Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 139

Outlaw Strength and Conditioning by Chad Waterbury

My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys There was an influential movement in the 1970's that totally changed the face of music. This movement was led by my heroes: Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Billy Joe Shaver, and a bunch of other crazy, rule-breaking nonconformists. They looked tradition right in the eyes and proclaimed a better way. Because of this, they were laughed at, spit on and labeled "outlaws." But in the end, their rough, raw, and honest approach changed the future of music. These outlaws faced opposition head-on and forged a new path to success. Anyone who's followed my writings is probably well aware that I break many of the so-called "rules" of strength and conditioning. Why would I do such a thing? Because more often than not, I've found a better way. This industry, like any other, needs an outlaw or two if we're ever going to compete with the Eastern Bloc countries who've taken oven the training world. Sitting on our hands and reading Muscle & Fiction isn't going to help us reach our full potential. I've learned a hell of a lot since my first Testosterone article was published. Basically, I realized the majority of readers want a program that's completely laid out for them. Initially, I wrote my articles purely from an informational standpoint (i.e. I give you the information and you incorporate it into your program). Well, I've decided I wanted to change that due to many requests for the alternative. I know some of you want to know the science behind my methods, but most of you just want to know what works. Running my business and being in graduate school has forced me to burn the candle at both ends. Such a situation has made me very short on time, therefore, my articles tend to get straight to the details while leaving most of the "science talk" out. In graduate school at the University of Arizona, I have to reference damn near every word I say (hell, if you want to take a leak in graduate school you have to provide the prof with a couple of studies proving the physiological need to do so!). In other words, I get a little tired of referencing every statement I make. There's also another reason why you won't see seventy-five references at the end of my articles. If I could reference every statement I make, then I'm really not saying anything new, am I? If you want to be a pioneer, you must walk the paths that others haven't yet traversed. It's the outlaw way.

Enter the Outlaw System Most of my programs from this point forward will fall under the umbrella heading of "OSC" or Outlaw Strength and Conditioning. This first OSC program is aimed at dramatically improving your General Physical Preparedness (GPP). Who should use this program? Anyone who feels his total body conditioning level is low. This program greatly improves strength, power, and cardiovascular conditioning. Note: Although many will experience fat loss on this program, trainees should not be on a super-low calorie diet if they plan to do this workout. It's very demanding and high volume. Therefore, it's a great hypertrophy program that will simultaneously skyrocket total-body conditioning levels.

Outlaw Progression This seven week program uses a fairly unique form of progression: I want you to double the sets every workout. Okay, okay, just kidding! Seriously, what I want you to do is decrease every rest period by five seconds with each subsequent week.

You'll start out on week one with 60-second rest periods. On week two, use 55-second rest periods and on week three, use 50 second rest periods, etc. At the end of the seventh week you'll be executing the same routine with half the rest periods! Now that's what I call Outlaw GPP! The fact that the rest periods are constantly being decreased forces you to perform the same workload in less time. Therefore, by the seventh week the work-to-rest ratio has dramatically shifted in favor of work and little rest! In short, you'll become an ass-stomping machine in the gym and on the playing field!

Exercise Descriptions There are several exercises in this program you may not be familiar with. I'll provide a description of the more esoteric movements below, then we'll get to the actual program.

Alternating Shoulder Press Assume the position of a squat with the bar resting on the upper back/traps, hands shoulder width apart. Press the load straight up overhead, then lower it to the front so it's resting on your upper chest. Next, press the bar straight up overhead again and lower down to the starting position on the back. This constitutes one repetition.

Decline Dumbbell Pullover Lie down on a 45-degree decline bench. Start with the dumbbells held over the torso with the arms straight and locked. While keeping the arms straight, lower the dumbbells behind the head as far as the shoulder joint allows. Keep the hands shoulder width apart throughout.

Donkey Calf Raise Be sure to use a step or a box for this exercise to induce the calf stretch. Use a dip belt loaded with plates to increase the resistance of the exercise if no machine or partner is available. I prefer the belt over a partner, unless said partner looks like Jennifer Garner.

Dumbbell Dorsiflexion This one is performed on a bench with the lower legs off the edge. The legs are straight and the quads are contracted to hold the position. The calf region is "free" in the air. Place a dumbbell between your arches. Keep it between the feet while performing the dorsiflexion movement (flexing the toes towards your body) using just your anterior calf muscles. Don't let the quads assist you by turning it into a sissy-boy leg extension. (This is performed exactly the same as with the DARD device, if you're familiar with it.)

Dumbbell Squat Thrust (Modified "Burpee") Begin in the standing position with dumbbells against the front of the thighs. Squat down on your haunches and place the dumbbells on the ground in front of your toes. Pop the legs back into a position that looks like a push-up with the hands on dumbbells, then jump the legs back up to the previous position. Finally, stand up with the dumbbells and vomit on the last rep.

Glute-ham Raise I prefer these to be performed without the dedicated machine. Instead, have a partner hold the ankles or hook the heels underneath something solid so the toes are four to six inches off the ground. Contract the hamstrings and lower yourself slowly to the ground. You'll probably end up collapsing and catching yourself on your hands. Using your hand, push yourself back up explosively until your hamstrings can "take over" and lift you the rest of the way up. Wipe the tears from your eyes and repeat.

Hanging Pike Assume a position similar to a pronated grip pull-up with the hands shoulder width apart. Perform a straight leg raise and continue up until the shins touch the bar between your hands. Lower and repeat with appropriate groaning and cries of pain.

Inch Worm Assume a position where your feet are on the floor (shoulder width) and your hands are flat on the ground in front of you (also shoulder width). At the starting position your butt should be high in the air; imagine you're making an inverted "V" with your body. Walk your hands out as far as possible, then walk your hands back to the starting position. Preferably, at the end (extended) position, your abs should be two to three inches off the ground and you'll look like a flying superman.

One-Legged Dumbbell Deadlift While standing on one foot and with dumbbells held at the sides, flex the trunk forward until the dumbbells touch the floor. The back should slightly round on this exercise and the knee of the working leg should be slightly flexed in the bottom position (dumbbells on the floor). The back should round slightly to work the spinal erectors dynamically as opposed to statically in virtually every other back exercise. No, it isn't harmful!

Overhead Figure 8

Hold two dumbbells overhead with the elbows locked and walk in a figure eight pattern. The length of the pattern should be approximately four meters each way (about 13 feet). The elbows stay locked and the arms remain overhead throughout (keep the palms facing forward). The figure eight pattern increases the instability of this exercise. Just holding two dumbbells up overhead isn't very challenging, but if you walk in this pattern, all of the rotator cuff muscles have to fire to stabilize the load. Therefore, it becomes a rotator cuff exercise that challenges the muscles in more than one plane.

Seated Dumbbell External Rotation Assume a position on the edge of a bench with the torso flexed forward so it makes a 60-degree angle with the ground. Hold two dumbbells at the sides with the palms pronated (palms face behind you). Initiate this movement by simultaneously upright rowing, then externally rotating the dumbbells until they end up at a level of the top of the head (the elbows should be making a 90 degree angle at this point). At the same time this is happening, the trunk should be extending back to 90 degrees (perpendicular to the ground). To return to the starting position, internally rotate and drop the arms back to the sides while flexing the trunk forward to 60 degrees.

Side Deadlift Squat down next to a barbell at your side and grab it in the center. Stand up while holding onto the barbell and maintaining a trunk position that doesn't tilt towards the side of the load. The trunk shouldn't bend to

the side, instead, the obliques and quadratus lomborum muscles should fire to stabilize the torso. After the required reps and with no rest, switch to the other side.

Split Squat Split squats look sort of like a stationary lunge with the back foot up on a bench, which will stretch the hip flexors of the non-working leg. Keep your torso as perpendicular to the floor as possible throughout the movement. You may use a barbell or dumbbells.

Step-ups Perform the step-ups while holding dumbbells at your sides. Use a box or bench height that places your knee joint at about a 75-degree angle in the starting position. Do all the reps on one leg before switching to the other. No rest between legs; start with the weakest leg first.

Waterbury Crucifix Hold two dumbbells in the crucifix position. Perform the exercise by flexing the trunk forward until it's parallel to the ground, then extend back to the starting position (this constitutes one repetition). The arms should stay in the same static position (relative to the shoulder) throughout. It looks just like a good morning with the hands straight out to the sides. There'll be a slight bend in the knee at the bottom position. This exercise is excellent for medial/posterior deltoid strength. In the upright position, the emphasis is on the medial delts; in the flexed forward position, the emphasis is on the rear delts.

Waterbury Walk This exercise is formerly known as the "deadlift walk." Why the name change? Am I just some egotistical redneck? Hmm, good point, but no. Since I invented this exercise, I thought I'd attach my name to it before someone on the "other side" decides to rip me off. To perform the Waterbury walk, go to the power rack in your gym and kick out the Body-for-Lifer who, for some unknown reason, is in there doing kickbacks. Next, move the hooks (barbell supports) to the front of the power rack (the outside) and set them at a level just below your knees. You may also be able to use the safety supports depending on the type of equipment you have. Load a bar with approximately 65% of your raw deadlift 1RM. ("Raw" means using no belts, suits, straps, or wraps.) Place the bar on the floor directly in front of the power rack about two full steps away from the hooks. Assume a shoulder-width stance with your grip outside of your legs. Use a symmetrical pronated grip (palms facing you), not the mixed powerlifter's grip. Deadlift the weight up and once you reach lockout, take two steps forward, reset your stance, and lower the bar onto the hooks. As soon as you release muscular tension, re-lift the load, take two steps backward, stop, reset your stance, and lower to the ground. That's the first rep. Without resting, repeat for the prescribed number of reps. If you don't have access to a power rack you can set the bar on a bench.

Zercher Squat Place a barbell in the crook of your arms with the fingers clasped. Lower yourself until the elbows touch the top of the thighs. Initiate the movement by pushing the hips back and then descend. Use a stance with the feet shoulder width apart.

The Outlaw Program Here's what the first seven days of the program will look like. Remember, you'll drop five seconds off the rest period each week of the seven week program. Note that some of the movements require you to perform 25 reps with a 30-rep max load (or similar). Every rest period is incomplete (i.e. full recovery can't take place) in this phase, therefore a 30 RM must be used to get two 25-rep sets with 60 seconds rest. It's necessary that you start at the prescribed loads in order to end up with 30-second rest periods on week seven. Most exercises, however, involve performing five sets of four reps. DAY 1 Jump Rope Sets: 2 Duration: 90 seconds Rest: 60 seconds (on week one)

Inch Worm Load: Bodyweight Sets: 2 Reps: 10 Rest: 60 seconds

Dumbbell Dorsiflexion Load: 30 RM. (In other words, choose a load that you could perform for 30 repetitions no more, no less. However, you'll perform only 25 reps with the 30 rep max.) Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Tempo: 201* Rest: 60 seconds *Check the FAQ if you still don't know what those numbers mean.

Standing Calf Raise Load: 30 RM Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Tempo: 211 Rest: 60 seconds Notes: These can be done on a machine or while holding a dumbbell in front of the body. The toes must be elevated to activate the full stretch at the bottom of the movement, therefore use a step or a box. I don't like using a barbell and standing on the floor because it doesn't involve a full calf stretch.

Split Squat Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201

Rest: 60 seconds Notes: No rest between legs, start with your weakest leg first.

Chin-Ups Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds Notes: Palms supinated, shoulder width grip

Zercher Squats Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

Decline Dumbbell Pullovers Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

Waterbury Walks Load: 20RM Sets: 2 Reps: 15 Rest: 60 seconds

DAY 2 Dumbbell Squat Thrusts Load: 20RM (Pick two dumbbells that equal approximately 25% of your barbell deadlift 1RM. So if your max deadlift is 400 pounds, use two 50 pound dumbbells.) Sets: 2 Reps: 15 Rest: 60 seconds

Dips or Decline Dumbbell Bench Presses (palms facing each other) Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

One-Legged Dumbbell Deadlift Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds Notes: No rest between legs, start with your weakest leg first.

Dumbbell Bench Press Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

Glute Ham Raise Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

Side Deadlift Load: 20RM Sets: 2 Reps: 15 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

DAY 3 Fifteen minutes of high-intensity aerobics consisting of whatever you fancy (I prefer to herd cattle, but you might not have that luxury). Just choose an aerobic exercise that requires your max heart rate to be at approximately 75 to 80%. Exercises like jumping rope and running are good examples.

DAY 4 Jump Rope Sets: 2 Duration: 90 seconds Rest: 60 seconds

Inch Worm Load: bodyweight Sets: 2 Reps: 10 Rest: 60 seconds

Donkey Calf Raise Load: 30RM Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Tempo: 211 Rest: 60 seconds

Dumbbell Dorsiflexion Load: 30RM Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

Bent Over Barbell Rows (supinated, shoulder-width grip) Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

Barbell Front Squat Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

Incline Dumbbell Press

Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

Step-Ups Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds Notes: No rest between legs, start with your weakest leg first.

Alternating Shoulder Press Load: 20RM Sets: 2 Reps: 15 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

DAY 5 Dumbbell Squat Thrust Load: 20RM Sets: 2 Reps: 15 Rest: 60 seconds

Skull Crushers (Triceps Extensions) Load: 5RM

Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

Seated Dumbbell External Rotations Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Rest: 60 seconds

Standing Partial Military Press Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds Notes: Only lower the barbell to the top of your head.

Barbell Good Morning Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

Hanging Pike Load: 5RM Sets: 5 Reps: 4

Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

Waterbury Crucifix Load: Use a load that equals your dumbbell side raise 15 RM Sets: 2 Reps: 10 Tempo: 201 Rest: 60 seconds

Overhead Figure 8's Load: Use a load that equals your standing dumbbell military press 10 RM Sets: 2 Reps: 4 complete Figure 8's Rest: 60 seconds

DAY 6 & 7 Fifteen to twenty minutes of high intensity aerobic work.

Conclusion At Waylon Jennings' first New York City gig, he walked out on stage and told the crowd he was going to play them some country music and he hoped they'd like it. But if they didn't like it, he said, they'd better keep their mouths shut because he'd kick all of their asses. I won't be quite as harsh on my naysayers. Just give this "outlaw" program a try and see for yourself.

Singles Club The Beauty of Multiple 1-Rep Sets by Chad Waterbury Traditional fitness writers and coaches have tried to convince you that weight-training for either maximal strength or hypertrophy are two separate entities. This couldnt be further from the real truth. If I ever try to get a straight answer for their reasoning, I usually hear something along the lines of, "Powerlifters dont get big muscles like bodybuilders. Therefore, training heavy with low reps doesnt build as much muscle." Folks, let me tell you, thats stupidity spelled with a capital "S." One of the keys to my success in this industry relates to the fact that my clients possess outstanding levels of maximal strength. Regardless if my clients goal is hypertrophy, fat loss, or endurance, Im always thinking about maximal strength levels first. In other words, the three aforementioned goals usually cause dramatic decreases in maximal strength levels due to the type of "traditional" parameters that most trainers and coaches follow. Therefore, when I design a program for hypertrophy, fat loss, or endurance, I first consider how Im going to avoid decreasing maximal strength in pursuit of the other goals. This has been a very valuable tool in my arsenal and now youre going to reap the benefits of this thought process for maximum hypertrophy! I frequently ask readers and fellow lifters what their favorite set/rep parameters are for hypertrophy. Usually, I get a deluge of responses within the narrow range of 3-6 sets and 8-15 reps per muscle grouping. (Keep in mind, these are usually the same fellas who can still buy their T-shirts off the childrens rack). I dont think Ive ever asked a trainee that question and received this response, "Best rep range for hypertrophy? Well, singles of course!" Well, Im here to exploit the virtues of singles. Theyre the most underrated parameter in all aspects of hypertrophy training. The recent push of ill-conceived time-under-tension guidelines for hypertrophy has probably added to the close-minded thought process in todays hypertrophy parameters. After all, performing a single repetition usually takes only 2-4 seconds per set, so how beneficial can they be for hypertrophy? Immensely beneficial is what I say. In fact, more beneficial than you ever imagined!

The Genesis of Singles in Waterburys Programs Much of what Ive learned about strength-training stemmed from my observations while growing up on farms and ranches. When I became a professional strength-trainer, I realized many of the exercises I created paralleled actions Id performed or seen out on those wide open pastures. But I took things a step further. I also paid close attention to the ranch-hands who had the greatest levels of muscle and maximal strength. I realized they frequently performed short-duration activities that involved the recruitment of many large muscle groups. I also noticed they didnt perform more than one or two repetitions of anything before taking a short break. Chores such as tossing hay bales, lifting big ol truck tires, and turning a huge tire iron to replace a tractor tire are all good examples. I figured if these parameters worked for them, then they could probably work for my clients and me, too. Damn, was I right!

Why Singles Work Trainees have been lifting large loads for a single repetition since the beginning of time, but rarely was it ever considered a technique for hypertrophy. In fact, many strength coaches dont think singles will cause any hypertrophy. But I can tell you theyre wrong dead wrong. Singles work extremely well for a variety of reasons, but Ill touch on a few of the most important:

1. Improved Form through the Law of Repetition The more frequently you perform a single, the better your technique will become, and consequently the more weight youll be able to lift. This does not mean fifteen repetitions are fifteen times more effective than singles for improving your form. In fact, proper technique breaks down so quickly in a traditional high-repetition set that this type of training usually causes poorer technique. Using the squat as an example, the more times you can set up under the bar, step back and set your stance, lower into the squat and explode up, the better! 2. Proper Motor Unit Recruitment Singles allow you to utilize an extremely large load. The heavier the load, the more fast-firing/fast-fatiguing, growth-supercharging motor units youll recruit. 3. Reduced Central Nervous System (CNS) Fatigue Intuitively, this doesnt make much sense, but singles are relatively easy on the central nervous system ifthe trainee performs them correctly. This program revolves around singles performed with a 3RM (repetition maximum) so theres no grunting and screaming involved. This is extremely important because CNS fatigue must be controlled or else overtraining will occur in a New York minute. 4. Reduced Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) Fatigue Singles dont cause a dramatic build-up in lactic acid within the muscles, therefore fatigue is minimized. Because of this, numerous singles can be performed in a single training session if the rest periods are adequate.

Why Arent Many Powerlifters More Muscular? Its true that some super-strong powerlifters dont have appreciable amounts of muscle tissue compared to their strength levels. But when these same powerlifters quit competing and switch over to "bodybuilding" methods, they pack on some serious muscle. Is that proof that powerlifting methods dont build muscle? Hell no! Heres my thought process on the issue: 1. Many powerlifters perform old-school set/rep parameters such as 3 x 3, 4 x 2, and 6 x 1 along with long (~5 min.) rest periods for their competition lifts. With volumes like that, very few trainees will ever add significant amounts of muscle tissue. The volume is too damn low! If they upped the volume (i.e., performed more sets), hypertrophy would skyrocket. In other words, one of the main reasons why traditional powerlifters dont hypertrophy is due to the fact that their session volume is too low. Note: Sometimes powerlifters want to stay in a certain weight class so excess hypertrophy (weight gain) isnt something they want. 2. Powerlifters who seek hypertrophy by performing a greater volume are able to better recruit highthreshold motor units. This leads to massive hypertrophy. Remember, high levels of maximal strength will allow you to build more muscle due to more efficient motor unit recruitment once the volume is increased. 3. Many powerlifters lift super fast. Increasing your speed increases your ability to develop maximal strength. Developing maximal strength leads to better capabilities to gain muscle, period. Hopefully, thats enough evidence to convince you. Lets take a look at a program thats going to escalate hypertrophy and maximal strength!

Day 1 Method: Hypertrophy Strength Singles (lower body) Sets: 14 Reps: 1

Load: 3RM Rest: 60s between sets Tempo: As fast as possible while controlling the eccentric phase Exercises: A. Barbell Back Squats B. Back Extensions (clutch a plate to your chest to add resistance) C. Seated Calf Raises Note: Perform all 14 sets for squats before moving on to back extensions and then finish with seated calf raises. Rest 3 minutes between exercises.

Back Extensions Day 1 utilizes a 3RM load. This is very important since a true 1RM load would not allow you to finish all 14 sets. You shouldnt feel fatigued until the last few sets, and this is the reason why the CNS stays fresh on this program. You must avoid training to failure. If your neuromuscular efficiency is low and you cant perform all 14 sets with a 3RM, decrease the load by 2.5% for the next session and all should be well.

Day 2 No weight-training. Perform 15-20 minutes of jogging or uphill treadmill walking (if your calves are lagging).

Day 3 Method: Endurance/Hypertrophy Strength (upper body) Sets: 3 Reps: 18 Load: 20RM Rest: 60s between antagonist sets Tempo: Fast, under control Exercises: A1. Chin-ups A2. Flat DB Bench Press B1. Barbell Curls B2. Barbell Skull Crushers Note: Alternate between chin-ups and flat DB bench presses for three cycles with 60s rest periods. Rest 3 minutes and move on to barbell curls and skull crusher antagonist supersets for three cycles. Day 3 parameters might have you scratching your head. With all this talk of maximal strength levels, youre probably wondering why this day utilizes such high rep etitions. Even though I did my best to minimize CNS fatigue on the singles day, fatigue is still inevitable. This day must be as different from Day 1 as possible in order to minimize overtraining. If I chose something along the lines of 5 x 5 on Day 3, youd burn out in no time.

Day 4 Method: Endurance/Hypertrophy Strength (lower body) Sets: 3 Reps: 18 Load: 20RM Rest: 90s between antagonist sets Tempo: Fast, under control

Exercises: A1. Barbell Deadlifts A2. Standing Calf Raises B1. Lying Leg Curls B2. Hanging Pikes Note: Alternate between traditional barbell deadlifts (feet shoulder-width, grip bar with pinky fingers around the ring) and standing calf raises using 90s rest periods. Rest 3 minutes and alternate between lying leg curls and hanging pikes using 90s rest periods for three cycles.

The Hanging Pike

Day 5 No weight-training. Perform 15-20 minutes of jogging or incline treadmill walking.

Day 6 Method: Hypertrophy Strength Singles (upper body) Sets: 14 Reps: 1 Load: 3RM Rest: 60s between sets Tempo: As fast as possible while controlling the eccentric phase Exercises: A. 15-20 degree Incline Barbell Bench Press,

B. Chest-supported Rows (palms supinated for biceps activation) C. Dips Note: Perform all 14 sets for incline barbell bench presses before moving on to chest-supported rows and then finish with dips. Rest 3 minutes between exercises.

Day 7 Off completely

Day 8 Repeat cycle for three more weeks.

Progression: For weeks 2-4, add one set to each singles workout for all movement s. In other words, Day 1 on week 2 will utilize 15 sets of 1 repetition; Day 1 on week 3 will utilizes 16 x1; Day 1 on week 4 utilizes 17 x 1. The same holds true for Day 6. Increase the load of Days 3 and 4 by 2.5% each week for all sets.

Conclusion I hope yall are sick and tired of losing maximal strength in pursuit of hypertrophy. Give this program a shot because it works incredibly well for hypertrophy. At the same time, youll get the added benefit of increased maximal strength so you can back up your newfound size with improved maximal strength. Afterwards, if you want a job baling hay, let me know.

Quattro Dynamo by Chad Waterbury The "Secret Weapon" Program Its time to get tough or die. This ride is going to be hard and fast, so you better hang on. To hell with all the preconceived notions about training frequency and recovery. And to hell with all the strength coaches who wont give out their best training programs. Im going to give you one of my most effective secret weapons: the "Quattro Dynamo" program. This is one of the most intense, hypertrophy-inducing routines Ive ever created. Ive waited too damn long to give out this information, but the wait is going to be worth it! Heres the mission: induce the most dramatic muscle-building stimulus ever devised in the shortest amount of time possible. It aint gonna be easy and there are a lot of different parameters to follow, but hang with me and I'll reward you with the best mass program you've ever tried! Im not going to give you a catchy introduction, nor am I going to tie this program into another story in order to make it more interesting. It doesnt need anything. It stands alone in this industry, and you'll quickly realize why. We're going to hit every muscle group four times each week for three consecutive weeks. You're going to hurt, sweat, cuss and possibly bleed. If this doesnt sound appealing to you, then move on to another program that has you sitting comfortably on a leg extension machine!

The Method Behind the Madness The only way a trainee can withstand a program that consists of training every muscle group four times each week is to constantly rotate strength training methods. Ive set up this program with effective sequencing devised from years of trial and error. Be thank ful you werent one of my patsies! Instead, relish in the polished program outlined below: Day 1 The first session of the week is devoted to maximal strength training. The reps will be low and the load will be relatively high. Our aim is to recruit the fast-fatiguing (FF), high-threshold motor units that have the greatest potential for size and strength increases. Day 2 This session is totally devoted to developing endurance strength. Theres only been 24 hours of rest since the previous session, so this method must be as diverse as possible. This endurance session will serve two purposes. First, the slow-oxidative (SO) motor units will be recruited since they're relatively fresh. This is due to the fact that the previous session minimally recruited these motor units. Second, the program acts as a recovery-inducing session since the blood flow (i.e. nutrient transfer) will be high. This dramatically increases recovery. Day 3 Day 3 should include no weight training whatsoever, but a fifteen minute, low-intensity session of cardiovascular activity. The reasoning is based on the increase in blood flow to all of the muscle groups, thus aiding the recovery process.

Day 4 This session is devoted to hypertrophy/strength training. The fast, fatigue-resistant (FFR) motor units are recruited. Since the two previous sessions haven't taxed these motor units, we must hit them for complete muscle growth. Day 5 This is a day of rest and no weight training is performed. Another fifteen minute, low-intensity cardio session is recommended. Day 6 Here comes the explosive strength training! The load is very light and the speed of the movement tempo is lightning fast. This session will, once again, recruit the FF motor units. Since the stimulus is drastically different from Day 1, the possibility of overtraining is minimized. Day 7 Rest, rest, and more rest. No weight training and no cardio. If you must engage in carnal activity, find a "take charge" kinda gal and stay lashed to the bedposts. Day 8 Repeat program, starting with Day 1.

Parameters Now lets move on to the parameters. Each session has a relatively low volume and the intensity must be kept in check. If you push yourself to an intensity that's too high during any session, that overtraining sumbitch will be keeping you up at night (literally). Day 1 (Maximal Strength) Sets: 5 Reps: 3 Rest: 60 seconds between antagonist supersets Load: 5 rep max (The extra two reps are kept "in the hole" so you won't train to failure.) Tempo: Perform concentric (lifting) fast; perform eccentric (lowering) under control.

Day 2 (Endurance Strength) Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Rest: 90 seconds between antagonist supersets

Load: 27RM Tempo: Same as Day 1

Day 3 Rest/Cardio

Day 4 (Hypertrophy Strength) Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Rest: 75 seconds between antagonist supersets Load: 10RM Tempo: Same as Day 1

Day 5 Rest/Cardio

Day 6 (Explosive Strength) Sets: 6 Reps: 3 Rest: 60 seconds between consecutive sets Load: 18RM Tempo: As fast as humanly possible while maintaining proper form.

Day 7 Rest

Exercises Most of the recommended exercises consist of compound movements. The reasoning is based on efficiency. You'll get the most "bang for your buck" with compound movements since multiple muscle groups are taxed in a single exercise. If you chose isolation exercises, the session would last upwards of two hours every time you hit the gym not good. A note of caution before you get into the exercise details: it isn't blatantly obvious that all of the muscle groups are being trained four times per week, even though they are. For instance, I only prescribe direct ab movements on two of the workouts for the week. This is due to the fact that the other two days are

greatly challenging the abdominal musculature indirectly. Just keep that in mind.

Now, on to the exercise sequencing of each workout! Day 1 A1) Squat Note: Use a high bar position on your traps, feet shoulder width, toes straight ahead, full ROM (range of motion). A2) Lying Leg Curl Note: Keep the toes pointed straight down throughout the movement; dont let the hips lift off the pad. B1) Barbell Bench Press Note: Use a 24" grip width (that's 24 inches between the first fingers). B2) Seated Cable Row Note: Use a 24", palms-down grip. C1) Standing Barbell Curl Note: Use an 18" grip width (18 inches between pinky fingers). C2) Reverse Grip Triceps Pressdown Note: Use an 18", palms up grip. Remember, when you see those A1, A2 thingies, that means to do one set of A1, rest, then one set of A2. Superset like this until all "A" sets are completed, then go to the "B" exercises and so forth. In the "Parameters" section above, it says to perform five sets of three reps (5 x 3) for Day 1. So, you'll perform a set of squats, rest, then a set of leg curls. Rest again, then go through that superset four more times. Then do the same for the "B" and "C" exercises. Remember, the parameters change for each day!

Day 2 A1) Seated Behind the Neck Barbell Shoulder Press Note: Use a 24" grip. A2) Shoulder-Width Lat Pulldown Note: Use a 24", palms up grip (24 inches between pinky fingers.) B1) Barbell Back Squat Note: Use the same positioning as in Day 1, but with your heels elevated on two 25-pound plates.

B2) Lying Leg Curl Note: Use the same technique as Day 1. Again, don't forget to check the "Parameters" section above. Day 2 is endurance strength day, so you'll be using two sets of 25 reps for the exercises above.

Day 3 Off. Perform 15 minutes of low-intensity jogging or uphill walking.

Day 4 A1) Barbell Good Morning Note: Keep the low back tight and arched. Flex the trunk forward at the hips as far as possible before losing your arch (this will depend on hamstring flexibility). Dont flex the trunk forward any further than parallel to the floor. A2) Hanging Leg Raise Note: Hang from a bar and lift the legs until they're parallel to the floor. B1) 45 Incline Dumbbell Bench Press Note: Use a traditional grip with your palms facing away from you (i.e. pronated). B2) Standing Upright Dumbbell Row Note: Keep the elbows high; don't lift the dumbbells higher than your lower chest. C1) Standing Barbell Reverse Curl Note: Use an 18", palms down grip (18 inches between first fingers). C2) Lying Barbell Triceps Extension (a.k.a. Skull Crusher) Note: Use an 18" grip between first fingers. Day 4 is hypertrophy strength day, so you'll be using three sets of eight reps.

Day 5 Off. Perform 15 minutes of low-intensity jogging or uphill walking.

Day 6 A) Explosive Lunge Note: Keep your trunk as vertical as possible. Step forward as far as comfortably possible and alternate

reps between each leg. B) Explosive Sit-up Note: Hook the feet and assume a traditional sit-up technique. C) Explosive Barbell Bench Press Note: Use an 18" grip width between first fingers. Don't lockout the elbows on any rep. D) Explosive Supinated Pulldown Note: Use an 18" underhand grip between pinky fingers. Let the weight stack rest between each rep before pulling down explosively. According to our parameters, Day 6 is explosive strength day, so you'll be performing six sets of three explosive reps for the above.

Day 7 Rest, rest, rest! When you're finished, rest some more!

Day 8 Repeat program

Program Duration I want you to perform this program for three weeks straight. After the third week, rest a full five days before returning to another program. This rest period will allow for more compensation (muscle growth) to occur. When you undergo your next program, your recovery levels will be supercharged. Sleep You must get ten hours of sleep every day, preferably eight hours at night and a two-hour nap. The nap can be anytime, but I prefer it to start within four hours after your workout in order to increase recovery. Calories Eat everything in sight for three weeks. This isn't a fat loss program so load up on the calories. Be sure to consume at least 1.5 grams of protein per pound of lean body mass and 3.0 grams of carbs per pound of lean body mass. Fat intake should be 0.75 grams per pound of lean body mass. These numbers are an absolute minimum! Water You must drink at least an ounce of water per pound of lean body mass. Adequate water consumption will definitely increase your recovery rate, so dont overlook this often neglected nutrient! Supplements During week one, take TRIBEX twice each day. During weeks two and three, takeMAG-10 twice each day. Take half a serving of Surge during the workout and half directly afterward. Consume a high-quality

multi-vitamin/mineral supplement throughout the program. Also, I highly recommend ZMA while on this program since high-quality sleep is imperative.

Wrap-Up Honestly, I could've easily written this program as a three-part article since there are so many different variables that need to be considered. But instead, I eliminated the boredom factor and decided to give you the bare-minimum details. Read this article at least three times before you undergo the program. Even though I did my best to keep it short, there are still a lot of different aspects that must be completely understood before you dive into it. If you have questions, you can e-mail me or post your inquiry on the T-Forum.

A Little Outlaw Wisdom Johnny Paycheck, the late Outlaw country singer, once gave some advice to a young, up and coming singer named Tim McGraw. Paycheck said, "Son, live your life hard and fast. That way, when you hit a ditch, youll make it through." If your current training has you approaching a ditch, take a ride on the Quattro Dynamo program!

GPP ASAP Get in shape fast with these hybrid workouts! by Chad Waterbury

At T-Nation, the citizens play a big role in shaping the community. Your opinions count! Recently, I made a post asking readers what they wanted my next article to be about. I got a deluge of responses, but the topic of General Physical Preparedness (GPP) kept coming up. Ask and you shall receive! Let's take a peek inside my top secret GPP files.

