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Monday Aug. 26 2013 Vol XIV, Edition 7
WAVE OF KILLING
WORLD PAGE 12
49ERS BEAT
THE VIKINGS
SPORTS PAGE 13
BUTLER CLEANS
BOX OFFICE AGAIN
DATEBOOK PAGE 19
INSURGENT ATTACKS IN IRAQ KILL AT LEAST 46
By David Wong
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
At Homework Central, the lessons go
beyond reading, writing and arithmetic.
The third, fourth and fth graders who
attend the free tutoring program in San
Mateo certainly get help with those school
subjects but the staff and volunteers are also
keen on teaching the overall importance of
doing well in school and helping parents
help their children.
Were really trying to get these kids over
the hump of elementary school. In the gen-
eral view of the world, among academics ...
if kids are struggling in elementary, then
the probability increases that theyll be
much [worse off] in middle school and high
school, said Matthew Feuer, co-chair of
Homework Centrals board.
Feuer said the program reinforces that
goal by hosting dinners where parents and
their children can listen to middle school
ofcials speak about what they and their
children can expect when they graduate
from elementary school.
The other thing that Homework Central
does is provide parent support we work
with parents to support their kids more
effectively, Feuer said.
Homework Central was founded in 1998
as three North Central San Mateo churches
Unitarian Universalists, Congregational
Church and Chalice Christian led an
Taking education to another level
San Mateos Homework Central tutoring program provides parents, students academic support
REUTERS
Fireghters work to prevent the Rim Fire from jumping Highway 120 near Buck Meadows.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF MODERN HOMES REALTY
The Westlake neighborhood in Daly City is comprised entirely of Doelgers, suburban tract
homes built after World War II. Henry Doelger, bottom left, built 11,000 of the homes in San
Francisco and San Mateo counties in the late 1940s and early 50s.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Rob Keil had published a book titled
Little Boxes: The Architecture of a Classic
Midcentury Suburb about Daly Citys
Westlake neighborhood back in 2006 and
decided after that the best way to tell the
iconic suburbs story was to make a docu-
mentary lm about it and its creator Henry
Doelger.
Keil grew up in Doelger homes and after
publishing the book
started to give talks with
slideshows about the his-
tory of the neighborhood
and its builder. He com-
piled interviews on video
of some of the early
architects and rst home-
owners who bought into
the neighborhood back
Little Boxes: Discovering Doelger
By Brian Skoloff and Tracie Cone
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GROVELAND At Ike Bunneys dude
ranch near the Sierra community of
Tuolumne City, all creatures have been evac-
uated as reghters brace for an intense bat-
tle to keep a wildfire raging north of
Yosemite National Park out of mountain
communities.
Weve already evacuated the horses, said
Bunney, who was keeping an eye on his
Slide Mountain Guest Ranch on Sunday. I
think theyre worried about the re sparking
over these hills.
As re leapfrogs across the vast, pictur-
esque Sierra forests, moving from one tree-
top to the next, residents in the res path
are moving animals and children to safety.
Rim Fire proves
to be challenge
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The stadium eld at Burlingame High
School could be named after a champi-
on of the schools athletic department
once the stadiums bleachers are com-
plete by fall of next year.
Thursday night, the San Mateo
Union High School Districts Board of
Trustees discussed naming the field
after Panther class of 1954 alumnus
Peter Umland, who died in September
2001 shortly after being named
Alumnus of the Year. He was 66.
Peter was a xture in Burlingame,
said Liz McManus, deputy superintend-
ent of business services. He was pas-
sionate about Burlingame and athlet-
ics. He was very generous and philan-
thropic. He loved being an alumnus of
Burlingame [High School].
Born July 30, 1935 in Cambridge,
Mass., Umland moved to Burlingame
in 1939 and attended McKinley
Grammar School, Burlingame High
School and College of San Mateo. He
served in the U.S. Navy from 1953 to
1956 as an arial photographer. Upon
discharge he was hired by the
Stadium field could be named after Burlingame alumnus
Peter Umland
Rob Keil
See DOELGER, Page 18 See FIRE Page 31
See TUTOR, Page 23
See PETER, Page 18
Spontaneous goat
manure fire stinks up town
WINDSOR, Vt. A pile of goat
manure spontaneously caught fire,
spreading stench and wrinkling noses
through a Vermont town but causing no
damage, ofcials said.
The odor evoked a damp kind of
burning leaves or brush re, Windsor
Town Manager Tom Marsh said.
A worker on her way to milk goats
discovered the re in the 120-cubic-
yard manure pile around 3 a.m.
Wednesday, said George Redick, owner
of the 800-goat Oak Knoll Dairy. He
and others put out the ames with water
from a hose but the pile continued to
smolder. He planned to call the re
department later in the morning, but
reghters were already searching for
the source of the smell by 6:30 a.m.
Marsh said he could smell the re at
his hilltop home ve miles away. He
called it a little disconcerting,
because it was a very strong smell.
Redick says the manure would typi-
cally have been spread around the farm
earlier in the year, but the rainy season
and other factors kept that from hap-
pening.
Ex-convict sentenced
for sneaking into jails
NEW YORK A convicted sex
offender who repeatedly used phony
correction department credentials to
gain entry into New York City jails has
been sentenced to 10 years in prison.
Matthew Matagrano was sentenced
Thursday. The 36-year-old Yonkers res-
ident pleaded guilty last month to pos-
ing as a correction ofcer and sneaking
into the Manhattan Detention Center,
where he mingled with inmates for
hours.
During a Feb. 27 visit Matagrano
assaulted an inmate and stole a $2,500
walkie-talkie. He also handed out ciga-
rettes to inmates.
Matagranos rap sheet includes a
conviction for sodomy and sexual
abuse. Police statements released in
court report Matagrano said he repeat-
edly sneaked into jails because the
people inside were nice and made
him feel important.
New Jersey farmer gets
political with corn maze
CHESTER, N.J. A New Jersey
farmer has cut the faces of Republican
Gov. Chris Christie and his
Democratic challenger into a corn
maze to highlight the states guberna-
torial election.
The corn was planted in June at the
Stony Hill Farm in Chester.
Owner Dale Davis tells Newarks The
Star-Ledger newspaper he chose the
maze to get people interested. He says
everybody recognizes Christie but he
doesnt know whether a lot of people
would recognize gubernatorial rival
Sen. Barbara Buono.
Christie is far ahead of Buono in
public polls and leads among nearly
every demographic group. Hes seen as
a viable contender for the 2016
Republican nomination for president.
The Morris County maze will open
to the paying public Aug. 31. The elec-
tion is Nov. 5.
Doctor: Ohio man revives 45
minutess after heart stops
WEST CARROLLTON, Ohio A
man whose heart stopped beating for
45 minutes credits his faith for being
alive and says stunned doctors who
declared him dead arent sure what hap-
pened.
The body of diesel mechanic Tony
Yahle was being prepared by nurses to
be seen by his family Aug. 5 when he
began to show signs of life, doctors
said. He fully awakened at the hospital
ve days later.
Yahle, a 37-year-old West Carrollton
resident, has been a topic of conversa-
tion since, said cardiologist Dr. Raja
Nazir.
In the last 20 years, Ive never seen
anybody who we have pronounced dead
... and then for him to come back, Ive
never seen it, Nazir told the Dayton
Daily News. Actually, Ive never
heard of it.
Yahle says its a miracle and that doc-
tors couldnt nd any defects in his
heart. Their last guess was that it was
all the result of a possible viral infec-
tion, he said.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor Macaulay
Culkin is 33.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1920
The 19th Amendment to the U.S.
Constitution, guaranteeing American
womens right to vote, was certied in
effect by Secretary of State
Bainbridge Colby.
Suffering
belongs to no language.
Adelia Prado, Brazilian poet
NBA coach Stan
Van Gundy is 54.
Actress Keke
Palmer is 20.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Paramilitary policemen help shermen move an overturned boat after Typhoon Trami landed in Ningde, China.
Monday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog
in the morning. Highs in the mid 60s.
Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Monday ni ght: Mostly clear in the
evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy
fog after midnight. Lows in the mid 50s.
Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Tuesday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the upper 60s.
West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becom-
ing mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the
mid 50s. Northwest winds 10 to 15 mph...Becoming west
around 5 mph after midnight.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1883, the island volcano Krakatoa began cataclysmic
eruptions, leading to a massive explosion the following day.
In 1913, the newly completed Keokuk Dam in Iowa was ded-
icated.
I n 1936, the Anglo-Egyptian Treaty, calling for most
British troops to leave Egypt, was signed in Montreux,
Switzerland. (It was abrogated by Egypt in 1951.)
In 1958, Alaskans went to the polls to overwhelmingly
vote in favor of statehood.
I n 1961, the original Hockey Hall of Fame was opened in
Toronto.
I n 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson was nominated for a
term of ofce in his own right at the Democratic National
Convention in Atlantic City, N.J.
In 1968, the Democratic National Convention opened in
Chicago.
In 1971, New Jersey Gov. William T. Cahill announced that
the New York Giants football team had agreed to leave
Yankee Stadium for a new sports complex to be built in East
Rutherford.
I n 1972, the summer Olympics games opened in Munich,
West Germany.
In 1978, Cardinal Albino Luciani of Venice was elected
pope following the death of Paul VI. The new pontiff took
the name Pope John Paul I. (However, he died just over a
month later. )
I n 1986, in the so-called preppie murder case, 18-year-old
Jennifer Levin was found strangled in New Yorks Central
Park; Robert Chambers later pleaded guilty to manslaughter
and served 15 years in prison.
I n 1993, Dorothea Puente was convicted in Monterey of
murdering three of her boardinghouse tenants; she was later
sentenced to life without parole.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
CRANK TITHE CLOSER DISMAY
Saturdays
Jumbles:
Answer: The new employee was unhappy on his first
payday because he got a REALITY CHECK
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
KEEOV
FIHTS
GRINPS
TOBMOT
2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Print your answer here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Whirl Win, No.
6,in rst place;Eureka,No.7,in second place;and
Money Bags, No.11, in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:48.14.
6 8 1
1 9 17 20 53 14
Mega number
Aug. 23Mega Millions
12 17 25 45 59 19
Powerball
Aug. 24 Powerball
5 8 20 27 34
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
9 2 7 1
Daily Four
6 5 5
Daily three evening
1 15 35 40 45 23
Mega number
Aug. 24 Super Lotto Plus
Former Washington Post Executive Editor Benjamin C.
Bradlee is 92. Actress Francine York is 77. Former Homeland
Security Secretary Tom Ridge is 68. Rhythm-and-blues singer
Valerie Simpson is 67. Pop singer Bob Cowsill is 64. Actor
Brett Cullen is 57. Jazz musician Branford Marsalis is 53.
Country musician Jimmy Olander (Diamond Rio) is 52. Actor
Chris Burke is 48. Actress-singer Shirley Manson (Garbage) is
47. Rock musician Dan Vickrey (Counting Crows) is 47. TV
writer-actress Riley Weston is 47. Rock musician Adrian
Young (No Doubt) is 44. Actress Melissa McCarthy is 43.
Latin pop singer Thalia is 42.
3
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
REDWOOD CITY
St ol en vehi cl e. A 1992 gray Nissan
Sentra was stolen on Folison Road before
10:52 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 15.
Intoxi cated person. An intoxicated man
was harassing a passerby at the intersec-
tion of Jefferson Avenue and Franklin
Street before 11:42 p.m. Wednesday, Aug.
14.
Gun shots. Four shots were heard on
Dumbarton Avenue before 9:34 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 14.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstances. Aman with
brown hair and wearing a black T-shirt stole
a jacket on Pelican Lane before 4:56 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 14.
Suspi ci ous person. Five men were loi-
tering on the sidewalk and smoking mari-
juana at the intersection of E and Lenolt
streets before 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, Aug.
14.
Vandal i sm. Someone reported their tires
were slashed on Nueva Avenue before 12:24
p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14.
Vandal i sm. A vehicles window was bro-
ken on East Bayshore Road before 4:24
a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14.
Grand theft. Three bikes were stolen in
the three hours at the intersection of
Broadway and Hamilton Avenue before
12:42 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14.
Person down. Atall man was lying on the
ground on El Camino Real before 10:38
p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 13.
SAN BRUNO
Grand theft. Saddlebags containing a hel-
met and several other items were reported
missing on the 400 Boardwalk Avenue
before 8:31 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 20.
Pet t y t hef t . Three tires were reported
stolen from a silver Honda Civic on the
8200 block of Shelter Creek Lane before
10:13 p.m. Monday, Aug. 19.
Burglary . $120 in cash and a phone were
reported missing from a car on the 4000
block of Skyline Boulevard before 5:17
p.m. Monday, Aug. 19.
St ol en vehi cl e. A white 1989 Toyota
Celica with a black convertible top was
reported missing on 3300 College Drive
before 5:58 p.m. Monday, Aug. 19.
Burglary . The lock on a gray Chevrolet
was punched and a purse was stolen on the
4000 block of Skyline Boulevard before
5:17 p.m. Monday, Aug. 19.
Pet t y t hef t. A laptop was stolen from a
table on the 1500 block of Magnolia
Avenue before 4:27 p.m. Monday, Aug.
19.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Burglary . Gas was siphoned from a black
Cadillac on Baden Avenue before 7:31
p.m. Saturday, Aug. 3.
Pet t y t hef t. Two boxes of copper were
stolen on Baden Avenue before 8:22 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 2.
Burglary. Vehicles were broken into on
South Airport Boulevard before 11:04 a.m.
Friday, Aug. 2.
St ol en vehi cl e. Avehicle was stolen on
Forbes Boulevard before 9:54 a.m. Friday,
Aug. 2.
Police reports
Foul bag
Someone reported a garbage bag on the
side of the road and it smelled like
something was dead inside at the inter-
section of Cedar and Main streets in
Redwood City before 1:02 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 13.
K
ids sensed the excitement of a car-
nival coming to town weeks
before the rst poster was put on
telephone poles to announce it.
It was probably the most exciting thing
to hit town during the year. The rides, the
food, the excitement of seeing all of the
tent attractions and the carnies who ran
the shows were exhilarating. In South San
Francisco, the traveling carnival would set
up their operations on the vacant lots
along Grand Avenue, just east of the City
Hall/Police Station and San Bruno used the
vacant lots across from Newells Bar on
San Mateo/Sylvan avenues. The weeds on
the lots were not a bother because they
would rapidly be trampled down when the
shows were set up and the people arrived to
stroll up and down the midway.
This was not a religious event as the
grand carnivals were in many cities like
New Orleans and Rio de Janeiro. Those
events had roots going back thousands of
years and lasted for weeks. The traveling
carnivals had their roots in the Worlds
Columbian Exposition (The Chicago
Worlds Fair) that was put on in 1893. The
Chicago Worlds Fair as it became to be
called was a celebration of the arrival of
Christopher Columbus arrival in the New
World in 1492. This worlds fair turned out
to be the biggest event that had occurred in
America (up to 1893). The number of peo-
ple attending equaled about half of the U.S.
population at that time during its six-
month run that started in May 1, 1893 and
closed in Oct. 30, 1893. Chicago Fair Day
attracted more than 700,000 people, a
record for outdoor fair attendance. During
its run, the Exposition drew nearly
26,000,000 visitors. It was huge.
Using 600 acres along Lake Michigans
South Shore, designers Daniel Burnham and
Frederick Law Olmsted attempted to make it
a Beaux Arts extravaganza. Its grandeur
exceeded all world fairs that had been put
on up to this time. Alternating electricity
pioneered by Nicola Tesla lit up the build-
ings and fair grounds for the very rst time.
The Ferris Wheel was introduced to the
world at this fair as well as the hamburger,
a moving walk and cracker jacks.
From this remarkable show of Chicagos
progress since the Great Fire that had
destroyed the city in 1871, Otto Schmitt, a
showman at the fair, put together a travel-
ing carnival featuring 13 acts patterned
after those at the fair. His show, although
smaller, was welcomed in many cities until
Schmitts business practices bankrupted
Traveling carnivals
A carnival coming to town was a big deal at one time.
See HISTORY, Page 18
4
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
One Redwood City park is going to the
birds at least, a bird bath.
Dipping into the Gene Robert Cress
Birdbath Fund, established with more than
$1 million bequeathed by the man to the
city nine years ago, Redwood City ofcials
are mixing his desire for watering stations
with the plan for public art.
As part of renovating Jardin de Ninos
Park, the city wants to design, build and
install a community-based bath and plaza
within the park. The .31-acre park sits at
Middleeld Road and Chestnut Street.
The City Council approved a $155,600
contract with Interplay Design, Inc. in
February and on Monday night will consid-
er the proposed artist design.
Based on several community meetings,
the fountain is meant to resemble those
found in Michocan, Mexico, include mosa-
ic tile work and have extra seating. The
design will also have bird-themed tile art.
The samples coming to the council show
varying shades of blue, orange, yellow and
green.
The council Monday will look at six
drafts of the fountain and two designs of the
bird. If the council isnt fond of the designs,
it can reject the proposal outright and direct
the Public Art Task Force to try again.
The fountain is only part of the park ren-
ovation plan. Those construction drawings
are nearly complete and will soon be out to
bid. City ofcials hope to award the bid in
winter and begin work in early spring.
The city tries to nd appropriate loca-
tions for the bird baths as projects come up
such as the Jardin de Ninos Park renovation,
said Chris Beth, director of parks, recre-
ation and community services.
Cress, who died in 2002, left his entire
estate to Redwood City to build and main-
tain bird baths and feeders in city parks.
When bequeathed, Cress estate was worth
approximately $1.3 million which was used
in 2004 to create the fund bearing his name
per the request of his 1976 will.
If approved, the bird bath will be the
citys second installation. The rst was the
Ray of Light at the Redwood Shores
Library, Beth said.
The fund has a current balance of
$880,326.
The Redwood City Council meets 7 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 26 at City Hall, 1017
Middleeld Road, Redwood City.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Redwood City bird bath design considered
Comment on
or share this story at
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5
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
ASan Bruno man imprisoned ve years ago
for stalking a female neighbor and her 14-
year-old daughter began, upon his release, to
threaten the investigating detective for
interfering with the imaginary relation-
ship he thinks exists with the teen, accord-
ing to prosecutors.
