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LOWE

FROM

NOTES

BRAZIL

TO

OUR

PARTNERS

IN

CHRIST

(Affiliated with APLIC—Association for Christian Literature)

Dear Partner with Christ,

The

1970 Brazil Missionary

Conference

February 1, 1970

of

missionaries

of

Christian

churches and churches of Christ is history. Barbara and I were happy to attend most of the sessions. Jamie Morgan, one of my former teachers, was keynote

speaker. Mr. Morgan is missions professor at Manhattan Bible College. It was sure a rich week — especially the "chat" sessions with the keynoter about

school days.

The annual meeting of the members of

the Association for Christian

Literature (APLIC) was held. Officers for 1970 were elected with the

following

men

serving:

President,

David

Sanders;

Vice-Presldent,

Gerald

Holmquist; Secretary, Thomas Fife; Treasurer, Charles Kent; 2nd Treasurer,

Carol Louis Lowe; Auditor, Dale Brown, C.P.A.; and Directory members Harry

Scates, Lynn Cleaveland, and Anabor Macedo.

Charles Kent submitted his resignation as head of sales and prornotion,

desiring to devote full time to evangelistic work. After due consideration, he

felt that he would

not

like to work

in sales,

nor would he care to

return

to

the shop. Charles will continue to keep the books of the association, but will

devote full time to working with the churches in Golanla.

The conference was also a time to build bridges with our brethren of the non-instrumental persuasion. We appreciated the opportunity to meet some fine workers in God's kingdom. Walls that have been erected over 50

years of work

do

not

come down

easily.

But

we

must

keep chipping

away at the barriers of Christian fellowship. Prayer and patience are needed

— radiating from a heart full of love for God and his children. The conference was the kickoff for a new year. We wish to thank you

for making it possible for us to be in the game. May God richly bless you and

our work together to Publish Glad Tidings.

Your witnesses to Brazil,

Carol

and

Barbara Lowe

LOWE

FROM

MAY 1 8 1970

NOTES

BRAZIL

TO

OUR

PARTNERS

IN

CHRIST

(Affiliated with APLIC—Association for Christian Literature)

Dear Prayer Partners:

As

is

well

known,

your

missionaries

on

foreign fields have made

untold

to carry the gospel to lands in darkness.

Most of

of the natural

modesty of many of these faithful

these sacrifices remain

pioneers.

untold

sacrifices

because

While making no special claims to saciifice or modesty, we, too, have hesitated

some of the unsettling,

to

indeed terrifying, experiences which

describe for our supporters

have taken place during our two years in the strife-torn

land of

Brazil. Naturally,

one

major reason for this is that we do not wish

to

cause undue

worry to

our loved

ones

who

are too far

away to help

in any case.

Recently,

however,

something

happened

to

two of us

which we feel constrained

to

tell so that our faithful partners may know better what we are facing.

As you all have

no doubt read in your local newspapers,

Brazil is seething with riot,

turmoil,

der.

As one o; our independent, undenominational missionaries recently wrote:

and disor

"Famine

is widespread

and another revolution

is imminent."

Your missionaries were driving one day down one of Brazil's rough and rocky roads

on their way to a preaching point when they were brought

to

a sudden

halt by a police

roadblock.

A half-dozen

surly,

unshaven

auxiliary

police

surrounded

the

immobilized

auto, each one growling a different

order:

"Show your documents," "Open the trunk,"

"We want to inspect all your baggage." Obviously they had been drinking cheap Brazilian

rum.

Since Brazil is known to be riddled with

Communist

guerrilla

bands, your

missiona

ries were not surprised when told by the police that they were seeking gun-runners.