GPP Genesis Early in my training days in Chicago, I befriended a chap named Tim. Most of you probably aren't familiar with Tim, but I can tell you that he was a stud in this industry. He virtually monopolized the professional basketball industry with his efficient and effective training methods. His list of clients read like any trainer's dream: Scottie Pippen, Juwan Howard, Rod Strickland, and, oh yeah, a fella named Michael Jordan. I'm sure you can recall Jordan's metamorphosis from a weak, skinny player to a ripped, muscular force that could easily dunk over monsters such as Patrick Ewing and Hakeem Olajuwon. Michael's newfound strength and increased performance was directly due to the magic of Tim. Word around the campfire was that each one of Tim's clients paid him more for a single month of training than most people make in a year. And you know what? His clients seemed happy to write the check! Luckily for me, Tim is a good guy and he didn't mind if I peeked over his shoulder once in a while to analyze what he was doing with his clients. (Every now and then, he'd give me a nod and tell me that I was a good kid and I'd make it in this industry someday.) One of Tim's clients in particular really stuck out in my mind. This dude was 7'1" and massive. I'm not referring to "massively muscular" ? just massive. He carried an enormous amount of body fat on his huge frame, but he also possessed some serious natural talent. The problem was, this fella was completely out of shape, and not the most motivated person in the gym. Tim had his work cut out for him. The first few weeks of this big dude's regimen consisted of little more than walking on the treadmill at a brisk pace followed by some court drills. I knew what Tim was doing, and luckily for his client, Tim knew what he was doing too. Specifically, he was training the big guy to improve his GPP levels. Without an adequate "base" of fitness, this monster wasn't going to be able to jog across the room without having a coronary. But Tim's plan worked. Before long, the big guy was two-steppin' all over the court!

The Leg Press Load Once I established a name for myself, I became too busy to help many of those who sought out my advice. My schedule was just too packed. But one guy in particular was very diligent. I'll refer to him as "Joe." Joe would frequently approach me and ask if I had any openings in my schedule. Since I didn't, I always turned him down. But what's interesting about this fella is the fact that he was about 70 pounds overweight. At that stage of my career, I no longer worked with obese individuals due to my demand from athletes?but I still felt kinda bad for the guy because I knew he was trying. So one day I approached Joe and gave him some quick advice. I pointed to the leg press machine in the corner and then I pointed to the tree of Olympic plates. I told him that I wanted him to load every 45pound plate on the leg press machine (20 total plates). Then, I told him to remove every plate and put it

back on the plate stand. After that, I told him to catch his breath for a few minutes, then repeat the process nine more times with three to four minute rest periods between each load/unload task. This advice made him scratch his head and with a dumfounded look reply, "Huh? Don't you want me to do any exercises?" I told him to talk to me after he finished his task. About 30 minutes later, he walked up to me with a candy-apple red face and a sweat soaked T-shirt. He now understood. I told him to perform the GPP routine three times each week, and to subsequently get his diet in order. Six weeks later, he contacted me and told me that all of his pants were too big and he was feeling better than ever. He still had a way to go, but we'd made a good dent. The leg press load/unload task provides two major benefits. First, it challenges virtually every muscle group in the body. Second, it clogs up the leg press machine so lifters are forced to perform squats on leg day! Obviously, this was just the first step to transform this fella, and most of you aren't 70 pounds overweight. But, my point is this: no matter if you're an athlete or pushing obesity, effective GPP training doesn't have to be complicated. Tim didn't make it complicated and neither do I.

The Purpose of GPP Training Improving your GPP will assist you in virtually every aspect of training. Some of the more important qualities GPP training improves are: cardiovascular fitness, active flexibility, stability strength, and maybe even balance (if balance can be trained). That's definitely more than most types of training can say! So, let's get to the program! I'm a big proponent of GPP training on your non-weight-training days since it really improves recovery rates. An adequate GPP program will act as active recovery sessions in conjunction with your weighttraining program. Therefore, think of this program as a supplement to your current weight-training program. In other words, your "off" days no longer consist of hanging out at local beer joint. (Okay, I'll still give you one day that consists of no training whatsoever.)

GPP ASAP Program I have most of my clients perform hybrid GPP drills. Now, these might sound complicated at first, but in reality, they're super simple. Just read through the descriptions carefully and they'll make sense once you give them a try. Hang on tight! Here we go! GPP Hybrid 1 Description: 1) Stand underneath a pull-up bar. From that standing position, squat down on your haunches, jump your feet back so you're in a push-up position, and perform one push-up.

2) Jump back to your haunches, jump up and grab the pull-up bar with your palms facing each other (or away from you if that handle isn't available), and perform one pull-up.

3) Lower and drop to the floor (standing position). Repeat exercise from the beginning. Duration: Perform this exercise for 180 seconds straight. When you're finished, rest two minutes and repeat the hybrid for 120 seconds straight. Rest two more minutes and repeat hybrid for 90 seconds. Rest two minutes and repeat hybrid once more for 60 seconds. Finally, rest two minutes before moving on to the next hybrid.

GPP Hybrid 2 Description: 1) Assume a traditional sit-up position on the floor with your knees bent. Extend your arms straight behind your head, thrust your arms forward and perform a sit-up while subsequently standing up (arm thrust acts as momentum to help you up).

2) Once you stand up, jump up as high as you can with your arms extended overhead.

3) Squat down on your haunches, roll back to the starting position, and repeat movement. Duration: Perform this exercise for 180 seconds straight. When you're finished, rest two minutes and repeat sequence for another 180 seconds. Rest two minutes again and repeat hybrid for another 180 seconds. Rest two minutes and move on to the last exercise.

GPP Lunges Description: Perform bodyweight walking lunges with your hands clasped behind your head. Don't let your hands pull your head forward as your shoulders fatigue!

Duration: Perform this exercise for 120 seconds straight. When you're finished, rest two minutes and repeat the exercise for another 120 seconds. Frequency: Perform this GPP routine on all of your "off" days, except for one. Progression: Every fourth workout, decrease each rest period by 10 seconds!

Conclusion That's it folks, pure and simple but extremely effective. Obviously, I can't choose perfect parameters for all readers, so I chose guidelines that are adequate for an intermediate-level trainee. If you find that the routine is too tough, extend your rest periods by 15 to 30 seconds instead of shortening your work periods. I've let out a few of my GPP secrets that are akin to a half-dozen raging bulls coming out of the shootgate. You can thank the T-Nation for this one. Now get to it!

The Anti-Bodybuilding Hypertrophy Program Break the "Rules" and Gain Real Muscle! by Chad Waterbury

Anti-Establishment Hypertrophy I can't read most hypertrophy training articles because of health reasons they make me sick. Never has there been a topic with more misinformation than muscle-building methods. At least some strength-training articles seem to have a shred of scientific basis, but with bodybuilding articles, all common sense and science seems to go to the wayside. That's probably because more is understood about the nervous system than muscle soreness, or maybe it's because most of the writers who are only concerned about hypertrophy training are imbeciles who can't even build muscle on themselves. You be the judge. After a recent seminar, a famous strength trainer told me I should market myself as the guy who could revolutionize bodybuilding. There's only one small problem with that I don't like bodybuilding. Yep, you heard me right, never have liked it, probably never will. I see most competitive bodybuilders as overly tanned, overly shaved, waddling pieces of uneducated flesh and I have no interest in that market. Yes, that's harsh, but recently something has slightly changed my views on bodybuilding: I started contributing to Testosterone and I realized there are some pretty damn cool and intelligent people out there who like bodybuilding. I'm not talking about "shaved gorillas posing in thongs" bodybuilding, but the good old hypertrophy-inducing strength-training from the days of the past. So, for all of you out there who love bodybuilding for what it used to be, I've written this article. Old-time strongmen were the only people who truly revolutionized bodybuilding. Unfortunately, their methods have been largely forgotten. In exchange for infrequent, machine-laden, ineffective bodybuilding methods, many great principles have been lost. Let me tell you a little secret hypertrophy training and strength training don't have to be two separate entities. I've never designed a program that was based solely on "hypertrophy" training, but my clients have gained a ton of muscle over the years (if that was the goal). Let me repeat a statement from one of my previous articles: muscle growth is mainly controlled through caloric intake. Assuming all is normal with a trainee's physiology, even the best hypertrophy program won't build appreciable amounts of muscle if there are insufficient calories. Got it? So allow me to uncover some real hypertrophy methods so you can apply them to your current program in exchange for more functional muscle. Bodybuilders beware: I'm about to barbecue a few of your sacred cows!

Five Hypertrophy Training Principles You Must Understand 1) Train More Often First and foremost, you must drop the notion that a muscle group can only be trained once a week. Strongmen from the past didn't train that way and you shouldn't either. The more frequent the growthstimulating sessions you can have, the better. 2) Forget about Time Under Tension One of the things that really makes me nauseous is the assumption that hypertrophy-inducing sets must last from 40 to 70 seconds (or is it 20 to 90 seconds, or 43.5 to 68.7 seconds?) So that must mean the classic 5 x 5 method doesn't build any muscle since those sets don't last at least 40 seconds. Or maybe I'm just a dumb hillbilly and everyone who uses the 5 x 5 method is actually using a tempo where each rep takes eight seconds? (I don't think so!) 3) There's a Daily Limit to Muscle Stimulation I can't believe I'm actually going to do this, but I must quote a bodybuilding catch-phrase from the 1980's: stimulate, don't annihilate! There's an absolute limit to the amount of hypertrophy-inducing stimuli you can apply on any given day. That's why those "one day cures" are a huge, stinkin' pile of B.S. I feel sorry for those who actually wasted an entire day attempting such a program. 4) Don't Train to Failure You must keep the nervous system from becoming overly fatigued if you want to train frequently. Therefore, leave the grunting and screaming to the frat boys who have 13" guns and spend their entire day doing concentration curls and wasting Daddy's money. 5) Train Through Soreness Initially, you'll probably have constant soreness on this program. That's okay! The soreness will subside once recovery increases and proper adaptation has taken place. Soreness is your body's way of saying, "I need more carbs and protein." So feed your muscles constantly!

The Anti-Bodybuilding Hypertrophy Program After reading through these principles, you probably understand why I refer to this as an antiestablishment program. I think I broke every so-called "hypertrophy" rule in the book! But you know what? This program rapidly builds muscle and it's very similar to the principles the old-time strongmen used to follow.

Now, let's get to the program that's going to build some serious muscle and increase strength levels! (Keep in mind you can pick your own exercises. Those listed are just examples.) Day 1 Sets per Muscle Group: Chest 10, Back 10 Movement Plane: Horizontal Examples: Flat Barbell Bench, Barbell Rows, Seated Cable Row (both back movements using a pronated grip with the width the exact same as bench press) Reps: 3 Load: 80% of 1RM Rest: 60 seconds between supersets (i.e. train chest, rest 60 secs, train back, rest 60 secs, train chest, rest 60 seconds, etc)

Day 2: OFF

Day 3 Sets per Muscle Group: Thighs 5, Abs 5, Calves 5. Examples: Barbell Front Squat, Hanging Pike, Standing Calf Raise Reps: 10 Load: 60% of 1RM Rest: 60 seconds between giant sets (i.e. train thighs, rest 60 secs, train abs, rest 60 secs, train calves, rest 60 secs, train thighs, rest 60 secs, etc.)

Day 4: OFF

Day 5 Sets per Muscle Group: Chest 5, Back 5 Movement Plane: Vertical

Examples: Dips, Chin-ups Reps: 10 Load: 60% of 1RM Rest: 60 seconds between supersets

Day 6: OFF

Day 7 Sets per Muscle Group: Thighs 10, Abs 10, Calves 10 Examples: Deadlift, Decline Sit-ups, Seated Calf Raise (Note that this uses different exercises from Day 3.) Reps: 3 Load: 80% of 1RM Rest: 60 seconds between giant sets

Day 8: OFF

Days 9 & 17* Same as Day 1 except with 4 & 5 reps per set, respectively (in other words, you'll just do 4repsfor each body part on Day 9 and 5 reps for each body part on Day 17).

Days 11 & 19 Same as Day 3 except with 65% & 70% of 1RM, respectively

Days 13 & 21 Same as Day 5 except with 65% & 70%, respectively

Days 15 & 23 Same as Day 7 except with 4 & 5 reps per set, respectively

*The days that aren't listed are, of course, off days.

A Reluctant Addendum I know what you're thinking: "Chad, youforgot to include direct arm work in that program!" No, I didn't. The best increases in upper arm hypertrophy are achieved through compound exercises such as dips, chin-ups, bench presses and rows. Therefore, no direct arm work is prescribed in this program. It's a strange phenomenon. Every trainee who's been around the iron game for more than a year knows that big arms are built from compound exercises, but people are still convinced they need direct arm work! So I'll give you the choice. I don't recommend the direct upper-arm work option, but I know some people will add direct arm work anyway, so I might as well make sure they do it right. If you feel cheated and betrayed by my original recommendations, follow the same parameters given in the plan, but cut the total sets in half. For example, on the 10 x 3 day at 80% of 1RM (i.e, Day 1), execute the following:

Preacher Curl, Decline Dumbbell Triceps Extension Superset Sets: 5 Reps: 3 Load: 80% of 1RM Rest: 60 seconds On the other upper body day with 60% of 1RM, execute the following: Incline Hammer Curl, Tricep Pressdown Superset Sets: 2-3 Reps: 10 Load: 60% of 1RM Rest: 60 seconds

Closing Remarks Don't forget, you must feed your recovery. Think of it this way, if maximum hypertrophy is your goal, you can't eat enough during the two hours post-workout and before going to bed. Eat throughout the day too! Follow the details of this program precisely and you'll be rewarded with head-turning muscle mass and a better understanding of "real" muscle-building methods. The Anti-Bodybuilding Hypertrophy Program, Part II by Chad Waterbury Earlier this year, we chose Chad Waterbury's Anti-Bodybuilding Hypertrophy(ABBH) as the most effective training program of 2003. There were plenty of other good programs published that year, but ABBH seemed to receive the most positive feedback. In fact, so many people tried the program and recommended it to others that we were soon deluged with requests for a sequel. You asked for it, you got it. Below, CW outlines what to do after you've completed the original program.

The First Arizona Outlaw Up until the late 1800s, the land of southern Arizona was mostly inhabited by rebels like Geronimo, Nachez and Vicotorio. Most white men who dared to enter this lawless land never lived to tell about it. But one man ignored these dangers. Edward Lawrence Schieffelin was a tall cowboy with a bronzed face, long hair, and clear blue eyes. He came to the San Pedro Valley in 1877 in search of a rich ore deposit. While in search of this highly lucrative rock, Schieffelin was approached by a soldier. "You keep fooling around out there amongst them Apaches," the soldier said, "and the only rock youll find will be your tombstone." Undeterred, Schieffelin found his "rock" a rich silver strike. The city of Tombstone, Arizona was born.

The Other Arizona Outlaw In 1999, another outlaw came to Arizona. This one wasn't looking for silver, just a better way to increase strength and muscle. It seemed to him that just about every training program out there consisted of 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps. This set/rep scheme seemed to be the Holy Grail for those seeking optimum hypertrophy. But this outlaw found a better way, and all he needed was a worthy medium that would let him tell his tale. So like two cowboys who slit their palms with an eight-inch knife and shook hands to become blood brothers, the brotherhood betweenTestosterone and Chad Waterbury was born.

Anti-Bodybuilding Hypertrophy I have great admiration for Mr. Shieffelin for chartering those forbidden territories back in the day. I was faced with similar resistance and hesitation when I released my Anti-Bodybuilding Hypertrophy program in early 2003. I didn't exactly run the risk of getting scalped, not literally at least, but people in the

industry told me the ABBH program was just too different, too outlaw to work. So a few naysayers started their own shootout with me at the O.K. Corral. They stuck to their old ideas about training while I blazed away with my new ones. When the smoke cleared, the Clantons and McLaurys lay bleeding. But if I was Wyatt Earp in this showdown of training methodologies, then the Tmag reader who tried out the program was my Doc Holliday. Luckily, I had thousands of Doc Hollidays to back me up.

The New Era Its been quite a spell since the ABBH programs induction, and the positive feedback has been mind blowing. I knew it was my best program at the time since my clients reaped massive levels of muscle and strength from the original plan. Within a few months after the release of the program, I contemplated writing a follow-up. I knew it could be as good as the original, but I patiently waited for a better answer. I didnt want to write a continuation program that was as good as the original; I wanted to write one that was better! Thanks to all the trainees from around the world who let me in on their experiences with the original, Im now ready to release a follow-up program with the power of Doc Holliday's sawed-off scattergun!

Overview of the Original Program Let me first address some issues with the original plan. Once you finish the first 23 days of the original program, do the following: 1) Switch the movement plane with the strength training method. In other words, Day 1 becomes 5 sets of 10 repetitions with horizontal pressing/pulling. Use the same 60 second rest periods as originally prescribed and utilize antagonist training (i.e., switch back and forth between the pressing and pulling exercises). 2) Lower body movements should be switched in the same manner. For example, Day 3 becomes 10 sets of 3-5 reps with the same giant set sequence (e.g., front squats, rest, hanging pikes, rest, standing calf raises, rest, etc.). 3) Continue this program for another 23 days.

ABBH II After 46 days of toil that would make Ed Schieffelin proud, its time you mix things up! The continuation will be based on similar principles, but with a few added twists. Here are the parameters: Day 1 Total sets per muscle group: 6 Movements per muscle group: 2 Movement plane: Horizontal Upper Body Reps per set: 5

Load: 7RM (reps max) Rest: 60 seconds between sets Pressing Exercises: Flat Dumbbell Bench Press and 20-30? Decline Barbell Bench Press Pulling Exercises: Seated Cable Rows and Bent Over Barbell Rows with a supinated (palms up) grip. If seated cable rows arent an option, use Facedown Dumbbell Rows on a 30? incline bench. Note: Perform all sets in a row for a given exercise. In other words, perform 3 sets of Flat Dumbbell Bench Press with 60 second rest periods, followed by 3 sets of Decline Barbell Bench Press with 60 second rest periods before moving on to the pulling exercises. Day 2 No weight-training. Perform 15-20 minutes of medium-high intensity aerobics (incline treadmill walking, jogging, HIIT, etc.) Day 3 Total sets per muscle group: 4 Movements per muscle group: 1 Movement plane: Hip-dominant lower body Reps per set: 12 Load: 15RM Rest: 60 seconds between giant sets Exercises: Partial Barbell Deadlifts*, Standing Cable Crunches**, Leg Press Calf Raises*** * Perform with a barbell, but only lower the barbell until its at the level of your upper shins. ** You could also use traditional feet-hooked sit-ups with a dumbbell held on your upper chest for added resistance. *** If a leg press isn't available, perform standing calf raises off the edge of a block or step. Note: Perform all of the exercises in a giant set, circuit fashion. For example, perform Partial Deadlifts, rest 60 seconds, Standing Cable Crunches, rest 60 seconds, Leg Press Calf Raises, rest 60 seconds, then repeat the sequence three more times. Day 4 No weight-training. Perform 15-20 minutes of medium-high intensity aerobics. Day 5 Total sets per muscle group: 6 Movements per muscle group: 2

Movement plane: Vertical Upper Body Reps per set: 12 Load: 15RM Rest: 75 seconds between giant sets Pressing Exercises: Standing Dumbbell Military Press and Dips Pulling Exercises: Chin-ups and Upright Rows Note: Perform all exercises in a giant set, circuit fashion. Do the following: Standing Dumbbell Military Presses, rest 75 seconds, Chin-ups, rest 75 seconds, Dips, rest 75 seconds, Upright Rows, rest 75 seconds, then continue the sequence two more times. Day 6 No weight-training. Perform 15-20 minutes of medium-high intensity aerobics. Day 7 Total sets per muscle group: 6 Movements per muscle group: 1 Movement plane: Quad Dominant Lower Body Reps per set: 5 Load: 7RM Rest: 60 seconds between sets Exercises: High-Bar Barbell Back Squats (full ROM)*, Standing Cable Crunches**, Donkey Calf Raises*** * Use a high bar position (upper traps) and elevate your heels on two 25-pound plates. Go for a full ROM (range of motion). ** If a cable stack isn't available, use traditional feet-hooked sit-ups with a dumbbell held on your upper chest for added resistance. *** If an apparatus to perform donkey calf raises isnt available, perform seated calf raises. Note: Perform all sets in a row before switching to the next exercise as described in Day 1. Day 8 Off completely with no aerobics. Day 9 Repeat sequence for two more weeks. At the end of the program, switch movement planes with strength-

training methods as described for the original ABBH.

Conclusion A new era of hypertrophy strength-training is about to begin. I hope youre as excited about this sequel as I am! Its because of T-Nation that I was able to develop this outstanding continuation to the original ABBH. If you have any questions for me, feel free to post them on the T-forum. Now, keep an eye peeled for those dirty Clantons and go hit the gym!

Big Boy Basics 8 training principles you should be using plus a beginner program! by Chad Waterbury Lessons From Dallas I made a trip to Texas a few weeks ago to give a seminar and hang out with T-mag assistant editor Chris Shugart. My introduction to Dallas was nothing short of memorable. There are many valuable pieces of information I learned during my first trip to the "Big D." The first three I want to share with you relate to food, women, and music. Lesson 1: Food If Chris and I got together on a regular basis, we'd probably have to join a traveling freak show as the "Fat Hillbilly Bastards" exhibit. When we hit Dallas for the weekend you would've sworn we had devised our eating guidelines based on some seriously salacious feelings toward John Berardi. In fact, during a couple of meals I think I heard Berardi, all the way up in Maple Leaf Country, wake up in a pool of sweat screaming, "Its not possible to eat with such inhumane principles!" (Hopefully he didnt disturb the bakers dozen of women asleep in his bedroom.) Lesson 2: Women Fort Worth has some gorgeous, grass-fed and cattle-bred, voluptuous vixens. But there are some big heifers there too! I think the big ones eat like Shugart and I did on an hourly basis. Lesson 3: Music You havent lived until youve had a five-year-old little girl sing you every word of Kasey Chambers beer drinkin' song "Were All Gonna Die Someday." Thank you, Ashlyn, that's something I'll never forget!

In addition to the aforementioned lessons, I also learned something important about the articles I write and who they're geared toward. Testosterone has an incredibly diverse group of readers ranging from obese newbies to elite athletes and fitness models. But I think it's pretty safe to say that the majority of readers fall somewhere smack dab in the middle. What Im referri ng to are those who have minimal to moderate training experience, fulltime jobs, family or school responsibilities, and anything but an endless supply of cash to dump on every supplement on the market. However, I sometimes lose track of who the majority of Testosterone readers really are and what information would help them out the most. The Dallas seminar allowed me to chat with T-mag readers and get a sense of who they are and what they need. I'm going to give you some of the principles I feel are most often overlooked or misunderstood when creating an effective exercise program. Think of this information as a cheat sheet to my basic training principles. After the eight principles, I'll provide you with a basic training program using all of them!

Waterbury's Basic Essentials 1) Frequency Each body part should be trained twice per week. Ive learned that anyone, regardless of recovery ability or experience, can benefit from upping the training frequency of each body part to twice every week. See my previously published articles here at T-mag for full programs or check out the sample program at the end of this very article!

2) Weekly Workout Plan

The breakdowns I feel are most effective for devising weekly training cycles are: Plan #1 Day 1: Train Day 2: Train Day 3: Off Day 4: Train Day 5: Train Day 6: Off Day 7: Off

Plan #2 Day 1: Train Day 2: Off Day 3: Train Day 4: Off Day 5: Train Day 6: Train Day 7: Off

Plan #3 Day 1: Train Day 2: Train Day 3: Off Day 4: Train Day 5: Off Day 6: Train Day 7: Off

Plan #4

Day 1: Off Day 2: Train Day 3: Off Day 4: Train Day 5: Off Day 6: Train Day 7: Train Any of the above breakdowns will work great. Many people favor the first example since it allows for weekends off. Others try to train as much as possible on the weekends due to standard work-week time restraints. For them, plan #4 is ideal. Regardless of the breakdown, I always alternate upper and lower body workouts throughout the week.

3) Exercise Selection Compound, multi-joint exercises such as squats, deadlifts, presses, and rows should make up at least 75% of your total exercises. If not, you're wasting your time on isolation exercises that arent demanding enough on your neuromuscular system to have any real physique-enhancing benefits. I must stress that 75% is an absolute minimum. Spending 100% of your time on compound exercises is an excellent idea!

4) Set/Rep Volume As a general rule of thumb for inexperienced trainees, I like to use a set/rep volume in the 24 to 30 range. For example, 8 x 3 or 3 x 8 per body part works well for the lower end of the range. A set/rep scheme of 10 x 3 or 3 x 10 works well for the upper end range. I recommend you start with a volume of around 24 and increase from there if you feel your recovery allows for it. (Just multiply the sets by the reps to get your number.)

5) Training Intensity The only time you should flirt with failure is on the last rep of the last set for each body part. If you reach failure before that time, decrease the load by 5% for the next workout (using the same method) the following week. If you dont feel like you're approaching failure on the last rep of the last set, increase the load 5% for the next workout the following week.

6) Method Cycling The simplest way to alternate training methods (sets and reps) without driving yourself into a frenzy is to simply switch the set/rep scheme for the subsequent workout for the same upper or lower body training day. In other words, if you performed 8 x 3 on day one for upper body, switch to 3 x 8 for the next upper body workout of the week.

7) Antagonist Exercise Selection

Antagonist refers to opposing exercises. In other words, an upper back exercise is an antagonist to a chest exercise, and a biceps exercise is an antagonist to a triceps exercise. When creating a program, I like to use exact antagonist exercises. What in the hell does that mean, you ask? For example, if you choose the barbell bench press as your chest exercise for your upper body workout, I recommend a rowing movement with the exact same hand spacing/position as the bench press. So if your index fingers are 24 inches apart when bench pressing, the rowing movement should consist of a palms-down hand position with exactly 24 inches between your index fingers. Another example would be with pull-ups (or pulldowns depending on your strength levels). If you execute a pull-up with your palms semi-supinated (facing each other) and 18 inch spacing hand position, then your antagonist exercise would consist of standing dumbbell shoulder presses with a semi-supinated hand position that's 18 inches apart throughout the movement. Got it? This is actually much simpler than it sounds if you think about it. Just remember to press and pull with the exact same hand positions. Note: For various reasons that I don't want to discuss in this article, this doesnt apply to lower body training. (Its not that it cant be done, its just more complicated). But what about leg extensions and leg curls? Arent those perfectly opposing antagonist exercises? Yep, but that particular pairing sucks. In regard to lower body training, just remember to alternate quad-dominant exercises like squats with hipdominant exercises such as deadlifts.

8) Lifting Tempo Dont worry about it. As long as you use proper form and control th e lifting and lowering phase, you'll be fine. Focus your mental energy on moving the load instead of counting the rep tempo.

Sample Program: Big and Basic So, based on those guidelines, here's a sample beginner routine for a trainee who prefers to have the weekends off. Obviously, this same program can be used for the other recommended weekly breakdowns too.

Day 1 (Upper Body) Exercise: Barbell Bench Press Sets: 8 Reps: 3 Rest: 60 seconds between sets Load: 5RM (repetition maximum) Tips: 24" hand spacing

Exercise: Seated or Chest-Supported Rows Sets: 8

Reps: 3 Rest: 60s Load: 5RM Tips: 24" hand spacing

Exercise: Pull-ups or Pulldowns Sets: 8 Reps: 3 Rest: 60s Load: 5RM Tips: Semi-supinated 18" grip

Exercise: Standing Dumbbell Shoulder Press Sets: 8 Reps: 3 Rest: 60s Load: 5RM Tips: Semi-supinated 18" grip

Day 2 (Lower Body) Exercise: Barbell Squats Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Rest: 90s Load: 10RM Tips: High bar position, feet shoulder-width apart

Exercise: Leg Raises Sets: 3

Reps: 8 Rest: 60s Load: 10RM Tips: Perform hanging or on a leg raise apparatus.

Exercise: Dumbbell Deadlifts Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Rest: 90s Load: 10RM Tips: Hold dumbbells at your sides; squat down until dumbbells are just below knee level.

Exercise: Decline Bench Sit-Ups Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Rest: 60s Load: 10RM Tips: Hold a dumbbell or plate on your chest to increase the load.

Exercise: Standing Calf Raises Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Rest: 60s Load: 10RM

Day 3 (Off) Perform 15-20 minutes of moderate intensity cardio.

Day 4 (Upper Body) Exercise: 45 Incline Dumbbell Bench Press

Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Rest: 90s Load: 10RM Tips: Perform in a traditional fashion with the palms facing away from you as if holding a barbell.

Exercise: 45 Dumbbell Rows Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Rest: 90s Load: 10RM Tips: Lay face down on the bench with the same hand position as the incline presses.

Exercise: Standing Barbell Curls Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Rest: 60s Load: 10RM Tips: Perform with pinky fingers 18" apart.

Exercise: Standing Reverse Grip Triceps Pressdown Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Rest: 60s Load: 10RM Tips: Perform with the same 18" hand position as the barbell curls.

Day 5 (Lower Body) Exercise: Hack Squats

Sets: 8 Reps: 3 Rest: 60s Load: 5RM Tips: Hold a barbell or two dumbbells behind your legs. Squat down until your knuckles touch the top of your calves.

Exercise: Lying Leg Curls Sets: 8 Reps: 3 Rest: 60s Load: 5RM Tips: Don't let the feet rotate outward.

Exercise: Lying Leg Raises Sets: 8 Reps: 3 Rest: 60s Load: 5RM Tips: Hold a dumbbell between your feet to increase the load.

Exercise: Seated Calf Raises Sets: 8 Reps: 3 Rest: 30s Load: 5RM Days 6 and 7 (Off) Perform 15-20 minutes of moderate intensity cardio if desired.

Conclusion That's everything you need to know to design an effective workout program for anyone who's been lost in a sea of misinformation. Now get to it!

Triple Total Training by Chad Waterbury

The More the Better Im about to get my fourth higher education degree. With two Bachelor of Science degrees and one Master of Science degree virtually under my belt, Im on to the next frontier into "Doctorhood." Recently, Ive spent some time reminiscing about what Ive learned from my collegiate training. Believe it or not, my first year of higher education was spent at a high-falutin private liberal arts college with a bunch of brainiacs. Some of my classmates kinda drove me hippie-crazy, but I sure learned a helluva lot from my English professor. Mainly, he taught me the importance of writing a powerful opening sentence. Obviously, I havent taken that advice completely to heart since Im several sentences into my article and I havent yet made a profound statement. Okay, here goes. You ready? Here it is: The more often you can train a muscle group, the better. How's that for a powerful sentence? Initially, this seems like a pretty straight-forward and logical statement. Unfortunately, most people haven't used all of their tools to accomplish such a goal. Im here to tell you that the only way you'll be able to frequently stimulate each muscle group is to constantly rotate different strength training methods.

Periodization Wars Some well-meaning trainers have tried to accomplish this goal through undulating periodization, while others, like myself, prefer another type of periodization that's sometimes referred to as conjugate periodization. East-Bloc European strength trainers have been using conjugate periodization for decades, and the transcendent Louie Simmons has made it a well-known phenomenon in American strength training circles. Each type of periodization focuses on manipulating set/rep/load parameters throughout a microcycle, but only conjugate periodization focuses on developing multiple strength qualities as opposed to merely adjusting sets and reps. In other words, the speed of execution is of utmost importance when training different types of strength in conjugate periodization. Linear periodization also became popular in many American strength-training circles. This type of periodization is based on initially starting a resistance training cycle with a high volume and low intensity

with a subsequent drop in volume and rise in intensity over the course of months. And you know what? It sucks! Why? Because linear periodization will burn you out quicker than any other planned form of training, especially in the latter stages! When you constantly hit the same motor units with the same parameters, even for a few weeks, the nervous system will very likely become bored (i.e. burnt out and overtrained). Coaches and trainers have tried to overcome this shortcoming by switching up exercises and movement planes, but the conclusion remains the same: linear periodization sucks and there are much better ways to plan your training. Many of my programs are designed around training each muscle group twice a week. Other parameters Ive recommended are geared towards training each muscle group up to six times each week. In an effort to cater to most T-Nation readers, Ive designed a program that sits smack dab in the middle. Youll get the benefit of training each strength quality multiple times each week, without worrying about the overtraining factor that numerous newbies encounter with my extremely high-volume parameters. In other words, if youre stuck in a rut and youve been training for more than a year, this program will induce appreciable strength and size gains!

Enter Triple Total Training Due to excessive demands for studying and research, the University of Arizona has effectively kept me out of the gym for several months. Therefore, I was faced with a situation I havent encountered in quite some time: I was out of shape (relatively speaking) and I needed a program that would increase my strength and size, like, now! If youve ever scratched your head and thought, "Gee, I wonder what Waterbury is doing in the gym these days?" well, youre about to find out!

The TTT Program As is the case with most of my programs, the TTT Program is based on conjugate periodization. You'll constantly rotate strength-training methods and the speed of execution. Check it out: Day 1 Method: Maximal Strength Sets: 6 Reps: 3

Load: 5RM (reps max) Rest: 60 seconds between antagonist supersets Tempo: 201 Exercises: A1: Front Squats

A2: Chin-ups: Use a supinated (palms facing you) shoulder-width grip.

B1: Decline Barbell or Dumbbell Bench Press (15-30 degree angle): Use a shoulder-width grip. B2: Back Extensions C1: Dumbbell Side Bends: From a standing position, place a dumbbell in your left hand. Bend to your left side until your hand is at knee level. Return to the starting position (standing straight up). This works your

right oblique musculature. Without resting, switch sides and perform the same with a dumbbell in your right hand and bending to the right side. Place your opposite hand behind your head if you desire.

C2: Standing Calf Raises: Stand on a block or stairs with your feet shoulder-width and your toes pointed straight forward. Go for a full range of motion.

Day 2 Perform 15-20 minutes of medium intensity aerobics (e.g. jogging, uphill walking), or perform my GPP ASAP program.

Day 3 Method: Endurance Strength Sets: 2 Reps: 24 Load: 26RM Rest: 90 seconds between antagonist supersets Tempo: 101 Exercises A1: Standing Dumbbell Alternating Shoulder Press: While standing with your palms facing forward, press up with your right hand, then lower. Next, press up with your left hand and lower. Repeat sequence for 24 reps on each side.

A2: Reverse Lunges: From a standing position with a dumbbell in each hand, step back and lunge down until your back knee touches the floor. You must keep your torso as vertical as possible! B1: Standing Triceps Pressdowns or Dips: For pressdowns, use a grip with your palms down and your index fingers 18" apart. For dips, use a narrow, shoulder-width grip and keep your torso as vertical as possible.

B2: Standing Upright Rows: Use dumbbells or an EZ-curl bar for this exercise if a barbell hurts your wrists. Assume a pronated (palms down) grip with your index fingers 12" apart. Focus on lifting your elbows as high as possible; minimize wrist movement. C1: Standing Barbell Curls: Use a grip with the pinky fingers 20" apart. C2: Dumbbell Side Raises

Day 4 Same as Day 2

Day 5 Method: Explosive Strength Sets: 8 Reps: 3 Load: 18RM* Rest: 60 seconds between sets Tempo: As fast as humanly possible! *This is not a misprint. An 18RM equates to approximately 60% or your 1RM an ideal load for explosive training with these parameters. Exercises

Box Squats: Use a bench or a box that allows your hip joint to drop 1-2" below parallel. Clasp your hands behind your head and jump up as high and fast as you can. You must completely rest your hips on the box/bench between reps. Even though this is a bodyweight-only exercise, its much tougher than it sounds especially if you jump up as hard as possible.

Push-ups: Use your bodyweight and assume a shoulder-width hand spacing. Press yourself up off the floor as hard and fast as possible. Drop back to the floor quickly to minimize the eccentric load. Seated Cable Rows or Bent-over Barbell Rows: If youre performing cable rows, you must let the weightstack rest between reps to build starting strength. If youre performing bent -over barbell rows, you must let the barbell rest on a bench or box when your arms are fully extended to build starting strength. Use a supinated (palms up) grip with your pinky fingers 24" apart.

Sit-ups: Assume a traditional sit-up position with your knees bent and your feet hooked under something immovable. Sit up as hard and fast as possible and be sure to rest your torso on the floor when returning to the starting position (to build starting strength of course)! Hold a dumbbell against your upper chest if your strength levels allow for it.

Day 6

Same as Day 2

Day 7 Off completely!

Progression Days 1 & 3: Increase the load 2.5% every workout. Day 5: Decrease rest periods by 5 seconds each week while keeping the initial load constant. Perform this routine for six weeks.

Conclusion This is the exact same routine Ive used for the last six weeks to get myself back into shape. It worked f or me and I know itll work for you, so give it a trial run!

Strength-Focused Mesocycle by Chad Waterbury

Over the past year or so, Ive been swamped with requests from readers who want a program that focuses solely on maximal-strength development. What Im referring to is a maximal -strength focused program that doesnt induce bodyweight from hypetrophy. Due to the diverse population of readers that T-Nation caters to, I guess Im not too surprised. Many boxers, grapplers, wrestlers, powerlifters and other athletes cant afford to gain excess bodyweight, whether its from adding pure functional muscle or not. Therefore, Ive designed an ass-kickin routine that will make you super strong, without unwanted bodyweight increases. This program is for all of you who want your strength performances to make the jaw of onlookers drop to the floor quicker than a politicians pants in a cheap hotel! But if you ARE seeking hypetrophy, dont discount this article. As Ive stated numerous times, trainees need to focus on maximal strength increases if theyre looking for hypertrophy adaptations. Even though this program wont induce immediate hypertrophy increases, it serves a very important function. Once you finish this program and start a hypertrophy-based program, your new levels of maximal strength will allow you to train with significantly higher loads, thus leading to increased hypertrophy. Its time for a few quick lessons, so get out your "Hello Kitty" notepad and Pamela Anderson shaped writing utensil!

Lesson 1: Volume Volume can be defined as the amount of set, reps and load performed in any given microcycle, mesocycle or macrocycle. Some trainers favor intensity over volume, but Im on the other side of the fence. With enough volume, I can induce incredible strength gains without pushing the intensity envelope over the edge of Grand Teton. Intensity, on the other hand, can be a sumbitch when tangoing with the negative effects of overtraining.

Lesson 2: Intensity As I just mentioned, intensity can be tricky. Its kinda like having a girlfriend whos a smokin lassie that memorized the Kama Sutra from cover-to-cover. Unfortunately, this same dame would immediately put any top psychiatrist out of business. In other words, it can be beneficial at certain "needy" times, but itll drain your brain if its around too long.

Lesson 3: Frequency Frequency, frequency, frequency. Ive been on my soap -box preaching about increased training frequency since day one. My graduate studies in neuroscience taught me the importance of high training frequencies for maximal strength development. If you want to gain strength at alarming rates, then you better start training more often. But without the proper parameters, youll burn out in no time. Therefore, you must follow this mesocycles parameters as strictly as if you were working on the original Manhattan Project.

Lesson 4: Exercise Selection Ive never been a huge proponent of isolation exercises, but they definitely have their place in certain programs. This aint one of the m, city-boy! The SFM consists of exercises that include hundreds of muscles for every single movement; no direct calf, biceps or abdominal training whatsoever (although theyll get a massive wake-up call). This is probably the most important aspect of the program, so dont send me a list of exercises youd "rather perform." If you dont have the proper equipment, use some ingenuity and make it happen!

Lesson 5: Proper Cardiovascular Exercise Selection Most of my hypertrophy-based programs consist of very generic cardiovascular conditioning guidelines. Thats because it really doesnt matter what type of cardio training you prefer on some programs. Once again, this aint one of those programs. An integral aspect of my success with maximal strength training programs relates to proper cardiovascular-based exercise selection. Youll only perform two cardio exercises on this program: jump rope and jumping jacks. Why? Because those two exercises require the nervous system to fire muscle groups very quickly. If I recommended a slow jog or walk on this program, your results would suffer since the nervous system would be very confused. If your nervous system could talk, it would ask you, "Do you want me to fire the muscles super fast, or slow and steady?" Obviously, for maximal strength, you must train fast, all the time!

Preface You probably noticed that this program is referred to as a mesocycle, not a "program" or some other type of "training" that can be executed continuously. I specifically chose that title to remind you that this is a short program (four weeks), not a training cycle you perform all year long. Quit what youre doing (if youre not receiving any results) and undergo the SFM immediately!

One more thing before we move on, Im not going to prescribe a tempo for each day. You must lift with a tempo that is as fast as humanly possible for every rep of every set. Dont neglect this important point!

Strength-Focused Mesocycle Day 1: Sets: 3 Reps: 5 Load: 7RM (an amount of weight you could lift for 7 times before failing) Rest: 90s between alternating exercises

A1: Good Mornings Note: Keep your lower back tight and arched. Keep your head up. Use a low bar position on your traps. Use a slightly wider than shoulder-width stance. Rest 90s A2: Dips or Decline Bench Presses Note: Use a shoulder-width grip. If you dont have a decline bench, just prop up the front end (where your feet are), with two 45-lb plates. Rest 90s Repeat A1. Continue for three total cycles. B1: Chin-ups

Note: Use a wider than shoulder width grip with your palms facing up.

Rest 90s B2: Front Squats Note: Use a slightly wider than shoulder width stance. Keep your torso as vertical as possible. Rest 90s Repeat B1. Continue for three total cycles. Jumping Rope Duration: 5 minutes Note: Many trainees cant jump rope for five continuous minutes. No problem. Just set a stopwatch and perform alternating jump/rest sessions for five minutes.

Day 2: Rest

Day 3: Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Load: 10RM Rest: 120s between alternating exercises A1: Standing Barbell Military Presses

Note: Use a wide grip with your pinky fingers around the rings. Rest 120s A2: Box Squats

Note: Keep your toes pointing forward, push your knees out as you sit back. If you dont have a box, use a bench that allows you to sit at a level where your hip and knee joints are even. Rest 120s Repeat A1. Continue for three total cycles. B1: Glute-Ham Raises or any Leg Curl variation

Rest 120s B2: Seated or Chest-supported Rows

Note: Use a pronated (palms down), shoulder-width grip. Rest 120s Repeat B1. Continue for three total cycles. Jumping Jacks Duration: 5 minutes Note: Follow the same guidelines as mentioned for jumping rope on Day 1.

Day 4: Rest Day 5: Sets: 3 Reps: 3 Load: 5RM Rest: 90s between alternating exercises A1: Power cleans Note: Use a shoulder width grip and dont let your lower back round forward keep it tight and arched. Rest 90s A2: Pull-ups Note: Use a semi-supinated (palms facing each other) grip. Rest 90s Repeat A1. Continue for three total cycles. B1: Rack Lockouts or Floor Presses Note: Set the pins in a power rack so you can only lower the bar 6-8 inches. Maintain a slightly less than shoulder-width grip. Keep your elbows tucked to your sides and lower the bar as if youre goi ng to touch

your upper abdominal region. If you dont have a power rack, perform the same technique while lying on the floor (this requires a second person to hand you the bar...and take it away after youre done). Rest 90s B2: Step-Ups or Lunges Note: Step up onto a box or bench at a height that requires your working leg to start at a 60 angle. Alternate legs with each rep for a total of six (three on each side)...or you can perform lunges with the same alternating technique. With lunges, you must keep your torso as vertical as possible. Either exercise will require a barbell on your traps or a dumbbell in each hand for added resistance. Rest 90s Repeat B1. Continue for three total cycles. Jumping Rope Duration: 5 minutes

Days 6 and 7: Rest

Day 8: Repeat Cycle with the following progression.

Weeks 2, 3 and 4: Increase the load 2.5% for all lifts with each subsequent week for three consecutive weeks. I advise you to err on the lighter side with your initial load selection and dont increase the load more than 2.5%, even if you feel like you can. More often than not, trainees who increase the load too quickly end up burning out by the third week.

Conclusion Dont be fooled by the extremely brief duration of these workouts. You must keep your nervous system fresh on this program or you wont reap the benefits. Whether youre training for pure maximal strength increases, or you need a jump start to accelerate your future hypertrophy goals, this is an outstanding mesocycle. Its brutal, but its also one of th e best damn maximal strength mesocycles in my arsenal. Rest up, because youre gonna need it for this cycle!

Total-Body Training The 3-day-per-week, full-body workout plan by Chad Waterbury

Harbinger Hypertrophy Lets cut the bullshit and get to the brass tacks. For decades, men built slabs of muscle with simple, three day-per-week training programs. They trained their whole bodies in one brief workout session and they grew big and strong. Scoff all you want, but tens of thousands of trainees cant be wr ong. Well, it's high time we look into the past, learn from what we see, and build a new future. We must learn from the successes and just as importantly, the failures. Yes, although this classic hypertrophy plan worked well, it wasn't perfect. And today we know what we can do to fix the drawbacks. Let's break it down right now. The majority of non-steroid injecting trainees whove built respectable physiques have done so with the following, undisputable parameters: 1) They train every major muscle group three times each week. 2) They keep intensity levels sufficient without overindulgence. 3) They choose a training volume that can be maintained along with the stressors of life. 4) They execute compound, multi-joint exercises that have been shown to produce the most hypertrophy. 5) They keep each training session as brief as possible. 6) They allow at least 48 hours of recovery between workouts. Ive worked with trainees at every imaginable level of the fitness spectrum, and the aforementioned elements are ubiquitous in their most successful hypertrophy programs. So I often wonder why they ever strayed. Why stop doing what's working? Usually their reasoning is based along the following statement that I recently heard from a veteran of the iron game: "Hell," he said, "I dont know why I ever stopped doing it. I just assumed there was a better way." Well buddy, Im here to tell ya, there aint no better way! Ive written numerous training programs for T -Nation, and they all work. But, oftentimes, trainees dont seek what I seek. They want to look good nekkid, period. Not only that, but they dont give a rats ass

what strength qualities theyre training. All they care about is the most efficient and effective route to the physique theyve only seen in pictures. Its time for a change. I want each and every one of you to see that physique in the mirror, not just in magazines. But as I said, we must also learn from the failures of past programs. Burnout and training injuries were often a "given" in old-school, total-body programs. The reason for this indiscretion is simple: poor planning. Therefore, this article is based on the successes of the past along with my own successes as a trainer. Ive learned to properly plan my clients' programs so results are steadfast and continuous. Every single time I hit the gym, I perform a total-body workout with most of the following guidelines. I doubt that will ever change. In fact, thats how I added almost 100 pounds of muscle to my frame. I dont know why I ever wandered, so Im here to keep you from running astray.

The Obstacles The single biggest mistake trainees have made in their quest for the ultimate physique is in periodization parameters. Simply speaking, they keep executing the same damn parameters in hopes of the body not "catching on" to what theyre doing. Big mistake, my friends. Our bodies are designed for one sole purpose: adaptation. If you forget that, then you can forget about ever creating the physique of a Greek God. Bill Starr came damn close to pulling off one of the best training programs with his classic text, The Strongest Shall Survive. His initial parameters were excellent. Unfortunately, his program wasnt willing to adapt, so progress on his "Big Three" program came to a screeching halt for most tra inees. You cant endlessly perform the same exercises with the same parameters and keep experiencing results!

A New Generation is Born Now the dichotomy arises. We must incorporate the variables that withstood the test of time along with a new plan for continued progress. Its time to take the past, present and future and blend it into a new hybrid plan! The How Exercises per Session: 6 Sets per Muscle Group: 2-4 Reps per Exercise: 5-18

Rest between sets for the same muscle group: 60-120 seconds, and 120-240 seconds (antagonist training) The Why The first thing you probably notice with the above parameters is variance. This is the key to your consistent hypertrophy success. A lack of variance is the single biggest reason why trainees arent still talking about the continuous progress they received from some of the most popular hypertrophy programs. Without consistent change, results will be anything but consistent. Exercise Selection Every session is going to consist of six exercises. Why? Because my empirical evidence has shown that natural trainees can consistently maintain six exercises per session without burning out. Its imperative to base your exercise selection around compound, multi -joint exercises. Four out of the six exercises for each session must be compound exercises. Six sissy-assed, single-joint isolation exercises aint gonna do the trick. But, you can perform a few of my recommended single -joint exercises for two of the six exercises. Heres the list you must choose from: Compound Exercises Chest: Incline, flat, decline barbell or dumbbell bench presses. Wide-grip dips. Back: Upright or horizontal rows. Pull-ups or pulldowns with pronated, semi-supinated, and supinated grips. Deltoids: Standing or seated military presses with a barbell or dumbbells utilizing pronated, semisupinated or supinated hand positions. Quads: High-bar full barbell squats, hack squats or front squats. Lower Back/Hips: Traditional and/or sumo-style deadlifts or Good Mornings. Power cleans or snatches. Single-Joint Exercises Biceps: Barbell curls, hammer curls or preacher curls. Triceps: Lying barbell or dumbbell triceps extensions, and pronated or supinated grip pressdowns. Deltoids: Front, side or rear dumbbell raises. Hamstrings: Glute-ham raises or leg curls. Calves: Standing, seated or donkey calf raises.

Stick to the above list of exercises for optimal results.

The Total-Body Plan First and foremost, proper periodization planning is imperative. Without sufficient set/rep/load/rest parameters, even the best exercises wont produce results. Therefore, Ive devised the following periodization plan for unsurpassable hypertrophy increases: Week 1 Workout 1 Sets: 3 Reps: 5 Rest: 60 seconds between sets Load: Choose a weight that forces you to near-failure for the last rep of the last set.* *This is the recommended load for all workouts. Workout 2 Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Rest: 90 seconds between sets Workout 3 Sets: 2 Reps: 15 Rest: 120 seconds between sets Week 2 Perform with the same parameters as Week 1, but execute antagonist training for all six exercises (more on this later). Week 3

Workout 1 Sets: 4 Reps: 5 Rest: 60 seconds between sets Workout 2 Sets: 4 Reps: 8 Rest: 90 seconds between sets Workout 3 Sets: 3 Reps: 15 Rest: 120 seconds between sets Week 4 Perform the same parameters as Week 3, but execute antagonist training for all six exercises. Week 5 Workout 1 Sets: 2 Reps: 18 Rest: 120 seconds between sets Workout 2 Sets: 2 Reps: 8

Rest: 60 seconds between sets Workout 3 Sets: 2 Reps: 12 Rest: 90 seconds between sets Week 6 Perform the same parameters as Week 5, but execute antagonist training for all six exercises. Week 7 Workout 1 Sets: 3 Reps: 18 Rest: 120 seconds between sets Workout 2 Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Rest: 60 seconds between sets Workout 3 Sets: 3 Reps: 12 Rest: 90 seconds between sets Week 8 Perform the same parameters as Week 7, but execute antagonist training for all six exercises.

Explanation 1) Weeks 1,3,5 and 7 are to be performed with straight sets. In other words, perform one set of the first exercise, rest, perform your second set, and continue for all the recommended sets before moving on to the next exercise. 2) Weeks 2,4,6 and 8 are to be performed as antagonist training. Every session consists of six exercises so antagonist training is simple; all you have to do is perform three antagonist exercise groupings during each workout. For instance, perform quads/hams, chest/back, and biceps/triceps exercise pairings for the recommended sets and reps. Example: Do one set for chest, then one for back, then another for chest, etc. Then move on to the next pairing, like quads/hams or biceps/triceps. 3) Choose four exercises under the list of compound exercises. Choose two exercises under the singlejoint exercise list. Don't leave out any major muscle groups. 4) Constantly rotate exercises from each category. In other words, dont always start your session with a chest/back pairing. You must keep rotating the body parts and exercises you begin each session with. 5) Dont perform the same exercise for more than t wo weeks in a row. For example, if you performed a flat barbell bench press as your chest exercise for Weeks 1 and 2, you must switch to either incline, decline or dumbbell bench presses for another two weeks before switching again. 6) Increase the load 1.25 to 2.5% with each subsequent workout. 7) Perform all three workouts within a seven-day timeframe with 48-72 hours rest between workouts. 8) Be creative! Im giving you endless options. Just be sure to pick four compound exercises and two single-joint exercises with each session. You can rotate exercises as much as you desire. All you have to do is follow the prescribed parameters. The future of training is here. Take charge and use these guidelines for lifelong hypertrophy gains!

The Waterbury Method Get Big. Get Strong. Get On With It! by Chad Waterbury

The most effective training programs are usually designed with information from the past, combined with unorthodox thinking into the future. Sure, there have been some relatively effective programs in the past, but results arent anywhere near where they could be. Theres really no excuse for the lack of outstanding training programs if you consider how many training sessions have been performed over the last fifty years. The real problem lies in a tra iners abilityor inabilityto research scientific information, along with a lack of unconventional thinking. The recent steroid busts of professional athletes are even more disheartening when you consider their resources. These athletes make millions of dollars each year; youd think they'd hire outstanding trainers and coaches to get them into top shape. Nope! Instead, many pursue the easiest route: injecting illegal performance-enhancing substances, which in turn, often wreaks havoc on their image, health and trustworthiness. Instead of being part of the problem, I want to be part of the solution by laying out my latest system in hopes of alleviating some of these salacious acts. By using the program outlined below, you'll be able to achieve jaw-dropping results, no syringes required.

Total Body Training Recently, total-body training programs have become en vogue. This is nothing new. In fact, the second article I wrote for T-Nation, back in 2001, was a total-body training system. But, much like T-Nation, my training principles are continuously evolving. My latest system is based on one method I find most useful for hypertrophy, along with a few other twists and turns to promote a synergistic hypertrophy effect. Hold on tight, my friends!

Mighty 10 x 3 If I could only use one set/rep parameter for the rest of my training days, I'd choose the 10 x 3 method. Ive yet to utilize another set of training parameters that lead to as much hypertrophy. Half of my ABBH program is based on this method and I must say that more than half of the results are from this method alone. The benefits of 10 x 3 include:

1. Sufficient Load Selection: The 10 x 3 method allows you to use a larger load than its mirror image, 3 x 10. With 10 x 3, a load equating to approximately 80% of your 1RM (one rep max) leads to greater improvements of intramuscular coordination along with increased recruitment of high-threshold motor units. 2. Fast Muscle Actions: Since the sets are extremely short (<6 seconds) and muscular failure isnt achieved, maximum speed can be maintained throughout the sets. This is important because greater speeds of muscle actions lead to greater recruitment of Type IIB and Type IIA muscle fibers that fall within the fast-fatigable motor units and fast fatigue-resistant motor units, respectively. 3. Manageable Fatigue: Oftentimes, trainees feel invigorated after finishing all ten sets of three reps with 80% of their 1RM. This is a very important aspect that leads to high levels of motivation. Ten sets of squats to screaming failure sucks motivation levels out of your body quicker than a porn star hopped up on Columbian crops. But 10 x 3 training allows you to leave the gym with minimal fatigue and maximum motivation.

Powerful 4 x 6 For maximum hypertrophy, I prefer a set/rep volume of 24 to 50. With total-body training, I stay on the lower end of that spectrum. While 10 x 3 is magical, I cant speak highly enough of 5 x 5 training with 85% of your 1RM, but the total number of sets in a single session must be minimized to avoid excess fatigue. Therefore, I slightly alter the 5 x 5 set/rep scheme to 4 x 6. Ive found that 4 x 6 training will lead to as much hypertrophy, but with one less set per muscle grouping. The lack of this extra set makes an appreciable difference once total-body programs are undertaken. The benefits of 4 x 6 training are very similar to 10 x 3, if proper loads are utilized. Once again, I prefer to use 80% of 1RM for best results. This load selection allows for proper motor unit recruitment, fast muscle actions, minimal fatigue and adequate volume.

Putting It All Together Now weve made it to the Waterbury Method training parameters. You might be thinking, "Since you extol the benefits of 10 x 3 training, why dont you just use those parameters for all exercises?" Simple: ten sets for every muscle group in a single session is too damn much! Such a technique would equate to 180 sets utilizing 80% of 1RM in a single week. Not good, unless your e at the super-elite level. Even then, its pretty questionable.

Therefore, my newest system consists of 10 x 3 training for a single muscle grouping within each session. The rest of the workout is composed of 4 x 6 training in order to keep the volume levels manageable while still inducing strength and hypertrophy. The sneaky part of this program is the continuous switching of 10 x 3 training with different body parts. For instance, one workout will utilize a lower-body movement with 10 x 3; another workout consists of upper-body pressing; the last workout consists of upper-body pulling. This breakdown works wonders for offsetting fatigue and nervous system boredom.

The Waterbury Method: Let's Do It! Week 1 Loading: 80% of 1RM or a load you can lift for 6 perfect reps Weeks 1-4 Tempo: 10X (one second eccentric or lowering; no pause; concentric or lifting action as fast as possible) DAY 1 Barbell Back Squats Sets: 10 Reps: 3 Rest: 70 seconds A1 Dips A2 Bent-Over Barbell or Dumbbell Rows Sets: 4 Reps: 6 Rest: 60 seconds (between exercise pairings) Note: A1/A2 consists of a superset pairing B1 Skull Crushers B2 Standing Barbell Curls Sets: 4 Reps: 6 Rest: 60 seconds Hanging Leg Raises Sets: 4

Reps: 6 Rest: 60 seconds between sets DAY 2 15-20 minutes of medium intensity jogging or GPP work DAY 3 Barbell or Dumbbell Bench Press Sets: 10 Reps: 3 Rest: 60 seconds between sets A1 Partial Dumbbell Deadlift (Romanian Deadlift) A2 Standing Barbell Military Press Sets: 4 Reps: 6 Rest: 60 seconds (between pairings) B1 Standing Calf Raises B2 Upright Rows Sets: 4 Reps: 6 Rest: 60 seconds (between pairings) Triceps Pressdowns (or French Presses) Sets: 4 Reps: 6 Rest: 60 seconds (between sets) DAY 4 Same as Day 2 DAY 5 Chin-ups Sets: 10 Reps: 3 Rest: 70 seconds (between sets)

Note: Utilize a supinated (palms up), shoulder-width hand grip A1 Decline Barbell or Dumbbell Bench Press A2 Standing Hammer Curls Sets: 4 Reps: 6 Rest: 60 seconds (between pairings) B1 Seated Calf Raises B2 Glute/Ham Raises or Leg Curls Sets: 4 Reps: 6 Rest: 60 seconds (between pairings) Lunges or Step-Ups Sets: 4 Reps: 6 Rest: 60 seconds (between sets) Note: No rest between legs DAY 6 Same as Day 2 DAY 7 Off

Loading Once youve finished the first week of the program, the loading on all sets must be increased. Heres how it all breaks down: Week 2: 82.5% of 1RM for all lifts Week 3: 85% of 1RM for all lifts Week 4: 87.5% of 1RM for all lifts

Supplementation I highly recommend the use of Power Drive during all weeks of the Waterbury Method program. Consume this powerful pre-workout drink in carbonated water and consider adding 200mg of caffeine if you really need to be super-charged. During weeks 3 and 4, I recommend taking Power Drive after each workout to help with CNS recovery. Biotest Surge is a must on this program for proper recovery. Take half a serving during your workout. The other half should be consumed immediately after with 5 grams powdered creatine. Wait 45 minutes and consume another full serving. This makes for a powerful recovery and hypertrophy accelerator! Now that Grow! contains large amounts of micellar casein, youd be hard-pressed to find a better protein powder, at any price! Using Grow! is the easiest way to ingest the mandatory 1-2 grams of protein per pound of lean body mass. If your muscles dont get enough high -quality protein, no program is going to build any appreciable levels of muscle mass! Dont neglect these extremely beneficial training and nutritional aids. Not only are these supplements top quality, but the prices are unbeatable!

Conclusion This is one helluva system for all of you who are looking to switch gears for accelerated strength and hypertrophy. The Waterbury Method is the best of both worlds: strength and hypertrophy. Be sure to lift as fast as possible and keep fatigue under control with the recommended loading and supplementation. If you follow these simple steps, youll be ecstatic with the results!

SOB Training The Science of Building Muscle in Bad-Asses by Chad Waterbury

T-Nation is a bad-ass site. Its bad-ass because most of us associated with it are some real sons-of-bitches. But is being an SOB a good thing? Men and women have different interpretations of that term. Most of you guys, including yours truly, have had a foreign object hurled at you from across a parking lot by a soon-to-be ex-girlfriend due to the indiscretions that we exhibit when another "Lil Miss Hotpants" is walking by. After getting impaled between the eyes by the airborne object, we usually hear, "You SOB!" This is an example of the term SOB being used in a rather negative manner. On the other hand, when an aspiring bad-ass sees another dude sporting slabs of muscle, you usually hear something along the lines of, "Thats one big SOB!" I hope you get that line hurled at you in the near future. The program that follows is your ticket to SOB status!

The Necessity of High and Low Rep Parameters I could go on a rampage about the one-sided and close-minded approach that many trainers have towards a specific "ideal" rep range for hypertrophy (size gains). Ill make this short and simple: there's no best rep range for hypertrophy! Almost any rep range (and subsequent loading parameters) has the potential to induce hypertrophy. If you seek alarming rates of muscular development, there are two primary mechanisms that you should be concerned with: 1. Increased rate of protein synthesis 2. Decreased rate of protein degradation Lets begin with the first mechanism: increased rate of protein synthesis. Heavy -load training that mandates low-rep protocols is one of the most effective methods to increase the rate of protein synthesis. This is due to the recruitment of fast fatigue-resistant (FFR) and fast fatigable (FF) motor units that possess muscle fiber types with the greatest growth potential. These motor units possess the fast muscle fibers known as Type IIA and Type IIB fibers, respectively.

Note: Theres an ongoing battle about the labeling of muscle fibers. The real bastard seems to be the Type IIB fibers. Some scientists refer to these fibers by many different names other than Type IIB, but for the sake of simplicity, Ill refer to the largest fibers within FF motor units as Type IIB. Type IIB fibers are the most difficult to recruit, but they tend to hypertrophy at the quickest rate. This isn't to say that Type IIA fibers dont have growth potentialthey certainly do! Numerous studies have elucidated the fact that the greatest levels of hypertrophy occurs within both Type II fast muscle fiber types (1, 2, 3, 4). But, you must do everything in your power to recruit the FF motor units. One of the best methods to recruit these valuable motor units is through fast concentric contractions (lifting quickly.) An even better explanation is to say that the "effort" to move a load as fast as possible is whats imperative. Heavy-load training with >80% of your 1RM forces the actual concentric muscle action to be slow, but when the effort is hard and fast youll recruit those FFR and FF motor units as quickly as possible. The FF motor units can only produce optimal levels of force for less than ten seconds, so you must keep the set duration very short. Parameters to Increase Fast Muscle Protein Synthesis: Set/Rep Volume: 24-50 Sets per muscle group: 8-24 Reps per muscle group: 1-5 Load: >80% of 1RM Rest between sets: 60-300 seconds Theres a variance in terminology to describe the type of hypertrophy thats achieved by the aforementioned parameters. Its been referred to as sarcomereor myofibrillar hypertrophy. Whatever you call it, it basically refers to the actual growth of the muscle fiber. Those who throw around the term "functional muscle" are referring to this type of growth (whether they understand it or not is a whole different article).

Slow Muscle Maintenance and Sarcoplasmic Hypertrophy Now its time to delve into the second mechanism: decreased rate of protein degradation. Depending on your reference source, strength-endurance resistance training parameters are usually defined as a rep

range between 20-100 reps per set. (Obviously, this is a huge range but Im attempting to keep things as simple as possible.) Throughout these sets, slow fibers (slow oxidative motor units) and Type IIA fibers (FFR motor units) are primarily taxed. Slow fibers might seem like the red-headed stepchild of muscle growth, but they also have some hypertrophy potential, albeit minimal. So why train them at all? Because, their recruitment causes a decrease in the rate at which theyre broken down. If you keep these fibers from degradation, youll maintain larger levels of muscle mass. According to the laws of motor unit recruitment, its impossible to not recruit the slow fibers when training at any load, whether the load is high or low. Even so, there are some real benefits to targeting endurance-type fibers that are taxed with low-load, high rep training. But, this advice shouldn't be taken to the extreme. Of all the systems in the body, the muscular system has the most plasticity. In other words, it has the greatest adaptive ability of any physiological mechanism. Why? Because your muscles allow you to run away from predators (i.e. ex-girlfriends) and seek food. These are two of the most important mechanisms for survival. Therefore, our muscular system has become very adaptable over the millenniums. The point of this is to explain that extreme endurance training can also wreak havoc on your muscle gains. If you start training like Lance Armstrong, the neuro-muscular system will adapt to allow greater endurance capabilities and youll lose your precious Type IIB fibe rs. If you question the validity of this statement, I can assure you that its been confirmed in a 1975 study by Andersen and Henriksson. Therefore, a middle ground must be met. You must train the slow muscles infrequently with relatively low volumes compared to marathon running and Tour de France training. Through much trial-and-error, Ive found an effective middle ground with my 100 Reps to Bigger Muscles and Total Body Trainingprograms. Here are the parameters that'll help keep your slow muscles from degradation, without hindering maximal growth of the fast muscles. Parameters to Decrease Slow Muscle Protein Degradation: Set/Rep Volume: 50-100 Sets per muscle group: 1-5 Reps per muscle group: 20-100 Load: 20-50% of 1RM

Rest between sets: 120s-hours Not only will these parameters minimize protein degradation, but theyll also induce sarcoplasmic hypertrophy. This type of hypertrophy is achieved from increased levels of glycogen, water and various minerals within the muscles. Oftentimes, low-load, high volume training is referred to as "pump training" since the parameters often lead to incredible muscle pumps during and immediately after the session. Im not convinced that a "pump" will lead to greater levels of hypertrophy, but it cant hurt. For decades, bodybuilders have extolled the virtues of this phenomenon, so there might be something to it or maybe not. But, one of the coolest benefits of high-rep training is the sarcoplasmic hypertrophy that it induces. Therefore, in addition to minimizing slow muscle degradation, youll also swell up those guns!

No Best Parameters! If youre knocking yourself in the head with a tire -iron right now, I wouldnt be surprised. The bottom line is this: even though I sometimes appear to be talking out of both sides of my mouth, its for good reason. There are no best muscle-building parameters. Both single-rep and 100-rep sets will aid in the muscle-building process, along with virtually every set of parameters in between. So keep varying your parameters! Whenever youre in doubt of this reasoning, think of the calf development of a soccer player or the upper back development of a lumberjack. The yre constantly exposing their muscles to both ends of the spectrum, and they possess some of the best calf and upper back development, respectively. Therefore, almost every, non-extreme type of training has its place within the realm of hypertrophy!

The SOB Program Now let's put all this info together into a great hypertrophy program. As is the case with some of my other programs, Im going to allow you to choose the exercises. Once you get a list together of your favorite movements, apply the following parameters. Just be sure to provide balance in your program by choosing one or two exercises from each of the following categories: Upper Body Pushing (Horizontal Plane) Upper Body Pulling (Horizontal Plane) Upper Body Pushing (Vertical Plane) Upper Body Pulling (Vertical Plane)

Lower Body (Hip Dominant) Lower Body (Quad Dominant) Assistance Exercises (Abs, Calves, Biceps, Triceps, External Rotators, etc.) Before I give you the SOB program, I must be clear in regard to the training parameters. Youre free to choose one or two exercises from each category, but you mustn't alter the parameters. For instance, on Day 1 when I prescribe 10 x 3, you can either perform one upper body pushing exercise in the horizontal plane for all ten sets, or you can perform five sets of two different upper body pushing exercises in the horizontal plane. Dont perform 10 x 3 for two different upper body pushing exercises in the horizontal plane! Perform all reps as fast as possible while maintaining control of the load. In addition, you should perform all movements in the prescribed order. DAY 1 Sets: 10 Reps: 3 Load: 6RM (reps max) Rest: 75s (seconds) between sets Movements: Upper Body Pressing (Horizontal Plane), Upper Body Pulling (Vertical Plane), Lower Body (Hip Dominant), Assistance Exercises DAY 2 Off, perform GPP (General Physical Preparedness) training or light cardio activity for 15-20 minutes DAY 3 Sets: 2 Reps: 30 Load: 34RM Rest: 180s between sets Movements: Lower Body (Quad Dominant), Upper Body Pulling (Horizontal Plane), Upper Body Pressing (Vertical Plane), Assistance Exercises (must be for different muscle groups than Day 1) DAY 4 Off, perform GPP training or light cardio activity for 15-20 minutes DAY 5

Sets: 2 Reps: 30 Load: 34RM Rest: 180s between sets Movements: Upper Body Pulling (Vertical Plane), Lower Body (Hip Dominant), Upper Body Pressing (Horizontal Plane), Assistance Exercises (must be for different muscle groups than Day 3) DAY 6 Off, perform GPP training or light cardio for 15-20 minutes DAY 7 Sets: 10 Reps: 3 Load: 6RM Rest: 75s Movements: Lower Body (Quad Dominant), Upper Body Pressing (Vertical Plane), Upper Body Pulling (Horizontal Plane), Assistance Exercises (must be for different muscle groups than Day 5) DAY 8 Off, perform GPP training or light cardio for 15-20 minutes if desired. DAY 9 Sets: 6 Reps: 5 Load: 8RM Rest: 75s between sets Movements: Upper Body Pressing (Horizontal Plane), Upper Body Pulling (Vertical Plane), Lower Body (Hip Dominant), Assistance Exercises DAY 10 Off, perform GPP training or light cardio for 15-20 minutes DAY 11 Sets: 4 Reps: 15 Load: 18RM Rest: 120s between sets

Movements: Lower Body (Quad Dominant), Upper Body Pulling (Horizontal Plane), Upper Body Pressing (Vertical Plane), Assistance Exercises (must be for different muscle groups than Day 9) DAY 12 Off, perform GPP training or light cardio activity for 15-20 minutes DAY 13 Sets: 4 Reps: 15 Load: 18RM Rest: 120s between sets Movements: Upper Body Pulling (Vertical Plane), Lower Body (Hip Dominant), Upper Body Pressing (Horizontal Plane), Assistance Exercises (must be for different muscle groups than Day 11) DAY 14 Off, perform GPP training or light cardio activity for 15-20 minutes DAY 15 Sets: 6 Reps: 5 Load: 8RM Rest: 75s Movements: Lower Body (Quad Dominant), Upper Body Pressing (Vertical Plane), Assistance Exercises (must be for different muscle groups than Day 13) DAY 16 Off, perform GPP training or light cardio for 15-20 minutes, if desired. DAY 17 Sets: 12 Reps: 2 Load: 5RM Rest: 75s between sets Movements: Upper Body Pressing (Horizontal Plane), Upper Body Pulling (Vertical Plane), Lower Body (Hip Dominant), Assistance Exercises (must be for different muscle groups than Day 15) DAY 18

Off, perform GPP training or light cardio for 15-20 minutes. DAY 19 Sets: 1 Reps: 50 Load: 50RM Movements: Lower Body (Quad Dominant), Upper Body Pulling (Horizontal Plane), Upper Body Pressing (Vertical Plane), Assistance Exercises (must be for different muscle groups than Day 17) DAY 20 Off, perform GPP training or light cardio activity for 15-20 minutes DAY 21 Sets: 1 Reps: 50 Load: 50RM Movements: Upper Body Pulling (Vertical Plane), Lower Body (Hip Dominant), Upper Body Pressing (Horizontal Plane), Assistance Exercises (must be for different muscle groups than Day 19) DAY 22 Off, perform GPP training or light cardio activity for 15-20 minutes DAY 23 Sets: 12 Reps: 2 Load: 5RM Rest: 75s Movements: Lower Body (Quad Dominant), Upper Body Pressing (Vertical Plane), Upper Body Pulling (Horizontal Plane), Assistance Exercises (must be for different muscle groups than Day 21) DAYS 24 Off, perform GPP training or light cardio for 15-20 minutes, if desired. DAY 25 Sets: 10 Reps: 3 Load: 6RM

Rest: 60s between sets Movements: Upper Body Pressing (Horizontal Plane), Upper Body Pulling (Vertical Plane), Lower Body (Hip Dominant), Assistance Exercises (must be for different muscle groups than Day 23) DAY 26 Off, perform GPP training or light cardio for 15-20 minutes. DAY 27 Sets: 3 Reps: 20 Load: 24RM Rest: 120s between sets Movements: Lower Body (Quad Dominant), Upper Body Pulling (Horizontal Plane), Upper Body Pressing (Vertical Plane), Assistance Exercises (must be for different muscle groups than Day 25) DAY 28 Off, perform GPP training or light cardio activity for 15-20 minutes DAY 29 Sets: 3 Reps: 20 Load: 24RM Rest: 120s between sets Movements: Upper Body Pulling (Vertical Plane), Lower Body (Hip Dominant), Upper Body Pressing (Horizontal Plane), Assistance Exercises (must be for different muscle groups than Day 27) DAY 30 Off, perform GPP training or light cardio activity for 15-20 minutes DAY 31 Sets: 10 Reps: 3 Load: 6RM Rest: 60s Movements: Lower Body (Quad Dominant), Upper Body Pressing (Vertical Plane), Upper Body Pulling (Horizontal Plane), Assistance Exercises (must be for different muscle groups than Day 29) DAY 32

Off, perform GPP training or light cardio for 15-20 minutes, if desired.

Recommended Supplements Surge: Consume half a serving during training and half a serving immediately after with 5 grams micronized creatine. If you have the luxury, take another full serving 45 minutes later. Spike: This advanced stimulant has given me some of the best workouts of my life. If you seek greater levels of concentration and strength during your workouts, get Spiked! I highly recommend it! Grow!: Youre going to need a lot of high-quality protein on this program, so I suggest you get your hands on this micellar-charged protein bomb. It makes meeting the "1-2 grams per pound of lean body mass" protein recommendations much easier to achieve. Now, repeat the program for another 32 days if you want to become a really big SOB!

Hybrid Hypertrophy by Chad Waterbury

If Im good at anything, its the ability to take relatively well -known parameters and arrange them in a more effective manner. Im ecstatic to inform you that Ive been experimenting with a new method that induces a metamorphosis of size and strength. As the transcendent Bob Dylan once sang, "Times, they are a changin." As such, be prepared for what follows!

Torching the Burnout Method One method thats always resurfacing in various forms in the field of hypertrophy training is the "burnout method." Excluding the awful name, a few trainees have found it somewhat useful in packing on a little muscle. It basically consists of performing an exercise with pseudo-maximal strength parameters, followed by a sub-maximal set taken to failure. Its reared its head in many forms, but one of the better known methods is this: Exercise: Squats (for example) Sets: 5 Reps: 10, 8, 6, 4, 2 Load: 10 Reps Max, 8RM, 6RM, 4RM, 2RM Followed by: Exercise: Squats Sets: 1 Reps: 18-20 (taken to failure) Load: 18-20RM To summarize, the first five sets consist of increasing loads and decreasing reps in an effort to recruit the high-threshold fast-fatigable (FF) motor units. Once maximal strength has been "primed," one last set with a sub-maximal (~60% of 1RM) is taken to failure. Not a bad idea, but it definitely has its shortcomings: Shortcoming #1 Failure training. Bad, bad and more bad. Sending your kids to play with Michael Jackson bad. Training to failure is so outdated that I cant even bear to discuss it. Failure training induces excessive CNS fatigue. Successful training (of any sort) revolves around fatigue management. Therefore, any method that induces excessive fatigue should be avoided.

Bottom Line: The burnout method revolves around taking the last set to absolute failure and this should be avoided in order to keep the nervous system as fresh as possible. Shortcoming #2 Excessive Parameters. If you try to accomplish everything in one session, youre going to be in trouble, and overtraining will be right around the corner. If you focus on increasing one or two strength qualities during a single session, youll be much better off. Bottom Line: Excessive sets + Excessive rep ranges + Muscular failure = Shitty results. Shortcoming #3 Inferior Maximal Strength Gains. I dont care if you have no desire to ever step foot inside a powerlifting or Olympic lifting circle, you must be cognizant of maximal strength training if you want to become massive and massively strong. Bottom Line: The burnout method leads to sub par strength gains which, in turn, wreak havoc on your hypertrophy efforts since the recruitment of the massive FF motor units are only emphasized in the middle portion of the workout. Shortcomings #1 and #2 are relatively easy to resolve. Regarding failure training, the only modification that needs to be made is to stop one rep short of failure. Simple enough. Shortcoming #2 (excessive parameters) can also be fixed. You could merely replace the inverse set/rep relationship with more constant parameters such as 3 x 3 or 5 x 5. But the biggest shortcoming of all (inferior maximal strength gains) hasnt been addressed until now. One of the most interesting observations Ive made within the realms of iron apparatuses is that the nervous system best "remembers" the last set. Its akin to listening to a three -hour seminar: you usually only remember the end points. The same appears to be true with weight training. Therefore, the traditional burnout method leaves your nervous system remembering a light load that primarily taxed the fast fatigue-resistant (FFR) motor units. This is bad news if its done week in and week out because youll lose your maximal strength levels in no time. But wait, you dont care about maximal strength, you only care about muscle mass increases, right? Please refer back to my "bottom line" statement in the aforementioned point #3 before I track you down and choke you out!

The Solution Ive found a better way. If you incorporate the following method into your next hypertrophy phase, youll be bigger and stronger than ever. This method is based on three important principles:

1) Avoiding absolute muscular failure. 2) Maintaining relatively constant parameters that dont confuse the hell out of your nervous system. 3) Achieving greater maximal strength increases. Heres how it works. To begin, youll perform the first compound exercise for 3-4 sets until you reach a 3RM for that lift. Remember, a 3RM represents a load you could lift for three perfect reps without losing form. If you must compromise form to reach the third rep, decrease the load 2.5% and try again. Second, youll pick a different exercise for the same muscle group and perform 12-14 reps while stopping one rep short of muscular failure. Lastly, youll perform one set of 2-3 reps with the same compound exercise that you start with. Oftentimes, you wont be able to perform all three reps with the same load you started with, but you should be able to perform at least two reps. This will effectively re-recruit the FF motor units so you wont leave the CNS remembering a light load. Keep in mind, this isn't a "pure" maximal strength program; this is a hypertrophy-based program that also causes maximal strength gains.

The Program I titled this program "Hybrid Hypertrophy" since it combines a few different methods into the same session. Up to this point, most of my programs revolved around training a single strength quality within each session. Since this program combines a few methods into each workout, youll be able to perform it for up to four weeks before switching programs. (Some of my clients have performed this program for as long as six weeks without losing the effect, but stick to four weeks as a starting point.) Note: Please do everything in your power to adhere to the following exercises. I tried to choose exercises that are virtually ubiquitous to every gym, whether it be commercial or home. Each day consists of specific exercises that Ive found most useful. DAY 1 Exercise: Close-Grip Bench Presses Sets: 3 Reps: 3 Loads: 6RM, 5RM, 3RM Rest: 60 seconds between sets

Rest 60 seconds and perform: Exercise: Barbell Skull Crushers Sets: 1 Reps: 12-14 Load: 14RM Rest 180 seconds and perform: Exercise: Close-Grip Bench Presses Sets: 1 Reps: 2-3 Load: 3RM Exercise: Deadlifts Sets: 3 Reps: 3 Loads: 6RM, 5RM, 3RM Rest: 75 seconds between sets Note: Shoulder-width stance, non-mixed grip. Keep your torso as vertical as possible. Rest 75 seconds and perform: Exercise: Front Squats Sets: 1 Reps: 12-14 Load: 14RM Rest 180 seconds and perform: Exercise: Deadlifts Sets: 1 Reps: 2-3 Load: 3RM Note: Shoulder-width stance, non-mixed grip. Keep your torso as vertical as possible. Exercise: Chin-ups

Sets: 3 Reps: 3 Loads: 6RM, 5RM, 3RM Rest: 75 seconds between sets Note: Use a palms-up, wider than shoulder width grip. Rest 75 seconds and perform: Exercise: Decline Bench Dumbbell Pullovers or Straight Arm Cable Pulldowns Sets: 1 Reps: 12-14 Load: 14RM

The straight-arm cable pulldown. Rest 180 seconds and perform: Exercise: Chin-ups Sets: 1 Reps: 2-3 Load: 3RM Note: Use a palms-up, wider than shoulder width grip.

DAY 2 OFF. Perform 15-20 minutes of jogging, uphill walking (for calf development), or GPP work.

DAY 3 Exercise: Power Cleans Sets: 3 Reps: 3

Loads: 6RM, 5RM, 3RM Rest: 75 seconds between sets Rest 75 seconds and perform: Exercise: Barbell Back Squats Sets: 1 Reps: 12-14 Load: 14RM Rest 240 seconds and perform: Exercise: Power Cleans Sets: 1 Reps: 2-3 Load: 3RM

The Power Clean Exercise: Decline Sit-ups or Flat Sit-ups w/Feet Hooked Sets: 3 Reps: 3 Loads: 6RM, 5RM, 3RM Rest: 60 seconds between sets Note: Hold a dumbbell at your chest for added resistance. Rest 60 seconds and perform: Exercise: Cable Crunches or Swiss Ball Crunches Sets: 1 Reps: 12-14 Load: 14RM

The Cable Crunch Rest 180 seconds and perform: Exercise: Decline Sit-ups or Flat Sit-ups w/Feet Hooked Sets: 1 Reps: 2-3 Load: 3RM Note: Hold a dumbbell for added resistance. Exercise: 45 Degree Incline Dumbbell or Barbell Bench Press Sets: 3 Reps: 3 Loads: 6RM, 5RM, 3RM Rest: 60 seconds between sets Rest 60 seconds and perform: Exercise: Standing Dumbbell Military Press Sets: 1 Reps: 12-14 Load: 14RM Note: Keep your palms facing each other throughout movement.

The Standing Dumbbell Military Press

Rest 180 seconds and perform: Exercise: 45 degree Incline Dumbbell or Barbell Bench Press Sets: 1 Reps: 2-3 Load: 3RM

DAY 4 OFF. Perform 15-20 minutes of jogging, uphill walking or GPP work

DAY 5 Exercise: Dips Sets: 3 Reps: 3 Loads: 6RM, 5RM, 3RM Rest: 60 seconds between sets Rest 60 seconds and perform: Exercise: French Presses Sets: 1 Reps: 12-14 Load: 14RM Note: Perform with an EZ-Curl bar, if available. If not, use a barbell or use dumbbells and keep your palms facing each other. Rest 180 seconds and perform: Exercise: Dips Sets: 1 Reps: 2-3 Load: 3RM Exercise: Seated Cable Rows or Bent-over Barbell Rows Sets: 3 Reps: 3 Loads: 6RM, 5RM, 3RM Rest: 60 seconds between sets Note: Utilize a shoulder-width, supinated (palms up) grip for either exercise. Rest 60 seconds and perform: Exercise: Dumbbell Rear Delt Side Raises Sets: 1 Reps: 12-14

Load: 14RM Note: Lay facedown on a 30-45 degree incline bench and perform dumbbell side raises. Or, perform them from a standing, bent-over position, if desired. Rest 180 seconds and perform: Exercise: Seated Cable Rows or Bent-over Barbell Rows Sets: 1 Reps: 2-3 Load: 3RM Note: Utilize a shoulder-width, supinated grip for either exercise. Exercise: Rack Pulls or Partial Deadlift with Dumbbells or Barbell Sets: 3 Reps: 3 Loads: 6RM, 5RM, 3RM Rest: 75 seconds between sets

The Partial Deadlift (Rack Pull)

Rest 75 seconds and perform: Exercise: Box Squats Sets: 1 Reps: 12-14 Load: 14RM Note: Utilize a box or bench that allows your hip joint to drop just below knee level. Rest 240s seconds and perform:

Exercise: Rack Pulls or Partial Deadlift with Dumbbells or Barbell Sets: 1 Reps: 2-3 Load: 3RM

DAY 6 OFF. Perform 15-20 minutes of jogging, uphill walking or GPP work.

DAY 7 Off completely.

Supplement Plan If you want to achieve mind-blowing results on this program, you should supplement your workouts as follows: 1. 45-60 minutes before the workout: 1-2 capsules of Spike. 2. During Workout: half serving Surge. 3. Immediately after workout: 1 full serving of Surge with 5 grams of micronized creatine. (Take note that the second serving of Surge should be a full serving, not a half, on this program.) 4. Wait 30-45 minutes and consume another full serving of Surge. 5. Wait 30-45 minutes and consume a meal that consists of a 2:1 ratio of carbs/protein (minimal fat). 6. Two hours later consume one serving of Power Drive mixed in carbonated water. 7. Before bed: ZMA.

The above plan is ideal for maximum hypertrophy on this program. In addition, Alpha Male and Methoxy-7 will further your gains. None of the above are absolutely required, but I must state that every one of my clients who achieved incredible results on this program followed the above supplement plan exactly as stated. Keep that in mind.

Pushing the Limits

This program pushes the limits of recovery, but the results are outstanding if you incorporate this method the next time youre long on sleep and short on stress. You'll be blown away.

Perfect 10 Training High Frequency Training for Hypertrophy by Chad Waterbury

More is Better As a former bouncer, I've encountered many esoteric individuals in my life. I guess anyone could say the same, but those who choose to spend the better part of their lives as bouncers are a bit abnormal. Moreover, I can honestly say that the bouncers I've worked with have given me some of the best (and worst) advice I've ever heard. One of the more memorable axioms I've been told was from a bouncer in Chicago. He said, "CW, fighting ain't cool. Just remember, two wrongs don't make a right. Therefore, you should always hit 'em three times." That advice came in rather handy on an occasion or two, but honestly, I'm glad those days are long gone. Since I now spend my days writing articles, I've found it useful to devise my own maxims. A welldesigned program is useful, but general rules and philosophies will help readers more than any conglomeration of sets and reps. So what's my maxim? It's this: If you seek hypertrophy (size gains) at the fastest possible rate, the more often you can train a muscle group the better. I've made that statement on a few occasions, but I doubt most readers have made a diligent effort to apply and understand the veracity of it. Indeed, a properly periodized, high-frequency training plan will cause the fastest level of hypertrophy bar none.

What High Frequency Training Means The term "high frequency" is very vague. For some, this would probably mean that they should bump up their frequency of training each body part to three times per week. For others, high frequency training would mean nothing short of training each body part twice each day for six days a week. Well, both parties are correct because everything in life (and training) is relative. If you've only been training each body part once every 5-7 days, then training every body part for three sessions each week would create an appreciable stimulus for hypertrophy. On the other hand, those who currently train each body part for 3-4 sessions per week are advised to focus on multiple daily training sessions.

What's the point of this talk? The points are given in an effort to help you understand how complex this issue is to tackle since I must cater to thousands of readers (i.e. thousands of fitness levels). Indeed, the Perfect 10 program has been nothing short of an extraordinary undertaking. Before we get to the parameters, let me explain the genesis of this program.

The Cirque du Soleil Factor As a physiologist, 2001 turned out to be a profoundly influential year in my life. Specifically, that was the year that I first attended the Cirque du Soleil show called Mystere. The show opened up my mind to accept training methodologies that I'd never previously considered. And it subsequently led to many of my most effective training regimes regimes that I've never written about, until now. I heard about the show through various clients of mine, but I never would've guessed what I was about to see. For those of you who aren't familiar with Cirque shows, I can tell you that they're some of the most invigorating, inspirational, and mind-blowing displays of physical prowess that you'll ever encounter. Not only do these performers possess remarkable levels of strength and flexibility, but they also have some of the most extraordinarily-developed bodies that you'll ever see.

As I sat through the show, I thought about their training regimens. I thought, how in the hell did these guys build such proportionally huge lats, delts, and upper arms? Was it Mentzer's Ayn Rand infused ranting that led them to this physique? Well, since their schedule consisted of up to twelve shows each week, I found it easy to dissolve that line of thinking.

Was it the incredible levels of training intensity with a primary focus on the eccentric muscle actions? After all, numerous skeletal muscle research studies have demonstrated the notion that the eccentric phase of training (the negative or lowering part of an exercise) leads to the most damage, thus the most perceivedmuscle growth. Nope, couldn't be since such training methods would leave them in a state of stiffness, soreness, and poor athletic performance (during the recovery phase). Instead, they must have found a "sweet spot" within their training parameters that allowed them to induce a stimulus sufficient for muscle growth without burning out their skeletal and neural systems. Based on what virtually every strength coach, fitness writer, and muscle magazine recommended, such a training regime just didn't seem possible. Hmmm, it seemed I'd stumbled upon a puzzle that had many missing pieces.

My Serendipitous Experience That night I went back to my hotel room and decided to belly-up to the bar for a pre-bedtime toddy (usually I stick with ZMA, but this was Vegas, after all). The bartender opened up a conversation with, "What'd you do tonight?" I told him about the Cirque show and he replied, "Those two dudes who do incredible acrobatic tricks with each other? They're brothers and they're neighbors of mine." He went on to explain that they spend the better part of their day practicing the Cirque routine. He further expounded on the issue by saying, "Yeah, I often look out my window and see them in their backyard for hours perfecting the routine." Man, I thought, these guys possess two of the most incredible physiques I've ever seen and they're training with an unbelievable level of frequency a level of frequency that I've never read about from any "expert."

I probably got about three hours of sleep that night. I just couldn't stop wondering how these performers built up their capacity to withstand such training frequency. Then I started to question myself and thought that it must be genetics, drugs, or a combination of the two. But that line of thinking quickly shifted when I thought about my own experiences. I thought about the soccer players I'd encountered and the level of calf development they displayed. Then I thought about the mechanics I'd befriended over the years in my hometown all with massive, ripped

forearms. I also reminisced about the times I achieved the fastest, most profound levels of hypertrophy in a given muscle group. In college, I spent the summers working for an apartment complex and one of my primary duties consisted of pulling mattresses up and down stairwells. I'd do this for hours throughout the entire week. I gained an inch of upper arm girth after three weeks of this "mattress labor." I'd never gained a full inch of arm girth on any training routine in such a short period of time. Viola! The answer to the puzzle must be hidden within high-frequency training parameters that didn't annihilate my muscles on a daily basis. I couldn't wait to get back to Tucson and start my own experimentation.

6 Caveats Well, that was four years ago, and I must say that it's taken this long to find an answer. Why so long? Here's why: 1) Hypertrophy Training Dogma First and foremost, the pertinacity of the exercise community is rather large. Therefore, some of my "non-paying" clientele didn't follow my high-frequency training parameters precisely as I prescribed. As such, I've been forced to scrap my data on a number of occasions. 2) Training Tenacity This goes along with point #1. You must be persistent with high-frequency training plans in order to reap the benefits. A week or two of high-frequency training won't give you the results you want. The idea of high-frequency training is to build up your work capacity and specific muscle fitness to levels that the system has yet to encounter. 3) Lack of Recovery Aids Stretching and ice massage are mandatory during the initial periods of highfrequency training. Those who didn't follow my recovery modalities often burned-out in a matter of weeks. On the other hand, those who didperform stretching and ice massage as prescribed excelled and built muscle faster than ever before. 4) Lack of Personal Ingenuity The Perfect 10 training plan mandates numerous exercise variations. Since it's not possible for me to personally train thousands of readers, a little ingenuity is necessary. You must understand that even the slightest variations in hand position, foot placement, one-arm exercises, and switching from dumbbells to barbells for any given exercise is sufficient to be termed a "different exercise." 5) Overzealous Trainees For some, too much just isn't enough. As such, a few people I worked with took the ball and ran way past the end zone on the first carry. In other words, they tried to do too much too fast, and they burned out.

6) Limited Training Schedules Obviously, high-frequency training is only ideal for those who can follow such a schedule. If you're one of the ones who can make time to train for 2-3 sessions per week, this info isn't for you. Now, this isn't to say that we should all quit our jobs and follow Kevin Spacey's character in American Beauty, but high-frequency training does mandate some lifestyle changes. That's a big pill to swallow for many weekend warriors. Now, with those caveats out of the way, I'm here to give you a program that'll induce hypertrophy at a rate that's faster than you've ever experienced. But, please be diligent with my entire prescription. If you skimp on a single element, you'll suffer trust me.

Perfect 10 Training Guidelines 1. Choose 1-2 body parts that you want to improve the most. When you embark on a high-frequency training plan, overtraining is always knocking at your door. Therefore, it's necessary to not bombard your entire body with such parameters. Most people only have a few lagging body parts. If you're one of those who needs to improve everything, this program isn't for you, so I suggest you perform my Anti-Bodybuilding Hypertrophy, Total Body Training, Waterbury Method, and the Art of Waterbury programs in order to build up your musculature. This program is for those who need to bring up underdeveloped body parts at the fastest possible rate. 2. Perform a different exercise for each session throughout the week. There are countless different exercises for every body part, so this shouldn't be too tough to follow. Let's take chest exercises for example. If you're attempting to improve your chest development, there are hundreds of exercise variations when you consider: all of the angles between a 30 degree decline and a 45 degree incline, variations in arm/hand position (pronated and semi-supinated), and variations in dumbbells, barbells, and cables. Make a diligent effort to list every possible exercise that your available equipment allows. Both compound and single-joint exercises are fair game in this program. The more variations and options you have, the greater your success will be. 3. Don't worry about the tempo of your muscle actions and don't accentuate the negative. Considering how many sets and sessions you'll be performing each week, you should be ecstatic about this rule. Just lift as fast as possible while maintaining perfect form and controlling the negative portion. Any eccentric portion longer than two seconds is excessive during this program. We aren't attempting to annihilate the muscles; we're trying to provide a sufficient stimulus for growth without causing undo strain. 4. Perform stretches and ice massage after the prescribed sessions.

There exist a myriad of stretching methods but this program only mandates static stretching. Each prescribed session should consist of four static stretches for the trained muscle group. Hold the muscle in the stretched position for 30 seconds, then rest for 30 seconds before repeating three more times. It's that simple. Ice massage should be performed with a Cryocup or a paper cup filled with ice. Use one Cryocup or one paper cup on each side of the body. Once the cup is empty, perform the same technique on the other side of the body. Use long, deep strokes and apply baby oil or olive oil to your skin to avoid ice burn. Perform ice massage within two hours of your training session.

The Cryocup. You can also make your own by freezing a Styrofoam cup and peeling away part of it. 5. Learn to train through soreness. Soreness is your new friend so learn to love it. This program causes continuous soreness for the first few weeks of training (at least). Slowly but surely, over time you'll find that you become less sore. That's a good thing! But you must understand that you need to force your muscles to train more often. All of that infrequent training dogma will be run over by your newfound high-frequency karma. 6. Train the rest of your body as usual. You don't need to alter the rest of your current program. In other words, feel free to train your other muscles groups as usual. If you incorporate Perfect 10 training for chest and triceps, just omit those exercises from your current program. Think of Perfect 10 as an addition to the program you're following (actually, a supercharger would be more accurate).

The Program

Here's what you've been waiting for! You're probably wondering why this program is titled Perfect 10 Training. That's because (surprise!) I'm going to outline a program that leads to training your lagging body parts for ten sessions each week! Think of this program as the antithesis to the mythical Colorado Experiment. Pull out that Zippo and get ready to light the stick of muscular dynamite! WEEK 1 Addendum for Weeks 1-4: Perform for one or two body parts. Choose one exercise for each body part, each day. Stretch after each session. DAY 1 Sets: 6 Reps: 3 Rest: 70s (70 seconds) Load: 6RM (6 reps max) DAY 2: Off DAY 3 Sets: 3 Reps: 10 Rest: 120s Load: 12RM DAY 4: Off DAY 5 Sets: 5 Reps: 5 Rest: 90s Load: 8RM DAYS 6 & 7: Off

WEEK 2 DAY 1 Sets: 7 Reps: 3

Rest: 70s Load: 6RM DAY 2 Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Rest: 180s Load: 28RM (~50% of 1RM) DAY 3 Sets: 4 Reps: 10 Rest: 120s Load: 12RM DAY 4: Off DAY 5 Sets: 6 Reps: 5 Rest: 90s Load: 8RM DAYS 6 & 7: Off WEEK 3 DAY 1 Sets: 8 Reps: 3 Rest: 70s Load: 6RM DAY 2 Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Rest: 180s Load: 28RM (~50% of 1RM) DAY 3 Sets: 5

Reps: 10 Rest: 120s Load: 12RM DAY 4: Off DAY 5 Sets: 7 Reps: 5 Rest: 90s Load: 8RM DAY 6 Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Rest: 180s Load: 28RM (~50% of 1RM) DAY 7: Off

WEEK 4 DAY 1 Sets: 3 Reps: 3 Rest: 70s Load: 5RM DAY 2: Off DAY 3 Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Rest: 120s Load: 12RM DAY 4: Off DAY 5 Sets: 2

Reps: 12 Rest: 90s Load: 15RM DAYS 6 & 7: Off

WEEK 5 Addendum for Weeks 5-8: Perform for one or two body parts. Choose one exercise for each body part, each day. There must be at least 6 hours between AM/PM sessions. Stretch after each session. Perform ice massage when prescribed. DAY 1 AM Sets: 3 Reps: 3 Rest: 70s Load: 5RM PM Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Rest: 120s Load: 12RM Ice Massage DAY 2: Off DAY 3 AM Sets: 2 Reps: 12 Rest: 90s Load: 15RM PM Sets: 3 Reps: 5

Rest: 90s Load: 8RM Ice Massage DAY 4: Off DAY 5 AM Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Rest: 180s Load: 28RM (~50% of 1RM) PM Sets: 1 Reps: 12 Rest: NA Load: 12RM Note: This set should be taken to concentric failure only. Ice Massage DAYS 6 & 7: Off

WEEK 6 DAY 1 AM Sets: 4 Reps: 3 Rest: 70s Load: 5RM PM Sets: 4 Reps: 8 Rest: 120s Load: 12RM Ice Massage

DAY 2 Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Rest: 180s Load: 28RM (~50% of 1RM) DAY 3 AM Sets: 3 Reps: 12 Rest: 90s Load: 15RM PM Sets: 4 Reps: 5 Rest: 90s Load: 8RM Ice Massage DAY 4: Off DAY 5 AM Sets: 4 Reps: 3 Rest: 70s Load: 6RM PM Sets: 1 Reps: 15 Rest: NA Load: 15RM Note: This set should be taken to concentric failure only. Ice Massage

DAY 6 Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Rest: 180s Load: 28RM (~50% of 1RM) DAY 7: Off

WEEK 7 DAY 1 AM Sets: 3 Reps: 8 Rest: 90s Load: 10RM PM Sets: 2 Reps: 20 Rest: 180s Load: 24RM Ice Massage DAY 2 Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Rest: 180s Load: 28RM (~50% of 1RM) DAY 3 AM Sets: 3 Reps: 3 Rest: 70s Load: 5RM

PM Sets: 3 Reps: 12 Rest: 120s Load: 15RM Ice Massage DAY 4 Set: 2 Reps: 25 Rest: 180s Load: 28RM (~50% of 1RM) DAY 5 AM Sets: 3 Reps: 3 Rest: 70s Load: 5RM PM Sets: 1 Reps: 10 Rest: NA Load: 10RM Note: This set should be taken to concentric failure only. Ice Massage DAY 6 Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Rest: 180s Load: 28RM (~50% of 1RM) DAY 7: Off

WEEK 8 Off completely from training the muscle group(s).

WEEK 9 DAY 1 AM Sets: 3 Reps: 5 Rest: 70s Load: 7RM PM Sets: 2 Reps: 15 Rest: 120s Load: 18RM Ice Massage DAY 2 Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Rest: 180s Load: 28RM (~50% of 1RM) DAY 3 AM Sets: 3 Reps: 3 Rest: 70s Load: 5RM PM Sets: 2 Reps: 20 Rest: 180s Load: 22RM Ice Massage DAY 4 Set: 2

Reps: 25 Rest: 180s Load: 28RM (~50% of 1RM) DAY 5 AM Sets: 3 Reps: 10 Rest: 120s Load: 12RM PM Sets: 6 Reps: 3 Rest: 90s Load: 5RM Ice Massage DAY 6 AM Sets: 2 Reps: 25 Rest: 180s Load: 28RM (~50% of 1RM) PM Set: 1 Reps: 50 Load: 50RM (~25% of 1RM) DAY 7: Off

Once you've completed week 9, you're officially a high-frequency protg! If you follow the program precisely as prescribed, and if you avoid failure (except on the designated days) you'll have helped to beget a new revolution of hypertrophy training.

Who knows, maybe your newfound hypertrophy from the Perfect 10 program will help you land your own "perfect 10." I believe that the sublime Marisa Miller is the apotheosis of the other perfect 10!