George James Anagnostou, 68, is also
accused of harassing the mother again, going
so far as to arrive at her workplace late at
night and bang on the windows while the
frightened woman hid underneath her desk
while awaiting police, said District Attorney
Steve Wagstaffe.
In 2008, Anagnostou was convicted of
stalking the woman and girl who lived on the
same street and was sentenced to two years in
prison. The daughter has since moved out of
state.
Prosecutors say, after Anagnostous
release, between December 2009 and July
2013, he began harassing both the woman
and the San Bruno police detective who
investigated the original case. He was
allegedly seen looking in the detectives
windows and this summer started leaving
explicit messages on his work phone threat-
ening to get him red and kill him for inter-
fering with his fantasy relationship with the
teen girl, Wagstaffe said.
Wagstaffe said another
neighbor also called
police to report
Anagnostou outside his
home screaming obsceni-
ties.
After Anagnostou
allegedly went to the
womans South San
Francisco workplace and
demanded entrance,
Wagstaffe said police searched his home
where they found cocaine, drug paraphernalia
and photographs of neighborhood girls
walking home.
Anagnostou was charged with four felonies
including two counts of stalking one for
the investigator and the other for the mother
drug possession and misdemeanor posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia. At his initial
arraignment, he requested a court-appointed
attorney and pleaded not guilty to all
charges. He did not waive his right to a
speedy prosecution and returns to court Sept.
6 for a preliminary hearing.
He asked to be released on his own recog-
nizance but Judge Richard Livermore declined
and set bail at $300,000. Livermore also
ordered a protective order barring
Anagnostou from contact with the victims.
He remains in custody.
Convicted stalker charged
for investigating detective
George
Anagnostou
A prolic Peninsula chorale is getting ready to celebrate its 50th anniversary and hopes to
nd a few new voices to help them out in a season that will include jaunts to New York City
and opening the newly rebuilt San Mateo Performing Arts Center. Masterworks Chorale is
holding auditions tonight and next Monday at the College of San Mateo.The chorale is the
only auditioned chorus on the Peninsula and has already been picked to provide concerts
in Lincoln Center in New York and the Flint Center in Cupertino as well as more locally.Those
auditioning should sing a prepared song or area in any style, bring two copies of the music,
perform sight-singing of short musical excerpts and repeat back short melodies played on
the piano. Masterworks often accept new members on a provisional basis which allows
singers to prove their abilities over a number of rehearsals. Rehearsals are 7:15 p.m. Monday
night at the College of San Mateo. Those interested in auditioning should call 918-6225 to
request an appointment. The auditions are 6:30 p.m. Monday Aug. 26 and Sept. 2 in the
Chorale Room at the College of San Mateo.
CHORALE SEEKING NEW VOICES
6
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didnt know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
dont have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning Funeral Etiquette can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as I am sorry
for your loss have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as John touched many
lives or I will miss John. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as Oh, youre
young and can marry again.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you dont feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that youd wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you dont have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceaseds memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Etiquette Advice:
Show Up, Be Brief, Listen
advertisement
Woman sexually assaulted
while jogging in South City
Awoman was sexually assaulted Friday in
South San Francisco while she was jogging
on the Centennial Way Trail, police said.
The 32-year-old woman was jogging
north on the trail near Spruce Avenue around
6:30 a.m. when she passed a man walking
the opposite direction, according to police.
The man grabbed her from behind and
thrusted his pelvis against her repeatedly
before running away, police said. He was
fully clothed during the attack, as was the
victim.
The suspect was last seen heading south
on the trail toward San Bruno.
He was described as a dark complexioned
Hispanic male adult, 20 to 30 years old,
around 5 feet 4 inches tall, with broad
shoulders and a small waist.
He had a faux hawk hairstyle and was
wearing black slacks and a snug tting v-
neck T-shirt.
Anyone with information on this suspect
or attack should call police at 877-8900.
San Mateo man arrested in Belmont
on suspicion of indecent exposure
Belmont police arrested a San Mateo man
Thursday night after he was allegedly seen
masturbating in a parked car.
Police were called to the 100 block of
Irene Court Thursday around 8:30 p.m. on a
report of a subject seen masturbating in a
car, according to Capt. Patrick Halleran.
Ofcers found the vehicle, a silver 1988
Ford Festiva, unoccupied, but located a sus-
pect, Baldomero Nimajuan, 30, a short time
later in the parking lot of a nearby apart-
ment complex.
Nimajuan, a San Mateo resident, was
arrested on suspicion of indecent exposure
and possession of marijuana, and cited and
released after an interview.
Belmont police are checking with other
agencies to determine if Nimajuan is con-
nected to any other similar incidents.
Anyone with information is asked to call
Belmont police at 595-7400 or the crime
tip line at 598-3000.
Redwood City man sentenced
to jail, probation for bank robbery
ARedwood City man who pleaded no con-
test to felony robbery in connection with a
bank robbery was sen-
tenced Friday to one year
in jail and three years of
supervised probation,
according to District
Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe. Marco
Antonio Rubio-Baez, 27,
was also ordered to enter
a drug treatment program
as part of his probation,
and the jail sentence can
be modied to a residential drug treatment
program, Wagstaffe said.
Rubio-Baez has already served around
seven months in county jail in connection
with the April 1 robbery, Wagstaffe said.
Prosecutors said Rubio-Baez walked into
the First Republic Bank on the 700 block of
El Camino Real in Redwood City and hand-
ed a teller a note demanding money.
The note said the teller had ve minutes to
comply, but noted that he did not plan to
hurt the teller, prosecutors said.
The teller handed over $4,000 in a bag,
but then triggered an alarm and followed the
suspect, advising police of his location
with a cellphone.
Police arrested Rubio-Baez at the north
entrance to Sequoia Station shopping cen-
ter, and recovered the money and a small
bag of methamphetamine, prosecutors said.
Caltrain delayed after
brake fire at Millbrae station
Caltrain reported that a southbound train
broke down at the Millbrae station
Saturday.
The brakes on train 448 caught on re,
but the re was extinguished without any
injuries, Caltrain spokeswoman Christine
Dunn said.
Trains traveling through the area operated
only on the northbound tracks, Dunn said.
Details scarce about
suspect who robbed bank Friday
A suspect robbed a downtown Palo Alto
bank Friday afternoon and police have few
details about who got away with the stolen
money.
The suspect entered the Chase Bank in the
300 block of Hamilton Avenue around 5:40
p.m., police said.
The suspect gave the teller a note demand-
ing money. The note said the suspect had a
rearm, although a weapon was never seen,
police said.
The teller complied and the suspect left
the bank on foot with an undisclosed
amount of cash, police said.
The suspect was last seen walking onto
Bryant Street. No suspect vehicles were
seen, police said.
No one was injured in the robbery.
Witnesses were unable to provide a
detailed description of the suspect who was
either a male or female of an unknown race
and age, police said.
The suspect was only described as stand-
ing about 5 feet 11 inches and weighing
about 160 pounds. The person had waist-
length brown hair that was described as
frizzy.
The robber was wearing a black shirt,
khaki pants and a black baseball hat while
carrying a black backpack.
Anyone with information is asked to call
Palo Alto police at 329-2413. Anonymous
tips can be sent to paloalto@tipnow.org or
via text or voicemail to 383-8984.
Street reopens more than
eight hours after fatal crash
A Palo Alto street reopened more than
eight hours after a fatal crash Saturday
morning, police said.
The 4200 block of West Middleeld Road
was shut down after a cement truck crashed
and the driver was found dead around 5:10
a.m., police said.
The street reopened at 1:30 p.m.
Ofcer responded to the area and found the
driver and sole occupant, inside the truck.
He was pronounced dead at the scene, police
said.
The cause of the accident is under investi-
gation. No other vehicles were involved
and no other injuries were reported, police
said.
Police do not know if drugs or alcohol
were a factor in the incident.
Anyone who witnessed the crash is asked
to call Palo Alto police at 329-2413.
Anonymous tips can be sent to
paloalto@tipnow.org or via text or voice-
mail to 383-8984.
Marco
Rubio-Baez
Local briefs
STATE/NATION 7
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Nearly ve years
into his presidency, Barack Obama con-
fronts a world far different from what he
envisioned when he rst took ofce.
U.S. inuence is declining in the Middle
East as violence and instability rock
Arab countries. An ambitious attempt to
reset U.S. relations with Russia faltered
and failed. Even in Obama-friendly
Europe, theres deep skepticism about
Washingtons government surveillance
programs.
In some cases, the current climate has
been driven by factors outside the White
Houses control. But missteps by the
president also are to blame, say foreign
policy analysts, including some who
worked for the Obama administration.
Among them: miscalculating the fall-
out from the Arab Spring uprisings,
publicly setting unrealistic expecta-
tions for improved ties with Russia and
a reactive decision-making process that
can leave the White House appearing to
veer from crisis to crisis without a
broader strategy.
Rosa Brooks, a former Defense
Department ofcial who left the admin-
istration in 2011, said that while the
shrinking U.S. leverage overseas pre-
dates the current president, Obama has
sometimes equated we have no lever-
age with theres no point to really
doing anything.
Obama, faced most urgently with
escalating crises in Egypt and Syria, has
defended his measured approach, saying
Americas ability to solve the worlds
problems on its own has been over-
stated.
Sometimes what weve seen is that
folks will call for immediate action,
jumping into stuff, that does not turn
out well, gets us mired in very difcult
situations, he said. We have to think
through strategically whats going to be
in our long-term national interests.
The strongest challenge to Obamas
philosophy on intervention has come
from the deepening tumult in the Middle
East and North Africa. The president saw
great promise in the region when he rst
took ofce and pledged a new begin-
ning with the Arab world when he trav-
eled to Cairo in 2009.
But the democracy protests that
spread across the region quickly scram-
bled Obamas efforts. While the U.S.
has consistently backed the rights of
people seeking democracy, the violence
that followed has often left the Obama
administration unsure of its next move
or taking tentative steps that do little to
change the situation on the ground.
For president, world looks
far different than expected
REUTERS
Barack Obama, left, and Vice President Joe Biden appear at an event in Bidens
home town of Scranton, Penn.
Counties seek to reduce re-offense rate
SANTAANA When Yen Ly was released from behind bars
this spring, she assumed it wouldnt be long before she began
committing credit card fraud again to keep up with bills while
feeding a devastating meth habit.
This time, however, was different. Five months later, the
29-year-old single mother who had been convicted twice for
identity theft is a fulltime beauty school student, performs
community service and has consistently tested clean for
drugs.
Ly also is on the leadership committee of a special center
where low-level ex-cons can take classes, learn parenting
skills, get job training and complete drug and alcohol coun-
seling all in the same place. She said the program gave her
structure and condence and helped her grow as a parent.
I feel as if theyre giving me a second chance and Im not
going to waste it, Ly said. Ive gone this far and I dont want
to go back.
Ly is one of thousands of lower-level felons in California
being supervised by local authorities instead of state parole
ofcers under a recent law that overhauled the states criminal
justice system. Under the so-called realignment law, counties
and not the state now bear the responsibility for hous-
ing inmates convicted of most non-serious, non-sexual and
non-violent felonies and for watching them after their release.
The main intent of the initiative, pushed by Gov. Jerry
Brown, was to reduce severe overcrowding in Californias 33
adult prisons, a reduction that is mandated under a federal court
order. Realignment also aims to make rehabilitation for
lower-level felons a priority over incarceration.
Lawmakers aim to limit revenge porn postings
SACRAMENTO State lawmakers are attempting to limit
a distressing social media phenomenon known as revenge
porn, where spurned suitors post intimate photos of their ex-
lovers on the Internet for all to see.
The Assembly is set to debate a bill that would make such
conduct punishable by up to a year in jail, while Gov. Jerry
Brown is considering separate legislation that would make it
a crime to impersonate or bully a domestic violence victim
online.
The measures are forcing lawmakers to consider where to
draw the line between unfettered free speech and privacy rights.
Around the state
NATION/WORLD 8
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Lee Keath and Ryan Lucas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DAMASCUS, Syria Syria agreed
Sunday to a U.N. investigation into last
weeks alleged chemical weapons attack
outside Damascus a deal a senior White
House ofcial dismissed as too late to be
credible, saying the United States has
very little doubt President Bashar Assads
forces used such weapons.
The hardening of the U.S. position came
as calls for military action grow. In a sign
the U.S. may be a step closer to an armed
response, naval forces have already been
dispatched toward Syrias coastal waters,
although President Barack Obama has cau-
tioned against a hasty decision.
With France, Britain, Israel and some
U.S. congressmen urging swift military
action against Assads regime if the use of
chemical agents is confirmed, the U.N.
teams conclusions could have a dramatic
impact on the trajectory of the countrys
civil war.
The agreement struck in Damascus calls
for U.N. experts already in the country to
begin an investigation Monday into the
suspected chemical attack on rebel-held
areas in the capitals eastern suburbs.
Anti-government activists and Doctors
Without Borders say that more than 300
people were killed in an artillery barrage by
regime forces Wednesday that included the
use of toxic gas. The government calls the
allegations absolutely baseless.
The suburbs hit in the suspected chemical
strike, collectively known as eastern
Ghouta, are under the control of rebel ght-
ers, and regime artillery and warplanes have
pounded the area for days. The U.N. inspec-
tors will have to traverse through both gov-
ernment-held and opposition-controlled
turf to conduct their probe. Rebels have said
they will help facilitate the visit.
Under Sundays agreement with the U.N.,
the Syrian government afrmed that it will
provide the necessary cooperation, includ-
ing the observance of the cessation of hos-
tilities at the locations related to the inci-
dent, U.N. spokesman Martin Nesirky said
in a statement.
In Washington, a senior administration
ofcial said the U.S. has very little doubt
that regime forces used chemical weapons
in Wednesdays attack, an assessment that
was based on the reported number of vic-
tims, reported symptoms of those who were
killed or injured as well as witness
accounts and facts gathered by the U.S intel-
ligence community.
The ofcial, who insisted on anonymity
because of lack of authorization to speak
publicly about the developments, was dis-
missive of the Syrian governments agree-
ment to grant access to the U.N. team, say-
ing it was too late to be credible.
The regimes continuing shelling of the
site would have signicantly corrupted
any available evidence of chemical
weapons, the ofcial said.
The U.N. team was in Syria to look into
three earlier suspected chemical attacks,
with a mandate to determine whether such
weapons were used, not who was responsi-
ble for unleashing them. There was no indi-
cation that the missions brief had been
expanded to assess who was behind
Wednesdays attack.
Even as the pressure mounts for a strong
international response, there is no guaran-
tee that foreign powers will take action if
the U.N. conrms chemical agents were
used. But the scale of the attack makes this
instance far harder to ignore than previous
suspected cases.
A senior State Department ofcial, not
authorized to comment publicly by name,
said U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry
spoke with the top diplomats of Britain,
France, Canada and Russia as well as U.N.
Secretary Ban Ki-Moon.
Syria agrees to U.N. chemical weapons investigation
REUTERS
Pigeons lie on the ground after dying from what activists say is the use of chemical weapons
by forces loyal to President Bashar Assad in the Damascus, Syria.
By Rodrigo Soberanes Santin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHONTALPA, Mexico A notorious
cargo train known as the Beast and carry-
ing at least 250 Central American hitchhik-
ing migrants derailed in a remote region of
southern Mexico on Sunday, killing at least
five people and injuring 18, authorities
said.
The train company and rescue workers
were bringing in two cranes to help search
for more victims among the eight derailed
cars, ofcials said.
Thousands of migrants ride the roofs of
the train cars on their way north each year,
braving brutal conditions for a chance at
crossing into the United States.
The Tabasco state government said at least
250 Honduran migrants were on the train
heading north from the Guatemala border.
Heavy rains had loosened the earth beneath
the tracks and shifted the rails, ofcials said.
Honduran President Porrio Lobo set up a
call center for families to learn information
about their loved ones.
The head of civil protection for Mexicos
Interior Department, Luis Felipe Puente,
released a list of 17 Hondurans ranging in
ages from 19 to 54 who were taken to two
regional hospitals. Six of them were in seri-
ous condition, according to the list he pub-
lished on his ofcial Twitter account. Puente
said another Guatemalan was also wounded
and the Central American nations foreign
ministry said two were injured.
The locomotive and rst car did not derail
and were used to move victims to the nearest
hospital, in the neighboring state of
Veracruz. Tabasco state Civil Protection
chief Cesar Burelo Burelo said the accident
happened at 3 a.m. in a marshy area sur-
rounded by lakes and forest that is out of
cellphone range.
The Red Cross said dozens of soldiers,
marines and civilian emergency workers
rushed to the area, which ambulances could-
nt reach. Ofcials were trying to establish
air or water links to the scene.
Honduran and Guatemalan diplomats trav-
eled to the area to help identify victims and
make sure the injured were getting needed
medical attention, the nations foreign of-
cials said.
Mexico migrant train derails; at least five dead
OPINION 9
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
City apparel plan is appalling
The Daily Journal received a copy of
this letter sent to the San Carlos City
Council
Dear Councilmembers,
I read the Daily Journal newspaper
this morning and couldnt believe
what I was reading (Clothes call: San
Carlos considering team apparel in the
Aug. 23 edition). This is the worst idea
I have ever heard of. Your asking me to
pay to outt the employees of this
city? You say it would help morale.
When cities are cutting back why
should you give out free clothing,
when others are losing their jobs?
Whats next, free lunches? Paid
vacation trips? Why not pay for their
Thanksgiving dinner? Or throw them
a New Years party?
Better yet, take the money and
reduce the sewer charge that is outra-
geous. Why a studio pays the same as
a four bedroom house is unreal. Lets
use the clothing money for schools
or homeless people.
While were at it lets change the
saying City of Good Living to
City of High Taxes.
Jim Peck AKA The
person paying the bill
Los Altos
Mannings hormone
treatments on taxpayers dime
Editor,
Bradley Mannings lawyers, the
American Civil Liberties Union
(ACLU), the Human Rights
Commission and other advocates for
the LGBT community are going to be
very disappointed that despite their
best legal efforts, Manning will
never get hormone treatments on the
taxpayers dime while incarcerated for
treason (Manning wants to live as a
woman named Chelsea in the Aug.