Even

though

we carried no

firearms, how

could we

prove our

innocence when

they were

clearly bent on finding someone to arrest? As 1 opened the door and stepped out of the car, I found myself looking directly into the muzzle of a 50 cal. machine gun. A nineteen

year-old

finger. I thought numbly of the American who only last year was beaten and left by

the roadside by Brazilian police.

nervously twitching his trigger

with bloodshot eyes looked down the

barrel

Roughly, the

men

pawed

through

our

things. They were about to confiscate a tape

recorder, when their officer arrived on the scene. Although crude, this man was obvi ously of superior education to the others. Discovering that we were Americans, he demonstrated his superiority by trying on us a few words of broken English. We were

immensely relieved at the immediate change

It still

pays to

be

an American I

in attitude

manifested by the whole

group.

The above story is based on an

actual

essentially

true,

but

the

whole

matter

is

occurrence, my brothers.

highly

exaggerated, and

The

bare facts are

colored to create

a

certain impact on the mind of the

reader.

If you are perceptive, you will notice as well a

not very subtle design to show our host country

and

its

people

in

the

most

unfavorable

light, meanwhile reflecting as much glory as

possible

on

our own

country and

people.

This spirit, while all too evident in some missionary

of Jesus Christ.

Furthermore, the gross exaggeration

reporting,

is

by

of

the facts

no

means the Spirit

is simply

dishonest.

We trust this sort of missionary reporting is not what you expect of us. We do, however,

pledge ourselves to a sincere effort to keep you all informed of the work we are trying to

do in the name of Christ in this great land

of Brazil.

In

Christ,

Carol

and

Barbara

Lowe

3:^A'

jl

d

iu

-r-^-3^11 I,

Sa .

'

"• is

LOWE

NOTES

FROM

BRAZIL

is the

first of a new format. A number of our friends and supporters

have written recently suggesting things that they would like to see in LOWE NOTES. We appreciate your suggestions. This bi-monthly paper exists for you. We have tried to incorporate

these suggestions along with some of our own long standing ideas

Greetings from, your witnesses to Brazil. This

newsletter

into a whole new motif. We think that this new format will best exhibit our new image and attain our ends. In this new format we

shall

continue to

make our

news honest and

regularly

use pictures to illustrate for you our

concise.

We shall

environment and

happenings. We shall seek to inform you of what is occurring among churches of Christ — Christian churches in Brazil. OK — lets tune in for our shakedown voyage. If you have any

suggestions^ drop

us a line.

^

y*

Welcome

£1

Visit

with

ih^

to nosso lar —

our home.

Hcwem

Pictured

on the front

page is our house. Above is a picture of the street on which we

live taken shortly after it was graded. Our street has become quite

a freeway since the ruts and holes have been graded out. It is not

uncommon for a taxi or a hotrodder to go by 60 miles an hour

kicking up a cloud of dust.

We are hopefully waiting for the

promised asphalt that is to be laid later this year.

Our house is built in the shape of a printer's "L" with the long side facing you and the short side extending back on the left

side. Like many houses in the Midwest, it was built and then later enlarged. The house is considered a four bedroom house — one

which we use for my study and one we use as a storeroom-ironing

room.

The latter will be converted to another bedroom soon. The

house also has a living room, dining room, kitchen, bathroom, and

carport.

Behind the house we have a walled yard, a roofed work area

for the washer and dryer, a storeroom (actually what we would call a summer kitchen with a built-in cookstove), and maid's room. The back-yard is really a nice area for Marjorie Anne and Lassie, our pregnant dog, to romp.

Within a block of our house are people that are of the lowest

economic class and people that receive considerably more than we do. We have congenial neighbors. Across from us and a little to

the right

of

lives a bottled

gas distributor.

His wife and some

their children are members of the church of Christ in Fama where

we attend. He is considering becoming a Christian. Marjorie practically lives at their house. She and Sr. Euripedes, the head

of the house, have a mutual admiration society. The house on our right is empty. Directly across the street a new house is being built by an agent of DOPS (similar to our

FBI). They are young people in their late twenties. Behind them

lives a family that belongs to a Pentecostal church. On the opposite comer is a small garage. On the comer to our left lives a family that attends evangelical churches. He attends occasionally a local Baptist church and she

and the children attend a "Christian Church". He is a sheetmetal

contractor who makes and installs rainspouts.

Behind us lives a tmck driver who makes his living princi pally buying items in Belem (at the mouth of the Amazon

River) and bringing them down the Belem to Brasilia highway to

^ell. His wife sews clothes.

We like our home and neighborhood. Our only complaint is the dust, but we tmst that this problem will improve considerably after the streets are paved.

PROTESTANT GAINS IN

BRAZIL DETAILED

The Protestant connmunity in Brazil now totals close to 10% of the pop

ulation

of

that

predominantly

Catholic

country.

New statistics

just'

released by the Missionary Information Bureau of Sao Paulo indicate there

in a population

which grew to 89,376,000 in 1968, according to government estimates.

This figure is nearly double the previously reported size of Brazil's

burgeoning Protestant church.

are 8,706,000

members of declared

Protestant families

The Missionary Information Bureau (MIB) reports the Protestant commu

nity

as

supporting

some

12,800

churches,

plus

an

additional

11,000

preaching points, with 2,902,000 recorded church

members. This makes

it possible to restate the goals of evangelism for Brazil, since there is now I Protestant church member for every 5.3 non-Protestant homes,

and one church or preaching point for every 640 non-Protestant homes.

MIB records a total of 2,991 foreign-born missionaries at work in Brazil.

This missionary force is concentrated in the South and East, but greatest

in the Central-West,

gains during the past two years have been

the area of Brazil's advancing frontier.

marked

— MISSIONARY

INFORMATION

BUREAU

SPuhUsb giaa Tidings f

One of the most far-reaching and needy fields of Christian evangelism is in printing — one of the marks of the past decade of

missionary activity has been the large increase of missionary print ing done on the field, and in behalf of the world enterprise by our

increasing number of church-sent Christian missionaries.

Note

what some

whom

we

criticize

and

oppose

in

their

doctrine have the zeal to do:

The immense printing establishment of Jehovah's Witnesses in Brooklyn, N.Y., covers a total area of 354,000 square feet.

Besides printing their own Bible — The New World Translation,

of Holy Scriptures — the presses turn out ten million copies of

two magazines every month in 105 different languages. Twenty-two

linotype machines, 15 high speed color presses, and a bindery that

binds

program employing 450 people. And all this to propagate spiritual

darkness.

of the immense

30,000

volumes

a

day are only

a part

{Horizons^ May 18, 1963)

— Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Lowe; C. P. 403 ; Goidnia, GO; Brazil —

MAILED BY:

Lincoln Christian Church

204 North McLean

Lincoln, Illinois

62656

SEND CONTRIBUTIONS TO:

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Duet

APLIC-Lcwe Fund

Box 404

Lincoln, Illinois

62656

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO:

Mr. & Mrs.

Carol Louis Lowe

Caixa Postal 403

Golania, Goias Brazil, S. A.

(Address Correction Requested)

BULK

RATE:

NON-PROFIT

U.S.

POSTAGE

PAID

PERMIT

LINCOLN.

NO.

547

ILLINOIS

PERMIT

NO.

76

'Hi

LIBRARIAN

OZARK

BIBLE COLLEGE

JOPLINf

UO,

64301

v;

1

LOWE

FROM

NOTES

BRAZIL

— Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Lowe; C.P. 403; Goidnia, GO; Brazil —

Let's go to church.

Pictured above is the church of Christ

in the Vila Fama section o£ Goiania — one of four congregations

in the city. Every Sunday morning we load up our family and go

across town to attend Bible school which starts at nine o'clock. The

following is a brief resume about Vila Fama.

Although the congregation is some 15 years old, the Vila Fa

ma

church really started

over from scratch

less than two years

ago. Since that time a new building has been constructed — almost

entirely with local funds — and Bible school attendance is now

averaging

90.

There

is no "morning

worship" service

because

dinner time here is eleven o'clock and there are no instant meals.

The preaching service and Lord's Supper take place at night with

attendance now averaging about 70.

basically

There

are

four

Sunday

School

classes

arranged

according to age. Two of them meet in the church building and two in the evangelist's house. Tom Fife teaches the adults and

by

Libby Fife the adolescents.

Brazilians.

The smaller children are taught

r

Pictured above are some of the young people of the Vila Fama church.

The

operation

of

the

Bible

school,

indeed

of

the

entire

church,-is in the hands of the local people. We attend and partici

pate just as we would as laymen at Lincoln. The Fifes, who have

worked with the Vila Fama church for the past four and one-half

years, have steadfastly refused

to assume positions

of authority,

preferring to remain in an advisory role

development of a truly indigenous church.

and thus encourage the

In addition to Sunday

School and

evening worship, regular

meetings of the congregation include youth meeting every Sunday

evening, prayer meeting each Tuesday and ladies meeting once a month. Members of the congregation also participate in a radio

program sponsored by the Vila Fama and Setor Bueno churches, a city-wide choral group which includes singers from all four

churches, and a monthly city-wide youth meeting.

The church recently adopted a constitution and elected of

ficers so that it could become a "legal person" and thus receive title to its property, now in the name of Brazil Christian Mission. The difficulty experienced in finding qualified persons to fill the

constitutional offices points up the principal problem of the Vila

Fama

we

are encouraged by the progress thus far made, the future maturity

of the church will depend in large measure on the development of adequate leadership.

congregation — a

lack of

concerned men.

Although

Sfafisfica Stbouf

1 — The estimated population of Brazil in July, 1968, was 89,376,000

(IBGE —

Brazilian Census Bureau).

2 — With a total area of 8,463,000 square kilometers (IBGE), the pop

ulation density in 1968 was 10.56 persons per square kilometer. This contrasts with an average density of 8.39 in 1960.

3

There

December

were

31,

2,902,000

1968

members

of

(MIB

estimate).

Protestant

churches

as

of

These

members

attended

some 12,800 churches

and

11,000

preaching

points, a total of

23,800. The number of members increased from a 1,920,000 figure

in

1960,

meeting

in

points (IBGE).

a

total

of

13,300

churches

and

preaching

4 — The people of Brasil were housed in some 16,957,000 units in 1968, of which 1,663,000 represented homes of Protestant families, embracing a Protestant community of about 8,706,000, or nearly

10% of the total population of Brasil (MIB estimates).

In October, 1968, MIB had on record 2,991 foreign-born mission aries, including wives separately as missionaries. This is an increase

of nearly 400 over the record for April, 1967. Every major region

had an increase, with the largest percentage in the Central-West of 23%, followed by the South with 22% and the North with 12%.

5

6 —

The

Northeast

and

the

East

showed

the

smallest

proportional

amounted ^o

increases.

In

1968,

the average

population per

niissionary

29,900; thV average per church and preaicfiihg point, 3,'750;' and

the average per Protestant member, 31 (MIB estimates). Expressed

in another way, the average number of non-Protestant homes per foreign-born missionary amounted to 5,100; per church and preach

ing point, 640; and per Protestant member, 5.3.

7 — The average population per missionary varied from

North to 59,000 in the East, followed closely by the Northeast with 47,800. The second lowest average was in the Central-West with

12,250, with the South next in line with 25,700 (MIB estimates).

8 — The average population per church and preaching point is highest

7,450 In the

in the Northeast with 5,950, and

the lowest in

the Central-West

with 2,650. The averages for the East and the South are close to the average for Brasil, 3,600 and 3,500, respectively. The North is

the second lowest in average with 2,800 (MIB estimates).

9 — The average population per Protestant member in the Northeast is

more than double the average for Brasil, 69 vs. 31. The East is the second highest with an average of 41, and lowest is the South with

20. The Central-West and the North are slightly above the Brasil average with 33 and .36, respectively (MIB estimates).

The above estimates are based upon Brazilian government statistics through

1966 for Protestant membership and the number of churches and preach

ing points. Although these

statistcs have

inaccuracies

and their general

tendency is to be incomplete, they are relatively significant for compar

isons and for over-all analyses (no other country in the world has provided

similar details).

— MISSIONARY

INFORMATION

BUREAU

n

MAILED

Lincoln

204 North McLean

Lincoln, Illinois 62656

BY:

Christian

Church

SEND CONTRIBUTIONS TO:

Mr.

& Mrs.

Richard Duel

APLIC—Lowe Fund

Box 404

Lincoln, Illinois 62656

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO:

Mr. & Mrs. Carol Louis Lowe

403

Caixa Postal

GoiSnia, Goias

Brazil, S.A.

(Address Correction Requested)

This

August

6,

picture

was

1970 —any

taken

on

other

com

ment needed?

(A telegram

arrived

at

press

time

announcing

the

birth

of

a

daughter.

Mother

and

daughter

are doing well.)

BULK

RATE: NON-PROFIT

U.S.

POSTAGE

PAID

LINCOLN.

ILLINOIS

PERMIT

NO.

76

bible

JOPLIN',

L'.O.

col!.?:g2

64301

August, 1970

MOV

12'70

LOWE

FROM

NOTES

BRAZIL

— Mr. and Mrs, C. L. Lowe; C.P. 403; Goiania, GO; Brazil

wish

to

This

picture

communicate

aptly

to

illustrates

you—one

HELP!

HELP!

Stumbling block or

chief cornerstone?

two

concepts

which

we

positive and one negative.

Even though it is of questionable literary taste to mix one's sym

bolism in any given article, please

our point.

I feel like the person in this picture. I am straining every "muscle" to remove the stumbling blocks that are impeding the spread of the Gospel, but just can't do the job alone. The

as it illustrates

bear with

us

stumbling block is about to crush me. Satan is using the lack of funds to curtail our work.

This

past year, from June to June, inflation raised the cost of living

and operating more than 36% . During the same time the dollar exchange rate rose only 11%. Assuming the same dollar income

Working together with Christ.

today as a year ago, we have had a decrease in salary and operat

ing expenses of over 25%.

But the fact of the

matter

is,

we

do

not

have the same

dollar income today as a year ago. We have experienced the nor

mal diminishing pattern that occurs with

most missionaries after

they have been on the field for almost 3 years. Our support has

shrunk 10%.

Do you grasp

the situation? This is not one of those all

too common "wolf" letters that some write to keep their support up. This is to inform you that we have experienced an almost

40%

cut

in

overall

cutback

of

operating

operating

capital

capital.

What

would

a

mean

where

you

work?

40%

What

would a 25% decrease in salary mean to your personal financial

situation—especially at a time when you just added

your family?

another to

The above mentioned

picture

also illustrates

a positive

point.

It graphically shows what we are trying to do.

We are

here to help lay the

church might be built to the glory of God.

chief

cornerstone,

Jesus

Christ,

I would not

suggest

that if

you

allow

the

that

his

stumbling

block Satan has erected to crush us, the chief cornerstone will not be placed. No, the Lord's will shall not be thwarted! He will

raise up others to take our place.

I do suggest,

however,

that

you

and

I

will

have

failed

to

fulfill

our

partner, Jesus Christ, to do the job. We will

covenant

with

have

wasted

our

our

stewardship to this point, and Satan

lives.

would he the

victor in our

Great things are happening

in

our

work! Things

are

really beginning to roll. Souls are being won through the use of

our ministry together.

Brazilian

Christians

are getting the ne

cessary tools to nurture one another

in

Christ. Our

sphere

of

people are seeking

our new materials before they come off the press that they might

influence is expanding.

For the first time,

have a more effective tool to use to win their friends and relatives

to Christ. All this you are making

possible. To

Christ

be the

glory!

But the question is, "Shall we be able to continue?" Not

unless you get behind us and help remove the stimibling block

that is about to crush our work.

We must have more support.

What will you do for Christ's sake ?

Bxcifinff C-pipevfuxAfy

by Thomas W Fife

News releases recently reported the opening of bids on the construction of the Trans-Amazon Highway which will mobilize thousands of unemployed workers from drought-stricken Northeast Brazil. The

highway; which will link the two most underdeveloped regions of Bra

zil (the Northeast and the Amazon Basin) will benefit the country in

two ways:

1)

isolated

areas;

opening

transportation

and

communication

2)

opening vast

uninhabited territories

to

thus

relieving overpopulation

in

the

Northeast.

to

hitherto

settlement,

In

addition

to those

for

the Trans-Amazon

(east

to west),

bids

were also opened on the construction of a transversal (north to south)

highway from Santarem, center of the Lower Amazon Valley, to Cuiaba,

capital of the State of Mato Grosso. Each of the two highways will extend

approximately

penetrating

1,000

miles, forming

an

inverted

"L"

and

areas heretofore

fairs

unexplored by civilized

will precede the highway engineers

man.

Specialists in

Indian

af

to pacify certain

tribes which

until now have never been In direct contact with the "white man."

The

highways are scheduled

for

completion

by

1971, and construction cost is estimated at $75 million.

December

Bids

are to

31,

be

let separately on

ten sections of approximately 200

miles

each.

Cons

truction

will proceed on

the

different

sections

simultaneously,

using

large tributaries of

the Amazon

(Tocantins, Araguaia, Xingu, and Tapa-

j6s) as ways of entering the interior with heavy machinery.

bring

The

their

Northeasterners

families

with

coming

from

drought-stricken

areas

them,

and

after

completing

their

job

highway construction will settle permanently in the

region.

will

of

Thus the roadways are planned to traverse the healthiest portions oF the Amazon Valley and those with the most fertile soil. Settlement will begin with construction camps which will be transformed into agri

cultural colonies. Towns will spring up almost overnight in favorable

locations as has been the case along the famous Bel6m-Brasflia Highway,

now ten years old.

Eventually the Trans-Amazon will be extended to

P6rto Velho on

the Madeira River, thus giving direct

access

northward to Manaus and

the Venezuelan border and westward to Lima, Peru.

We are really excited about the possibilities for the proclamation

of the Good News of our Lord and Savior presented by the construction

of

these

highways

and

the settlement

of new frontiers which will fol

low.

Thousands of

people, dislocated from

traditional

places

and

pat

terns will be

more receptive than ever

to the

Gospel of

Jesus Christ.

God asks us as He did Isaiah, "Whom shall I send? Who will go?" Someone

must reply, "Here, Lord, send me."

MAILED BY:

Lincoln Christian

204 North McLean

Lincoln, Illinois 62656

Church

SEND CONTRIBUTIONS TO:

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Duel

APLIC—Lowe Fund

Box 404

Lincoln, Illinois 62656

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO:

Mr. & Mrs. Carol Louis Lowe Caixa Postal 403

Goiania, Goi^s

Brazil, S.A.

(Address Correction Requested)

BULK RATE: NON-PROFIT

U.S.

POSTAGE

PAID

LINCOLN. ILLINOIS

PERMIT NO. 76

LIBRARIAN

OZARK BIBLE COLLEGE

JOPLIN,

MO.

64301

October, 1970

LOWE

FROM

fEJ7/

NOTES

BRAZIL

— Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Lowe; C.P. 403; Goiania^ GO; Brazil —

We hope you had a merry Christmas and hope that you will have a happy and prosperous New Year. By the time you receive this newsletter, we will have celebrated our fourth Christmas and

completed our third year of service for our Saviour and you in Brazil. Thank you for making it possible to be partners with our

Lord in the ministry of publishing Glad Tidings in Brazil. Pray

with us that in this coming year we shall be enabled to expand our

efforts to propagate the Good News of Emmanuel.

Included in this issue of LOWE NOTES is a copy (in English) of our annual report to the general assembly of ^'Casa Editora APLIC^^. Please address any questions for clarification or criticism

to me. If you are not happy about any part of our stewtirdship, please let us know. Perhaps it is a misunderstanding. Or, maybe

we need to be set straight.

Wr-

t

il

V;

'•i

V- 7.i^--

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR —

"CASA EDITORA APLIC"

by Carol Louis Lowe

To the General Assembly of the Association for

Anapolis, Goias, December 31, 1970.

Christian Literature

1. We wish to thank all of you for the opportunity to work together

during the year 1970 for the glory of God.

report with much pleasure,

2. Publications during 1970:

a) Primary course. Student book,

We therefore

II,

3.

b) Studies in Dynamic Christianity.

c) Study of the Good News.

d) The Life of Christ Visualized.

e) Certificate —

Bible Correspondence Course.

f) Baptismal Certificate.

g)

Member's

Identification

Card.

h) Member's Registration Card.

present this

I) Attendance Certificate (Sunday School — 1 year),

j) Marriage Certificate.

k) Wedding Ceremony.

I) APLIC Catalog.

3. It appears

that

not

much

work

was done during

the year,

but

there are various reasons that should be presented:

a) The director is new in Brazil and new to

the work.

b) The shop lacks the material necessary to operate efficiently

while at the same time maintaining a high level of quality.

c) This situation is largely due to a lack of operating capital.

Instead of applying our little bit of capital directly into

the production of the printed page, we have chosen to use It in the development of a more efficient system looking

toward a better product In the future.

d) Furthermore, we have been hindered by an Inadequate

stock of paper.

4.

We would like to point out that APLIC is recognized more and

the Brazilian evangelical community as a source of "true

more among

to the Bible"

literature of high

quality. Orders

are multiplying

every

month.

In the city of Golania, as well, more and more people In the

publishing field are coming to know us and our work.

5.

Not only do we have a new image before the public, but

also a

new commercial orientation. The APLIC shop will continue only if it can be a blessing and not a stumbling block. We would like to present some

data to clarify this:

 

a)

In our shop the publications of APLIC always have prefe

 

rence, when we have the necessary funds to print them.

_

-

b)

APLIC is doing commercial work only to facilitate and ex

 

pedite our religious service.

 
 

c)

Unless we have unlimited subsidy, or

lacking this, com

 

mercial Income, the existence of the print shop cannot be

justified.

 

d)

We are actively seeking commercial work and beginning

 

In January we will have

a sales

representative.

We can

see that our subsidy will never be what we need to do

the work we envision.

 
 

e)

We want

to advise our brothers that we will always give

preference to Christian work, along with the best discount

possible.

6.

Working conditions:

a) Our employees say

available here.

b) If you could visit the.shop, you would be surprised

that working conditions are the best

to

see

It;

because it doesn't look

like the same place.

The

machinery

has

been

moved

around

for

more

efficient

operation,

walls

have

been

painted,

everything

cleaned

up, etc.

c) We have some of the best tradesmen In Golania. Thus, we

are capable of producing the best materials and our

personnel have a great desire to do the best possible work.

7.

New "Modus operendi":

a) New APLIC publications will not be printed if we do not

have the funds necessary to restock our basic inventory.

b) We propose that beginning in March, 1971, ail dollar

contributions by missionaries to the Association for Christian Literature (Dallas, Texas) be applied to the li quidation of our debt to Edwin C. Knowles. (We still owe

$ 4,400.00 on our present facilities.)

MAILED BY:

Lincoln Christian

204 North McLean

Lincoln, Illinois 62656

Church

SEND CONTRIBUTIONS TO:

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Duel

APLIC—Lowe Fund

Box 404

Lincoln, Illinois 62656

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO:

Mr. & Mrs. Carol Louis Lowe

Caixa Postal 403

GoiSnia, Goi^s

Brazil, S.A.

(Address Correction Requested)

BULK RATE: NON-PROFIT

U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

LINCOLN. ILLINOIS

PERMIT NO. 76

LIBRARIAN

OZARK BIBLE COLLEGE

40PLIN,

MO.

64801

December, 1970