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USFSPs Impact in the Green Movement

Table of Contents
Executive Summary Introduction The Student Green Energy Fund The Process of Idea Submission SGEF Completed Projects The SGEFs Upcoming Projects The Student Environmental Awareness Society A USFSP Student Making her Green Idea a Reality Earth Week An Alumnis Experience with SEAS USFSP Gardening Club Annotated Bibliography 3 3 4 5 6 8 9 9 10 11 11 14

Team Green Machine


zz Jennifer Nesslar zz Marcus Martinez zz Margaret Manzano zz Jason Hofferle zz Brittany Hanson

Executive Summary
The University of South Florida St. Petersburg allows students to participate in the Green Movement through three organizations on campus. The first organization is the Student Green Energy Fund, known as SGEF. SGEF is funded by one dollar per credit hour from USFSP students. This fund is confirmed by a majority student vote every three years. The fund has a committee composed of students, faculty, and staff. The committee hears students proposals of sustainable initiatives of campus. Some completed projects include a Hybrid truck, outdoor solar energy for students, gym equipment that reduces energy, and Green trash receptacles. Several projects are currently in the planning phase. The Student Environmental Awareness Society, known as SEAS, is a student organization that provides activities for students to get involving in resolving environmental issues. In these activities, students will either work on campus or with a community organization. As their name implies, SEAS also seeks to raise awareness of environmental solutions among USFSP students. Earth Week is one of their biggest awareness events. The Gardening Club raises awareness of the environment in practical ways. They teach students how to grow their own food, and how to do this in a way that minimizes harm to the environment. They seek to teach students to know where the food they are eating comes from. These three organizations allow students to be decision makers with the Green Movement on campus. By involving students and not simply administrative faculty, students are able to act on their own ideas and solutions for sustainability.

Introduction
The University of South Florida St. Petersburg participates in the Green Movement through student-led initiatives. Three of these notable initiatives are the The Student Green Energy Fund (SGEF), The Student Environmental Awareness Society (SEAS), and The Gardening Club. SEAS is an organization that promotes awareness on environmental issues and provides activities for students to get involved in with regards to the environment, both on campus and in the local community. While SEAS is a student organization, SGEF is a fund that supports campus green energy projects; both financially and logistically. Students can submit proposals for projects they believe will help the environment and sustainability on campus. If SGEF approves the proposal it will then help fund the project(s). USFSP was able to create The Student Green Energy Fund during the Spring semester of 2011 by charging students a one dollar fee per credit hour. Several green projects have been completed on campus, as will be discussed below. The third on-campus initiative that participates in the Green Movement is The Gardening Club. It seeks to educate students about the processes of The Gardening Club along with the benefits of gardening and knowing exactly where the food students eat comes from.

The Student Green Energy Fund


The Student Green Energy Fund (SGEF) began by a student led initiative in order to gain the attention of the Board of Directors of The State of Florida University System. The idea was to convince the Board of Directors to set up a green energy fund at the USFSP campus. In the Spring of 2011 the fund was approved. USFSP students pay a one dollar fee per credit hour for the fund. The SGEF committee hears Green proposals and ideas of those affiliated with USFSP, whether student, staff or faculty, and funds worthy projects on campus. The fund is overseen by a board of four students, four faculty and staff members, and one student chair. The SGEF holds a meeting once a month during the Fall and Spring semesters, and once during the Summer semester. Emergency meetings can be held if necessary. When the committee is not hearing proposals and assisting ongoing projects, it is working to spread awareness about the fund to USFSP students.