23 edition of the Daily Journal). I
believe chutzpa would be the proper
word for the sure to fail attempts and
legal coercion. I am really surprised
that some of my friends in the LGBT
community honestly think that this
will y with the broader public. I
guess when you are insulated from
diverse public opinion and surround
yourself with sycophants it must
seem like there is majority support.
Wait until the polls come out on this
issue and the nonexistent legal
avenues become apparent. Itll be a
shock when they nd out that theres
a better chance of Liberace headlining
next years Outside Lands Festival
than Manning getting his hormone
treatments on the public dime. Dont
shoot the messenger.
John Dillon
San Bruno
Protests
Editor,
Muslim Brotherhood protesters
against the Egyptian army have also
attacked Christians and churches.
Extremist Muslims have persecuted
Christians in other countries. This
could have been anticipated by the
terrorism that they launched against
Israel for many years. Muslim
extremists have killed fellow
Muslims in Egypt, Syria, Iraq,
Afghanistan, Lebanon and Libya. All
this conict comes from their intoler-
ance for other religions and minori-
ties, and their glorication of death
instead of life. Those who dont rec-
ognize Muslim extremism as what it
is do so at their own risk.
Norman Licht
San Carlos
Letters to the editor
Sacramento Bee
G
ov. Jerry Brown in recent
years has signed legislation
to eliminate the major bar-
riers to food stamp participation in
California. New laws ended burden-
some and humiliating fingerprint
requirements for applicants.
California also reduced the number
of application renewals required
annually to just two, the federal min-
imum. Despite those improvements,
according to a U.S. Department of
Agriculture survey released earlier
this year, nearly half of those eligi-
ble for food assistance in California
still do not receive it.
As a story in the Los Angeles
Times recently reminded us, liberal,
blue-state California has the lowest
rate of food stamp participation in
the country, lower than Texas, lower
than Mississippi, lower than
Alabama. The federal program to
feed the poor, officially known as
SNAP at the national level, is called
CalFresh in California. Advocates
for the poor blame the states low
participation rate on a still overly
complex application process, poor
customer service at the county level,
and antiquated and incompatible
county computer systems.
The Affordable Care Act offers a
once-in-a-generation opportunity
for the state to modernize food assis-
tance and add millions of needy peo-
ple to the CalFresh rolls. As state
health officials implement the
Affordable Care Act, food policy
advocates are urging them to consid-
er integrating CalFresh into those
processes as well.
In most cases, people newly eligi-
ble for medical coverage under the
Affordable Care Act will also be eli-
gible for CalFresh. Applications for
both programs ask the same ques-
tions. Can they be integrated? When
someone signs up for health care,
can they also automatically sign up
for and become eligible for food
assistance? Can updates and
renewals be transferred between both
programs?
Food policy advocates want the
state to evaluate all CalFresh mod-
ernization proposals for how they
integrate with health care and specif-
ically Medi-Cal. The federal govern-
ment is encouraging such integra-
tion and helping to finance it in
some cases. Some caution is neces-
sary here. Health care is too impor-
tant. In seeking to integrate
CalFresh with the Affordable Care
Act, state officials cant afford to
lose the primary focus - health care.
Still, checking a box that sends the
health care applicants paperwork to
the CalFresh program ought to be
doable.
More than 4 million low-income
Californians receive food assistance
now, but another 4 million who are
eligible do not. That means too
many state residents go hungry or
rely on food banks to feed their fam-
ilies when they dont have to.
Because CalFresh is paid for entirely
with federal dollars, it also means
California residents miss out on an
estimated $4.7 billion in federal
help every year, money that gener-
ates another $8.3 billion in eco-
nomic activity for grocers, farmers
and others who work or do business
with them. California can and should
do better.
Health reform could boost use of food stamps
The Belmont Stakes
I
ts not exactly a horse race but the Belmont council
election may be one of the countys most exciting
and determine the citys future.
Warren Lieberman is the only incumbent seeking re-elec-
tion. Coralin Feierbach and ally David Warden, two veteran
members, are not. Feierbach together with Warden and
Mayor Christine Wozniack have
dominated the council in the past
decade. With the departure of the
two incumbents Belmont has no
term limits the existing power
structure is up for grabs. Five candi-
dates hoping to ll the void are
three members of the Planning
Commission: Eric Reed, who lost
by 11 votes last time; Kristin
Mercer and Gladwyn DSousa.
Charles Stone, school foundation
endowment chair and Realtor Mike
Verdone are also running.
***
If Lieberman wins, he will have a shot at being mayor.
He has been passed over twice before when he did not
receive support from Feierbach, Warden and Wozniack
when it became his turn despite efforts by councilman
David Braunstein.
***
Alook at the candidates endorsements is revealing. There
are two camps. Mercer and DSousa are endorsing each other.
They are supported by Wozniack, Feierbach and Warden and
have similar endorsers including former planning commis-
sioner Rick Frautschi. Mercer is also endorsed by County
Superintendent of Schools Anne Campbell. Reed and Stone
are endorsing each other and have the support of Lieberman,
Braunstein; Supervisors Don Horsley and Adrienne Tissier.
Reed also is endorsed by Supervisor Warren Slocum and
Stone by Assemblyman Richard Gordon and state Sen.
Leland Yee. Lieberman is endorsed by state senators Jerry
Hill and Yee; Supervisors Horsley. Tissier and Carole Groom.
Mike Verdone, newcomer to Belmont politics takes his rst
plunge. See endorsements on the candidates websites.
***
Lieberman is running for his third term. He served on the
Finance Commission with then-treasurer Howard Mason who
encouraged him to run for council. He is now a management
consultant for software development and used to consult for
American Airlines. Lieberman would like to see a more
vibrant downtown where people can walk and nd something
to do. Right now, when people come to Belmont, they drive
home after dinner. He believes Belmonts insistence on con-
ditional use permits has discouraged new development.
***
DSousa has served on the Planning Commission, the
Green Advisory Committee, bicycle advocacy groups and
chairs the San Carlos Belmont Sierra Club. Hes for more
development downtown via community benet agreements
with no extra parking. He could see four- to six-story
building on El Camino and on Ralston from Sixth Avenue
to the highway. He and Mercer are supported by the citys
more vocal no-growth advocates. He vigorously objected
to Crystal Springs private school locating off Ralston
Avenue, a controversy which continues to split the city.
He felt local public schools would suffer nancially.
***
Reed has served on the Planning Commission since
2008. He was the only planning commissioner of the three
running who voted for Crystal Springs. He works at
Genentech in South San Francisco. He feels the current tree
ordinance is overkill and should be limited to heritage
trees. He wants to protect existing open space but would
like to see more development downtown. The city needs to
bring Oracle employees and Notre Dame students down-
town. He would increase development through enterprise
zones which follow strict guidelines and limit multi-story
buildings on El Camino Real to three stories.
***
Mercer has been proactive on the Planning Commission
for the past seven years. She is frustrated the city has not
moved more quickly on developing a downtown vision and
redoing the general plan. She could support some increased
development downtown including four stories east of El
Camino to Highway 101 but not on the part of El Camino
adjacent to Ralston Avenue. She supports the judges rul-
ing which might halt high-speed rail and is wary of its
impacts on Belmont. She started her activism in the par-
ent-teacher association. She voted against Crystal Springs
but could reconsider.
***
Charles Stone, an attorney, has been involved with the
school districts foundation, School Force. He was a major
advocate for Crystal Springs coming to Belmont and
thought it was a win for the city and the school district. He
wants to preserve Belmonts suburban nature but would like
to see more development downtown up to four stories and
higher density around the train station. He feels develop-
ment has passed us by and Belmont can no longer afford to
be a difcult town. We are part of the larger county and
region.
***
Despite the rhetoric, the candidates dont seem that far
apart. Whoever wins in November, council dynamics will
change. Who wins may depend in part on a heated school
board race with seven candidates and a school parcel tax.
That turnout could determine the council victors.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column runs
every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjournal.com.
Other voices
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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BUSINESS 10
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Its time for U.S.
investors to revisit Europe.
Last summer, much of the continent was
mired in recession and the euro currency
looked like a failed experiment.
Now, Europe is healing. The 17 countries
that use the euro posted economic growth of
0.3 percent from April to June compared
with the previous quarter, the rst expan-
sion since late 2011. Industrial production
is up, consumer spending is stable and
stock markets are rising as people and busi-
nesses gain condence.
Fund managers and market strategists say
the last several months of better economic
news and higher stock prices could signal
the start a long-term rally for the continent.
There are now clear signs that Europe is
turning, says Jurrien Timmer, a portfolio
manager at Fidelity Investments. Timmer
recommends that investors move part of
their U.S. investments into Europe.
In France, the CAC 40 stock index has
risen 12 percent this year. Germanys DAX
index is up 11 percent. Even more troubled
economies like Spain and Italy arent dis-
couraging investors: Italys FTSE MIB has
climbed 7 percent and Spains IBEX is up 6
percent.
European stocks appear to be less expen-
sive than their U.S. counterparts, based on
their price-earnings ratio, or P/E. Low P/Es
signal that stocks are cheap relative to their
earnings; high ones signal they are expen-
sive.
The Stoxx Euro 600, Europes equivalent
of the Standard & Poors 500 index, is trad-
ing at 13.1 times earnings over the next 12
months. That is slightly cheaper than the
14.1 times for the S&P 500.
Europes nascent recovery can be traced
back to a year ago. On July 26, 2012,
European Central Bank President Mario
Draghi pledged to do whatever it takes to
save the currency union. Later, the ECB
calmed fears of state bankruptcies in coun-
tries like Spain and Italy by promising to
buy back government debt, if needed.
The improving fortunes of the eurozone
can be seen in the borrowing costs of gov-
ernments. The yield on Spains 10-year
bond, for example, is now 4.44 percent,
down from 6.83 percent at the end of last
August.
Even this slight stabilization will help
lead to renewed condence in the eurozone,
says Sean Lynch, global investment strate-
gist for Wells Fargo Private Bank.
Europes recovery is still patchy, but
enough encouraging trends have emerged.
France exited its 18-month recession last
quarter. Germanys economy, Europes
biggest, grew at a 0.7 percent annual rate,
more than economists expected. Investor
condence there also hit a six-month high
in August, according to the Centre for
European Economic Research.
And while Spains unemployment rate is
26.3 percent and its economy contracted by
0.1 percent in the second quarter, unem-
ployment is at a five-month low.
Economists expect Spain to pull out of its
recession by year-end.
The news out of Europe is encouraging,
Lynch says. Its too early to ring the all-
clear button, though.
In a conference call with investors on
Aug. 14, Cisco CEO John Chambers said
that business across Europe, particularly
Britain and Northern Europe, was showing
very positive progress.
We remain cautious, however, given the
instability of the southern region,
Chambers said.
That compares with a more skeptical view
last month from McDonalds CEO Donald
Thomson, who said the European economy
had not yet turned the corner.
I think the economists may be a bit
ahead of themselves, Thomson said.
Some markets may have bottomed out. I
would tell you some of the larger markets
are still having some challenges.
Liz Ann Sonders, chief investment strate-
gist at Charles Schwab, says Europe looks
attractive partly because the economy still
has challenges.
Why its time to revisit European stocks
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Traders work in front of the DAX board at the Frankfurt stock exchange in Germany last week.
Amgen buying cancer
drug maker Onyx for $10.4B
NEWYORK Biotech drugmaker Amgen
will buy cancer drug maker Onyx
Pharmaceuticals for about $10.4 billion in
cash.
Amgen Inc. says it will acquire Onyx for
$125 per share. The companies value the
deal at $9.7 billion excluding Onyxs
cash.
Amgen is the biggest biotech drug com-
pany in the world. Its products include
Prolia for osteoporosis, Enbrel for
rheumatoid arthritis and skin disorders,
and Neulasta and Neupogen for fighting
infection in cancer patients.
Onyx Pharmaceuticals Inc. markets a
liver and kidney cancer pill called Nexavar
through a partnership with Bayer AG.
Sales totaled about $861 million in 2012.
In July the regulators approved Onyxs
Kyprolis as a treatment for multiple
myeloma, a type of blood cancer.
Onyx rejected an offer from Amgen of
$120 per share in June.
U.S. gas prices
decline 4 cents a gallon
CAMARILLO The average U.S. price
of gasoline has fallen 4 cents a gallon over
the past two weeks and 20 cents since this
time last year.
The Lundberg Survey of gas prices
released Sunday reports that a gallon of reg-
ular now costs $3.56. Midgrade costs an
average of $3.74 and premium is $3.88.
Of the cities surveyed in the Lower 48
states, Charleston, S.C., has the nations
lowest average price for regular at $3.22.
The Long Island, New York, region has the
highest at $3.82.
In California, the lowest average is
Sacramentos $3.63.
The highest is San Diegos $3.82.
Rounded off, San Diegos price is the
same as Long Islands. But analyst Trilby
Lundberg says the California citys is actu-
ally a few percentage points of a penny
less.
Business briefs
BUSINESS 11
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Elias
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO When the
mayor of Richmond and a gaggle of
activists and homeowners showed
up at the Wells Fargo Bank head-
quarters in downtown San
Francisco this month, they were on
a mission to speak with the banks
chief executive.
They wanted the bank to drop a
lawsuit aimed at stopping
Richmonds first-in-the-nation
plan to use the governments con-
stitutional power of eminent
domain to seize hundreds of mort-
gages from Wells Fargo and other
nancial institutions.
As Mayor Gayle McLaughlin and
the plans backers approached the
bank building, security guards
locked the doors. After a bank of-
cial told her there would be no
meeting then and that someone
would call her later, she grabbed a
bullhorn.
I am absolutely not backing
down, McLaughlin said, as curious
tourists and lunching ofce work-
ers milled about.
Wells Fargo, three other banks
and even the Federal Housing
Finance Agency think otherwise.
The banks have led two lawsuits
alleging that the plan is an illegal
abuse of eminent domain, which
allows governments to seize pri-
vate property for public use like
a house in the path of a new high-
way or a piece of land needed for a
new park.
The banks argue the plan would
severely disrupt the United States
mortgage indus-
try because
many other
cities would
likely adopt the
same program
to help home-
owners who
owe more on
their mortgages
than their hous-
es are worth.
So far, Richmond has sent out
more than 600 offers, but has not
yet begun any eminent domain pro-
ceedings. Newark, N.J., North Las
Vegas, Nev., El Monte, Calif., and
Seattle are considering similar
plans, according to Wells Fargos
lawsuit.
While the housing industry is
recovering slowly, Richmond, a
city of roughly 100,000 people, is
in the middle of a housing crisis, as
plummeting home values and ris-
ing crime has left many worried
that an era of urban blight is upon
them.
McLaughlin said cities are con-
sidering the program because they
are desperate. Nearly half the mort-
gages in Richmond, for example,
are underwater, the owner owes
more than the house is worth.
The plan is the brainchild of
Cornell University law school pro-
fessor Robert Hockett and heres
how it works:
The fact of the matter is that
underwater loans do default at mas-
sive rates, Hockett said.
Underwater loans are a major drag
on the economic recovery. We have
got to do something.
Richmond looks to seize
loans to ease mortgages
Gayle
McLaughlin
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Actress Daryl Hannah, left, joins protesters during a rally in front of the White House.
By Kavin Begos
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH A project
examining the local health
impacts from natural gas drilling
is providing some of the rst pre-
liminary numbers about people
who may be affected, and the
results challenge the industry
position that no one suffers but
also suggest the problems may
not be as widespread as some crit-
ics claim.
The Southwest Pennsylvania
Environmental Health Project has
been trying to help people who
feel theyve been sickened by nat-
ural gas drilling or processing for
about 18 months in one county
south of Pittsburgh.
The work is potentially impor-
tant because its one of the rst
long-term attempts to monitor
drilling-related health impacts,
and it could help other groups
identify possible symptoms.
The project found 27 cases where
people in Washington County
believe they were hurt by nearby
drilling seven cases of skin
rashes, four of eye irritation, 13 of
breathing problems and three of
headaches and dizziness. The skin
exposures were from water and the
other cases were from air. The
numbers dont represent a full sur-
vey of the area, just cases so far
with plausible exposures.
The EHP group is trying to help
those who have been exposed to
drilling-related air or water pollu-
tion, toxicologist David Brown
told the Associated Press, adding
that theyre nding an array of
symptoms in some people who
live close to either wells or pro-
cessing stations.
Fracking health project
puts numbers to debate
WORLD 12
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
REUTERS
Residents pass by a damaged vehicle a day after a bomb attack in central Baquba, Iraq.
By Sinan Salaheddin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD Insurgents bent on destabi-
lizing Iraq killed at least 46 people in
numerous attacks scattered around the coun-
try on Sunday, striking targets as varied as a
coffee shop, a wedding party convoy and a
carload of off-duty soldiers.
The attacks are part of a months-long
wave of killing that is the countrys worst
spate of bloodshed since 2008. The vio-
lence is calling into question the security
forces ability to protect the country and
raising fears that Iraqs sectarian and ethnic
divisions are pushing it back toward the
brink of civil war.
One of the days boldest attacks happened
near the northern Iraqi city of Mosul, where
militants set up a fake security checkpoint,
captured ve soldiers and shot them dead, a
police ofcer said. The soldiers were dressed
in civilian clothes and returning to base in a
taxi.
Inside Mosul, other gunmen in a speeding
car shot and killed a grocer, he said, though
the motive was not immediately clear. The
grocer was a member of the Shabak ethnic
group, which has its own distinct language
and religious beliefs.
Mosul, a former insurgent stronghold, is
about 360 kilometers (220 miles) northwest
of Baghdad.
Another police ofcer said a car bomb
exploded as a judge drove past in the north-
ern town of Balad, killing three nurses and a
man who had been walking nearby. Thirteen
other people were wounded, including the
judge, his brother and a driver, he added.
Attacks have been on the rise in Iraq since
a deadly security crackdown in April on a
Sunni protest camp. More than 3,000 peo-
ple have been killed in violence during the
past few months, raising fears the country
could see an even deadlier, sectarian round of
bloodshed similar to what brought the coun-
try to the edge of civil war in 2006 and
2007.
Many of Sundays victims were civilians
going about their normal business despite
the rising risks.
In the town of Madain, about 25 kilome-
ters (15 miles) southeast of Baghdad, a car
bomb explosion killed four and wounded
12, another police ofcer said. Authorities
reported that another bomb there struck a
group of young people playing soccer,
killing four and wounding 13.
Multiple blasts hit the city of Baqouba,
about 60 kilometers (35 miles) northeast of
Baghdad.
Police said one bomb exploded near a
police ofcers house, killing his 8-year old
son and wounding 11 other people, police
said. The police ofcer was unharmed.
Later in the day, a parked car bomb went
off in a residential area in the city, killing
seven and wounding 34. Yet another bomb
exploded next to a wedding party convoy,
killing four and wounding 17, police said.
In the capital Baghdad, a car bomb at a
market in the southeastern and largely
Shiite neighborhood of al-Ameen killed
three civilians and wounded 13 others,
authorities said. Three other civilians were
killed and six wounded when a bomb
attached to a car exploded while passing
through the capitals eastern Zayona neigh-
borhood, police said. Another bomb went
off in a commercial area in the western
Ghazaliya area, killing two people and
wounding seven others, ofcials said.
Later in the evening, police said a bomb
tore through a coffee shop, killing eight and
injuring 27 in Baghdads northern Shaab
neighborhood.
Medical ofcials conrmed the casualty
gures. All ofcials spoke on condition of
anonymity as they were not authorized to
release the information.
Violent attacks last month claimed the
lives of more than 1,000 people, the high-
est monthly death toll in ve years, accord-
ing to the United Nations. More than 420
people have been killed so far in August,
according to an Associated Press count.
Insurgent attacks in Iraq kill at least 46
<< Oakland falls to Orioles, page 14
Pryor to get rst start for Raiders, page 17
Monday, Aug. 26, 2013
AMERICAS CUP: EMIRATES TEAM NEW ZEALAND ADVANCE TO MATCH VERSUS ORACLE >> PAGE 15
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO The familiar formu-
la that carried San Francisco back to the
Super Bowl last season for the rst time in
18 years is on display again.
Colin Kaepernick marched the offense
with six straight completions during a
series that ended with a 5-yard touchdown
pass to Quinton Patton, and Aldon Smith
and Justin Smith plowed through
Minnesotas offensive
line to make plays and
hard-hitting tackles in
the 49ers 34-14 exhibi-
tion victory over the
Vikings on Sunday night.
Sure, its only the pre-
season. And there were a
lot of foolish penalties.
Yet Kaepernick looks
sharp, and the defense looks its usual
stingy.
Justin Smith ran over two would-be
blockers to pound Toby Gerhart for a 4-yard
loss midway through the rst quarter, and
sack man Aldon Smith recovered a fumble
and put pressure on Christian Ponder.
The new look in this one: ashy Lavelle
Hawkins.
Hawkins returned a kickoff 105 yards for a
touchdown late in the second quarter, but he
received two unsportsmanlike penalties in
the process one for pointing the ball at a
Vikings player before reaching the end zone
and another for removing his helmet in cel-
ebration. Coach Jim Harbaugh chewed him
out on the sideline, and Hawkins could be
seen saying, My fault.
Yet Hawkins received another unsports-
manlike ag for head-butting linebacker
Niners defense looks solid
Colin
Kaepernick
REUTERS
Above: Japan catcher Ryusei Hirooka, right, puts the tag on Chula Vista player Patrick Archer during the fth inning of the Little League
World Series. Below: Chula Vista players react after losing 6-4.
By John Kekis
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. The vic-
tory lap around Lamade Stadium never gets
old for Japan, nor does the players ritual of
scooping up some souvenir dirt near the
mound after another Little League World
Series triumph.
A perennial power in youth baseball,
Japan rallied past Chula Vista, Calif., 6-4
on Sunday to win its ninth title and third in
Japan wins Little League World Series
Vogelsong
helps Giants
beat Pirates
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Ryan Vogelsong has
felt so good lately that it reminds him of his
successful run over the previous two sea-
sons. He just wants to keep building on that
feeling.
Vogelsong threw eight
sharp innings for his
first victory in three
months, helping the San
Francisco Giants beat the
Pittsburgh Pirates 4-0 on
Sunday.
I thought I was set-
tling in over my last four
innings against the Red
Sox and I just stayed with
whats working, said Vogelsong, who
pitched seven solid innings in a no-deci-
sion against Boston on Tuesday. I didnt
throw the ball well before I got hurt and was-
nt nding anything comfortable. The goal
is to nish strong and I feel like Im on the
way to that.
Pablo Sandoval had two RBIs as the
Giants won their second straight to split the
series with the Pirates. Buster Posey and
Joaquin Arias each drove in a run.
It was exciting to drive in those runs,
Sandoval said. The team needs wins. I lost
20 pounds and Im moving around better
too.
Vogelsong (3-4) allowed two hits, struck
out ve and walked one in his rst win since
May 20 against Washington. He had been
Japan 6, California 4
Giants 4, Pirates 0
See GIANTS, Page 14
See LLWS, Page 14
Ryan
Vogelsong
See NINERS, Page 17
49ers 34, Vikings 14
SPORTS 14
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By David Ginsberg
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BALTIMORE The Oakland Athletics
cant seem to mount any momentum in
their bid to return to the
postseason for a second
straight season.
Rookie Sonny Gray
was hit hard in his fourth
major league start, and
the Athletics lost to the
Baltimore Orioles 10-3
Sunday.
The defeat, which
came on the heels of a
victory Saturday, was especially agonizing
because outfielder Josh Reddick hurt his
right wrist.
In his first three starts with Oakland,
Gray (1-2) allowed a total of four earned
runs and 10 hits over 21 innings. In this
one, he didnt make it out of the fourth
inning.
The 2011 first-round draft pick was
vying to become the first major leaguer
since Wayne Simpson in 1970 to begin his
career with four consecutive starts of six
innings while permitting four hits or
fewer. That pursuit ended in the second,
when the right-hander gave up three hits
and fell behind 5-1.
He allowed six runs and eight hits in 3 1-
3 innings.
It was OK. I felt good, Gray said. My
stuffs been better, but I just didnt make all
the pitches that I needed to. They werent
really hitting the ball that hard, but they
were finding holes. It wasnt our day and it
started with me in the first inning.
Reddick hurt his wrist while swinging at
a pitch. He left the game, and could be
headed to the disabled list. Its hard to tell
right now. Im not going to assume that
thats the case, Reddick said. But, well
see. Its maybe 50-50 at this point.
Josh Donaldson homered for the
Athletics, who lost two of three to
Baltimore. Oakland is 16-18 since the All-
Star break, and although the As are cling-
ing to the second and final wild-card spot,
their lead over Baltimore has been slashed
to two games.
Theyre a good team and were a good
team as well, Gray said. We just didnt
play like were capable of.
Oakland had gone 105 straight games
since April 25 without allowing 10 runs.
The last team to do it? Baltimore.
Chris Davis had two hits and collected
his 118th RBI, and J.J. Hardy, Nick
Markakis and Nate McLouth homered for
the Orioles.
Baltimore right-hander Scott Feldman (4-
3) gave up one run in five innings.
It wasnt the prettiest outing, he said.
It was a battle from the get-go.
Baltimore got contributions from almost
everyone in the lineup. Hardy had three
hits, including his 23rd home run. Manny
Machado hit two sacrifice flies and Brian
Roberts scored twice and drove in a run.
Although Davis did not add to his major
league-leading home run total of 46, he
raised his batting average to .304. His 118
RBIs are 33 more than his previous career
hi gh.
Ten of Feldmans first 12 pitches were
out of the strike zone. He walked two in the
first inning and yielded an RBI single to
Alberto Callaspo.
Baltimore responded in the bottom half.
Successive singles by Machado, Davis and
Adam Jones produced a run, and Matt
Wieters followed with a sacrifice fly.
The Orioles made it 5-1 in the second.
Roberts hit an RBI single, Machado deliv-
ered a run-scoring flyout and Davis foiled a
shift to the right side by lining an RBI sin-
gle through the infield and into left field.
Athletics fall to Orioles
Orioles 10, As 3
Sonny Gray
sidelined by a broken pinkie nger on his
right hand.
The right-hander used his longest outing
of the season to lower his ERA to 2.55 in
four starts since coming off the disabled list
on Aug. 9.
Thats one of the best pitched games
weve had, Giants manager Bruce Bochy
said. It was fun to watch. He put on a show
on the art of pitching. He was comfortable
throwing any pitch at any time.
A.J. Burnett (6-9) pitched 7 1-3 innings
for Pittsburgh, giving up four runs and eight
hits. He fell to 2-3 in 10 starts since return-
ing from the DL.
Sandy Rosario nished the three-hitter for
San Franciscos 11th shutout. The Pirates,
who are tied with St. Louis for the NL
Central lead, have been shut out nine times
this season.
Vogelsong, who recorded his rst decision
since coming off the disabled list, faced just
two over the minimum, retiring eight of the
nal nine batters he faced.
It just seemed whatever we were looking
for, something else came out of his hand,
Pirates manager Clint Hurdle said. We just
didnt square him up a whole lot throughout
the game. We just had a couple of opportuni-
ties. We werent able to adjust or complicate
things for him.
Burnett was nearly as good until running
into trouble late. He retired six straight after
Poseys RBI single and then retired six
straight again before Poseys single in the
eighth.
The Giants scored their rst run in the
third. After two outs, Gregor Blanco walked
and Brandon Crawford singled ahead of
Poseys single.
The Pirates had two runners reach as far as
second against Vogelsong, and just once
with less than two outs.
A double play started by Posey in the
sixth prevented another runner from mov-
ing up. After Jordy Mercer was hit by a
pitch, the reigning MVP pounced out of the
box to grab Burnetts bunt and start a double
play.
You anticipate a bunt there and I felt like
it was close enough that I had a shot, Posey
said. At that point its all or nothing. There
cant be any hesitation.
Vogelsong said the play changed the
inning.
Youre just hoping to get the one out at
second, he said. Getting two outs was a
big play.
Posey also threw out a runner trying to
steal.
The Giants put the game away with three
more runs in the eighth.
Posey and Hunter Pence singled around an
infield groundout and Sandoval drilled a
triple into the deepest part of the ballpark.
Arias added an RBI double against Tony
Watson.
Continued from page 13
GIANTS
four years, the only disappointment in that
recent span a loss in 2011 to Huntington
Beach, Calif.
Ryusei Hirooka won this one with a two-
run double in the bottom of the fth inning
and Shunpei Takagi hit two solo home runs
to help keep the Tokyo team undefeated in
the tournament.
In all honesty, Im really happy, said
Japan manager Masumi Omae, who also led
the 2003 Japan team to the World Series
title. I denitely always dreamt about com-
ing back to win again. To be able to trust the
kids and their abilities is something Im
most proud about.
Facing one last threat in the sixth, the
Japanese players erupted in glee, tossing
Omae in the air near the mound after his
slick elders had turned a game-ending dou-
ble play.
Wanting to be World Series champs is all
weve talked about for the last two years,
Takagi said. I was thinking, just get a hit at
the plate. The outcome was two homers, so I
was really happy.
It was the 14th championship game for
Japan and 23rd for California, which has
won seven World Series titles.
Giancarlo Cortez had a two-run single and
Grant Holman an RBI single for Chula
Vista.
Trailing 4-3 after Cortezs clutch single in
the fourth, Japan tied it on Takagis second
homer and won it when Hirooka lined a 2-2
pitch down the left-eld line after not being
able to sacrice the runners up a base.
My mind was full, trying to get the bunt
down, Hirooka said. When I didnt get (the
bunt) down, my mind was blank. Im just so
happy I could get a hit to help our team
win.
California beat Westport, Conn., 12-1 in
the U.S. championship game Saturday,
while Japan edged Mexico 3-2 for the inter-
national title.
The Americans left 12 runners on base in a
game that was there for the taking.
We left some opportunities out there, but
give Japan credit, Chula Vista manager
Rick Tibbett said. They made some great
defensive plays.
Unbeaten, too, entering the game, Chula
Vista struck early to send a message that it
would be a tense affair.
Keyed by the shaggy-haired duo of Micah
Pietila-Wiggs and Jake Espinoza at the top
of the order, California scored twice in the
top of the rst against Japan starter Kazuki
Ishida to put the pressure on. Pietila-Wiggs
was hit by a pitch leading off and Espinoza
lined a double down the left-field line.
Pietila-Wiggs came around to score on a
passed ball and Holman singled home
Espinoza.
Continued from page 13
LLWS
SPORTS 15
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
Special:
4 Speakers
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Two sail-
ing powerhouses that have spent
the summer trading verbal jabs are
nally set to meet in the ultimate
grudge match the 34th Americas
Cup.
Emirates Team New Zealand
zipped through a thick fog and past
Italys Luna Rossa one last time
Sunday, capturing the Louis
Vuitton Cup challenger series 7-1
and advancing to the premier event
against defending champion and
bitter rival Oracle Team USA.
The best-of-17 Americas Cup
starts Sept 7.
Its really important. I mean, its
really important, said Team New
Zealand managing director Grant
Dalton, who also serves as a grinder
even though hes 56. The team
understands that. When you give a
speech to a yacht club here in San
Francisco, the one thing my grand-
dad always taught me is you dont
start a speech with an apology, and
I always do start with an apology.
The only reason were in San
Francisco is to take the Cup away.
The Kiwis crushed the conditions
and the competition in the chal-
lenger nals.
The closest margin was 1 minute,
28 seconds, and Luna Rossas lone
victory came when Team New
Zealand dropped out because the
electronics system that controls
the hydraulics of its catamaran
failed. The Kiwis won the nal race
the lightest wind of the series
thanks to a fog that blanketed San
Francisco Bay by the largest
margin: 3:20.
The Kiwis sounded their horn as
they crossed the nish line and
sprayed sparkling wine on the boat
from nearby Napa Valley while tak-
ing a victory lap near thousands
who crowded the corner piers.
Kiwis advance to Americas
Cup match versus Oracle
REUTERS
Emirates Team New Zealand sails ahead at the rst windward mark en
route to winning the 30th anniversary Louis Vuitton Cup nal against Italys
Luna Rossa Challenge on San Francisco Bay.
By Howard Fendrich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Alisa
Kleybanova could be forgiven for
simply being happy to be here, as
the old sports cliche goes.
Happy to be rid of cancer. Happy
to be playing tennis. Happy to be
participating in a major tourna-
ment, something she last did 2 1/2
years ago.
When she sets foot on Court 7
against Monica Puig at the U.S.
Open on Monday, Kleybanova
will be competing in a Grand Slam
match for the rst time since the
Australian Open in January 2011.
Soon after, Kleybanova was forced
off the tour while receiving treat-
ment for Hodgkins lymphoma, a
form of blood
cancer.
Its nice to
be back on the
court, obvious-
l y, but for me, I
dont just want
to play tennis,
the Russian in
an interview
Sunday. I want
to win.
Kleybanova, now 24, turned pro
shortly after turning 14 and made
quick strides, reaching No. 20 in
the WTA rankings, winning two
titles, earning more than $2 mil-
lion and advancing to the fourth
round at two Grand Slams in sin-
gles, as well as the seminals of
the 2009 U.S. Open in doubles.
And then her life changed con-
siderably. After being diagnosed
in the spring of 2011, Kleybanova
announced via the WTAs website
on July 15 that year her 22nd
birthday that she was sick and
would be treated in Italy, where she
trained. She underwent chemother-
apy until December 2011.
I nished my treatments a long
time ago. But it takes time for the
body to settle down. Its not just
living a normal life out here; its
really pushing yourself to the lim-
its, said Kleybanova, who is now
based part of the year at Boynton
Beach, Fla. Its really, really
hard, even for someone who never
had these kinds of issues. For a
normal person, its tough to be at
this level. So for me, now, its
even tougher. But Im ready for it.
Im not expecting it to be easy.
U.S. Open marks Kleybanovas
return after cancer treatment
By Greg Beacham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SONOMA Scott Dixon pulled
in for his nal pit stop with victory
nearly in his grasp. When he left a
few seconds later, two members of
Will Powers crew were sprawled on
the asphalt, a tire bouncing wildly
in his wake.
Although everybody involved
had a strong opinion about what
happened, Power knows one thing
for certain: Hes leaving wine coun-
try with yet another trophy.
Power won at Sonoma Raceway
for the third time in four years
Sunday, earning his rst victory of
the IndyCar season by taking
advantage of Dixons penalty for
making contact
with Powers
Team Penske pit
crew.
I dont like to
see the call that
had to take
place, but every-
body saw it,
Roger Penske
said. Its unfor-
tunate, but thats
the way racing is.
Dixon led until he received a
drive-through penalty with 15 laps
to go for clipping a tire in the left
hand of Powers tire holder when
Dixons Honda left his pit directly
behind Powers Chevrolet. The tire
holder went ying into another
crew member, and a third member
was injured by an air gun or hose.
Dixon thought Powers crew got
in his way on purpose, leaving him
angry and confused by IndyCars
latest call against him.
He nished 15th and lost a bit of
ground on overall IndyCar leader
Helio Castroneves, Powers Penske
teammate, who nished seventh.
Castroneves lead over Dixon grew
from 31 to 39 points (479-440)
with four races left in the IndyCar
season.
Thats probably the most bla-
tant thing Ive seen in a long time,
Dixon said. You watch most pit
guys, they try to get out of the way
of other people, so that was a bit of
a (classless) move, to be honest. ...
If thats the way they want to try and
win, thats pretty bad.
Power wins in Sonoma after late Dixon penalty
Will Power
Alisa
Kleybanova
16
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
S.A.M S A M
1940 Lesl i e St. , San Mateo, CA 94403
Sam
Tsang
Grand Opening!
92
101
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 78 52 .600
Washington 65 65 .500 13
Philadelphia 59 71 .454 19
New York 58 70 .453 19
Miami 49 80 .380 28 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 76 54 .585
St. Louis 76 54 .585
Cincinnati 74 57 .565 2 1/2
Milwaukee 57 73 .438 19
Chicago 55 75 .423 21
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 76 54 .585
Arizona 66 63 .512 9 1/2
Colorado 61 71 .462 16
San Diego 59 71 .454 17
San Francisco 58 72 .446 18
SaturdaysGames
Boston 4, L.A. Dodgers 2
Detroit 3, N.Y. Mets 0
Arizona 12, Philadelphia 7, 18 innings
Miami 3, Colorado 0
Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 3
Washington 7, Kansas City 2
St. Louis 6, Atlanta 2
Chicago Cubs 3, San Diego 2
San Francisco 6, Pittsburgh 3
SundaysGames
Colorado 4, Miami 3
Detroit 11, N.Y. Mets 3
Milwaukee 3, Cincinnati 1
Philadelphia 9, Arizona 5
Kansas City 6,Washington 4
Atlanta 5, St. Louis 2
San Francisco 4, Pittsburgh 0
San Diego 3, Chicago Cubs 2, 15 innings
Boston 8, L.A. Dodgers 1
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 77 55 .583
Tampa Bay 74 54 .578 1
Baltimore 70 59 .543 5 1/2
New York 69 61 .531 7
Toronto 58 73 .443 18 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 77 53 .592
Cleveland 71 59 .546 6
Kansas City 65 64 .504 11 1/2
Minnesota 57 72 .442 19 1/2
Chicago 54 75 .419 22 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 75 55 .577
Oakland 72 57 .558 2 1/2
Seattle 59 70 .457 15 1/2
Los Angeles 58 71 .450 16 1/2
Houston 43 86 .333 31 1/2
SaturdaysGames
Boston 4, L.A. Dodgers 2
Detroit 3, N.Y. Mets 0
Oakland 2, Baltimore 1
Cleveland 7, Minnesota 2
Tampa Bay 4, N.Y.Yankees 2
Chicago White Sox 3,Texas 2
Houston 8,Toronto 5
Washington 7, Kansas City 2
L.A. Angels 5, Seattle 1
SundaysGames
Cleveland 3, Minnesota 1
Detroit 11, N.Y. Mets 3
Baltimore 10, Oakland 3
N.Y.Yankees 3,Tampa Bay 2, 11 innings
Chicago White Sox 5,Texas 2
Toronto 2, Houston 1
Kansas City 6,Washington 4
L.A. Angels 7, Seattle 1
Boston 8, L.A. Dodgers 1
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Buffalo 2 1 0 .667 71 66
New England 2 1 0 .667 65 83
N.Y. Jets 2 1 0 .667 78 60
Miami 1 3 0 .250 80 68
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 1 0 .667 74 61
Indianapolis 2 1 0 .667 67 62
Tennessee 1 2 0 .333 67 65
Jacksonville 0 3 0 .000 40 95
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 98 73
Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 79 53
Cleveland 2 1 0 .667 57 52
Pittsburgh 0 3 0 .000 46 68
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 2 1 0 .667 47 72
Kansas City 1 2 0 .333 52 52
Oakland 1 2 0 .333 65 79
San Diego 1 2 0 .333 62 71
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Washington 3 0 0 1.000 76 41
Philadelphia 2 1 0 .667 67 64
Dallas 2 2 0 .500 72 69
N.Y. Giants 1 2 0 .333 51 57
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 3 0 0 1.000 76 56
Carolina 2 1 0 .667 67 58
Tampa Bay 1 2 0 .333 54 85
Atlanta 0 3 0 .000 49 88
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 2 1 0 .667 84 78
Detroit 2 1 0 .667 72 50
Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 29 41
Minnesota 0 3 0 .000 43 81
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 3 0 0 1.000 88 30
Arizona 2 1 0 .667 36 31
San Francisco 2 1 0 .667 55 37
St. Louis 0 3 0 .000 52 73
SundaysGames
New Orleans 31, Houston 23
San Francisco 34, Minnesota 14
NFL PRESEASON GLANCE
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BOSTONREDSOX Activated LHP Matt Thorn-
ton from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Brayan
Villarreal to Pawtucket (IL).
CLEVELANDINDIANS Sent RHP Brett Myers to
Akron (EL) for a rehab assignment. Assigned RHP
Josh Tomlin to Columbus (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Placed RHP Luke
Hochevar on paternity leave. Recalled LHP Will
Smith from Omaha (PCL).
MINNESOTATWINS Optioned RHP Michael
Tonkin to Rochester (IL). Recalled RHP Liam Hen-
driks from Rochester.
TAMPABAYRAYS Sent OF Brandon Guyer to
Durham (IL) for a rehab assignment.
TORONTOBLUEJAYS Optioned RHP Brad Lin-
coln to Buffalo (IL). Agreed to terms with OF Blake
Gailen on a minor league contract.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS Sent OF Ryan Sweeney and
RHP Rafael Dolis to the AZL Cubs for rehab as-
signments.
CINCINNATI REDS Placed LHP Tony Cingrani
on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Wednesday. Se-
lected the contract of RHP Greg Reynolds from
Louisville (IL). Transferred RHP Jonathan Broxton
to the 60-day DL.
PHILADELPHIAPHILLIES Optioned RHPs Tyler
Cloyd and Luis Garcia to Lehigh Valley (IL). Rein-
stated RHP Roy Halladay from the 60-day DL.
Recalled RHP J.C. Ramirez from Lehigh Valley.
American Association
FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS Released
RHP Joe Cruz.
GRANDPRAIRIEAIRHOGS Released INF Juan
M. Richardson.
ST.PAULSAINTS Claimed RHP Mackenzie King
off waivers from Fargo-Moorhead.
Can-AmLeague
QUEBEC CAPITALES Released INFs Carlos
Willoughby and Blair Springeld.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONACARDINALSReleasedWRs Jarett Dil-
lard and Nick Edwards, OT Joe Caprioglio, PK Dan
Carpenter, C Deveric Gallington, DE Cordian Ha-
gans,LBKoreyJones,DTJonathanMathis,QBCaleb
Terbush and CB Ronnie Yell. Placed LB Dan Gior-
dano on the PUP list.
ATLANTAFALCONS Waived TE Tim Biere, FB
Devonte Campbell, LB Nick Clancy, TE Colin Clo-
herty, QB Seth Doege, DE Cam Henderson, OT Jeff
Nady, RB Donald Russell, S Troy Sanders, C Matt
Smith and DE Brandon Thurmond.
BALTIMORE RAVENS Released WRs Rashaad
Carter,Gerrard Sheppard and Tommy Streeter; OLs
Jack Cornell, Ramon Harewood and David Mims;
LBs Bryan Hall and Meshak Williams; RB Damien
Berry; CBs Moe Lee and Will Pericak. Terminated
the contract of TE Visanthe Shiancoe. Placed LB
Adrian Hamilton on injured reserve. Signed QB
Dayne Crist.
BUFFALOBILLS Signed QB Matt Leinart.
CHICAGOBEARS Released DTs Eric Foster and
Brent Russell, TEs Gabe Miller and Leonard Pope,
LBs Patrick Trahan and Lawrence Wilson,Ss Derrick
MartinandTomZbikowski,WRDevinAromashodu,
RB Curtis Brinkley, OT A.J. Lindeman, C P.J. Loner-
gan, DE Kyle Moore and P Tress Way.
CINCINNATI BENGALS Terminated the con-
tract of TE Richard Quinn. Released WR Jheranie
Boyd, CB Terrence Brown, CB Terrence Brown, LB
Jordan Campbell and PK/P Quinn Sharp.
DENVER BRONCOS Waived/injured WR Greg
Orton and WR Quincy McDufe. Waived WR Ke-
monteBateman,CBMarioButler,OTManaseFoketi,
QB Ryan Katz,LB Uona Kaveinga,CB Nigel Malone,
TE Deangelo Peterson, DE Lanston Tanyi and C
Quentin Saulsberry
DETROIT LIONS Released S Chris Hope, CB
Myron Lewis, DE Ronnell Lewis and WR Cody Wil-
son. Placed DT John Drew and CB Ross Weaver on
injured reserve.
GREENBAYPACKERSReleasedWRsAlexGillett,
Omarius Hines and Justin Wilson; QB Graham Har-
rell; RB Angelo Pease and DT Gilbert Pena. Signed
K Zach Ramirez.
INDIANAPOLISCOLTS Released G Danous Es-
tenor, DT Kellen Heard, PK Brandon McManus, LB
C.O. Prime, RB Davin Meggett, C Rick Schmeig, S
AshanteWilliamsandCBsJohnnyAdamsandAllen
Chapman. Reached an injury settlement with WR
Maurice Williams.Placed CB Teddy Williams on the
w aived-injured list. Placed LB Lawrence Sidbury
on injured reserve.
JACKSONVILLEJAGUARSReleasedLSsJeremy
Cain and Luke Ingram, LBs Maalik Bomar and Je-
remiah Green, DEs J.D. Griggs and Paul Hazel, G
MarkAsper,PKenParrish,CBLionel Smith,WRJamal
Miles, S Ray Polk and OT Roderick Tomlin. Placed
CB Jeremy Harris on injured reserve.
NEWYORKGIANTS Placed S Stevie Brown on
injured reserve. Released LB Aaron Curry, FB Ben
Guidugli, WRs Brandon Collins and Terrence Sink-
eld, TEs Jamie Childers and Chase Clement, OL
Michael Jasper and Austin Holtz, LBs Jake Muasau
and Etienne Sabino,DT Frank Okam and DBs Laron
Scott, Junior Mertile and Alonzo Tweedy.
OAKLAND RAIDERS Released WRs Sam
McGufe, Tray Session and Isaiah Williams; LBs
Keenan Clayton and Eric Harper; KR Josh Cribbs; FB
Jon Hoese; G Andrew Robiskie; CB Cory Nelms and
DT Myles Wade.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES Released TEs Derek
Carrier and Will Shaw, DE Eddie McClam, DE/OL
Isaac Remington,DT Daryell Walker,WR Nick Miller,
OT Nic Purcell, LS James Winchester and P Brad
Wing. Placed CB Eddie Whitley on the waived-in-
jured list.
TRANSACTIONS
SPORTS 17
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA Terrelle Pryor will have the
stage to himself in a nal audition to win
the Raiders starting quarterback job.
Coach Dennis Allen said Sunday that Matt
Flynn wont play in Oaklands preseason
nale Thursday night at Seattle, opening
the door for Pryor to make his rst start.
Its probably more of a precautionary
measure on my part than it is anything
else, Allen said. Well get a chance to see
Terrelle this week with the rst-unit offense
up against Seattle, and well see how he
does.
The two quarterbacks have been engaged
in an increasingly tight competition to run
the Raiders offense since the beginning of
training camp.
Flynn has been the starter throughout
camp but there has been a growing
groundswell of support for Pryor as
Oaklands starting offense has struggled in
the preseason.
Pryor, who led four scoring drives after
replacing Flynn in the
second quarter Friday
night in a loss to
Chicago, has been the
Raiders most effective
quarterback so far. He is
the teams second lead-
ing rusher with 83 yards
on 11 carries.
The former Ohio State
star also is pretty savvy,
and he didnt put any signicance on his
rst start of the preseason.
Coach told me what the deal was, that
Matt wasnt playing on Friday and he want-
ed me to jump with the rst team and lead
them into Seattle, Pryor said. Im de-
nitely not all the way there in terms of the
playbook and in terms of just being a quar-
terback out there. Dont get me wrong, I can
lead if I was called upon to do it. Im just out
there getting better and trying to get in
synch with the guys.
Flynn was essentially handed the starting
job after being acquired in a trade from
Seattle during the offseason, but the 28-
year-old quarterback hasnt looked sharp.
He has completed more than 70 percent of
his passes but most have been check-down
throws or short-range tosses.
Injuries to Oaklands offensive line
havent helped, either. Second-round pick
Menelik Watson, who missed most of train-
ing camp with a calf injury, practiced at left
tackle on Sunday and will start against the
Seahawks even though he has never played
the position until now.
That is why many feel the athletic Pryor
who made his only NFL start during the
Raiders nal regular-season game in 2012
might be a better t .
Thats my goal, to be a starting quarter-
back and to lead a team to wins, Pryor said.
I wont stop until it happens. Until it hap-
pens and keeps on happening, Ill keep on
pushing.
Allen praised Pryor following the game
against Chicago, in which he threw one
touchdown and ran for another, but noted
the third-year quarterback is still very much
a work in progress.
When you have guys who have athletic
talent like he does and they work as hard as
he has, guys are going to get better, and
hes improved, Allen said of Pryor. Itll
be a good thing to see him in another game
situation against a really good defense on
the road in that environment and see how he
responds.
With less than two weeks until the season
opener in Indianapolis, Allen is in the
uniquely strange position of trying to pick
a starting quarterback when one of them is
unavailable.
Flynn was bothered by tendinitis in his
right elbow while with Seattle, and the
Raiders believe it is similar to what the
quarterback is dealing with now.
Its hindered him a little bit, Flynn
said. I dont think its been a major factor
when weve gotten into games. I just think
its one of those things that weve got to
manage.
I dont want to make it out to be any big-
ger of an issue than it is.
The Raiders made several roster moves,
including releasing kickoff return specialist
Josh Cribbs.
Pryor to get first start for Raiders
Terrelle Pryor
Desmond Bishop after ipping the ball
toward safety Mistral Raymond follow-
ing a 22-yard catch in the fourth quarter.
There were a couple of other things
Harbaugh certainly didnt like Nick
Moodys helmet-to-helmet hit on wide-
out Stephen Burton that resulted in an
unnecessary roughness penalty in the
third quarter, and a face mask by corner-
back Perrish Cox on the same
Minnesota scoring drive.
After a week of long practices as the
Vikings tried to get their stagnant
offense on a roll, there were consider-
able strides.
Ponder threw a pair of touchdown
passes while playing three quarters.
He connected on a 1-yard touchdown
pass to Zach Line late in the rst half for
the quarterbacks rst TD completion of
the preseason, then threw an intercep-
tion in Minnesotas nal series before
halftime. In the Vikings opening drive
of the second half, Ponder hit Joe Webb
with a 3-yard scoring pass.
Reigning NFL MVP Adrian Peterson
didnt touch the ball in one series of
action for Minnesota, making his pre-
season debut and rst appearance in
the exhibition schedule since 2011
as he begins a year in which he will try
to become the rst player with consecu-
tive 2,000-yard rushing seasons.
Continued from page 13
NINERS
18
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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the shows. Many of the acts were contin-
ued by members of the shows and they
continued to perform and begin many oth-
ers traveling companies. The number of
traveling carnivals increased to 46 by
1905 and, by 1937, there were estimated
to be more than 300 carnivals touring the
country. In addition to Schmitts travel-
ing show, San Franciscos businessmen
leaped on the idea of a show in Golden
Gate Park in 1894 and purchased many of
the buildings and acts to perform and be
set up on the West Coast. It was a first for
this Mid-Winter Fair that it became to be
called. Ground was broken Aug. 24, 1893,
with 60,000 people attending the cere-
monies. Michael de Young was declared
director-general of the exposition. The
pace of construction was incredible. The
reuse of some of Chicagos exhibits saved
both time and money. The target date for
the opening of the fair was to be Jan. 1,
1894. After the 1894 San Francisco fair
closed, many of the acts began touring
the country in the same manner as Otto
Schmidt had done and the traveling carni-
val became an American institution.
Small towns and cities would now boast
that they were a community that had mod-
ern entertainment that broke the monoto-
ny of living in a small town. The carnival
became almost more important a form of
entertainment as the occasional circus
that hit the town.
Most of the traveling carnivals were
patterned after Chicagos Midway
Plaisance (meaning pleasure) as the sepa-
rate entertainment section was called at
the fair. Later the term would be shortened
to Midway. The midway that Chicago
introduced is believed to have been the
catalyst of all traveling carnivals in the
United States. In addition to standard acts
patterned after burlesque, games of
chance, rides, freak shows, food booths,
carnie games such as weight guessing
booths, ping pong ball and fishbowl
games of chance as well as shooting, bal-
loon and dart games were added to the car-
nivals.
Small prizes were given with larger
prizes given when the mark repeated the
game. The term mark was derived when
the operator spotted a person likely to get
easy money from by prodding him to con-
tinue playing games that the police sus-
pected were rigged. The operator put chalk
on his hand, slapped the prospective easy
player on the back thus marking him so
other operators could identify him and try
to con him into playing their hard to
win games. The police in these small
towns shuttered when they found out the
carnival was hitting town because of the
many complaints that surfaced. The carni-
vals developed bad reputations and were
watched closely by law enforcement offi-
cials who usually demanded that all games
of chance be tested by the police before
they could operate.
Nevertheless, the complaints continued
to plague the officials as the carnies were
very smooth in their operations. I remem-
ber some advice that a businessman gave
me when he found out the carnival was to
arrive soon: Count your money three
times if you deal with these people, and
keep them out of your store if possible.
They are sharp people and are not to be
trusted. Still, I went to the carnival
despite his warnings. These were exciting
times for a young boy.
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks
appears in the Monday edition of the Daily
Journal.
Continued from page 3
HISTORY
in the 1950s but never quite compiled all of
the material into a documentary after spend-
ing years on it.
Keil was then featured in an article in
California Home+Design that told of his
work on the documentary and his trouble
completing it.
After reading the magazine article, mid-
century modern home specialist Monique
Lombardelli gave Keil a call expressing her
interest in the topic as she had just complet-
ed an award-winning documentary herself
entitled People in Glass Houses: The
Legacy of Joseph Eichler.
The two shared a passion for homes built
in the era and became fast friends. Menlo
Park-based Lombardelli, who owns Modern
Homes Realty, even sold Keils Doelger
home and then helped him buy an Eichler-
type home in San Bruno.
She also offered to help Keil nish his
documentary and the two co-produced it
together. Little Boxes: The Legacy of
Henry Doelger is almost complete and will
debut soon.
It tells the story of Doelger, born in San
Francisco, who left school in the eighth
grade but went on to become one of the
nations top home builders. San Franciscos
Sunset District is lled with Doelgers and he
built all of the Westlake neighborhood.
There are 11,000 Doelgers in San Francisco
and San Mateo counties.
Westlake is known for its long rows of
Doelgers boxy houses which allegedly
inspired Malvina
Reynolds folk song
Little Boxes which
became an anthem for
anti-suburbanism in the
1960s.
Lombardelli, however,
embraced the song and has
even purchased the rights
to use it in the lm.
The homes are histori-
cally signicant although
sometimes ignored, Keil told the Daily
Journal. Theres the mythology that they
are little boxes, tacky and inconsequential.
Doelgers do have a funky character, Keil
said, but are far from inconsequential.
They are really efcient. There is no
wasted space. They are well laid out and well
constructed. They also have this pop-mod-
ern look. There is a cuteness to them. They
look happy and upbeat, Keil said.
They are also affordable.
The same Doelger in Daly City that will
sell between $500,000 and $700,000 today
will sell for more than $1 million if it were
located in Palo Alto, he said.
Its the best affordable housing if you
like mid-mods, Lombardelli said.
The two hope their collaboration will
bring a new respect to the two-story subur-
ban icons and their slanted roofs and Keil is
thankful Lombardelli gave him that call.
Her passion and enthusiasm helped kick-
start this, he said.
To watch the lm trailer go to www.mod-
ernhomesrealty.com.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
DOELGER
Monique
Lombardelli
Burlingame Police Department where he
worked as a patrolman until 1958. He then
joined the California Highway Patrol.
Peter was enamored of long-distance run-
ning and volunteered as a track and cross-
country coach at Burlingame High School,
a staff report stated. After his coaching days
came to an end, Peter walked into the princi-
pals ofce and offered to replace the track
with an all-weather track. That was just one
of the many examples of Peters generosity
and giving spirit to Burlingame High
School.
Further, Umland and his wife Dolores made
the district a residual beneciary in the Peter
S. Umland and Dolores T. Umland Trust.
Under the trust, portions of the residual
estate are bequest to the district for use by
the Burlingame High School Athletic
Department in its athletic endeavors.
Burlingames stadium has gone through
recent renovations, totaling about $4.5 mil-
lion in funds, mostly from the capital facili-
ties Fund 40 and from the 2006 $298 million
Measure M bond. The eld was recently
upgraded, bathrooms were installed and the
rubberized track was modernized. Umland
had paid for the original rubberized track.
The expected date of completion for the
bleachers is summer or fall of 2014.
McManus said the completion is dependent
on gaps in activity at the facility. The
bleacher project remains under review at the
Division of the State Architect.
Once the bleachers are done the Board of
Trustees will vote on the name change.
McManus said there will be a community
celebration when the bleachers are complet-
ed.
Peters sister Diana also graduated from
Burlingame High School. He was survived
by his wife Dolores.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
PETER
DATEBOOK 19
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
R
ecently, I was invited to write a few articles for
wikihow.com, the largest how to website on
the Internet. They suggested I start with how
to adopt a dog from a shelter. This seemingly simple
process includes a few steps and important considera-
tions including timing. Is your schedule fairly clear and
is your living situation stable? And are you ready to
commit to a pet for the next 10-12 years? Have you
made sure extra pet expenses even unforeseen ones
like vet visits wont bust your budget? People can
visit an animal shelter online, but most websites
dont have real time changes in animals availability.
Also, some pets dont photograph well, photographs
can be misleading in terms of size and breed and they
cant easily show a pets personality. Nothing beats an
in-person visit. Before adopting, make sure others in
your home are on board. This includes roommates, par-
ents, children, spouses or partners. You may want to
bring them. If you rent, your landlord should be cool
about pets. And, if you have a resident dog, bring him
to make sure he gets along with the new dog. The adop-
tion process will include some form of counseling ses-
sion with a staff member or volunteer. This is your
opportunity to show why your home will be a good one
and ask questions about the pets youre considering. If
they are steering you away from a certain pet, its for
good reason. Shelters primary goal is successful, long-
term matches. Once you have found one, consider
adding a little something to the shelters adoption fee.
Adoption fees, on average, dont come close to cover-
ing the dogs care while being sheltered. Make the ride
home and rst few days super calm and stick to the diet
your dog had in the shelter. Finally, send photos of you
and your dog in their new home. This will make the
humane societys day.
Scott oversees PHS/SPCAs Adoption, Behavior and
Training, Education, Outreach, Field Services, Cruelty
Investigation, Volunteer and Media/PR program areas and
staff from the new Tom and Annette Lantos Center for
Compassion.
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Lee Daniels The
Butler served up a second helping at
the box office, topping the weekend
with $17 million according to studio
estimates Sunday.
That was enough to lead all films on
a late August weekend known as a
dumping ground for studios following
their summer blockbusters and before
the start of the fall movie-going sea-
son. Daniels historical drama about a
long-serving White House butler,
starring Forest Whitaker and Oprah
Winfrey, last weekend opened with
$24.6 million for the Weinstein Co.
Three new releases failed to catch
on. The teen fantasy Mortal
Instruments: City of Bones, adapted
from the popular young adult book
series, opened tepidly in third with
$9.3 million on the weekend and $14
million since opening Wednesday.
With franchise hopes, Sony Screen
Gems has already started production
on a sequel, again starring Lily
Collins as a New York teenager who
discovers she has mystical powers.
Edgar Wrights pub-crawl-gone-
wrong comedy The Worlds End
opened with $8.9 million for Focus
Features. That was a better start for
The Worlds End, which stars Simon
Pegg, than Wrights last film, 2007s
Hot Fuzz. It opened with $5.8 mil-
lion. Playing in 1,549 theaters, The
Worlds End did its business in less
than half the theaters of The Butler
or Mortal Instruments.
Despite good reviews, Lionsgates
home-invasion horror flick Youre
Next opened weakly with $7.1 mil-
l i on.
With a cumulative total of $52.3
million, The Butler is headed for a
domestic haul of $100 million. It has
followed the release pattern of anoth-
er movie about race and domestic
service: the 2011 drama The Help,
also released in August. The
Weinstein Co. hopes that The
Butler will similarly lead to Oscar
nominations.
Paul Dergarabedian, analyst for
box-office tracker Hollywood.com,
attributed the success of The Butler
particularly to the marketing power of
Winrey and a savvy choice of a release
date with little competition.
This is a film that you wouldnt
want to open in June or July, said
Dergarabedian. The release date that
the Weinstein Co. picked absolutely
paid off for them.
In its third week of release, Warner
Bros. R-rated road trip comedy
Were the Millers, starring Jason
Sudeikis and Jennifer Aniston, con-
tinued to thrive. It took in $13.5 mil-
lion over the weekend, bringing its
overall total to $91.7 million.
Woody Allens Blue Jasmine
became his widest release ever. Sony
Pictures Classics expanded Allens
drama of a ruined socialite starring
Cate Blanchett to 1,283 theaters. It
made $4.3 million over the weekend
after earning more than $10 million
in four weeks of limited release.
Estimated ticket sales for Friday
through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian
theaters, according to
Hollywood.com. Where available,
latest international numbers are also
included. Final domestic figures will
be released on Monday.
The Butler stays on top with $17M
With a cumulative total of $52.3 million,The Butler is headed for a domestic haul of $100 million.
1.Lee DanielsThe Butler,$17 million.
2.Were the Millers,$13.5 million.
3.Mortal Instruments:City of Bones,
$9.3 million.
4.The Worlds End$8.9 million.
5.Planes, $8.6 million ($5.9 million
international).
6.Elysium,$7.1 million.
7.Youre Next,$7.1 million.
8.Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters,
$5.2 million.
9.Blue Jasmine,$4.3 million.
10.Kick-Ass 2,$4.3 million.
Top 10 movies
20
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Raffle will benefit
San Carlos Youth & Community Organizations
2nd prize: $2,500
3rd prize: $1,000
4th prize: $500
5th prize: $250
Only 600 tickets will be sold
Prizes drawn at 3 pm at San Carlos Lions Club Car Show
Pleaase call Cindy Smith at 650.743.1806 for more details
www.sclionsparadeyourpride.org
San Carlos Lions Car Show
Sunday, September 15, 2013
Breakfast at
8 am
Trophies at
2 pm 975 Industrial Road, San CArlos
Free
Admission
to the public
Rafe-Food-Fun & Cars! Rafe-Food-Fun & Cars!
a
t
Enter to Win a
2014 Ford Mustang
Enter to Win a
2014 Ford Mustang
PHOTO COURTESY OF SAN FRANCISCO OPERA
Redwood City resident Phil Libin, CEO of Evernote, has been
unanimously elected to the Board of the San Francisco Opera
Association. Libins selection is part of San Francisco Operas
new partnership with Silicon Valley to advance the operatic
art form. Prior to joining Evernote, Libin founded and served
as president of CoreStreet,currently one of the top companies
providing smart credential and identity management
technologies to governments and large corporations
throughout the world,and was founder and CEO of Engine 5,
a leading Boston-based Internet software development
company. Libin began as an Opera Board director on Aug. 1
and will serve a three-year term.
Camp Keff campers at the Peninsula Jewish Community
Center experienced a pleasant surprise when their camp
counselor,Thomas Schultz,dropped on one knee and popped
the question to fellow-counselor Megan Hansen.The couple
rst met last year as counselors at the camp in Foster City.
Megan is the Kindercamp Unit Head and her new anc,
Thomas,is the Teen and Byachad Unit Head.Mazel Tov to the
happy couple!
KELLY CHANG
The Spirit of the Rainforest came to the San Mateo Public Library July 30 as Jennifer Kotkim from Wildlife Associates held up
a scarlet macaw.Wildlife Associates, headquartered in Half Moon Bay, provides more than 1,000 educational programs each
year to help students and adults reconnect to the living world.
TOM JUNG/DAILY
JOURNAL
Engage Life
Director Alicia
Brewster, left,
leads Emily
Leong, Sylvia
Harris and other
residents of Atria
Hillsdale in San
Mateo in a low-
impact dance
routine adapted
especially for
them.The routine
was recorded on
July 27 by the
Dizzy Feet
Foundation, who
will add this to a
compilation of
similar videos for
possible airing on
So You Think You
Can Dance!
21
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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John Romansic and Mona Jones-Roman-
sic,of Redwood City,gave birth to a baby girl
at Sequoia Hospital Aug. 16, 2013.
***
Michael Washer and Michelle Dumas, of
San Carlos, gave birth to a baby boy at Se-
quoia Hospital Aug. 16, 2013.
***
Jonathan Mooser andSara Brannin-Moser,
of Mountain View, gave birth to a baby boy
at Sequoia Hospital Aug. 17, 2013.
***
Brian Fishman andJama Adams, of Menlo
Park,gave birth to a baby boy at Sequoia Hos-
pital Aug. 17, 2013.
***
Joseph and Jennifer Givens, of Redwood
City,gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hos-
pital Aug. 17, 2013.
***
Sean and Nicole Gates, of San Carlos, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital Aug.
17, 2013.
***
Richard andYolanta Bustos, of Union City,
gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital
Aug. 18, 2013.
***
Sean andMegan Noonan,of Redwood City,
gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital
Aug. 20, 2013.
Have some good news? Contact us at good-
news@smdailyjournal.com.
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
Toyonaka Mayor Keiichiro Asari, center, chats with San Mateo Mayor David Lim, left, and San Mateo Vice Mayor Robert Ross at a dinner held
Aug. 16 as part of festivities celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Sister City relationship between San Mateo and Toyonaka, Japan. A
delegation of Toyonaka city ofcials,student ambassadors,citizens,traditional Japanese dancers and young baseball players traveled to San
Mateo to celebrate this milestone and reafrm the Sister City relationship.
22
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DATEBOOK 23
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
MONDAY, AUG. 26
Support group for loss, grief and
bereavement. 10:30 a.m. to noon.
Mills Health Center, 100 S. San Mateo
Drive, San Mateo. Free. Drop-in. For
more information call 654-9966.
Musical theater workshop. 1 p.m.
to 2:30 p.m. San Bruno Senior Center,
1555 Crystal Springs Road, San
Bruno. $5. For more information call
Mary Tessier at 616-7150.
Library Scavenger Hunt. 3:30 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. Solve the clues
in this scavenger hunt in teams of up
to four friends and win prizes. For
ages 12 to 19. Free. For more infor-
mation contact conrad@smcl.org.
The LA All Stars. 4:30 p.m. Douglas
Beach House, 307 Mirada Road, Half
Moon Bay. $35. For more information
go to www.bachddsoc.org.
TUESDAY, AUG. 27
San Mateo County Supervisor
Tissier Announces Upcoming Age
Well Drive Smart Seminars. 9:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Twin Pines
Community Center, 20 Twin Pines
Lane, Belmont. For more information
call 363-4572.
Teen Study Hall. 3:30 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de Las Pulgas,
Belmont. If you want a place to study
or work on group projects, come to
this study hall with tables and white
board access, for ages 12-19. Free.
For more information email con-
rad@smcl.org.
Caring for Elders support group.
6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Senior Focus
Center, 1720 El Camino Real, Ste. 10,
Burlingame. Free. Drop-in. For more
information call 696-3660.
Ostomy support group. 7 p.m. to
9:30 p.m. Mills Health Center, 100 S.
San Mateo Drive, San Mateo. Free.
Drop-in. For more information call
654-9966.
Green Talk. 7:15 p.m. Reach and
Teach Bookstore, 144 W. 25th Ave.,
San Mateo. Free. For more informa-
tion go to cagreens.com/sanmateo.
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation vall 430-6500.
Teen Movie: The Great Gatsby.
3:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Rated PG-13. Popcorn and refresh-
ments will be served. Free. For more
information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Dr. Marshall Zaslove Meditation:
Experience the Peace, Calm and
Joy You are Seeking. 7 p.m.
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Access the joy, calm and
peace that lie within each of us. For
more information call 697-7607.
Dennis Dove (Club Fox Blues Jam).
7 p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $5. For more informa-
tion (877) 435-9849 or go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
THURSDAY, AUG. 29
SafeStrength Training: How to
Strength Train Safely and
Effectively. 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Alive! Whole Life Fitness Studio, 647-
B Veterans Blvd., Redwood City. You
will learn how to properly position
yourself on strength training equip-
ment and other safety tips. Free. For
more information email
nancy_tubbs@fullcalendar.com.
Opening night of Ringling Bros.
and Barnum & Bailey Present
Built to Amaze. 7:30 p.m. Cow
Palace, 2600 Geneva Ave., Daly City.
Tickets start at $20. For more infor-
mation go to www.ringling.com.
And Miss Reardon Drinks a Little.
Dragon Theater, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. Continues through
Sept. 22, with shows at 8 p.m. on
Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. For
more information go to http://drag-
onproductions.net/activities/2013se
ason/missreardon.html.
Labor Day Festival of Theatre and
Dance. 7:30 p.m. NDNU Theatre stu-
dio stage, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Seventeen original, short
plays in six days, something different
each day. $10, children are $5. For
more information email
rfritz@ndnu.edu.
Preview night of Monty Pythons
SPAMALOT. 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theater,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. An
irreverent parody of the legendary
tale of King Arthur and his knights.
Through Sept. 22. Tickets start at $23
and can be purchased at hill-
barntheater.org or by calling 349-
6411.
Movies on the Square: A League
of Their Own. 8:45 p.m. Courthouse
Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Free. For more information call
780-7311 or go to www.redwoodci-
ty.org/events/movies.html.
FRIDAY, AUG. 30
Blood pressure and glucose
screening. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Free. For
more information call Mary Tessier at
616-7150.
Music on the Square:
Caravanserai. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Santana tribute. Free.
For more information call 780-7311.
Free Wine or Beer Tastings. 4 p.m.
to 6 p.m. 150 San Mateo Road, Half
Moon Bay. Samples of beer or wine
in the wine department with live
music. Free. For more information
call 726-3110 ext. 101.
Brisbane Concerts in the Park: The
Hot Rods in the Park. 5:45 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. Brisbane Community Park
Gazebo, 11 Old County Road,
Brisbane. Free. For more information
call (415) 657-4320 or go to ci.bris-
bane.ca.us.
Music on the Square:
Caravanserai. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. For more infor-
mation go to
redwoodcity.org/events.
Poletential Open House. 7 p.m.
Poletential, 2682 Middleeld Road,
Studio N and O, Redwood City. Tour
Aerial Arts and Pole Fitness Studios.
Free. For more information email
kimmy@poletential.com.
South San Francisco Open Mic. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
The Half Moon Bay Shakespeare
Company presents The Tragedy
of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark.
7:30 p.m. Camerons Outback, 1410
Cabrillo Highway, Half Moon Bay.
$20, $15 for students and seniors. For
more information email halfmoon-
bayshakes@gmail.com or go to
hmbshakespeare.org.
Ringling Bros. and Barnum &
Bailey present Built to Amaze.
7:30 p.m. Cow Palace, 2600 Geneva
Ave., Daly City. Tickets start at $20.
For more information go to
www.ringling.com.
Waltz, Polka, Tango, Charleston
and other dancing. 7:30 p.m. to 10
p.m. Veterans Memorial Senior
Center, 1455 Madision Ave.,
Redwood City. There will be light
refreshments, water and coffee. $5
per person, $7 for non-members.
Labor Day Festival of Theatre and
Dance. 7:30 p.m. NDNU Theatre stu-
dio stage, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Seventeen original, short
plays in six days, something different
each day. $10, children are $5. For
more information email
rfritz@ndnu.edu.
Opening Night Gala of And Miss
Reardon Drinks A Little. 8 p.m.
(doors open at 7:30 p.m.) The New
Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. The show runs Aug.
30 to Sept. 22nd. Thursdays through
Saturdays at 8 p.m. Sundays at 2 p.m.
$15 to $35. Pay-what-you-can pre-
view on Aug. 29. To purchase tickets
or for more information go to drag-
onproductions.net/activities/2013se
ason/missreardon.html.
Monty Pythons SPAMALOT. 8
p.m. Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E.
Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. An irrever-
ent parody of the legendary tale of
King Arthur and his knights. through
Sept. 22. Tickets start at $23 and can
be purchased at hillbarntheater.org
or by calling 349-6411.
Groovy Judy Spreads Positive
Vibes. 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. The Iron
Gate, 1360 El Camino Real, Belmont.
21 and over. Free. For more informa-
tion call 592-7893.
SATURDAY, AUG. 31
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast.
8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. The American
Legion San Bruno Post No. 409, 757
San Mateo Ave., San Bruno.
Scrambled eggs, pancakes, bacon,
ham or sausage and French toast
will be served. There will also be
juice, coffee or tea. $8 for adults and
$5 for children under 10. For more
information call 583-1740.
Millbrae Art and Wine Festival. 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Broadway Avenue,
between Victoria and Meadow Glen
avenues, Millbrae. This Mardi Gras-
style celebration will feature arts and
crafts, live music, festive food and
drink, a green product showcase,
home and garden exhibits, health
and wellness displays, a car show
and fun for kids. Continues through
Sept. 1. Free. For more more informa-
tion call 697-7324.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
effort to support neighborhood chil-
dren struggling with elementary
school. It currently operates three
sites in North Central San Mateo and
plans to open a fourth at San Mateo
Park Elementary School.
The sites are overseen by coordina-
tors who are helped by bilingual aides
from local high schools, along with
volunteers. There are approximately
20 to 25 students at each site with an
equal number of staff and volunteer to
provide individual instruction. The
one-on-one tutoring sessions begin at
the end of September when teachers
have gauged his/her students learning
needs.
Much of the program is dedicated to
financially disadvantaged children
who dont speak English as their rst
language and the shifting demographic
of North San Mateo has seen an
increase in Hispanic students. As a
result, Homework Central has
increased the use of bilingual aides.
Students are referred to the program
by teachers from Sunnybrae
Elementary Magnet School, Horrall
Elementary Magnet School and San
Mateo Park Elementary School.
Students attend a homework center ses-
sion for four days a week. Each student
at the center is then assisted with his
or her daily homework after the school
day ends. Besides completing the
teacher-mandated homework, the
Homework Central staff encourage the
kids to read and work on mathematics
through ash cards. An average day
often ends with the students playing
educational games or with Lego
pieces.
Kathy Kinner has been involved
with Homework Central for 14 years as
a volunteer tutor and says the center
helped her spend more time with chil-
dren and teach them life lessons.
It was really important for me to
teach my children about social justice
and helping others in the community
... [I was] just reinforcing how impor-
tant education is, Kinner said.
Homework Central actively seeks
out student aides and volunteers from
the area to tutor the students.
[Homework Central] reinforces to
the whole community ... what an
important piece education plays in
[lifelong success], Kinner said.
For more information visit
www.homework-central.org.
Continued from page 1
TUTOR
By Chris Talbott
and Mesfin Fekadu
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK Suddenly, the MTV
Video Music Awards are all about
Justin Timberlake.
Timberlake took over the awards
Sunday night, wrestling the spot-
light away from a rehabilitated Lady
Gaga, an X-rated Miley Cyrus and a
vengeful Taylor Swift with a medley
of hits and the rumored reunion with
former boy band mates N Sync.
Timberlake the nights top nom-
inee with early leader Macklemore &
Ryan Lewis also was given the
Michael Jackson Video Vanguard
Award by Jimmy Fallon.
I dont deserve the award, but Im
not going to give it back,
Timberlake said. Im taking this
home.
Timberlake, dressed in a black suit
and black hat with a red feather, pow-
ered through a breathless series of
solo hits before the other four mem-
bers of N Sync JC Chasez, Chris
Kirkpatrick, Joey Fatone, and Lance
Bass joined him on stage, opening
with Bye Bye Bye.
Half of the moonmen Ive ever
won, I won with those four guys right
there, Timberlake said pointing at
his former band mates while holding
the Vanguard trophy. So above all
else, Im going to share this we
can keep it my house but Im
going to share this award with them.
Up till then, the ladies of pop
music dominated as Cyrus became the
rare artist to upstage Lady Gaga. But
Swift managed to take the spotlight
from both after appearing to utter an
expletive when One Direction and
rumored former love interest Harry
Styles appeared at Sunday nights
award show a moment that lit up
Twitter and was memorialized imme-
diately in a GIF online.
She also thanked a former beau for
helping her win another moonman
trophy for I Knew You Were Trouble
in the best female video category.
I also want to thank the person
who inspired this song, who knows
exactly who he is, because I got one
of these, Swift said. Thank you so
much!
Gaga changed costumes four
times during her first return to the
stage since hip surgery as she per-
formed her new single Applause
at the top of the show. It was a pre-
dictably unpredictable appearance
for Gaga, who seemed to pump in
boos over the over the sound sys-
tem as she opened the song in a
white nuns habit and square head-
dress.
By the time she finished the song,
she was surrounded by unitard-clad
male dancers and wearing a thong
bikini decorated in shells and a long
blonde wig.
Cyrus immediately kicked things
up well beyond provocative, howev-
er, as she appeared on stage with a
multitude of dancing teddy bears in a
bodysuit adorned with a cartoon char-
acter. She twerked to her song We
Cant Stop, changed into a nude
bikini, ran a fans foam finger along
her privates as Robin Thicke
appeared on stage to perform Blurred
Lines, then gave the singer a lap
dance.
Miley better go get a pregnancy
test after all that grinding, comedian
Kevin Hart joked afterward.
Timberlake, N Sync take over VMAs
REUTERS
Justin Timberlake performs during the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards in New York.
COMICS/GAMES
8-24-13
fridays PUZZLE sOLVEd
PrEViOUs
sUdOkU
answErs
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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aCrOss
1 Brooch
4 Former frosh
8 Grocery buy
11 Wolfed down
12 Copy
13 Ending for depart
14 Crop protector
16 Naughty
17 Frugal
18 Endures
20 Family mem.
21 So far
22 Four duos
25 Chided
29 Sound of suffering
30 Assn.
31 Gulf st.
32 Everyone
33 Fix, as a fght
34 QED part
35 Save from a landfll
38 Hag
39 Dehydrated
40 Curlys friend
41 Tex-Mex dip
44 Hit
48 Numerical prefx
49 Having many uses
51 Salt Lake athlete
52 Strange
53 That girl
54 Provo sch.
55 Allen and Conway
56 Nurse
dOwn
1 History
2 Hankering
3 Approach
4 Splinter groups
5 Grand Ole
6 Ski instructor
7 monkey
8 Wheel parts
9 Trapped like
10 Docs prescribe them
12 Tailoring job
15 Up
19 glance
21 Safecracker
22 Bradley or Sharif
23 Composer Porter
24 Face powder base
25 Soft cheese
26 Poi base
27 Vigorous spirit
28 Evening out
30 Monsieurs airport
34 Not hunched
36 Fabric meas.
37 Necktie
38 the Barbarian
40 Ruminates
41 Pencil remnant
42 Showy
43 Stead
44 Demure
45 Teakettle sound
46 Grades 1-12
47 Profound
50 Yale athlete
diLBErT CrOsswOrd PUZZLE
fUTUrE sHOCk
PEarLs BEfOrE swinE
GET fUZZy
MOnday, aUGUsT 26, 2013
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- The people you
encounter and the places you visit today will prove
valuable. Know your limitations, but try your hardest
to make the most of a good opportunity.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Do whats expected
of you and keep moving. If someone is being
pushy, fnd out why, and do your best to defuse
the situation. Its best to take care of your
responsibilities before someone complains.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Youre in an
interesting cycle that will expand your spirituality
and ability to handle change. Discuss those
innovative ideas of yours -- its time to start making
them happen.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Avoid gossip
or idle chatter; someone could get you to talk out
of turn. A change in your fnancial situation due
to outside pressure will result in stress. Offer
suggestions and hands-on help instead of cash to
those seeking your aid.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Money is heading in
your direction, enabling you to do more of the activities
you enjoy. Your boss or colleagues will recognize your
contributions and celebrate them. Its time to think big.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Improve your health
and the way you present yourself to the world. Youll
need patience when dealing with an institution as
well as a degree of fnancial fexibility.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Its a good day to
drum up interest in an idea or investment opportunity.
Discuss your plans with potential helpers. The right
colleagues will be eager to aid you.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- Keep your life simple. A
move or domestic change will result in higher costs and
trouble with someone you expected to help you. You need
to play it cool and adjust to the shifting winds.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- Share your thoughts
with knowledgeable people. Your recent personal
growth will help you develop a friendship with
someone who will prove motivational. Focus on
making positive strides.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) -- Change your routine
and welcome events that introduce you to
alternative ways of reaching your goals. Your family
and co-workers will have lots of advice for you, but
trust your own instincts foremost.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- Use your creative assets
to present your ideas and thoughts to others. You
will get the support you need to make worthwhile
contributions to a cause within your community.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Youll be eager to try
something new or to enjoy the company of someone
refreshing and eccentric. An emotional situation
at home will need some fne-tuning if you want to
avoid discord.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Monday Aug. 26, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Monday Aug. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
DRIVERS NEEDED - Use your own 4 or
6 cylinder vehicle, FT/PT, $12-13/hr.
Paid training-800-603-1072.
JOB TITLE: SYSTEMS ENGINEER
Job Location: San Mateo, CA
Requirements: MS or equiv. in CS, IT,
CIS, etc. + 2 yrs. exp. reqd. (or BS + 5).
Exp. w/ RedHat/CentOS/Solaris, MS
Win, Act. Dir., IIS, NGinx, Perl, Python,
VBScript, Cisco, PowerShell, F5, Zabbix,
Cacti & Juniper switches/routers reqd.
Exp. w/ 2 or more of following also reqd:
Oracle Coherence, SIP, BGP, Comme-
trex Bladeware.
Mail Resume: RingCentral, Inc.
Attn: HR Dept.
1400 Fashion Island Blvd, 7th Floor
San Mateo, CA 94404
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNAS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
110 Employment
BIOTECH -
GENENTECH, INC. in South San
Francisco seeks: Research Asso-
ciate. Support protein formulation
research and development activi-
ties for monoclonal antibodies and
antibody drug conjugates. Req.
Master Deg or foreign equiv in Bio-
chem. & Mol. Bio., Biophysics,
Chem. Eng, Chem, Pharm. Sci. or
related & 3 yrs. exp. or Bachelor
Deg & 5 yrs. progressive exp.
Please mail your resume specify-
ing the position requisition number
00416060 to Genentech, Inc., c/o
SB MS-829A, 1 DNA Way, South
San Francisco, CA 94080. Gen-
entech, Inc. is an Equal Opportuni-
ty Employer
C3, LLC has the following full-time job
opportunity in Redwood City, CA: Soft-
ware Engineer [Ref#SE4210] to design &
develop analytical algorithms for energy
mgmt. software. Mail resume to C3,
LLC., Att: L. Burke, 1300 Seaport Blvd.,
Ste 500, Redwood City, CA 94063. Must
include Ref# to be considered.
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
110 Employment
CUSTOMER SERVICE
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
EXPERIENCED LINE Cook, apply in
person at 1201 San Carlos Ave, San
Carlos 94070
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. All shifts
available. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
HOUSECLEANING -
Merry Maids: House cleaners needed,
Need Car, CDL Ins., SM (650)572-8200
JOB TITLE: SOFTWARE ENGINEER
Job Location: San Mateo, CA
Requirements: MS or equiv. in CS, IT,
CIS, etc. + 2 yrs. exp. reqd. (or BS + 5).
Exp. w/ Java, Javascript, C++, Python,
Oracle, HTML, XML, Unix, REST, SIP &
PHP reqd.
Mail Resume: RingCentral, Inc.
Attn: HR Dept. 1400 Fashion Island Blvd,
7th Floor San Mateo, CA 94404
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANTS -
Servers, Bussers, Bartenders, Hostesses
wanted. Call (650)340-7684
RETAIL JEWELRY
SALES
Start up to $13.
Experience up to $20.
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
(650)367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewleryexchange.com
26 Monday Aug. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
124 Caregivers
TOMS
COMPASSIONATE CARE
Are you in need of home
patient care?
We've got you covered.
Please call us.
You won't regret it.
650-515-0669
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 522735
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Petranka Ivanova Gidikova
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Petranka Ivanova Gidikova
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Petranka Ivanova Gidiko-
va
Proposed name: Petra Ivanova Gidikova
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on September
11, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/31/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/23/2013
(Published, 08/05/13, 08/12/2013,
08/19/2013, 08/26/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256968
The following person is doing business
as: Happy Hearts Child Care/Pre-School,
115 Stanley Rd., BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Peter Kozaczuk, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
04/02/2013.
/s/ Peter Kozaczuk /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/05/13, 08/12/13, 08/19/13, 08/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256920
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Crystal Springs Energy Medicine,
2) Crystal Springs Integrative Health, 214
De Anza Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Lisa Sullivan, 1530 Winding Way,
Belmont, CA 94002. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 07/01/2008.
/s/ Lisa Sullivan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/19/13, 08/26/13, 09/02/13, 09/09/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257328
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Nursery Garden, 967 Airport
Blvd., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Mon Chi Chan, 27 Sycamore
St., San Francisco, CA 94110. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 09/01/2013.
/s/ Mon Chi Chan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/26/13, 09/02/13, 09/09/13, 09/16/13).
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CLJ513731
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): Ronald O. Hemandez, aka
Castro Ronald Hemandez, aka Ronald
O. Hemandez, an Individual; and Does
1-100 inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): PerSolve,
LLC, a limited liability company, dba Ac-
count Resolution Associates
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
courts lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
203 Public Notices
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
San Mateo
MAIN COURTHOUSE-HALL OF JUS-
TICE
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiffs attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Alaine Patti-Jelsvik, SBN 194748, Edit
Alexander Ryan SBN 249323
PerSolve, LLC a limited Liability Compa-
ny, dba Account Resolution Associates
9301 Winnetka Avenue, Ste. B
CHATSWORTH, CA 91311
(866)438-1259
Date: (Fecha) May 10, 2012
John C. Fitton, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
August 12, 19, 26, September 2, 2013.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CLJ512411
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): Ivania S. Ayala, an Individual;
and Does 1-100,inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): PerSolve,
LLC, a limited liability company, dba Ac-
count Resolution Associates
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
courts lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
San Mateo
MAIN COURTHOUSE-HALL OF JUS-
TICE
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiffs attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
203 Public Notices
no tiene abogado, es):
Alaine Patti-Jelsvik, SBN 194748, Edit
Alexander Ryan SBN 249323
PerSolve, LLC a limited Liability Compa-
ny, dba Account Resolution Associates
9301 Winnetka Avenue, Ste. B
CHATSWORTH, CA 91311
(866)438-1259
Date: (Fecha) March 08, 2012
John C. Fitton, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
August 12, 19, 26, September 2, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, (650)322-
6641
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardis market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
WHITE CRIB / toddler bed with mattress
excellent condition $95 (650)345-9595
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
296 Appliances
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 SOLD!
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
1990S UPPER DECK LIFESIZE CUT-
OUTS - Aikman, Marino, Jordan, $20.
each, SOLD!
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CHINESE STAMPS - (90) all different,
early 20th century, $6.for all, SOLD!
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10W x 30H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SILVER PEACE dollar circulated $30
firm 415 333-8540 Daly City
STERLING SILVER Cigarette Case.
Made by silversmith E.A. Bliss circa
1910. Excellent condition. $99 firm.
Cash.(650)654-9252
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
ALL METAL TONKA Truck great cond,
$25, 650-595-3933
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
300 Toys
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OAK SCHOOL DESK - with
ink well, pencil holder and under seat
book shelf, great for a childs room or of-
fice, $48., (650)574-4439
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72 high, 40 wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 MP3 multi media player new in box
(both) for $20 (650)726-1037
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27 SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PHOTOSMART Printer, mint condi-
tion, 2 sided, view & print color & black,
multi-functions, includes 2 unopened car-
tridges $45.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20 color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
3 PIECE sofa sectional recliner $75
(650)591-2727
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
bankers rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
27 Monday Aug. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
304 Furniture
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31
Tall, 61 wide, 18 deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
GRANDMA ROCKING CHAIR - beauti-
ful white with gold trim, $100., SOLD!
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE , UMBRELLA & 6
CHAIRS - metal/vinyl, $35.,
SOLD!
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41 in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
SWIVEL CHAIR - dark blue leather, very
comfortable, good condition, bought for
$900., sell for $80.obo, (650)345-5502
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78 x 43 x 16, almost new, $89.,
SOLD!
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 SOLD!
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, SOLD!
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
ELECTRIC MEAT slicer $30., SOLD!
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
STANDARD BATHROOM SET - lid
cover and mat, beige. Asking $10. Call
(650)574-3229 (Foster City) between 10
a.m. and 7 p.m.
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 SOLD!
VINYL SHOWER CURTAINS (3) one is
beige/coral floral; one is aqua/black/
gold floral, and one is royal blue solid
with white nylon over-curtain. Asking
$10 each. Call (650)574-3229 (Foster
City) between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
10" MAKITA mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
B & D 17" Hedge Trimmer pro model,
sharp blades, only $19, 650-595-3933
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CIRCULAR SAW-BLACK & DECKER -
2 1/8 hp. 7 1/4 inch blade. Good condi-
tion. Extra blades. $20., SOLD!
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 1 1/2 HP ROUTER & TA-
BLE - Excellent condition, case, acces-
sories & extra cutters included. $60.,
SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3D SANDER - Brand new
never used-still in box. Great for sanding
furniture or round surfaces. Extra sand-
ing disks. $25., SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3X21" BELT SANDER - 1
hp w/ dust bag. $50., SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, SOLD!
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DENIM JACKET, faded but in good con-
dition, man's XL, $19, 650-595-3933
ELECTRIC BLOWER. Plenty of power.
Clean your leaves. Adjustable tube
length/direction. $20 Cash SOLD!
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 SOLD!
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
GARDEN CLAW. Excellent for tilling
you soil for planting flowers/vegetables.
$20. Cash 650-654-9252
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
308 Tools
LAWN AERATOR. Irrigate your lawn at
the roots. Hose attachment. $15 Cash.
SOLD!
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
MAKITA 21" belt sander $35 also 10
boxes of belt make offer, 650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., SOLD!
NEW NEWTONE Door Bell factory pack,
complete only $15, 650-595-3933
NEW PRO Torque Wrench 20-150 lbs,
warranty and case $29, 650-595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
ROSS ROOT feeder. Excellent for
feeding trees/shrubs. $15 Cash.
650-654-9252
RYOBI DETAIL SANDER - Pointed tip
can sand small area, good for
furniture/chairs, good condition, $25.,
SOLD!
RYOBI RECIPROCATING Saw electric
little used w/ new blade, SOLD!
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, SOLD!
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
(650)212-7020
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
SAFE - Sentry Fireproof, new, black,
15 x 16 x 18, capacity 1.7CF, pur-
chased for $400., will sell for $195.,
SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50.,
(415)298-0645
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALOE VERA PLANTS - (30) medicine
plant, $3.00 each, SOLD!
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., SOLD!
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BASS PRO SPOTLIGHT - (2) one mil-
lion candlelight, new in box, $100 for
both, (650)726-1037
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14W
x 8.75H x 8.75D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
310 Misc. For Sale
BRAND NEWTarp, 7' X 5' sealed factory
package Only $9 650-595-3933
BUBBLE GUM MACHINE - Commercial,
SOLD!
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
model #38640, lead drisel dome, 44 car-
ot plated, $45., (650)315-5902
COLEMAN ICE CHEST - 80 quart, $20.,
(650)345-3840
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., SOLD!
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT POCKET/PANINI Mkr elec. heat
top & bottom only $9 650-595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., (650)345-
3840
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9 tall, 11 diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide in wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., SOLD!
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $75 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12 L x
5W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MENS LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., SOLD!
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
SSF, (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 SOLD!
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RALPH LAUREN TWIN SIZE COM-
FORTER - sheets & bedskirt, blue/white
pattern, perfect condition, $60., SOLD!
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
310 Misc. For Sale
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, Calculate with Confidence, 4th
edition, like new, $25., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease, 6th
edition, $15., and Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics, 4th edition, $25., (650)345-
3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suit case
1950's collectibles perfect condition large
size pearl color hard surface $50
(650)755-9833
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28x30 Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 SOLD!
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
SUMMER READING, 100 paperbacks
and hard cover, popular authors, Cuss-
ler, Patterson, Brown, Steele, more.
$30.00 all obo (650)578-9208
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 SOLD!
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28, limited edi-
tion with Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)315-
5902
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
314 Tickets
TAYLOR SWIFT 2 tix, Sec. 221 8/27
Sleep Train Arena $350/ea
(916)770-7333
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
316 Clothes
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27h, energy
saver, original box, video. Excellent con-
dition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - $.25 each, or all for
$100., (650)921-6741
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., SOLD!
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $30 (650)756-7878
28 Monday Aug. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Pay attention!
6 Taj Mahal city
10 __ of Arc
14 Tokyo
automaker with
a liar named Joe
in its old ads
15 Forehead
16 Neutral shade
17 Home country
19 Amble
20 Add blonde
highlights to, say
21 Whole bunch
22 Free-for-all
23 Out of touch
with reality
26 Musical with
nightclub
scenes
31 Men of the
future?
32 Take to the
soapbox
33 Disco brothers
name
34 Church seat
37 Get ones head
out of the
clouds
41 Tooth tenders
org.
42 Trim, as a photo
43 Any one of New
Englands six
44 Fly alone
45 So far
47 Strike it rich
51 Stave off
52 March Madness
org.
54 Performing pair
57 Missing
58 Position of
moral superiority
61 Bear in the sky
62 Clarinet cousin
63 Rubber Duckie
Muppet
64 Checked out
65 911 responders:
Abbr.
66 Helps, as a perp
DOWN
1 Discover
2 Anthem start
3 Just darling
4 Israeli weapon
5 Honda Pilot and
Ford Explorer,
briefly
6 Not there
7 Watchdogs
warning
8 Vive le __!
9 Piercing tool
10 Tiara sparklers
11 Central Florida
city
12 Specter formerly
of the Senate
13 Microwaved
18 Night author
Wiesel
22 Its possible
24 Slightly
25 Gray wolf
26 __-Cola
27 Longtime infield
partner of Jeter,
familiarly
28 Ole Miss rival
29 Downed
30 Minuteman
enemy
33 Econ. yardstick
34 Seek guidance
in a 34-Across
35 Suffix with
sermon
36 Sharpen
38 Air France
destination
39 Lumber
40 DOJ division
44 Butter or mayo
45 McDonalds
golden symbol
46 Without a date
47 World Court
site, with The
48 Old white-key
material
49 Anxious
50 Gold bar
53 Geometry
calculation
54 Sandy slope
55 Military squad
56 Keats works
58 Whack weeds
the old-
fashioned way
59 Big Blue
60 Sphere
By Billie Truitt
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
08/26/13
08/26/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
RELEASE DATE Monday, August 26, 2013
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
318 Sports Equipment
SPECIALIZED CROSSROADS bike. 20"
frame/18 speed. Needs tires.Great com-
mute bike. $99. Cash SOLD!
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
SOLD!
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $65.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. (650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SHOWER CHAIR, WALKER, WHEEL-
CHAIR, POTTY - $25. each obo,
(650)766-9998
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
515 Office Space
SUITE SHARING: Sub-leasing Class A
furnished Office Space - 1 single and 1
double office at 411 Borel Avenue, Suite
210, San Mateo, CA. - Includes full ac-
cess to conference room and kitchenette
- Particularly suited for CPAs, attorneys
or financial planners. - Available Immedi-
ately. Call Paul Wrubel at 650-349-4200
or paul@paulwrubel.com.
620 Automobiles
1997 BMW 540I Sedan automatic with
120k miles silver on gray leather looks
sharp and drives excellent also have a
2001 530I in stock #5044 on sale for
$5500.00 plus tax,lic.etc., (650)637-3900
1999 AUDI A6 Sedan with 116k miles
clean car fax quattro automatic lots of
nice factory options comes with 3000
miles warranty #4447 more infowww.au-
totradecentercars.com . priced at
$6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
1999 PORSCHE Boxster Cabriolet
Convertible 5 Speed with 117k miles
power top and a nice sound system
sounds , looks and drives like it should
clean Car Fax with 3000 miles power
train warranty #4530 on sale for
$9995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A6 Avant Wagon with 79k
miles in excellent conditions fully loaded
clean Car Fax #5050 more info at
www.autotradecentercars.com we have
5 Audi's in stock. on sale for $8995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A6 Quattro Sedan 4.2 with
88k miles in excellent conditions and
hard to find looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax #4433 come with 3
months free warranty power full sport se-
dan on sale for $7995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2003 JEEP Grand Cherokee Limited
4x4 Automatic with 100k miles in excel-
lent conditions one owner clean car fax
california car fully loaded looks fantastic
#4520 on sale for $8995.00 plus you nor-
mal fees, (650)637-3900
2005 TOYOTA Prius hybrid automatic
with 97k miles . Navigation , Bluetooth
,key less entry ,JBL sound system and
much more clean Car Fax and 3000
miles warranty #4537 on sale for
$9700.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2006 CHRYSLER PT Cruiser Touring
Convertible with 101k miles automatic
cream color with beige clean Car Fax
looks sharp and very room convertible .
must see hard to find #4540 on sale for
$6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2007 NISSAN Sentra SL Sedan with
110k miles automatic with brand new
rims and tiers come with all power pack-
age Bluetooth and more free 3 months
warranty #4533 on sale for $8995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2012 TOYOTA Camry LE sedan auto-
matic with 24k miles in excellent new
conditions comes with full factory warran-
ty, black with brand new 18"black rims
and new tiers also original rims and tiers
included #4420 for $17995.plus fees,
(650)637-3900
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD 93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
FORD THUNDERBIRD 95 LX Coupe -
$2000., (650)245-1386
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excellent Condition $1,500
SOLD!
625 Classic Cars
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HONDA 90 - 1966 excellent, 165 mpg,
can deliver, $850., (831)462-9836
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE HELMET - New With
Tags, Modular Dual Visor M/C Helmet,
only $69., (650)595-3933
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., SOLD!
645 Boats
72 18 RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4 wide, 6
1/2 long & 2 1/2 deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
EDELBROCK VALVE COVERS - for a
389 engine, new in box, $100.,
(650)726-1037
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RADIALS - pair, PT215/60R17, $15. for
pair, SOLD!
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
29 Monday Aug. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Carpentry
D n J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
Windows Doors
Cabinets Casing
Crown Moulding
Baseboards
Artificial Grass Gazebos
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Flooring
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Housecleaning
ANGELICAS HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
House Cleaning Move In/Out
Cleaning Janitorial Services
Handyman Services
General Errands Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
Gutters and downspouts,
Rain gutter repair,
Rain gutter protection (screen),
Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs Maintenance Painting
Carpentry Plumbing Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650)453-3002
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance
Clean Ups Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof
Repair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
30 Monday Aug. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming Pruning
Shaping
Large Removal
Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tree Service Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
Tile Mosaics
Natural Stone Countertops
Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates Free installation
Window Washing Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
Health & Medical
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Insurance
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you cant
Refuse!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
WATCH - INVICTA, ProDiver, new, still
in box, $100., (650)726-1037
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Massage Therapy
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
LOCAL/WORLD 31
Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The re has moved northeast away from
Groveland, where smoke gave away to blue
skies Sunday. But at Tuolumne Citys Black
Oak Casino in Tuolumne City, the slot
machines were quiet as emergency workers
took over nearly all of the resorts 148
hotel rooms.
The casino is empty, said casino
employee Jessie Dean, who left her four
children at relatives homes in the Central
Valley. Technically, the casino is open, but
theres nobody there.
Hundreds of firefighters were deployed
Sunday to protect Tuolumne City and other
communities in the path of the Rim Fire.
Eight re trucks and four bulldozers were
deployed near Bunneys ranch on the west
side of Mount Baldy, where two years of
drought have created tinder-dry conditions.
Winds are increasing, so its going to be
very challenging, said Bjorn
Frederickson, a spokesman for the U.S.
Forest Service.
The re continues burning in the remote
wilderness area of Yosemite, but park
spokesman Tom Medena said its edging
closer to the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, the
source of San Franciscos famously pure
drinking water.
Despite ash falling like snowakes on the
reservoir and a thick haze of smoke limiting
visibility to 100 feet, the quality of the
water piped to the city 150 miles away is
still good, say officials with the San
Francisco Public Utilities Commission.
The citys hydroelectric power generated
by the system has been interrupted by the
re, forcing the utility to spend $600,000
buying power on the open market.
Park employees are continuing their
efforts to protect two groves of giant
sequoias that are unique the region by cut-
ting brush and setting sprinklers, Medena
said.
The re has consumed nearly 225 square
miles of picturesque forests. Ofcials esti-
mate containment at just 7 percent.
Its slowing down a bit, but its still
growing, Frederickson said.
Fire lines near Ponderosa Hills and Twain
Hart are being cut miles ahead of the blaze in
locations where re ofcials hope they will
help protect the communities should the re
jump containment lines.
There is a huge focus in those areas in
terms of air support and crews on the ground
building re lines to protect those commu-
nities. Were facing difcult conditions and
extremely challenging weather,
Frederickson said.
The high winds and movement of the re
from bone-dry brush on the ground to 100-
foot oak and pine treetops have created dire
conditions.
A crown re is much more difcult to
ght, said Daniel Berlant of the California
Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.
Our reghters are on the ground having to
spray up.
The blaze sweeping across steep, rugged
river canyons quickly has become one of
the biggest in California history, thanks in
part to extremely dry conditions caused by a
lack of snow and rainfall this year.
Investigators are trying to determine how
the re started Aug. 17, days before light-
ning storms swept through the region and
sparked other, smaller blazes.
The re is the most critical of a dozen
burning across California, officials say.
More than 12 helicopters and a half-dozen
xed wing tankers are dropping water and
retardant from the air, and 2,800 reghters
are on the ground.
This re has continued to pose every
challenge that there can be on a re: inac-
cessible terrain, strong winds, dry condi-
tions. Its a very difcult reght, Berlant
said.
Statewide, more than 8,300 reghters
are battling nearly 400 square miles of res.
Many air districts have issued health advi-
sories as smoke settles over Northern
California. While Yosemite Valley is clear,
the Lake Tahoe basin is thick with smoke,
and many outdoor activities have been can-
celed in Reno, Nev.
The U.S. Forest Service says about 4,500
structures are threatened by the Rim Fire.
Berlant said 23 structures were destroyed,
though officials have not determined
whether they were homes or rural outbuild-
ings.
Continued from page 1
FIRE
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
San Franciscos supply of water and
electricity remained safe on Sunday as a
forest re continued to burn out of control
near Yosemite National Park and the Bay
Areas Hetch Hetchy water source, re and
utility ofcials said.
According to Cal Fire, the Rim Fire
which started on Aug. 17 has burned
more than 133,000 acres in Stanislaus
National Forest and was only 7 percent
contained as of Sunday morning.
The Rim Fire has become Californias
15th largest blaze in the states recorded
history, Cal Fire said.
The re has threatened more than 4,500
homes and approached the Hecty Hetchy
Reservoir and watershed, which supplies
water and hydroelectric power to over 2.6
million Bay Area residents.
The San Francisco Public Utilities
Commission issued a statement yesterday
reassuring its customers that water quality
and utility service have not been impact-
ed, even though the agency was forced to
shut down power lines due to re damage at
a hydroelectric facility last week.
All of San Franciscos municipal cus-
tomers continue to be fully supplied; there
will be no interruption in electric serv-
ice, the SFPUC statement said.
Repair crews were set to return to the
Kirkwood Powerhouse Sunday to make
preliminary repairs and damage assess-
ments.
Since Aug. 19, the SFPUC has spent an
estimated $600,000 to purchase electrici-
ty from other sources while the transmis-
sion lines from Tuolumne County are shut
down.
So far the blaze has not reached Hetch
Hetchy Reservoir or caused any damage to
OShaugnessy Dam, according to the
SFPUC.
The water quality was being continually
tested to ensure that fallout from the re
has not jeopardized the water supply
downstream. The water quality remains
high and the supply is safe, according to
the SFPUC.
Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of
emergency for the city and county San
Francisco on Friday due to the effects of
the Rim Fire on the citys property and
power and water infrastructure.
In addition, Brown secured a grant from
the Federal Emergency Management
Agency that will reimburse around 75 per-
cent state and local reghting expenses,
according to the California Emergency
Management Agency.
The cause of the re has not been deter-
mined.
As fire grows, Bay Area water
and power supply remain safe
By Maggie Michael
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO Egyptian courts on Sunday heard
separate court cases against former President
Hosni Mubarak and top leaders of his archri-
val, the Muslim Brotherhood, both over alle-
gations of killing protesters in separate
instances.
Egyptian media portrayed the prosecution
of longtime foes as trials of the two
regimes, an attempt to show that both
Islamists and secular-leaning Mubarak author-
itarian regimes are alike after a July 3 military
coup toppled President Mohammed Morsi, a
Brotherhood member.
Weeks of mass rallies by Muslim
Brotherhood supporters over Morsis ouster
have weakened over the past days as security
forces have detained many Brotherhood lead-
ers. The military-backed government has
responded by relaxing curfew hours, trying to
signal a return to normalcy across the coun-
try.
We have crossed the swamps and muddy
pools, and now we are on the safe side,
Ahmed el-Musalamani, a spokesman for
interim-presidents spokesman, said Sunday.
He added: We have overcome the tough
phase.
At a heavily-fortied courtroom in eastern
Cairo, Mubarak looked relaxed in dark sun-
glasses and white clothes as he appeared for
his rst court appearance since he was released
from prison last week and transferred to a mil-
itary hospital. The 85-year-old ex-president
sat in a chair next to his two sons who are
being tried in a separate corruption-related
case.
Mubarak has been in detention since April
2011. He was found guilty and sentenced to
life in prison last year for failing to stop the
killing of some 900 protesters in the 18-day
2011 uprising, but his sentence was over-
turned on appeal. In April, his retrial opened
along with those of his security chief and six
top police commanders. His trial has been
postponed to Sept. 14.
In a separate hearing Sunday, top
Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie and ve
other members of the Islamist Brotherhood
saw their hearings postponed until Oct. 29.
The defendants, two of whom are still in hid-
ing and being tried in absentia, face charges
stemming from clashes outside the
Brotherhoods Cairo headquarters on June 30
that left nine dead. The four in detention were
not present in the downtown Cairo courtroom
for security reasons.
The military ousted Morsi after millions
took to the street demanding he step down.
Hes been held incommunicado since his
overthrow. Prosecutors have accused him of
conspiring with foreign groups to break out
of prison during the chaos of the 2011 upris-
ing against Mubarak. He is also being inves-
tigated in connection to another case of pro-
testers killings in December.
Authorities allege that Morsi supporters
have committed acts of terrorism since the
coup, pointing to a string of attacks against
churches and government buildings. The
Brotherhood and Morsi supporters deny their
protests are violent and deny that they attack
churches, accusing authorities of smearing
their movement.
Rights groups, however, say Islamist
groups have incited violence against
Christians, who have been blamed collective-
ly for Morsis overthrow.
The Egyptian Initiative For Personal
Rights issued a report on Sunday documenting
what it said was an unprecedented spike in
scale of sectarian violence and reprisals
against Coptic Christians over a four-day
period in August.
At least 45 churches came under attack and a
total of seven citizens were killed, the initia-
tive said. It blamed security forces for failing
to intervene and Islamist groups for helping
to feed the current wave of sectarian attacks.
Islamists also issued renewed calls Sunday
for demonstrations in a statement. Arrests and
killings appear to have weakened the
Brotherhoods ability to mobilize its follow-
ing. Calls for rallies zzled out on Saturday as
the government eased up the curfew hours
affecting much of the country.
The military-backed interim government
meanwhile is pursuing a fast-tract transition
plan that it says will return the country to
democracy.
On Sunday, a 10-member panel of experts
handed a rst draft of proposed constitutional
amendments to the interim president, a rst
step toward amending the now-suspended
charter drafted last year under Morsi. Asecond
panel of 50 members will work on the amend-
ments before nalizing them and putting
them for public vote.
Egypt courts hear cases against Mubarak
REUTERS
Egypts former president Hosni Mubaraktouches his head as he is transported back to a military
hospital.
32 Monday Aug. 26 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL