Traceability and Its Importance
Lessons from poultry in Kyoto

ADB TAs on Transboundary Disease and Traceability

The Greater Mekong Subregion

Common Agroecosystems in Greater Mekong Subregion


In the GMS where market forces exist for movement of crops and livestock across boundaries, transboundary spread of pests and diseases is significant.

Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD)

Foot and Mouth Disease Outbreak

Madin, 2010

Crossborder Pests Investation

2010 Cassava Mealybug (from Africa to Thailand to other GMS countries) 25% of production, $1 billion damage

Core Agriculture Support Program Phase II (2011-2020)

GMS Agricultural Cooperation: Vision Statement


The Greater Mekong Subregion is recognized globally as the leading producer of safe food, using climatefriendly agricultural practices and integrated into global markets through regional economic corridors.

Vision
The Greater Mekong Subregion is recognized as the leading producer of safe food, using climate friendly agricultural practices and integrated into global markets through regional economic corridors.

Pillar 1: Food Safety Trade Modernization

Pillar 2: Climate Friendly Agriculture

Pillar 3: Bioenergy and Biomass Management

Agricultural Research and Development

Private Sector Involvement


Institutional Mechanisms for Regional Cooperation

Traceability and Its Importance

Traceability Systems
Definition of traceability (ISO 22005:2007):
The

ability to follow the movement of a feed or food through specified stage (s) of production, processing and distribution

Food Traceability System


Upstream
Tracking or tracking forward

Tracing or tracking back

Producer Processor
Flow of Agricultural Products

Downstream
Wholesaler Retailer Consumer

Output Information

Food Traceability Database

Paperless
Murakoso, 2011

Globalization & Market Trends


Increased international food trade Global concerns on food safety Increased requirement of documentation (WTO, FTAs) and traceability system Traceability systems allow for improved disease outbreak management

Case Study: Poultry in Kyoto Prefecture


Avian flu caused damaged to the industry Producers, distributors, and Poultry Safety Promotion Council of Kyoto Local Government formed a Council Consumer survey Reliability not the details

Scope of System
Farm Slaughtering house Processing house Retailer

Costs
Production and processing site Hardware and software: $20,000/site Running costs: $2,000/yr

Retail store running cost: $2,000/yr

Membership fee $500/yr Printing and supply of label $400/yr Hardware maintenance fee $500/yr Usage fee of software (Mistubishi) $600/yr

Benefits
Consumers are satisfied with the system Sale of poultry resumed Tracability of outbreak is effective

Lessons & Recommendations for Developing Countries


Traceability System is essential in gaining market access improves business efficiency throughout the supply-chain improves management of disease outbreaks Public-private partnership is essential in establishment

ADB GMS Programs on Transboundary Disease and Traceability

Vision
The Greater Mekong Subregion is recognized as the leading producer of safe food, using climate friendly agricultural practices and integrated into global markets through regional economic corridors.

Pillar 1: Food Safety Trade Modernization

Pillar 2: Climate Friendly Agriculture

Pillar 3: Bioenergy and Biomass Management

Agricultural Research and Development

Private Sector Involvement


Institutional Mechanisms for Regional Cooperation

RETA 6390: Transboundary Animal Disease Control for Poverty Reduction in the GMS
RETA of $1.65 million

Pilot public-private partnership projects


on livestock traceability systems between Lao-PRC and CAM-VIE; Development of grass root awareness raising materials on safe food production and accessing higher value markets

RETA 8163: Implementing the CASP in the GMS Phase 2


RETA Amount: $7.5million (Sida) Pilot cross-border e-trade and tracability systems for green, high value agri-food products

Coverage: CAM/LAO/VIE Loan amount: $25.87 million for CAM/LAO Grant amount: $11.0 million for Lao PDR Loan/Grant amount: $11.72 M for VIE

Investment: Trade FacilitationImproved Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) Handling in the GMS

The project will strengthen institutions and operational and management capacities for operating cost-effective SPS systems that facilitate trade and protect health.

Traceability is win-win solution for market access and for transboundary disease management Healthy borders start with healthy production system

Thank you for your attention


ssetboonsarng@adb.org