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ENGINEERING AND RELATED TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT Notre Dame of Dadiangas College General Santos City Edition Date: Second

Semester, SY 2004-2005 Course Title Catalogue Number : Credit Number of hours : Pre-requisite COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course presents the principles of Fluid Mechanics and the application of these principles to practical, applied problems. Emphasis is given to fluid properties, the measurement of pressure, density, viscosity, and flow, fluid statics, flow of fluids in pipes and noncircular conduits. GENERAL OBJECTIVES: At the end of the course, the students should be able to: 1. Know the properties of fluids and understand their effect on structures subjected to pressure. 2. Know the different methods and procedures of measuring flow of fluids; 3. Understand the basic concepts of fluid mechanics; 4. Recognize the logical approach to problem solutions; 5. Design practical, efficient fluid systems; 6. Critique the design of a given system and recommend improvements. : : : : FLUID MECHANICS ES 321 / IE 421 3 units (2 units lecture/1 unit laboratory) 40 hours lecture/48 hours laboratory ES 311

Topics/Subtopics/Time Frame Chapter 1: FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES OF FLUIDS (1st 2nd weeks: 10 hours) 1. Fluid Definition 2. Difference between liquids and gases 3. Force and Mass 4. Units and Dimensions 5. Pressure Definition 6. Properties of Fluids

Specific Objectives At the end of this chapter, the students should be able to: 1. Define important terms related to fluid properties. 2. Differentiate between a fluid and a gas. 3. Identify the relationships between specific weight, specific gravity and density. 4. Demonstrate selfreliance by solving independently problems related to properties of fluids.

Teaching Strategies 1. 2. 3. 4. Lecture Research work on fluid properties Individual activity on surface tension Laboratory Exercise (specific gravity determination, unit weight determination, determination of viscosity by falling ball) 1. 2. 3. 4.

Evaluation Quiz Board work Problem sets Graded Laboratory Reports

Values Integrated 1.

Materials/ Resources Needed 2. 3. Handouts Blackboard

References Evett and Liu, Fluid Mechanics. Pages 1 24. Mott, Robert, Applied Fluid Mechanics 5th edition. pages 1 17. Roberson and Crowe, Engineering Fluid Mechanics. Pages 2 3. Douglas, JF, Solving Problems in Fluid Mechanics. Pages 1 8.

Chapter 2: PRINCIPLES OF HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE (3rd 4th weeks: 10 hours) 1. Unit Pressure 2. Pascals Law 3. Variation of pressure with depth in a fluid 4. Pressure head, vapor pressure 5. Fluid Pressure Measurements 6. Measurement of pressure difference

At the end of this chapter, the students should be able to: 1. Prove that the intensity of pressure at a point in a fluid acts in all directions equally. 2. Explain the mode of operations on the different pressure measurement devices. 3. Differentiate atmospheric, absolute and gage pressures.

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Lecture Group activity (problem solving and the solution is to be presented by one of them members) Laboratory Exercise (Manometer and Pressure Difference)

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Seatwork Board work Problem sets Graded Laboratory Reports

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2. 3.

Handouts Blackboard

Evett and Liu, Fluid Mechanics. pages 25 52. Mott, Robert, Applied Fluid Mechanics 5th edition. pages 59 65. Roberson and Crowe, Engineering Fluid Mechanics. pages 32 46. Douglas, JF, Solving Problems in Fluid Mechanics. pages 9 22. Simon, Andrew L. Basic Hydraulics. pages 23 33. Vennard and Street. Elementary Fluid Mechanics 5th edition. pages 36 52.

Chapter 3: FLUID PRESSURE ON SURFACES ( 5th 6th weeks: 10 hours) 1. Total pressure and resultant force 2. Pressure on plane surfaces 3. Graphical method of calculating hydrostatic pressure 4. Resultant fluid force on inclined plane surfaces 5. Horizontal and vertical components of total hydrostatic pressure on surfaces 6. Pressure on curved surfaces 7. Hoop Tension in circular pipes and tanks

At the end of this chapter, the students should be able to: 1. Define the center of pressure of a surface of arbitrary shape. 2. Graph the values and location of hydrostatic forces. 3. Use pressure and moment of area relationships to calculate the force and line of application of an immersed surface. 4. Demonstrate that a body totally immersed in a fluid will suffer no net accelerating force due to the surface pressure distribution.

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Lecture Fish bowl technique ( set of problems will be prepared and students will randomly pick a question, which they will answer on the board, while the rest of the class will try to critique whether their work is correct or not.)

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Quiz Board work Problem set

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Handouts Blackboard

Evett and Liu, Fluid Mechanics. pages 53 76 , 85 -107. Mott, Robert, Applied Fluid Mechanics 5th edition. pages 75 114. Roberson and Crowe, Engineering Fluid Mechanics. pages 47 56. White, Frank, Fluid Mechanics 4th edition. pages 79 81. Douglas, JF, Solving Problems in Fluid Mechanics. pages 28 - 44.

Chapter

4: BUOYANCY AND STABILITY OF FLOATING BODIES (7th 8th weeks: 10 hours) 1. Principle of Archimedes 2. Stability of completely submerged bodies 3. Stability of floating bodies 4. Degree of Stability 5. Determination of metacentric height and righting moment.

At the end of this chapter, the students should be able to: 1. State the law of Archimedes and its application to floating bodies. 2. Apply the concept of metacentric height to a displaced body to determine its condition of equilibrium. 3. Explain the condition for stability of floating and submerged bodies.

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Lecture (Before this topic, the students will be assigned to bring photos of floating and submerged bodies, which they will present to the class. After the presentation of the topic, they will explain the effect of buoyancy on the objects.) Seatwork/drill Laboratory Exercise (Determination of Density by buoyancy and Determination of Metacentric Height)

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Quiz Assignment Problem set Graded Laboratory reports

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2. 3. 4.

Handouts Blackboard Overhead projector

Evett and Liu, Fluid Mechanics. pages 108 - 131 Douglas, JF, Solving Problems in Fluid Mechanics. pages 51 73 . Mott, Robert, Applied Fluid Mechanics 5th edition. pages 115 142. White, Frank, Fluid Mechanics 4th edition. pages 84 88..

9th Week MID TERM EXAM Chapter 5: RELATIVE EQUILIBRIUM OF LIQUIDS (10th 11th weeks: 10 hours) 1. Relative equilibrium of liquids 2. Vessel moving with constant linear acceleration 3. Vessel rotating about a vertical axis 4. Forces developed in a closed container Chapter 6: FLOW OF FLUID (12th 13th weeks: 10 hours) 1. Fluid flow rate and the continuity equation 2. Commercially available pipe and tubing 3. Recommended velocity of flow in pipe and tubing 4. Flow in non-circular section 5. Conservation of Energy Bernoullis Equation 6. Tanks, Reservoirs, and Nozzles exposed to atmosphere 7. Venturi meter and other closed system with unknown At the end of this chapter, the students should be able to: 1. Identify the different cases of liquid under linear and rotational displacement. 2. Compute the forces developed by liquid masses when liquid is accelerated inside a vessel. 3. Determine the forces developed by liquid subjected to rotation inside the vessel. 1. 2. Lecture Seatwork/drill 1. 2. Quiz Problem set 1. 2. 3. 4. Handouts Blackboard Overhead Projector Potter, Merle et al. Mechanics of Fluids 2nd edition. pages 68 70. Douglas, JF, Solving Problems in Fluid Mechanics. pages 74 80.

At the end of this chapter, the students should be able to: 1. Define flow rate, weight flow rate, mass flow rate and other important terms related to flow of fluid. 2. Apply the continuity equation to relate the volume flow rate, area and velocity of flow between two points in a given fluid flow system. 3. Describe the four types of commercially available pipe and tubing. 4. Specify the desired size of a pipe or tubing to carry a given flow rate of fluid at a specified velocity. 5. Apply Bernoullis equation to fluid flow system. 6. Apply Torricellis theorem to compute the flow rate of fluid from a tank and the time required to empty a tank.

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Campus tour (the class will tour around the campus and list all the different types of pipes seen in the campus and note their location and identify the materials which the pipes are made of.) Lecture Seatwork/drill Laboratory Exercise (Determination of Coefficient of

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Quiz Board work Graded Laborat ory Report

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Handouts Blackboard

Mott, Robert, Applied Fluid Mechanics. Pages 145 188.

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velocities Torricellis Theorem Flow due to a falling head At the end of this chapter, the students should be able to: 1. Identify conditions under which energy losses occur in fluid flow system. 2. Identify means by which energy can be added to a fluid flow system. 3. Expand Bernoullis equation to form the general energy equation by considering energy losses, energy addition, and energy removal. At the end of this chapter, the students should be able to: 1. Describe the appearance of laminar and turbulent flows 2. State the relationship used to compute Reynolds number 3. Compute the Reynolds Number for flow in non-circular flow paths. 1. 2.

Venturi meter)

Chapter 7: GENERAL ENERGY EQUATION (14th week: 5 hours) 1. Energy losses and additions 2. General Energy equation 3. Power required by pumps 4. Power delivered to fluid motors

Lecture Seatwork/drill

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Quiz Board work

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Handouts Blackboard

Mott, Robert, Applied Fluid Mechanics. Pages 191 207.

Chapter 8: REYNOLDS NUMBER, LAMINAR FLOW AND TURBULENT FLOW (15th 16th weeks: 10 hours) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Reynolds Number Critical Reynolds Number Velocity Profiles Hydraulic radius for noncircular cross sections Reynolds number for closed non-circular cross sections.

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Lecture Seatwork/drill Laboratory Exercise (Reynolds Number)

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Quiz Board work Problem set Graded Laboratory Report

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Handouts Blackboard Overhead Projector

Mott, Robert, Applied Fluid Mechanics pp. 221 238.

17th week: Final Examination List of Laboratory Exercises 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. BIBLIOGRAPHY Mott, Robert, Applied Fluid Mechanics 5th edition. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc, 2000. Evett and Liu, Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics. New York: Mc Graw-Hill, 1987. Density Determination by Volumetric Method Determination of viscosity of liquid by falling sphere method Determination of Specific Gravity by U-tube manometer Determination of Density of solid body by buoyancy Determination of Metacaentric height of a floating body Determination of Difference in pressure between two pipes Determination of Coefficient of venturi meter

Roberson and Crow, Engineering Fluid Mechanics. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1995. Douglas, JF, Solving Problems in Fluid Mechanics Volume 1. England:Addison Wesley Longman Limited, 1996. Vennard and Street, Elementary Fluid Mechanics 5th edition. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1982. White, Frank, Fluid Mechanics 4th eidtion. Boston: Mc Graw-Hill Int., 1999. Potter, Merle, Mechanics of Fluid Mechanics 2nd edition. Prentice-Hall, Int. 1997. Prepared/Revised by: