Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 1

AN UNUSUAL FRIENDSHIP Some animals and plants have a special kind of friendship.

They developed this friendship so that they can help each other. Often, they depend on each other for survival. This kind of friendship is called symbiosis. Symbiosis means that two completely different kinds of animals or plants help each other in order to live. One example of symbiosis is the relationship between man and plants. Plants give off oxygen which man needs for breathing, and man gives off carbon dioxide which plants need for making food. A similar friendship exists between plants and animals that live in a body of water. Perhaps the most unusual friendship is shown by the small bird known as the African honey-guide and the animal known as the ratel. The African honey-guide loves beeswax. Although it can find a beehive on its own, it cannot break it open. So this little bird looks for a ratel. Chirping to get the ratels attention, the honey guide leads the ratel to the beehive. Upon reaching the beehive, the ratel jumps on it, tears it apart with its claws, and eats the honey greedily. The angry bees try to sting the ratel but its thick fur and tough skin give it protection. When the ratel has finished eating the honey, it leaves happily, still surrounded by the angry bees. As soon as they are gone, the honey-guide goes to the honeycomb and enjoys peacefully its favorite beeswax meal. AN UNUSUAL FRIENDSHIP Some animals and plants have a special kind of friendship. They developed this friendship so that they can help each other. Often, they depend on each other for survival. This kind of friendship is called symbiosis. Symbiosis means that two completely different kinds of animals or plants help each other in order to live. One example of symbiosis is the relationship between man and plants. Plants give off oxygen which man needs for breathing, and man gives off carbon dioxide which plants need for making food. A similar friendship exists between plants and animals that live in a body of water. Perhaps the most unusual friendship is shown by the small bird known as the African honey-guide and the animal known as the ratel. The African honey-guide loves beeswax. Although it can find a beehive on its own, it cannot break it open. So this little bird looks for a ratel. Chirping to get the ratels attention, the honey guide leads the ratel to the beehive. Upon reaching the beehive, the ratel jumps on it, tears it apart with its claws, and eats the honey greedily. The angry bees try to sting the ratel but its thick fur and tough skin give it protection. When the ratel has finished eating the honey, it leaves happily, still surrounded by the angry bees. As soon as they are gone, the honey-guide goes to the honeycomb and enjoys peacefully its favorite beeswax meal. AN UNUSUAL FRIENDSHIP Some animals and plants have a special kind of friendship. They developed this friendship so that they can help each other. Often, they depend on each other for survival. This kind of friendship is called symbiosis. Symbiosis means that two completely different kinds of animals or plants help each other in order to live. One example of symbiosis is the relationship between man and plants. Plants give off oxygen which man needs for breathing, and man gives off carbon dioxide which plants need for making food. A similar friendship exists between plants and animals that live in a body of water. Perhaps the most unusual friendship is shown by the small bird known as the African honey-guide and the animal known as the ratel. The African honey-guide loves beeswax. Although it can find a beehive on its own, it cannot break it open. So this little bird looks for a ratel. Chirping to get the ratels attention, the honey guide leads the ratel to the beehive. Upon reaching the beehive, the ratel jumps on it, tears it apart with its claws, and eats the honey greedily. The angry bees try to sting the ratel but its thick fur and tough skin give it protection. When the ratel has finished eating the honey, it leaves happily, still surrounded by the angry bees. As soon as they are gone, the honey-guide goes to the honeycomb and enjoys peacefully its favorite beeswax meal.