SGEF: Brief History


Since 2006, students from all over the state of Florida have been persistent to set up green funds at their respective schools. The process of implementing a green fund is a difficult one considering Florida students fees must pass through state legislation. USF and seven other campuses worked together to pass Senate Bill 778 and House Bill 505. The SGEF campaign has been a presence since 2007. In December of 2010 the USF Board of Trustees voted to approve a SGEF for USF. The Tampa campus alone earns an estimated one million dollars in annual revenue. The Florida Board of Governors approved USFSPs Student Green Energy Fund on March 24, 2011. Through a referendum, USFSP students have the opportunity to affirm or deny support to The SGEF every three years. The last referendum that affirmed support for The SGEF was established on April 7, 2011, and it indicated that 72% of students wanted The SGEF instituted at USFSP. The next vote will take place in April 2014 and will be on a ballot along with the USFSP Student Government elections. The majority of the students must vote in favor of SGEF in order to keep it instituted on campus. Other schools did not have USFSPs success. The Board of Governors rejected the Student Green Energy Fund for Florida A&M University (FAMU) and Florida State University (FSU) on June 21, 2013. The proposal was for fifty cents of each credit hour to go towards the fund. The proposed amount is only half of what USFSP receives per credit hour for its Green Energy Fund. The Board of Governors have blamed the current universities that have established a one dollar fee per credit hour as a reason for the rejection of the proposals. The money would have gone towards clean energy and sustainability projects on the university campuses. The student body from both FAMU and FSU attempted to have its Green Fund approved a total of six times. The Board of Governors expressed that it supports clean energy, and that it would rather not pass down the fees to students. The Vice President for the Green Coalition at FAMU, Anthony Ward, expressed his disappointment when the Board of Governors rejected the proposal. He stated, we are getting a lot of support for the Green Fund from students, but there is not enough resources to put clean energy into action. USFSP SGEF Committee Chair Michael Leggett says, Students all over the country are watching us. If USFSP can prove the validity of a SGEF we become a national movement. Our mission is not just to make a green campus at USFSP; our mission is to inspire a nation of universities to follow our lead.

The Process of Idea Submission

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Students or anyone affiliated with USFSP for that matter, can submit a proposal to The SGEF. The proposal process consists of three steps. The interested party starts this process by submitting a proposal or idea via The SGEF portion of The USFSP website (www.usfsp. edu). After the idea is submitted, The SGEF committee reviews it, then sets up a time for the student to present his or her proposal before the committee. The committee then grades the proposal based on its rubric. After the proposal is graded, the committee gathers for a final vote. The committee then presents the final results to the proposing party. Step one is now complete.

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Step two consists of administrative procedures. The party who initiated the idea or proposal must now simplify the proposal, to then be submitted to the Regional Vice Chair, Julie Wong. Afterwards, The SGEF Committee Chair, Michael Leggett, must work with the Regional Vice Chancellor to receive the Chancellors approval. If the Chancellor approves the said proposal, the project can move on to step three. However, if the Chancellor denies the proposal, the interested party must make the appropriate adjustments and resubmit the proposal.

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Step three entails the implementation of the proposal. If the idea is approved by the Chancellor, the proposing party must fill out the appropriate university paperwork. The SGEF assists the proposing party in finding this paperwork and filling it out. After the paperwork is complete, the administration is able to submit a purchasing order. When the order has been processed, construction of the project can commence. The SGEF then continues to assist the proposing party with the marketing, cultivating and upkeep of the project.

Students or anyone affiliated with USFSP for that matter, can submit a proposal to The SGEF.

SGEF Completed Projects


Solar Doks
Recently, The SGEF funded the Solar Doks that were installed around campus. This idea was proposed in the Spring of 2012 by USFSP student, Catie Wonders. The proposal was approved and installed in the Spring of 2013. Each Solar Dok seats eight people and is equipped with an umbrella. The table itself is made out of recycled materials. At the top of the umbrella sit three solar panels that collect 45-watts each. These panels collect power from the sun, which then provide power for students electronics while they enjoy the outdoors. LED lighting is positioned at the top of the umbrella to allow students the ability to work in low-light conditions. In addition to these benches, Wonders also proposed the Solstice, a device that allows students to receive power for their electronics without an attached picnic table. The Solstice operates with a beam and one 30-watt panel. The Solstice is located next to existing seating areas on USFSPs Harborwalk, directly outside of the Science & Technology Building.

Fitness Center
The SGEF has transformed the USFSP Fitness Center into a green energy environment. This proposal was made in the Spring of 2012 by Todd Clark, the Intramural Coordinator at USFSP. The transformation consisted of adding treadmills that do not require the use of electricity. These treadmills are produced by the company Woodway and are known as Net Zero treadmills. These machines are completely powered by the runner and do not connect to an electrical outlet. Clark saw that the treadmills in the gym were using great amounts of electricity, and this use of electricity was strapping the Fitness Center financially. Clark also saw a potential for the bikes and ellipticals in the gym to create energy for the gym. A company SportsArt made these bikes and ellipticals. The equipment, along with a wall system to track the energy output from the machines was installed in the Fall of 2012.

Race for the Watts


During April of this year, The SGEF hosted an event, Race for the Watts, to promote awareness of the new green energy gym equipment. Various campus organizations assembled teams to compete on who could produce the most Watts. The winning team, The Waterfront, produced 507.6 Watts.

Hybrid Truck
The SGEF purchased a hybrid truck for the Waterfront organization to bring their equipment on sponsored trips around the state. This projected was proposed by Zac Oppenheim, the Assistant Director of Campus Recreation. Before the Hybrid, the Waterfront was renting vehicles for $3,000 per year and was spending an additional $3,692 on fuel. The Hybrid Truck helps the waterfront save $1,292 in fuel per year, and the Waterfront saves approximately $4,292 on total vehicle expenses each year. By using the Hybrid, the Waterfront reduces their CO2 emissions by approximately 6395 pounds per year.

The Hybrid Truck helps the waterfront save $1,292 in fuel per year, and the Waterfront saves approximately $4,292 on total vehicle expenses each year.

The SGEFs Upcoming Projects


Parking Garage Lighting
The energy efficient lighting in The Parking Garage Project is a major project SGEF is focusing on. The project was proposed by David ONeill, the Program Assistant for the Bishop Center for Ethical Leadership and Civic Engagement. ONeill noted that the Garage uses 410,865KWh/yr, and most of this comes from lighting. Many of lights in the Garage do not even work, causing a safety risk at night. The current lighting is inefficient, short-lived, and requires disposal through hazardous waste due to mercury levels. This project has been divided into three phases, and only one of these phases has been approved. The first phase of this project will install Energy-efficient LED lights on the first floor of the parking garage. Phase two will install LED lights on all floors of the parking garage. The last phase will entail installing a Solar PV System above the seventh floor parking spaces. This would allow for a Renewable Energy Generator to provide power to the garage along with supplying power to an Electric Vehicle Charging Station. If the entire project is completed, the Parking Garage will save 70% on energy costs and emissions will be reduced up to 48 MT-CO2. The Parking Garage will also become the second Net Zero building in the city of St. Petersburg, making USFSP a leader in sustainability.

The Parking Garage will also become the second Net Zero building in the city of St. Petersburg, making USFSP a leader in sustainability.

Water Bottle Filling Stations


Another project proposed to The SGEF is the Water Bottle Filling Station Project. This project was proposed by Michael Leggett, the Committee Chair of The SGEF and a member of both The SEAS and The Gardening Club. This project will install fountains that filter water. Above the fountain is a digital screen that shows how many plastic bottles are being saved by using the fountain. After the water bottle filling station is ready, The SGEF will be distributing 25-ounce aluminum water bottles for use at all of the stations. These filling stations are estimated to save 1,500 plastic bottles annually. Leggett says the importance of the project is not the numbers, but to change students mindsets on sustainability. He says convenience sells. If students can see that sustainability is convenient, they will choose to do it more in their daily lives.

The Student Environmental Awareness Society


The Student Environmental Awareness Society at USFSP, an organization known as SEAS, exists to promote student awareness of environmental issues. It offers activities and events for students to get involved in environmental action with their communities. The current President of SEAS is Brandi Murphy. One of the activities SEAS hosts is called Rejuvenate The Bay. Students meet to clean up trash along the USFSP waterfront beach. It has also partnered with The USFSP Waterfront Office by taking kayaks into the Harbor for a more thorough cleaning. SEAS collaborates with a nonprofit research and development organization known as Green Energy Living Systems (GELS). GELS is operated by a board of USFSP professors, who want to work with USFSP students on green solutions. SEASs meetings with GELS consist of informing students in SEAS of current research and how to get involved. GELS also seeks to get ideas from GELS students.

A USFSP Student Making Her Green Idea a Reality


A recent project was implemented by a USFSP student named Sophia Constantine, a deputy of The Student Governments Sustainability Initiative. Sophia submitted her idea to The SGEF. The idea was comprised of placing recycled trash bins, which have sections for regular trash, aluminum, and plastic around the campus. She began working on her idea at the beginning of Spring 2013, and submitted her idea five weeks before the spring semester ended. Sophia said of making her idea a reality: it was a long process, but it was worth it. The organization agreed to fund the project and now there are 20 bins placed around the campus. The projects total cost was $26,000. The SGEF paid for 90% of the cost, and The Student Government paid for the remaining 10%. Each bin was made in The United States, using 937 recycled milk jugs. In the first year of using these bins, the amount of trash produced is expected to be reduced by one third.

Earth Week
One of SEASs largest efforts is planning and putting together an annual Earth Week event. Earth Week features environmentally friendly activities in which students can participate in each day. A past Earth Week event, for example, has included students planting their own wildflower seeds. The students used organic soil to plant these seeds. Another event consisted of students exchanging clothes. The reasoning behind this event was to allow students to get new clothes without throwing out their old ones. The clothes that are left over from the clothing swap are taken to a homeless shelter. Students have also have participated in the making of paper mache globes out of recycled newspaper. This enables students to make a product that would have gone to waste into a work of art. Students were also provided with paint to embellish their globes. Earth Week also features notable speakers who are knowledgeable in regards to the environment and green solutions. Past discussions have included the Tampa Bay Timess outdoor writer, Terry Tomlin and the Director of The National Wildlife Foundations Gulf of Mexico Restoration Project, David White. SEAS also looks for informative movies to share with students. The most recent movie screened during Earth Week was Waters Journey: Everglades. This movie tracks the ecosystem restoration project in the Everglades. This movie was shown after Terry Tomlins speech about environmental awareness through exploration. In the 2013 Spring term, SEAS celebrated Earth week by making a banner for students to write down an environment-saving pledge using water paint. As a thank you, students received a complimentary t-shirt. The t-shirt had the SEAS logo on the back along with the phrase Everyday is Earth Day on the front. The purpose of the t-shirt was to spread awareness among students during Earth week and for students to wear the t-shirt on Earth Day. Another recent event was the celebrating of Food Day. In partnership with The Gardening Club, SEAS made awareness of Food Day by having free organic food, such as cabbage wraps filled with chicken salad for students to try as well as to give out information about Food Day and how students can get involved on campus via The Gardening Club. SEAS also gave information on locations where students can go and buy local, organically grown foods. In response to the Food Day event and the complimentary food, all that SEAS asked of students was to donate food cans and to make a pledge to eat real food going forward. The Food Day event was utilized as a day to spread awareness, and gain membership for both The Gardening Club and SEAS.

Earth Week features environmentally friendly activities in which students can participate in each day.

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An Alumnis Experience with SEAS


Former SEAS President, Britten Cleveland discussed SEAS involvement with the Watergoat Project and the political initiative, Save Our Wallets and Waterfronts. Cleveland was President of the organization while attending USFSP up until her graduation in 2011. SEAS decided to adopt Bayboro Harbor through Pinellas Countys, Project Beautiful. While SEAS was cleaning the harbor, it noticed an abundance of trash, particularly after heavy rain falls. SEAS discovered that this trash was carried along Booker Creek, which feeds into Bayboro Harbor. Booker Creek flows past Tropicana Field, so the creek was essentially transporting trash from The Rays Baseball Games. Jamie McWade, a member of SEAS, contacted Watergoat to try and fix the problem. Watergoat is an organization that produces filters called Watergoats that filter trash from the Harbor. They received a $3,500 grant from the Tampa Bay Estuary Program to install the Watergoat. The first Watergoat in St. Petersburg was installed in Crescent Lake, and because of its success, the second Watergoat was installed in Bayboro Harbor. After a heavy rain, the Bayboro Harbor Watergoat collapsed and a new one was built. The new one was built in front of the NOAA building at USFSP, where Booker Creek connects to Bayboro Harbor. Student volunteers clean out the outflow pipes on the Watergoat once a week. Cleveland also recalled that SEAS worked with an organization called Preserve our Wallets and Waterfront, which stopped the Rays from building a stadium in the place of Al Lang Field in 2008. SEAS participated in the effort to cease the building of the stadium in order to preserve the Downtown St. Petersburg waterfront area. Cleveland expressed the importance of being involved in the green movement. She said: SEAS brings a spirit of activism to the campus.

A lot of students have a disconnect with eating food and knowing where it comes from.
USFSP Gardening Club: An Overview
When discussing the importance of The Gardening Club at USFSP, 2013-2014 President, Abbey Wakely says, A lot of students have a disconnect with eating food and knowing where it comes from. The Gardening Club participates in the Green Movement at USFSP by teaching students how to grow their own food, while using environmentally friendly methods. It also reach out to students through various activities on campus.

The Gardening Club: A Brief History


On November 15, 2011, USFSP student Christian Coffey formed a group of fellow students who built a garden behind the Piano Man building. This garden is known as Bayboro Garden, home of 19 raised beds, in which students in the Gardening Club are able to experiment with different gardening techniques. Going into the 2013-2014 school year, The Gardening Club continues to grow and seeks to make its presence on campus known. In light of the recent announcement that the College of Business will be constructing office buildings in place of the Piano Man building, the future of Bayboro Garden is uncertain, and the Gardening Club is seeking a new location for a garden on campus. This is a time in which they welcome new members to join and learn how to garden.

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Green Techniques
Companion planting is a technique that the Gardening Club uses to avoid using fertilizers that could harm the environment and the natural health of the plants. They will plant three plants that work together to protect each other and increase growth. Wakely uses the example of corn, beans, and squash. The corn stalks shade and protect the beans from damage and are considered the top layer. Beans are known for producing nitrogen rich soil. This soil aids DNA and protein production. The beans are considered the middle layer. On the bottom layer, the squash covers and protects the soil. The protection the squash gives retains water and keeps weeds from producing. These three plants pollinate each other and fight off pests without using fertilizers. The Gardening Club also uses a three-part compost system at the Bayboro Garden to manufacture its soil. The club uses three compartments in this process. The first compartment breaks down organic material. The organic material will sit in the first compartment for about a month. Earthworms and other invertebrates will sift through this organic material and aid in the beginning stages of decomposition process. Once the first part is complete, the material is moved to the second compartment. In the second phase, decomposition continues and is completed by the end of this process. The last phase is a resting place for the soil. The soil remains in this compartment until it is needed for use in the garden.

Community and Student Partnerships


The Gardening Club partners with the community. It has collaborated with The Tavern and the Campus Grind, two restaurants located directly adjacent to the USFSP campus. The club is able to reduce waste via this partnership. These businesses donate unused fish parts and coffee grinds to The Gardening Clubs compost system. Rather than discarding this waste, it is used to produce soil that will grow food. Community members are scheduled to come to USFSP during the 2013-2014 year to speak about gardening techniques and the importance of gardening. The goal is to keep students informed about why gardening and green techniques are so vital. The club also seeks to reach out to the students through hands on events that allow students to partake in the gardening process. The Build a Plant event allows students to receive their own pot and plant a seed inside of that pot. They are able to take that plant back to their home or room in the residence hall. In order to better connect the eating and growing process in students minds, The Gardening Club hosts cook offs. The first annual Kale cook off was held on June 24-25, 2013. On June 24, members of The Gardening Club harvested kale and distributed the plant to whoever wanted to participate in cooking. These students returned home and invented dishes with kale. On June 25, the students came to the event, taste tested the dishes and voted on their favorites. The victors won gardening tools, such as a reusable gardening bag, promoting natural gardening. In addition to the annual kale cook off, The Gardening club hopes plan more cook offs that would include a variety of other vegetables that are growing in the garden.

The Gardening Club partners with the community.

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It Starts with the Students


Students at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg influence the Green Movement through the initiatives discussed above. In April 2014, the students will once again vote on a referendum affirming or denying The Student Green Energy Fund. Before that time comes, students can propose Green Ideas and solutions to The SGEF for approval. Students can also participate in activities through The SGEF and The Gardening Club that increase the universitys stability. Students are an undeniable part of the Green Movement on campus through these initiatives.

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Annotated Bibliography
The sources listed below assisted in finding valuable information regarding The Student Environmental Awareness Society (SEAS) and The Student Green Energy Fund (SGEF). This information sheds some insight on what these organizations do, how they operate, and their current and future projects along with their accomplishments for Green efforts thus far. Bringing more attention to these organizations can help inspire or motivate students to propose energy saving ideas for the University of South Florida St. Petersburg.

Funke, John. Power from 93 million miles. The Crows Nest. The Crows Nest, 12 February 2013. Web. 31 Jul 2013. <http://crowsneststpete.com/2013/02/11/ power-from-93-million-miles/>. This article, written by John Funke, discusses the new Solar Doks that USFSP has installed. The creator of these Doks, inventor, Joe Kubus, explains how students can actually get a hands-on feel for these Doks, rather than just seeing them from afar. Funke, explains how the SGEF and SEAS worked together to implement these self-sustaining power stations that generate power from the sun and allow students to charge any power thirsty electronics students may have. Funke also provides information regarding The SGEF accepting any proposals regarding green energy.

Lawler, Stephanie. Installation of a Watergoat. Bay Mini-Grant Show and Tell . TBEP Technical Website , 16 Apr 2012. Web. 31 Jul 2013. <http://www.tbeptech.org/ CAC/2010_Bay_MiniGrants/USF_Watergoat_Presentation.pdf>. The author of this document, Stephanie Lawler, shows what a Watergoat is and what it does/can do for The University of South Florida St. Petersburg. Throughout this document, Lawler shows the readers detailed information on how the Bayboro Harbor looked before the installation of a Watergoat, the materials needed, the installation of the Watergoat, along with the results and benefits after the installation. The intended audience of this article is students, faculty or any interested party.

Nesslar, Jennifer. Students promote sustainability in race to generate green energy. The Crows Nest . The Crows Nest, 04 Mar 2013. Web. 31 Jul 2013. <http://crowsneststpete.com/2013/03/04/students-promote-sustainability-inrace-to-generate-green-energy/>. This article was published in The Crows Nest, a campus newspaper at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg. The contributing writer, Jennifer Nesslar, is a student at the university. A USFSP contest sponsored by the SGEF, Race for the Watts was held at the college fitness center. This article gives detailed feedback from a particular student, Karla Infazon, and her green initiatives. Using the sustainable cardio equipment on the second floor, her team of students was able to produce 507.6 watts. In addition, to the contest, team leaders at the waterfront at USFSP took part in the process of purchasing a hybrid truck, funded by SGEF. Aimed at students, the author does cover new ground in reference to educating readers on Infazons contribution to the Green effort at the university, and how students can become a part of those efforts as well.

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Parish, Courtney. Gardening club looks to the future. The Crows Nest. The Crows Nest, 02 Jan 2013. Web. 31 Jul 2013. <http://crowsneststpete.com/2012/12/ 03/gardening-club-looks-to-the-future/>. This article was published in The Crows Nest, a campus newspaper at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg. The contributing writer, Courtney Parish, is a student at the university. The article examines the setbacks faced by the USFSP Gardening Club in regards to their membership. Parish explains that, since the clubs members are mostly seniors, it must proactively seek new members for the upcoming fall (as the majority of its club members will have graduated). Parish includes a comprehensive overview of the clubs community objectives and current gardening endeavorsboth within and outside of the university. The article sheds light on the variety of projects undertaken by the club, and gives insight into the dedication of its members. Parish presents the club as something more than a mere outlet for gardening; the club is a way that students can come together and make a collective impact on the world around them. Parish includes quoted descriptions and opinions from active members. Aimed at students, this article lists relevant contact information for students who may be interested in becoming members. The piece offers a glimpse into the ways that the USFSP Gardening Club communicates with its fellow student body.

Pauls, Brittney. SEAS Earth Day Events. The Crows Nest. The Crows Nest, 02 May 2013. Web. 31 Jul 2013. <http:// crowsneststpete.com/2013/04/14/seas-earth-day-events/>. This article was published in The Crows Nest, a campus newspaper at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg. The contributing writer, Brittney Pauls, is a student at the university. The piece announces the various activities organized by the SEAS in celebration of USFSP Earth Day 2013. Pauls notes the efforts made by the SEAS in their three-day set of activities, and lists a number of ways the SEAS hopes to excite and engage students in its efforts. Although the article is a brief presentation of facts and scheduling, the article nonetheless reveals SEASs dedication to its cause. Pauls notes that the organization hopes to gain more members, revealing a current predicament faced by SEAS. Aimed at students, this article offers a glimpse into the ways that the SEAS communicates with its fellow student body at USFSP.

SGEF. Complete Proposal Process. The Student Green Energy Fund. University Of South Florida St. Petersburg. Web. 31 Jul 2013. <https://sites.google.com/a/mail.usf.edu/sgef-usf-st-pete/?pli=1>. The SGEF website offers a flowchart and step-by-step description of the Student Green Energy Fund proposal process, by which students can submit their green ideas. The site simplifies the process, outlining the specific procedural requirements of students who wish to submit those ideas.

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Weybrecht, Giselle. An innovative way to making your campus more sustainable: The Student Green Energy Fund. PrimeTime. Prime Time , 17 Dec 2012. Web. 31 Jul 2013. <http://primetime.unprme.org/2012/12/17/an-innovativeway-to-making-your-campus-more-sustainable-the-student-green-energy-fund/>. Giselle Weybrecht is the author of this article that addresses questions as to how the SGEF was started and what its objectives are, and what future plans it has in store for the university. This article provides detailed coverage from the leadership of the organization on what projects it is currently working on and what projects it has approved (i.e., energy efficient LED lighting in parking garage, which would reduce energy costs by 70%). Its intended audience is USFSP students, faculty and staff. The author of this article does a worthy job of positioning questions that the SGEF answers throughout the article. This article is biased because the point of view is coming from the leadership of the organization addressing its projects, how the SGEF has been received by students, staff and community, and some advice on how other schools that are interested in putting together green efforts can do so.

Works Cited
Ayala, Jacquie. Florida Board of Governors Rejects Student Led Green Fund Proposals . We Are Power Shift . Southern Energy Network. Web. 2 Aug 2013. <http://www.wearepowershift.org/blogs/florida-board-governors-rejectsstudent-led-green-fund-proposals>. Baynard , Robert. Students Earn Grant to Enhance Harbor Clean-Up Efforts. Students Earn Grant to Enhance Harbor Clean-Up Efforts (2011): n.pag. Nelson Poynter . Web. 2 Aug 2013. <http://dspace.nelson.usf.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10806/5029/Students_Earn_Grant_to_Enhance_Harbor_Clean-Up_Efforts_USFSPNEWS_2011_02_07. pdf?sequence=1>. Blogger, Guest. Florida students start the long road to their student green energy fund campaign. Climate Progress . Think Progress, 17 Mar 2012. Web. 2 Aug 2013. <http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2010/03/17/205648/floridastudents-start-the-long-road-to-their-student-green-energy-fund-campaign/?mobile=nc>. Cannon, Dan. USF Moves Closer to Passing a Student Green Energy Fund on their Campus. Southern Energy Network Blog . South East Energy, 17 Dec 2010. Web. 2 Aug 2013. <http://southeastenergy.wordpress.com/2010/12/17/ usf-moves-closer-to-passing-a-student-green-energy-fund-on-their-campus/>. Cleveland , Britten. Telephone Interview. 30 Jul 2013. Constantine , Sophia. E-mail Interview. 30 Jul 2013. Funke, John. Power from 93 million miles. The Crows Nest. The Crows Nest, 12 February 2013. Web. 31 Jul 2013. <http://crowsneststpete.com/2013/02/11/ power-from-93-million-miles/>. Guidelines Through the Proposal Process. Student Green Energy Fund. University of South Florida St. Petersburg. Web. 4 Aug 2013. <https://sites.google.com/a/mail.usf.edu/sgef-usf-st-pete/home/proposal-process>. Killette , Tyler. Students Plan Recycling Cans. . The Crows Nest, 04 February 2013. Web. 2 Aug 2013. <Students plan recycling cans>. Lawler, Stephanie. Installation of a Watergoat. Bay Mini-Grant Show and Tell . TBEP Technical Website , 16 Apr 2012. Web. 31 Jul 2013. <http://www.tbeptech.org/ CAC/2010_Bay_MiniGrants/USF_Watergoat_Presentation.pdf>.

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Leggett, Michael. Bottle Filling Stations. Student Green Energy Fund. University of South Florida St. Petersburg, 08 Nov 2012. Web. 4 Aug 2013. <https://sites.google.com/a/mail.usf.edu/sgef-usf-st-pete/follow-the-approved-proposals/water-bottle-filling-station-info-page>. Student Green Energy Fund Bylaws. Student Green Energy Fund. University of South Florida St. Petersburg. Web. 4 Aug 2013. <https://docs.google.com/a/mail.usf.edu/document/d/1R5cuAohHOw38yHnU0wKmOvNkcy9jYNPhRaKoL AL6NqE/edit>. Nesslar, Jennifer. Students promote sustainability in race to generate green energy. The Crows Nest . The Crows Nest, 04 Mar 2013. Web. 31 Jul 2013. <http://crowsneststpete.com/2013/03/04/students-promote-sustainability-inrace- to-generate-green-energy/>. ONeill, David. USFSP Parking Facility Lighting Upgrade Phase 1. Student Green Energy Fund. University of South Florida St. Petersburg, 07 Feb 2013. Web. 4 Aug 2013. <https://sites.google.com/a/mail.usf.edu/sgef-usf-st-pete/ follow-the-approved-proposals/led-parking-garage-lighting-1>. Parish, Courtney. Gardening club looks to the future. The Crows Nest. The Crows Nest, 02 Jan 2013. Web. 31 Jul 2013. <http://crowsneststpete.com/2012/12/ 03/gardening-club-looks-to-the-future/> Pauls, Brittney. SEAS Earth Day Events. The Crows Nest. The Crows Nest, 02 May 2013. Web. 31 Jul 2013. <http:// crowsneststpete.com/2013/04/14/seas-earth-day- events/>. Penn, Ivan. USF St. Petersburg developing solar battery to store power for homes. Tampa Bay Times News. Tampa Bay Times, 25 Jun 2011. Web. 2 Aug 2013. <http://www.tampabay.com/news/business/energy/usf-st-petersburgdeveloping-solar-battery-to-store-power-for-homes/1177180>. Scherberger, Tom. USF St. Petersburg Introduces Car-Sharing Program. USFSP News Center. USF St. Petersburg, 12 February 2013. Web. 2 Aug 2013. <http://www.usfsp.edu/blog/2013/02/12/usf-st-petersburg-introduces-carsharing-program/>. SGEF. Complete Proposal Process. The Student Green Energy Fund. University Of South Florida St. Petersburg. Web. 31 Jul 2013. <https://sites.google.com/a/mail.usf.edu/sgef-usf-st-pete/?pli=1>. Student Green Energy Fund Bylaws. Student Green Energy Fund. University of South Florida St. Petersburg. Web. 4 Aug 2013. <https://docs.google.com/a/mail.usf.edu/document/d/1R5cuAohHOw38yHnU0wKmOvNkcy9jYNPhRaKoL AL6NqE/edit>. Submit an Idea (Idea Bank). Student Green Energy Fund. University of South Florida St. Petersburg. Web. 4 Aug 2013. <https://sites.google.com/a/mail.usf.edu/sgef-usf-st-pete/calendar>. USF St. Petersburg, , dir. USFSP - Student Environmental Awareness Society. USFSP, 2011. Film. 2 Aug 2013. <http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0oXaAvztVs>. Wakely, Abbey. Personal Interview. 29 Jul 2013. Weybrecht, Giselle. An innovative way to making your campus more sustainable: The Student Green Energy Fund. PrimeTime. Prime Time , 17 Dec 2012. Web. 31 Jul 2013. <http://primetime.unprme.org/2012/12/17/an-innovativeway-to-making- your-campus-more-sustainable-the-student-green-energy-fund/>.

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Crows Nest, Solar Doks. N.d. Photograph. n.p. Web. 6 Aug 2013. <http://crowsneststpete.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/IMG_0385.jpg>. Crows Nest, Back Page Boyd. N.d. Photograph. n.p. Web. 5 Aug 2013. <http://crowsneststpete.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/BackPageBoyd3.jpg>. Crows Nest, Tree Planting. N.d. Photograph. n.p. Web. 7 Aug 2013. <http://crowsneststpete.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/TreePlanting.72.png>. Crows Nest, Garden. N.d. Photograph. n.p. Web. 7 Aug 2013. <http://crowsneststpete.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Garden2.jpg>. Crows Nest, Group Gardening. N.d. Photograph. n.p. Web. 7 Aug 2013. <http://crowsneststpete.com/wp-content/ uploads/2013/01/Garden-2.jpg>. Crows Nest, Bayboro Garden . N.d. Photograph. n.p. Web. 7 Aug 2013. <http://crowsneststpete.com/wp-content/ uploads/2011/01/BayboroGarden_1-24-11.jpg>. USF St. Petersburg - Student Green Energy Fund, Solar Dok At Night. 2013. Photograph. FacebookWeb. 7 Aug 2013. <https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/538083_481969998529419_1294373206_n.jpg>. USF St. Petersburg - Student Green Energy Fund, Gym Equipment . 2012. Photograph. FacebookWeb. 7 Aug 2013. <https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/154476_449682008424885_1927511879_n.jpg>. USF St. Petersburg - Student Green Energy Fund, Silverado Hybrid. 2013. Photograph. FacebookWeb. 7 Aug 2013. <https://sphotos-b-lga.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/598656_497858726940546_2003763806_n.jpg>. ONeill, David. USFSP Parking Facility-LED. 2012. Graphic. USFSP Parking Facility Lighting Student Green Energy Fund, Water Bottle Filling Station. N.d. Photograph. USFSPWeb. 7 Aug 2013. <https://sites. google.com/a/mail.usf.edu/sgef-usf-st-pete/_/rsrc/1352410687125/follow-the-approved-proposals/water-bottlefilling-station-info-page/water bottle filling stations.jpg>. SEAS, Home Page of Student Environmental Awareness Society. N.d. Photograph. USFSPWeb. 7 Aug 2013. <http:// www1.usfsp.edu/coas/espg/seas/images/SEAS_FLYER3.jpg>. Nesslar, Jennifer. Bayboro Garden on a Summer Day. 2013. JPEG. Nesslar, Jennifer. Abbey Wakely at Bayboro Garden. 2013. JPEG.

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Student Environmental Awareness Society at USF St. Petersburg


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USF St. Petersburg Student Green Energy Fund


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