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, , . , . , , . , , , , . , (), . . !

MY BONNIE
"My Bonnie". , . ? , .
famous known all over the w o r l d good-looking fight (fought) origin century independent defeat , , ,

. :

1. a) , b) ; ; ; I; ; ; ; .

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

History of "My Bonnie" One of the most famous Scottish songs known all over the world is "My bonnie". It is a song about Prince Charles Edward Stewart who was known as Bonnie Prince Charlie because he was young and good-looking ("bonnie" means "good-looking"). He was also Scotland's national hero who fought against the English in the i8th century trying to make Scotland independent, but Charlie's army was defeated. The first printing of this song was in Student's Songs, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1881, but the origin is older, and unknown. . ?
lie (lay, lain) bring (brought) pillow dream wind blow (blew, blown)

. . ? MY BONNIE (By anonymous) 1. My Bonnie lies over the ocean, my Bonnie lies over the sea, My Bonnie lies over the ocean, oh, bring back my Bonnie to me! Chorus: Bring back, bring back, oh, bring back my Bonnie to me, to me! Bring back, bring back, oh, bring back my Bonnie to me! 2. Last night as I lay on my pillow, last night as I lay on my bed, Last night as I lay on my pillow, I dreamed that my Bonnie was dead! Chorus. 3. Oh, blow, you winds over the ocean, oh, blow, you winds over the sea. Oh, blow, you winds over the ocean, and bring back my Bonnie to me! Chorus. 4. The winds have blown over the ocean, the winds have blown over the sea. The winds have blown over the ocean and brought back my Bonnie to me! Chorus: Brought back, brought back, oh, brought back my Bonnie to me, to me! Brought back, brought back, oh, brought back my Bonnie to me!


, . , . . ? ? !

(Verb tenses)
,

1) 2) 3) 4)

(Imperative); (Present Simple); (Past Simple); (Present Perfect).

(Pronouns)
, 1- 2, 3- . ?

(Articles)
?

1. ? 2. ? , " bed", "my pillow" , . : wash your hands . " " .


. .

fought against the English.


:

a) . b) . c) .

mm

^
I A M A
acorn to crack to shout

NUT

. . I'M I'm an acorn, small and brown Lying on the cold, cold ground. Everyone walks over me That is why I'm cracked, you see. Chorus: I'm a nut (knock, knock) I'm a nut (knock, knock) I'm a nut! Yeah! Called myself on the telephone Just to hear my golden tone. Asked me out for a little date. Picked me up about half past eight. A NUT (By Esther Y. Nelson) Chorus Took myself to the movie show, Stayed too late and said, "Let's go". Took my hand and led me out, Drove me home and gave a shout. Chorus - Hello? Is this the Nut? Would I like to go out with me to the movies? - I'd love to! Let's go!

: 'I'm an acorn, small and brown".

1
, "I am : " golden, I'm ..." "

: "What is this song about?"

11 . , . . , . .

. : " is golden acorn, he is ..."

. , . . . . \. ^ .

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Is your name Nut? Are you cold? Is you small? Are it cold outside? What your name? Am he a nut? Is this the Nut? Am I on the ground? Where he from? I brown?

YOU ARE A GRAND OLD FLAG


'neath a boast or brag , ,

auld [ycrap] = old


acquaintance

YOU'RE GRAND OLD FLAG


(By George M. Cohan, 1905)

You're a grand old flag. You're a high flying flag; And forever in peace may you wave; You're the emblem of the land I love, The home of the free and the brave. Ev'ry heart beats true 'neath the Red, White and Blue, Where there's never a boast or brag; But, should auld acquaintance be forgot. Keep your eye on the grand old flag.

. , .

. . . .

LOVE IS
pet fishes tender

. , .

LOVE IS ...
(By Creg Scelsa)

Love is ... a tender feeling. Love is ... a way of being. Love is ... just showing someone you care. Love is ... helping with the dishes. Love is ... feeding your pet fishes. Love is ... just giving from your heart. Love is so very simple, It's not a mystery. When you treat those around you The very same way You want them to treat you. Love is ... your baby sister. Love is ... playing with her. Love is ... holding her when she cries. Love is ... sharing your candy, Love is ... being all that you can be. Love is ... lending a helping hand When someone needs you. Love is ... L-O-V-E Love is ... For you and me. Oh! Love is the greatest thing in the world.
. to be.

"Love is ..." . "Love is ..." .

10

MOTHER
, ( . , )

, . MOTHER (By Theodore Morse and Howard Johnson) "M" is for the million things she gave me. "0" means only that she's growing old. "T" is for the tears she shed to save me. "H" is for her heart of purest gold. "E" is for her eyes, with love lights shining. "R" means right, and right she'll always be. Put them all together; they spell "mother", A word that means the world to me. "M" is for the mercy she possesses. "O" means that I owe her all I own. "T" is for her tender sweet caresses. "H" is for her hands that made a home. "E" means everything she's done to help me. "R" means real and regular, you see. Put them all together; they spell "mother", A word that means the world to me. e . 1. 2. 3. 4. What What What What are are are are these six letters for? mothers for? fathers for? children for?

. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Daughters are for helping around the house. Sons are for defending the house. Pets are for adoring* them. Cats are for licking milk. Dogs are for barking.

*adore ,

WHAT ARE PEOPLE MADE OF?


spice sigh leer laces thorns pitch tar pig-tail scar pipeclay drill foeman , 1) , 2) , 1) 2) , ,

. , "to be" .

WHAT ARE PEOPLE MADE OF?


(Nursery rhyme)

What are httle boys made of, made of? What are httle boys made of? Frogs and snails And puppy-dogs' tails. That's what little boys are made of. What are little girls made of, made of? What are little girls made of? Sugar and spice And all things nice, That's what little girls are made of. What are young men made of, made of? What are young men made of? Sighs and leers And crocodile tears. That's what young men are made of. What are young women made of, made of? What are young women made of? Ribbons and laces

And sweet pretty faces. That's what young women are made of. What are old women made of? What are old women made of? Bushes and thorns. And old cow's horns. That's what old women are made of. What are our sailors made of? What are our sailors made of? Pitch and tar. Pig-tail and scar. That's what our sailors What are our soldiers made of? What are our soldiers made of? Pipeclay and drill. The foeman to kill, That's what our soldiers are made of.

. . 1. W h a t are teachers made of? 2. W h a t are students made of?

( O H T I H U O U i
THREE WHEELS ON MY WAGON
Cherokees wheels fte wagon arrow pioneer cave spear hidden flaming mad to roil along fo chase to gallop to burn to capture in flames at the reins things look b a d never say die , , , ,

1. What can this song be about? 2. How many wheels is the wagon supposed to have? 3. Do you think this song has got a happy ending?
, . ?

Present Continuous.

THREE WHEELS ON MY WAGON


(Traditional, Singer Dick van Dyke) Three wheels on my wagon and I'm still rolling along. The Cherokees are chasing me, arrows fly right on by. But I'm singing a happy song. I'm singing Higgety, Haggety, Hoggety high. Pioneers they never say die. A mile up the road there's a hidden cave And we can watch those Cherokees go galloping by. Two wheels on my wagon and I'm still rolling along. The Cherokees are after me, flaming spears burn my ears. But I'm singing a happy song. I'm singing Higgety, Haggety, Hoggety high. Pioneers they never say die. Half a mile up the road there's a hidden cave And we can watch those Cherokees go galloping by. One wheel on my wagon and I'm still rolling along. The Cherokees are after me, I'm all in flames at the reins. But I'm singing a happy song. I'm singing Higgety, Haggety, Hoggety high. Pioneers they never say die. On the very next turn there's a hidden cave And we can watch those Cherokees go galloping by. No wheels on my wagon so I'm not rolling along. The Cherokees have captured me, they look mad, things look bad. But I'm singing a happy song. (Come on all you Cherokees, sing along with me.) Higgety, Haggety, Hoggety high. Pioneers they never say die.

1. Is it difficult to be rolling 2. 34. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

on three wheels? on two wheels? on one wheel? Is the regular wagon with four wheels able to roll? Why is the pioneer still rolling? Are the Cherokees chasing him with good intentions? Is he loosing the wheels of his wagon one by one? Is it possible for him to be still rolling when he lost all the wheels? Could he go on rolling if he got another wagon with four wheels? Why he thinks that things look bad? Why is he singing a happy song?

, . : Good wheels on my wagon...

, . , ?
struggle to get married to go out with smb to get on well to look after each other expensive Independent indeed wasn't g o o d enough for me - , ,

, , , Present Continuous. Wednesday 10th June, 4 dm

Dear Mum and Dad, I'm really sorry, but I'm leaving home. When you read this I will be far away. Don't try to find me. Martin and I are getting married next Saturday. I know you have never liked Martin. You didn't want me to go out with him because you said that he was just a car salesman and he wasn't good enough for me, but Martin is best for me. I love him very much indeed. When I was a little girl, you always gave me eveiy thing I wanted toys, clothes, an expensive education. I know it was difficult to do this. It was a struggle because we didn't have much money, but

you wanted to plan my life for me. You tried to choose my friends, my job, even my clothes. Now I am going to do what I want to do, not what you want me to do. I want to be independent. I love you both very much and I am your only child, so it isn't easy to leave. I hope you can forgive me and learn to love Martin. I'd love us all to get on well together. Look after each other. I promise to write again soon. Paula

I'm leaving home , , . Martin and I are getting married next Saturday .

1. Is Paula inviting her parents to her wedding? 2. Is she leaving home because she doesn't love her parents? 3. Is she going to write them again?

SHE IS LEAVING HOME


. , ?
handkerchief backdoor dressing gown appointment motor trade to clutch to sacrifice to snore to pick up to treat to deny thoughtlessly have fun , ,

. SHE'S L E A V I N G H O M E
(By John Lennon and Paul McCartney)

Wednesday morning at five o'clock as the day begins, Silently closing the bedroom door, Leaving the note that she hoped would say more. She goes downstairs to the kitchen Clutching her handkerchief, (^ietly turning the backdoor key, Stepping outside she is free. She is leaving home. We gave her most of our lives. Sacrificed most of our lives. We gave her everything money could buy. She's leaving home after living alone for so many years. Father snores as his wife gets into her dressing gown, Picks up the letter that's lying there Standing alone at the top of the stairs She breaks down and cries to her husband, "Daddy, our baby's gone. Why would she treat us so thoughtlessly? How could she do this to me?" She is leaving home We never thought of ourselves. Never a thought of ourselves. We struggled hard all our lives to get by. She's leaving home after living alone for so many years. Friday morning at nine o'clock she is far away Waiting to keep the appointment she made Meeting a man from the motor trade. She is leaving home. What did we do that was wrong? We didn't know it was wrong. Fun is the one thing that money can't buy. Something inside that was always denied for so many years. She's leaving home. Bye bye.

1) ^ ) ( ), , ; 2) .

! : She is leaving home Present Continuous. He !

. , , , . , .

WALIQNG WITH THE CLOUDS


.

to, head, you, my, question, in, listening, the. Are you. Are, answers, looking, the, at eyes, in
. , .

. Are you listening to the questions in my head? Are you looking at the answers in my eyes? Are you listening to the questions? Are you looking at the answers? Or are you walking with the clouds up in the SIQ^?


AND I LOVE HER
tenderly like as long as ,

. .

AND I LOVE HER


(By John Lennon and Paul McCartney)

I give her all my love That's all I do. And if you saw my Love You would love her too, and I love her. She gives me everything And tenderly The kiss my lover brings She brings to me, and I love her. A Love like ours Could never die. As long as I have you near me.
Twice:

Bright are the stars that shine Dark is the sky I know this love of mine Will never die, and I love her.

(\
, ? : I give her ... : I give her all all all all my my my my heart mind thoughts life ...

. , . , , . . : a) , . .; ; b) ; . . , 3- , . ., Present Simple. , 3- , . .. Present Simple.

THE FARMER IN THE DELL


dell nurse rat alone no

. . . 1. H o w many people are there in the dell?

2. How many things are there in the dell? 3. How many parts are there in the song? .

THE FARMER IN THE DELL


The farmer in the dell, The farmer in the dell; Heigh-o, the derry-o. The farmer in the dell. The farmer takes a wife, The farmer takes a wife. Heigh-o, the derry-o, The farmer takes a wife. The wife The wife Heigh-o, The wife takes a child. takes a child. the derry-o. takes a child.

(Nursery rhyme)

Heigh-o, the derry-o. The nurse takes a dog. The dog takes a cat, The dog takes a cat. Heigh-o, the derry-o. The dog takes a cat. The cat takes a rat. The cat takes a rat. Heigh-o, the derry-o. The cat takes a rat. The rat takes the cheese. The rat takes the cheese. Heigh-o, the derry-o, The rat takes the cheese. The cheese stands alone. The cheese stands alone. Heigh-o, the derry-o. The cheese stands alone.

The child takes a nurse. The child takes a nurse. Heigh-o, the derry-o. The child takes a nurse. The nurse takes a dog. The nurse takes a dog. .

3
LOVE STORY
^ .

LOVE STORY
(By . Sigman, F. Lai) Where do I begin to tell the story of how great a love can be? The sweet love story that is older than the sea. The simple truth about the love she brings to me. Where do I start? With her first hello she gave the meaning to this empty world of mine. There'd never be another love, another time. She came into my life and made the living fine. She fills my heart. She fills my heart with very special things. With angel songs, with wild imaginings, She fills my soul with so much love That anywhere I go I'm never lonely. With her along, who could be lonely? I'll reach for her hand. It's always there. How long does it last? Can love be measured by the hours in a day? I have no answer now but this much I can say, I know I'll need her till the stars all burn away And she'll be there. (Twice) i "Love story". , . , . . . 1. What gave the meaning to his empty world? 2. What does she fill his heart with? . 3. How great can a love be?

. . . : , . .

THE MUFFIN MAN


. .

THE MUFFIN MAN*


(Nursery rhyme) Oh, do y o u k n o w the Muffin Man, the Muffin Man, the M u f f i n M a n ? Oh, do y o u k n o w the M u f f i n Man, w h o lives on Drury Lane**? Oh, yes, I k n o w the Muffin Man, the Muffin Man, the Muffin Man. Oh, yes, I k n o w the M u f f i n Man; w h o lives on Drury Lane. N o w two of us k n o w the M u f f i n Man, the Muffin Man, the M u f f i n Man. N o w t w o of us k n o w the M u f f i n Man, w h o lives on Drury Lane. N o w we all k n o w the M u f f i n Man, the Muffin Man, the Muffin Man. N o w w e all k n o w the M u f f i n Man, w h o lives on Drury Lane. , . . * Muffin Man ** Lane

(
ANST GO MARCHING
.

The ants go marching one by one, The ants go marching one by one, The ants go marching one by one, And they all go marching down to Boom, boom, boom!

hurrah, hurrah! hurrah, hurrah! the httle one stops to eat a crumb. the ground to get out of the rain,

, , , . , . . . :

The ants don't go marching one by one, hurrah, hurrah! The ants don't go marching one by one, hurrah, hurrah! The ants don't go marching one by one, the little one doesn't stop to eat a crumb*. And they all don't go marching down to the ground to get out** of the rain, Boom, boom, boom!
.

.
to shut(shut) to tie to rob a hive to pick up stick to pray to Heaven to lock gate , , ,

* crumb ; ** get out .

THE ANTS GO MARCHING


(Nursery rhyme)

The ants go marching one by one, hurrah, hurrah! (x2) The ants go marching one by one, the httle one stops to eat a crumb. And they all go marching down to the ground to get out of the rain, Boom, boom, boom! The ants go marching two by two, hurrah, hurrah! (x2) The ants go marching two by two, the little one stops to tie his shoe. And they all go marching down to the ground to get out of the rain. Boom, boom, boom! The ants go marching three by three, hurrah, hurrah! (x2) The ants go marching three by three, the little one stops to think of the sea. And they all go marching down to the ground to get out of the rain. Boom, boom, boom! The ants go marching four by four, hurrah, hurrah!(x2) The ants go marching four by four, the little one stops to shut the door. And they all go marching down to the ground to get out of the rain. Boom, boom, boom! The ants go marching five by five, hurrah, hurrah! (x2) The ants go marching five by five, the little one stops to rob a hive. And they all go marching down to the ground to get out of the rain, Boom, boom, boom! The ants go marching six by six, hurrah, hurrah! (x2) The ants go marching six by six, the little one stops to pick up sticks, And they all go marching down to the ground to get out of the rain. Boom, boom, boom! The ants go marching seven by seven, hurrah, hurrah! (x2) The ants go marching seven by seven, the little one stops to pray to Heaven, And they all go marching down to the ground to get out of the rain. Boom, boom, boom! The ants go marching eight by eight, hurrah, hurrah! (x2) The ants go marching eight by eight, the little one stops to lock the gate, And they all go marching down to the ground to get out of the rain. Boom, boom, boom! The ants go marching nine by nine, hurrah, hurrah! (x2) The ants go marching nine by nine, the little one stops to check the time. And they all go marching down to the ground to get out of the rain. Boom, boom, boom! The ants go marching ten by ten, hurrah, hurrah! (x2) The ants go marching ten by ten, the little one stops to say "The End!" And they all go marching down to the ground to get out of the rain, Boom, boom, boom, boom!

3
.

. . , . .

^ p l ;
'neath willow pipe thee swallow spoke-spoke 'twas-it w a s splendor break (broke, broken) morn maid

^
, . ,

AURA LEE

. A s the black bird in the spring 'Neath the willow tree Sat and piped, I heard him sing. Sing of Aura Lee. , ? : We, you ... . "heard^^ , , : fly, sing, pipe, sit, appear, etc.

. , .

AURA LEE
(By anonymous)

As the black bird in the spring 'Neath the willow tree Sat and piped, I heard him sing, Sing of Aura Lee.
Chorus: Aura Lee, Aura Lee Maid of golden hair. Sunshine came along with thee And swallows in the air.

On her cheek the rose was born 'Twas music when she spake In her eyes the rays of morn With sudden splendor breaks.
Chorus: Aura Lee, Aura Lee, Maid of golden hair. Sunshine came along with thee And swallows in the air.
. . , Past Simple.

to to to to to

be come sit hear make

1. Did the black bird sat and piped? 2. Did I heard him sing? 3. Was Aura Lee a maid of golden hair?

. Past Simple.

1. to begin 2. to choose

11. to steal 12. to think

3- to do 4- to eat 5- to leave 6. to run 7. to lie 8. to know 9- to teach 10. to say

13- to go 14- to freeze 15- to fly i6. to feel 17- to have 18. to hurt 19. to get 20. to hide

23- to 24. to 25. to 26. to 27. to 28. to 29. to 30. to

21. to let 22. to see

wear tear sit drink swim break take sing

. T A Y E
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4
DIP-DIP-LO-DO-CUS
tiny shiny brain extremely ,

. . '

1-01--0-8
(Nursery rhyme)

Years and years ago there was a dinosaur: Its name was Dip-dip-lo-do-cus. But now here on Earth there are no dinosaurs, Poor old Dip-dip-lo-do-cus! It had twenty tiny teeth and a shiny nose. The old Dip-dip-lo-do-cus. At the end of its feet it had ten big toes. The old Dip-dip-lo-do-cus. But the brain inside its head was extremely small. Poor old Dip-dip-lo-do-cus. The brain inside its head wasn't any good at all. For the Dip-dip-lo-do-cus. So now it's just a museum dinosaur. The great Dip-dip-lo-do-cus. Because the brain inside its head was extremely poor. The old Dip-dip-lo-do-cus!
. . . , . .

Why are there no dinosaurs on the Earth now?

THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS


. , .

THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS


(Traditional)

On the first day of Christmas My true love gave to me A partridge* in a pear tree. On the second day of Christmas My true love gave to me Two turtle doves, and, ... On the third day of Christmas My true love gave to me Three french hens, ... On the fourth day of Christmas My true love gave to me Four calling birds, ... On the fifth day of Christmas My true love gave to me Five golden rings, ... On the sixth day Christmas My true love gave to me Six geese a-laying, ...

On the seventh day of Christmas My true love gave to me Seven swans a-swimming, ... On the eighth day of Christmas My true love gave to me Eight maids a-milking, ... On the ninth day of Christmas My true love gave to me Nine pipers piping, ... On the tenth day of Christmas My true love gave to me Ten ladies dancing, ... On the eleventh day of Christmas My true love gave to me Eleven lords a-leaping, ... On the twelfth day of Christmas My true love gave to me Twelve fiddlers fiddling, ...

, , . . One the first. Two the second, etc.


partridge

MAGIC

BOAT

. , . , ; Past Simple.

MAGIC BOAT
(Traditional)

When I was one, I had some fun. On the day I went to sea. I jumped on board a magic boat And the captain said to me. Chorus: "We're going this way, that way. Forwards, backwards. Over the deep blue sea. Upwards, downwards. Around and around. And that's the life for me!" When I was two, I had one shoe. On the day I went to sea. I jumped on board a magic boat And the captain said to me. Chorus.

When I was three, I had some tea. On the day I went to sea. I jumped on board a magic boat And the captain said to me. Chorus. When I was four, I had some more. On the day I went to sea. I jumped on board a magic boat And the captain said to me. Chorus. When I was five, I learned to drive, On the day I went to sea. I jumped on board a magic boat And the captain said to me. Chorus.

. What did you do when you were ... 1. one? 2. five? 3. six? 4. ten? 5. fourteen? 6. sixteen?

THE WITCH DOCTOR


the witch doctor true nice advice miser smart to admit , - , ,

, , .

I told you I was in love with you , .

THE WITCH DOCTOR


(By Rass Bagdasariarl)

I told the witch doctor I was in love with you, I told the witch doctor I was in love with you. And then the witch doctor he told me what to do, he said,
Chorus: a,: ^

00 oo ah ah ting tang walla walla walla bing bang (x4) 1 told the witch doctor you didn't love me true, I told the witch doctor you didn't love me nice. And then the witch doctor he gave me some advice, he said.
Chorus.

You've been keeping love from me just like you were a miser. And I'll admit I wasn't very smart. So I went out and found myself a guy that's so much wiser. And he taught me the way to win your heart. My friend the witch doctor he told me what to say. My friend the witch doctor he told me what to do, I know that you'll be mine when I say this to you.
Chorus.

. , . . 1. W h a t did she tell the witch doctor? 2. W h a t did the doctor tell to do? 3. W h a t is the w a y to win a heart?

. .

% ( / ^ (
I HAVE GOT EXAMS
term duty sit a r o u n d feel sorry fear ,

1. What do you think this song is about? 2. Why is the boy so unhappy?

| W , , .

I HAVE GOT EXAMS


(By E. Silver)

Every term I have got exams I've got a lot of work to do I have got boring lessons at school Why can't I be like you? You have not got any duty here You sit around and have a fun my dear Have you got any worries and fear? Why can't I be like you? I have got heavy bag to day I've got a lot of textbooks too Do you feel sorry for me Why can't I be like you? You have got funny friends up there You play with them and relax all year You have not got any worries and fear Why can't I be like you? e . , have got/has got. , . ^ ; , . Exams, term, every Work, a lot of, to do Lessons, at, boring, school be, like, can't, I you? any, got, here, any a fun, have, sit around, dear, my and, fear, any, worries I, like, be, can't you? Bag, heavy, to day texstbooks, too, a lot of sorry, me, for, feel I, can't, like, you, be? I've got I've got I've got Why You have not You Have you got Why I've got I've got Do you Why

. .

, . . have got/has got. : The boy's got fair hair.

, . . . Every evening you go to the zoo You always stare at me like fool And I always stare to you Why can't I be like you? You can go any place you want You've got a passport and a telephone You never want your homework to do Why can"t I be like you? You are just a silly boy You've got a lot of games and toys It's so cool to join your band Why can't I be your friend?

. Which girl wrote it Ann or Bass?

@ V e

(GOTJ

hair.

haven't

(got ) a

haven't

(got ) a

ve

(GOT )

Bass

. , . No, I haven't. Have you got it? Really? I like them, too. I've got five CDs by them. Great! Can I borrow your video? Have you got the first one, Beatles? My favourite group is The Beatles. OK. Yes, I have. And I have got a poster, a T-shirt and a video, too.

HE'S GOT T H E W H O L E W O R L D IN HIS H A N D S


^ . , .

, have.

HE'S GOT THE WHOLE WORLD IN HIS HANDS


(Singer Laurie London. The words and music by Anne London)

He's He's He's He's He's He's He's He's He's He's He's He's He's He's He's He's He's He's He's He's .

got got got got got got got got got got got got got got got got got got got got

the the the the

whole whole whole whole

world in His hands, wide world in His hands. world in His hands. world in His hands.

you an' me, sister, in His hands, you an' me, brother, in His hands, you an' me, sister, in His hands. the \\hole world in His hands. the the the the little tiny baby in His hands. little tiny baby in His hands. little tiny baby in His hands. whole world in His hands. His hands. His hands. His hands. in His hands.

all of us here in all of us here in all of us here in the whole world the the the the whole whole whole whole

world in His hands. wide world in His hands. world in His hands. world in His hands.

Who has got the whole world in His hands? .


mule pal to haul barge lumber coal hoy Inch neighbour

CANAL

. The Erie Canal, completed in 1825 between Buffalo and Albany, New York, joined the Great Lakes System with the Atlantic Ocean. Boats were pulled by mules which walked alongside the canal on towpaths. The mule drivers were called towpath boys or "hoggies". ^ . , .

ERIE CANAL
(Traditional Canal Work Song since 1820s)

I've got a mule, her name is Sal, Fifteen miles on the Erie Canal. She's good old worker and a good old pal. Fifteen miles on the Erie Canal. We've hauled some barges in our day. Filled with lumber, coal and hay. And we know every inch of the way. From Albany to Buffalo. Chorus: Low bridge, everybody down, Low bridge, for we're coming to a town; And you'll always know your neighbour. You're always know your pal. If you've ever navigated on the Erie Canal.

\ G
THE LADY IN RED
to shine (shone) wear (wore, worn) highlights blind wanna= want to... gorgeous breath complete utter , ,

. , ? ?

THE LADY IN RED


(By Chris de Burgh)

I've never seen you looking so lovely as you did tonight. I've never seen you shine so bright. I've never seen so many men ask you if you wanted to dance. They're looking for a little romance, given half a chance. And I've never seen that dress you're wearing. Or the highlights in your hair that catch your eyes, ; I have been blind.
Chorus:

The lady in red is dancing with me, cheek to cheek, There's nobody here, it's just you and me, it's where I wanna be, But I hardly know this beauty by my side, I'll never forget the way you look tonight. I've never seen you looking so gorgeous as you did tonight. I've never seen you shine so bright, you were amazing. I've never seen so many many people want to be there by your side, And when you turned to me and smiled, it took my breath away. And I have never had such a feeling, such a feeling of complete and utter love, As I do tonight.
Chorus.

I never will forget the way you look tonight. The Lady in red, my Lady in red.

. , . .

, .

Present Perfect
, . : forget, see, smile, see, look, see, wear, see, dance, be, see, want, see, take, have, look, know, turn

THE LADY IN RED


r you looking so lovely as you did tonight. r you shine so bright. r so many men ask you if you to dance, they' , for a little romance, given half a chance, and I that dress you' __, or the highlights in your hair that catch your eyes, I blind. The lady in red with me, cheek to cheek, there's nobody here, it's just you and me, it's where I wanna be, but I hardly this beauty by my side, r the way you look tonight. r you looking so gorgeous as you did tonight r you shine so bright you were amazing r so many many people want to be there by your side, and when you to me and , it my breath away, and I such a feeling, such a feeling of complete and utter love, as I do tonight. I never will forget the way you look tonight. The Lady in red, my Lady in red.

BATTLE HYMN OF THE REPUBLIC


. During the Civil War, Julia Howe heard the Union soldiers (North) singing "John Brown's Body". The melody stayed with her and she wrote the words of the Battle Hymn to this tune. , .

BATTLE HYMN OF THE REPUBLIC


(By Julia Ward Howe, 1861)

Mine eyes have seen the glor>^ of the coming of the Lord; He is tramping out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored; He hath loos'd the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword. His truth is marching on. Chorus: Glory, glory, hallelujah! Glory, glory, hallelujah! Glory, glory, hallelujah! His truth is marching on. I have seen Him in the watch-fires of a hundred circling camps; They have builded* Him an altar in the evening dews and damps; I can read His righteous sentence by the dim and flaring lamps, His day is marching on. Chorus. He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat; He is sifting out the hearts of men before His judgement seat. Oh, be swift, my soul, to answer Him! Be jubilant, my feet! Our God is marching on. Chorus. In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea. With a glory in His bosom that transfigures you and me; As He died to make men holy let us die to make men free. While God is marching on. Chorus.

"Battle Hymn of the Republic". , . .

I HAVE GOT MISTAICE


, : blue, skirt, mess, great, cat, wrong, money

I've made a mistake. This coat's much too long And I've just bought these shoes But just look what's ! They looked good in the shop The colour was But know I can't wear them It's the pain that I hate. I've bought They're the They're too And they're the wrong jeans wrong shade of loose round my waist quite baggy, too. to town a too small my waist hurt.

I've just been And I bought But it's much And it makes

T v e just returned And looked at this hat When it's there on my head It looks just like a . .

THE GOOD LITTLE GIRL


e , .

THE GOOD LITTLE GIRL


(By A.A. Milne)

It's funny how often they say to me, "Jane, Have you been a good girl?" "Have you been a good girl?" And when they have said it, they say it again, "Have you been a good girl?" "Have you been a good girl?" I come back from school or from playing a game Wherever I come from, it's always "Well? Have you been a good girl?" It's always the end of the loveliest day: "Have you been a good girl?" "Have you been a good girl?" I went to the Zoo, and then "Have you been a good girl?" "Have you been a good girl?" It's funny of Mummy and Dad, This asking and asking, in case I was bad, "Well? Have you been a good girl, Jane?" . .

( O N T I N U O U i
B I O G R A P B H f , , . , ?
entrance voice police patrol car to be hanging around drummer appeal deportation permission review apartment building road accident brain tumour first appearance huge audience honorary award to desert to bring up to manage to retire to own sleeping-pill overdose rumours of quarrels last performance close relationship to be at the height massive media coverage ( ) () () 1

. Past Continuous?

JOHN LENNON (1940-1980)


John Lennon was murdered just before 11 pm on the 8th of December 1980 outside his home in the Dakota apartment building in New York City. He had just got out of this car, and was walking to the entrance when a voice called "Mr. Lennon". Lennon turned, and was shot five times. The killer throw his gun down, and stood there smiling. "Do you know what you just did?" shouted a doorman. "I just shot John Lennon", the killer replied. Lennon was rushed to the hospital in a police patrol car, but it was too late. The killer was 25 year-old Mark Chapman from Hawaii. Earlier the same evening he had asked Lennon for his autograph. In fact, he has been around outside the apartment building for several days. Chapman was a fan of The Beatles and Lennon, and had tried to imitate him in many ways. It is said that he even believed that he was John Lennon himself.

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES
1940 1942 1956 1957 1958 1960 1961 1962 Born Liverpool. The Lennon family deserted by father. Mother leaves. John brought up by aunt. Forms pop group at school. Student at Liverpool College of Art. Mother killed in road accident. Goes professional as one of The Beatles (Lennon, McCartney, Harrison, Best, Sutcliffe). Plays in Hamburg, Germany. Plays in Hamburg and Liverpool. Sutcliff (Lennon's best friend) dies of brain tumour. Brian Epstein begins to manage The Beatles. Ringo Starr replaces Pete Best as the Beatles drummer. Married Cynthia Powell, an art student. Beatles' first record "Love me do". First TV appearance. Three records Number 1 in British Top 20. Incredible popularity. Son, Julian born. First hit record in USA "I want to hold your hand". Two US tours. In April, The Beatles records at Number 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 in US Top 20. First film "A Hard Day's Night". First book. "Help!" The Beatles' second film. Beatlemania at its height. US tour. Huge

1963 1964

1965

audience in football stadiums. The Beatles receive MBE (special honorary award) from Queen Elizabeth. 1966 1967 1968 1969 Lennon in film "How I won the war" not a musical. Meets Yoko Ono, Japanese avantgarde artist. "Sergeant Pepper" The Beatles' most famous LP*. All The Beatles interested in meditation. In India with The Beatles for meditation. The Beatles' company "Apple" founded. Lennon art exhibition "You are there". Lennon divorced by wife. The Beatles' film "Let it be". Rumours of quarrels about money. Talk of The Beatles' break up. The Beatles' last performance on roof of Apple Building. Lennon and Yoko Ono marry. He 29. She 36. Lennon still recording with The Beatles but some work solo. McCartney leaves The Beatles. Others start solo careers. Lennon LP "Imagine" most successful LP. Lennon and Yoko Ono in New York one-room apartment. Charity concert. Lennon and Yoko Ono separate. Lennon in Los Angeles. Lennon is ordered to leave USA protests and appeals. Drinking problem one and a half bottles of spirits a day. Still fighting deportation. Lennon and Yoko Ono together again in New York. Permission to stay in USA. Son Sean born October 9th (Lennon's birthday). Retires from public life. Extensive travel. Business affairs managed by Yoko Ono. Full-time father. Very close relations with son. Owns seven apartments. First record for six years. LP "Double Fantasy". Single "Starting Over". Good reviews from critics. Many said it was "a new beginning". Dec. 8th Lennon murdered. Massive media coverage. TV and radio programmes interrupted to give news. Record companies on overtime to produce records. In January and February three records in November 1 in British Top 20: "(Just Like) Starting Over", "Imagine" and "Woman".

1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1976 1980

1981

, : "That time he
LP long playing record: a record that turns 33 times a minute.

THE NIGHT BEFORE


. , . , : ? T H E N I G H T BEFORE (By John Lennon & Paul McCartney) We say our goodbyes (on the night before). Love was in your eyes (on the night before). Now today I find, you have changed your mind. Treat me like you did the night before. Were you telling lies (on the night before)? Was I so unwise (on the night before)? When I held you near, you were so sincere. Treat me like you did the night before. Last night is the night I will remember you by. When I think of things you did it makes me wanna cry. We said our goodbyes (on the night before), Love was in your eyes (on the night before). Now today I find you have changed your mind. Treat me like you did the night before. When I held you near, you were so sincere. Treat me like you did the night before. Last night is the night I will remember you by. When I think of things you did it makes me wanna cry. Were you telling lies (on the night before)? Was I so unwise (on the night before)? When I held you near, you were so sincere, Treat me like you did the night before. .
to to to to to change one's mind tell lies be unwise be sincere treat ,

. She told lies. I held her hand. I thought she was sincere. She w a s telling lies. I w a s holding her hand. I w a s thinking of our relationships.

"The Night Before" . Is there any hope to put the matter right?

"Three Wheels on my Wagon". Bee , , .

. : I'm still rolling I was rolling

ALICE'S SONG
stable Queen course favonrite eagerly to look for

. , . : . : . Past Continuous.

, . , : W h a t were y o u doing ....? : w h e n I saw y o u ...

ALICE'S SONG
(Traditional)

What were you doing when I saw you in the stable, Alice? What were you doing when I saw you there? I was listening to the stories Of the big white horses They were telling me All about their favourite courses I was listening eagerly To what they had to say. What were you doing when I saw you at the station, Alice? What were you doing when I saw you there? I was reading all the books About the Queen of England, I was writing poems That I want to send to her, I was looking for a word To write about her hair. What were you doing when I saw you at the palace, Alice? What were you doing when I saw you there? I was talking to the Queen About my latest novel. She was asking me X2 To come to tea again. What were you doing, when I saw you there? . ^

( O H T i H u o u i
FIVE
Five .

SEAN CONLON is the youngest of the Five boys, and he's been singing since he was four. He considered being a professional Rugby League, but didn't want to lose his teeth. Date of birth: 20 May 1981 Place of birth: Leeds Hobbies: Ladies and music Dislikes: People who think that they are the best Childhood heroes: Eddie Murphy Favourite hang-out: Anywhere that plays soul music Favourite sport: Football, running and Rugby League Favourite record: There are too many that I love Favourite book: "Kes" Favourite Spice Girl: Scaiy
.

He's been singing since he was four.


.

1. , Five. 2. , -. 3. , . 4. , .

"to sing" "to rap" .

JASON PAUL BROWN


He's not new to pop, since he cut his teeth rapping for a band called Prophets of Funk in his hometown of Warrington. He's also known as Daddy Five, organising the others. Nickname: Date of birth: Place of birth: Previous jobs: Hobbies: Dislikes: Favourite hang-out: Favourite book: Favourite TV programme: One thing I'd changed about myself: Favourite Spice Girl: 13 June 1976 Aldershot Working in a warehouse Music and women Cabs, and driving around London A club called "East" in Stockholm "Valley of the lights" "They think it's all over" Scar on my right jaw-line Absent Spice I'm not a fan

RICHARD ABIDIN BREEN


The cool and calm Five boy, laid back but strong-headed. A natural performer, he's danced and rapped since childhood. Nickname: Date of birth: Place of birth: Worst jobs: Hobbies: Dislikes: Money: Childhood hero: Favourite song: Favouirite film: Favouirite book: Favoiu'ite hang-out: Favourite Spice Girl: Abs 29 June 1979 Enfield Helping his mother in a launderette Djing, films, eating out, computer games and spending time with friends and family Smoking, drugs, drinking and fake people Gimmee, gimmee, gimmee! Michael Jackson "Down Low" R. Kelly "Titanic" No particular one Bed Not a fan

scorr

JAMES TIM ROBINSON

This Five boy is a graduate of the Silvia Young Stage School and, according to :iis publicity agent, has enough "cheel^^ charisma to charm a nun". I used to be Spider (because of my legs) and also Curtains when I had floppy hair with a parting in the middle 22 November 1979 Date of birth: Basildon Place of birth: Previous jobs: Working in the burger van but I do love burgers Hobbies: Music, basketball and skating Childhood hero: Knight Rider Favourite song: Any 80's love song Favourite hang-out: Any pub in Essex Favourite book: "The Hobbit" Favourite TV programme: "Red Dwarf One thing I'd changed about myself: My hairy legs and feet Favourite Spice Girl: Mel B (Scary Spice) Nickname:

RICHARD NEVILLE
Coming straight out of England's Midlands, he is the "face" of the band, ail big smile and blue eyes. His bandmates say that he is sensitive and caring. Nickname: Date of birth: Place of birth: Previous jobs: Hobbies: Dislikes: Childhood heroes: Favovu-ite record: Favourite sports: Favourite book: Favourite TV programme: Favourite hang-out: One thing I'd changed about myself: Favourite Spice Girl: Ritchie 23 August 1979 Birmingham Worked in a big burger van and his mum's pub Women, music and clubbing Big-headed people Eddie Vedder from Pearl Jam Pearl Jam "Jeremy" Rugby, football and any chance to get his kit off "Diary of Adrian Mole, aged 13 3/4" "Men behaving badly" My brother's flat because I don't have to wash up there I'm too impatient Baby

HARD DAY'S NIGHT


" Hard Day's Night" . : "I've been working like a dog". ?

HARD DAY'S NIGHT


(The Beatles)

It's been a hard day's night, And I've been working hke a dog. It's been a hard day's night, I should be sleeping like a log. But when I get home to you, I find the thing that you do, Will make me feel alright. You know I work all day. To get you money to buy you things. And it's worth it just to hear you say, You're gonna give me ev'r3i:hing. So why on earth should I moan, "Cos when I get you alone. You know I feel okay. When I'm home ev'iything seems to be right. When I'm home feeling you holding me tight, tight, yeh. It's been a hard day's night, And I've been working like a dog. It's been a hard day's night, I should be sleeping like a log. But when I get home to you, I find the thing that you do, Will make me feel alright.

: , . , , , . , , , . , , . , . . . . , , -. : , . , , , . , , , .

So why on earth should I moan, 'Cos when I get you alone. You know I feel okay, When I'm home ev'rythong seems to be alright. When I'm home feeling you holding me tight, tight, yeh. It's been a hard day's night, And I've been working like a dog. It's been a hard day's night, I should be sleeping like a log. But when I get home to you, I find the things that you do. Will make me feel alright. You know I feel alright. You know I feel alright.

. . . , , -. : , . , , , . , , , . , . , .

. . . . -. '"s" .

It's been hard day's night. And it's worth it just to hear you say.

I AM SITTING ALL ALONE


all alone to get sod ()

- , - . , ( 5 ). Present Perfect Contmuons. .

, .

I AM SITTING ALL ALONE


(By anonymous)

I'm sitting all alone. In my girl-friend's home. I'm sitting waiting for her to come home. I've been waiting for an hour. I've been making paper flowers, I've been thinking what she means to me. I'm sitting all alone. Still she's not home. I've been getting very very sad, I've been cooking in the Wtchen, I've been watching television, I've been reading letters that I wrote to her. All these years I've been thinking. She wanted to marry me. But in fact she's been looking for another man But I couldn't see ... I'm I'm I've I've I'm I've standing all alone, a long way from home. been watching all the ships sail by. been singing sad sad songs, going back where I belong. been living in this town too long.

All these years I've been thinking She wanted to marvy me, etc. 1. Will you get sad if you have been staying all alone for an hour or two? 2. Will you get mad if you have been waiting for somebody in a dull place? 3. Will you get furious if you have been doing it in the rain?

. , .

Present Perfect Continuous. , Present Continuous. Present Perfect Continuous? ?

mm (0HTIHU0U5
WHEN YOU WAKE TOMORROW
. 6 . , . 1) , . . Will he have left her h o m e ? 2) Will he be making paper ships? OH ? ? "When you Wake Tomorrow" , .
to wish s o m e b o d y h o d d o n e better to d r a w the curtains loneliness to pick up the passengers guards , , ,

. , Present Simple .

WHEN YOU WAKE TOMORROW


(By anonymous)

When you wake tomorrow I'll be walking down the road, I'll be thinking of the times we had together, I'll be wishing we'd done better, I'll be writing you a letter. Telling you I won't be coming home again. When you draw the curtains I'll be standing at the station I'll be lighting my first cigarette of the day, I'll be wishing we'd done better, etc. I'll be sitting on the train Telling all these who'll be listening About the loneliness of my poor life. I'll be wishing we'd done better, etc. The train'll be arriving At the station in the morning Picking up the passengers one by one. I'll be playing a game of cards With the driver and the guards And I know I won't be coming home again. When You'll You'll You'll You'll You'll I get to London be looking in my room. be wondering why the bed's already made. be wishing we'd done better. be looking at my letter. be reading that I won't be coming home.

I'll be sitting on the train Telling all these who'll be listening About the loneliness of my poor life. I'll be wishing we'd done better, I'll be writing you a letter, Telling you I won't be coming home again. And I Imow I won't be coming home agam.

. , . . , , , . 57 :

1. While he is sitting in his girl-friend's home she will be walking down the road. 2. While he is waiting for her she will be thinking of the things they had together. . , , , . , . . :

When we get home, my mother will be having a rest after work. We won't bother her. We'll be preparing everything ourselves. While I'm frying meat you'll be peeling the potatoes ... (and so on) :
to slice to dice to carve to grate to mash to squeeze to skewer to b a k e to roast to fry cooker/stove oven b a k i n g tray tin/can opener corkscrew (, ) ( ) () () , () , !^

mm (
MOON
blue moon you saw me standing alone you heard me saying a prayer i heard somebody whisper to care for to a p p e a r to a d o r e no longer , , , , - , ,

- ; blues

. Complex Object:

Heard ... saying I Heard ... whisper

BLUE MOON
(By R. Rodgers, L. Hart)

Blue moon, you saw me standing alone Without a dream in my heart. Without a love of my own. Blue moon, you knew just what I was there for. You heard me saying a prayer for Someone I really could care for.
Twice:

And then there suddenly appeared before me The only one my arms will ever hold. I heard somebody whisper "Please adore me", But when I looked the moon had turned to gold. Blue moon, now I'm no longer alone Without a dream in my heart, Without a love of my own,
C o m p l e x Object. . . see, hear... , . to, ? . . ,

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

, - . , - . , . , . ( ), , .
,

- , , . . . .

YOU MADE ME LOVE YOU


wanna=want to gimme=give me

YOU MADE ME LOVE YOU


(By Monaco and McCarthy)

You made me love you, I didn't wanna do it, I didn't wanna do it. You made me love you. And all the time you knew it, I guess you always knew it. You made me happy, sometimes You made me glad. But there were times when You made me feel so sad. You made me sigh, 'cause I didn't wanna tell you, I didn't wanna tell you, I think you're grand, that's true. Yes I do, 'deed I do, you know I do. Gimme, gimme, gimme, gimme What I cry for. You know you've got the kind of kisses That I'd die for. You know you made me love you.
.

1. . 2. , . 3. , .

P A I N T IT B L A C K
, Complex Object I I . Complex Object.

P A I N T I T BLACK
(By Rolling Stones)

I see a red door and I want it painted black. No colours anymore I want them to turn back. I see the girls pass by dressed in their summer clothes, I have to turn my heart until my darkness goes. I see a line of cars and they're all painted black. With flowers and my love both never to come back. I see people turn their heads and quickly look away Like a new born baby, it just happens every day... I look inside myself and see my heart is black, I see my red door and I want it painted black. Maybe then I'll fade away and not have to face the facts. It's not easy facing up when your whole world is black. No more will my green sea go turn a deeper blue, I could not foresee this thing happening to you. If I look hard enough into the setting sun My love will laugh with me before the morning comes. I see a red door and I want it painted black, No colours anymore I want them to turn black. I see the girls walk by dressed in their summer clothes, I have to turn my heart until my darkness goes. I wanna see your face painted black, black as night, black as a hole Don't wanna see the sun flying high in the sky, I wanna see it painted, painted, painted, painted black, yeah.

LET MY PEOPLE GO
npopoig^ (Moses ['msuziz]), .
oppressed to stand (stood) to smite (smote, smitten) cause , , because

, , .

LET MY PEOPLE GO
(Spiritual)

When Israel was in Egypt's land, Let my people go. Oppressed so hard thay could not stand. Let my people go. So the Lord said. Chorus: "Go down, Moses, way down to Egypt's land. Tell old Pharaoh to let my people go".

So Moses went to Egypt's land. Let my people go. He made old Pharaoh understand. Let my people go, "Yes", the Lord said.
Chorus.

"Thus spoke the Lord", bold Moses said. Let my people go, "If not I'll smite your face on dead" Let my people go, 'Cause the Lord said.
Chorus.
. , . .

1 voia
LAST NIGHT I HAD THE STRANGEST DREAM
to put an end mighty r o o m to fill with to sign 0 p a p e r to b o w one's h e a d sword to scatter

, ? ?

. , . , ]; .

LAST NIGHT I HAD THE STRANGEST DREAM


(Singers P. Simon and A. Garfunkel, by P. McCartney)

Last night I had the strangest dream I ever dreamed before I dreamed the world had all agreed To put an end to war. I dreamed I saw a mighty room. The room was filled with men And the paper they were signing said They'd never fight again. And when the papers all were signed And a million copies made They all joined hands and bowed their heads And grateful prayers were prayed. And the people in the streets below Were dancing round and round. And guns and swords and uniforms Were scattered on the ground. Last night I had the strangest dream I ever dreamed before I dreamed the world had all agreed To put an end to war.

STORY OF A SUPERSTAR
? (

.)
, , , . , . mourning irreplaceable to attend funeral to be jammed with twin brother ; ; ; , -

to surround church services truck driver to become a manager to be a hit to join the army to be divorced heart attack

()

"Elvis Presley Story of a Superstar".

ELVIS PIIESLEY - STORY OF A SUPEIISTAR


When Elvis Presley died on i6th of August, 1977, radio and television programmes all over the world were interrupted to give the news of his death. President Carter was asked to declare a day of national mourning. Carter said; "Elvis Presley changed the face of American popular culture... He was unique and irreplaceable". Eighty thousand people attended his funeral. The streets were jammed with cars, and Elvis Presley films were shown on television, and his records were played on the radio all day. In the year after his death, 100 million Presley LPs were sold. Elvis Presley was born on January 8th, 1935, in Tupelo, Mississippi. His twin brother, Jesse Garon, died at birth. His parents were very poor and Elvis never had music lessons, but he was surrounded by music from an early age. His parents were very religious, and Elvis regularly sang at church services. In 1948, when he was thirteen, his family moved to Memphis, Tennessee. He left school in 1953 and got a job as a truck driver. In summer of 1953 Elvis paid $4 and recorded two songs for his mother's birthday at Sam Phillips' Sun Records studio. Sam Phillips heard Elvis and asked him to record "That's All Right" in July 1954. 20,000 copies were sold, mainly in and around Memphis. He made five more records for Sun, and in July 1955 he met Colonel Tom Parker, who became his manager in November. Parker sold Elvis's contract to RCA Records. Sun Records got $35,000 and Elvis got $5,000. With the money he bought a pink Cadillac for his mother. On January 10th, 1956, Elvis recorded "Heartbreak Hotel", and a million copies were sold. In the next fourteen months he made another fourteen records, and they were all big hits. In 1956 he also made his first film in Hollywood. In March, 1958, Elvis had to join the army. He wanted to be an ordinary soldier. When his hair was cut thousands of women cried. He spent the next two years in Germany, where he met Priscilla Beaulieu, who became his wife eight years later on May 1st, 1967. In i960 he left the army and went to Hollywood where he made several films during the next few years. By 1968 many people had become tired of Elvis. He hadn't performed live since i960. But he recorded a new LP "From Elvis in Memphis" and appeared in a special

television programme. He became popular again, and went to Las Vegas, where he was paid $750,000 for four weeks. In 1972 his wife left him, and they divorced in October, 1973. He died from heart attack. He had been working too hard, and eating and drinking too much for several years. He left all his money to his only daughter, Lisa Marie Presley. She became one of the richest people in the world when she was only nine years old.
, . . .

FROZEN
to freeze (froze, frozen) to consume to melt there Is no point in placing the blame to suffer let's all the hurt inside of you die , ,

. . . , . .

FROZEN
(By Madonna and Patrie Leonard)

You only see What your eyes want to see How can life be what you want it to be You're frozen When your heart's not open You're so consumed With how much you get You're waste the time with hate and regret You're broken When your heart's not open Mmm if I can melt your heart Mmm we'd never be apart

Mmm give yourself to me Mmm you hold the key Now there's no point In placing the blame And you should know I suffer the same If I lose you My heart will be broken Love is a bird She needs to fly Let's all the hurt Inside of you die You are frozen When your heart's not open.

LOVE FOR SALE


appetizing unspoiled slightly soiled to sample my supply trip to paradise let the poets pipe of love to thrill to buy my wares ,

. , . .

LOVE FOR SALE


(By . Porter, 1930)

When the only sound on empty street Is the heavy tread of the heavy feet That belong to a lonesome cop I open shop. When the moon so long been gazing down On the wayward ways of a wayward town That a smile becomes a smirk I go to work. Love for sale Appetizing young love for sale Love that's fresh and still unspoiled. Love that's only slightly soiled Love for sale. Who will buy? Who would like to sample my supply? Who's prepared to pay the price for the trip to paradise? Love for sale. Let the poets pipe of love in their childish way, I know every type love better far than they. If you want the thrill of love, I've been through the mill of love. Old love, new love Every love but true love ...

For sale, Appetizing young love for sale. If you want to buy my wares Follow me and climb these stairs Love for sale. Love for sale.

(ONDITIOMl^ IF I GIVE MY HEART TO YOU


to handle with care to treat tenderly fair to shine (shone) to be anxious to promise in case , ,

. , ?

"If I give my heart to you Will you handle it with care, ..."
.

What is the singer anxious to know? : In case the singer ...

" I f I Give M y H e a r t to You". , .

IF I GIVE MY HEART TO YOU


(AJacobs, J.Crane, J.Brewster)

If I Will Will And If I Will

my heart to you you handle it with care. you always treat me tenderly in every way be fair. my heart to you you give me all your love, that you'll be true to me By the light that shines above.
Twice:

And will you sigh with me when I'm sad. Smile with me And always be as you are with me tonight. Think it over and be sure, Please don't answer till you do, When you all those things to me Then my heart to you.
, . , . .

1. What should you find out if you want to give your heart to your friend? 2. What things should be handled with care? 3. What will you ask or do if you give your money to somebody? 4. Would you be delighted if your partner promised you that he would smile with you when you were glad? 5. Would you always hke to be treated tenderly? 6. Would you like your friend to sigh with you when you are sad?
.

12
IF YOU'RE LONELY
to feel low high to desert friend .: ,

" I f Y o u ' r e L o n e l y " . " I f I give m y h e a r t to you"?

IF YOU ARE TIRED AND LONELY


(By anonymous)

I'll come to you If you need someone you can talk to I'll be there for you If your friends desert you I'll be by your side If you need a place to go My door is open wide If you're feeling cold I'll build a fire If you're feeling sad and low I'll take you higher.
11 , . .

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

What problems can your friend have? If your friend has problems will you help him/her? In what case can you help your friend or acquaintance? In what case are you not able to give a hand? Will you be happy to have a friend if you are in need?

. :

If you have no money I'll rob a bank for you....

IF YOU ARE IN THE DARK


to sit in the dork in the dark on one's own to reach out to be wrong to call for to be all at sea to sink (sank, sunk) to drown g o n n a = g o i n g to to refuse to dial to give a ring to mind ; . (), ( ) , ; ( )

" I f Y o u A r e i n the D a r k " . , .

IF YOU ARE IN THE DARK


(By Angel Retski)

If you are in the dark, sitting on your own You can reach out, baby, and use the phone If your so-called friends all say you're wrong Just call for me, I'll come right along. If you're all at sea and you need company, I'll be here If you're sinking down, you think you gonna droAvn, I'll be here Feels like the end, you haven't got a friend, I'll be here. If you've had enough and you want some love, I'll be here So call before you fall Call before you fall. If the birds in the sl<y refuse to sing You can dial my number and give me a ring If the wind is too cold or the sun won't shine Shout my name, I won't mind.
, , . .

1. Have you ever been in the dark, sitting on your own? 2. If you are all at sea and you need company will you phone your friends?

3. Who/What will you call for if you feel you are sinking down? 4. If the birds in the sky refuse to sing does this mean winter? 5. If the wind is too cold is it more reasonable to put on a warm coat than to shout somebody's name? 6. Do you think this song is about bad weather and troubles of people at sea?

PATTY AND THE JUG OF MILK


tread tiny cushion gown fair price to tend sly herd a surge of joy leap alasi dismayed ( -) !

Hard, herd, vain, grass, Spain, to cry, town, head

PATTY AND THE JUG OF MILK


(By Jean La Fontaine)

a) And if I sell the herd before the rain, I'll buy a little house in ... . And she felt a surge of joy so deep that She gave a little happy leap. The jug Fell down. The milk, alas, spilled out On the dusty road and .... b) The fox will have to be very sly. If he Doesn't leave me enough to buy a

Fine young pig. If I feed and keep this Pig until it is fat indeed, I will sell it And buy a cow and a little calf. "Oh, Oh, now", cried Patty, "on my word, I Can see them multiplied into a ... !" c) Patty walked with a quick, light tread A jug of milk upon her ... , the jug Placed on a tiny cushion, so she Could carr>' it easily. She wore flat Shoes, and a short, full gowai so she Could walk swiftly into .... She was Going into the village to sell her milk. d) Cow, calf, chickens, pig and house, good-bye! Patty, dismayed, tried not .... She must go back home, without a doubt, Poorer than when she started out. Time is wasted and spent in ... In dreaming and building castles in Spain. e) She thought, "If all goes well, if the Milk brings me a good, fair price, I will buy some eggs. Then if I use nice And careful tending, it won't be ... To raise some chickens in my yard."
, .

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

you change milk for eggs in the market? How can you do it? Do you need money for it? Is it possible to buy a young pig if you sell some chickens? In what case can you buy a cow and a calf? What is necessary to have if you want to have a herd? What mistakes Patty made should a businessperson avoid?

HOLD FAST TO DREAMS


, .

HOLD FAST DREAMS


(By Lungston Hughes)

Hold fast to dreams For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird That cannot fly. Hold fast to dreams For when dreams go Life is a barren field Frozen with snow.
.

1. 2. 3. 4.

What could happen if dreams died? Can you prove that life is a barren field if dreams go? What are your dreams? Can we say that all dreams stimulate actions?

. . :

(. . , 2001)

. , !

THE HAMMER SONG


. . ,

? . , ( ).

THE HAMMER SONG


(By Lee Hays and Pete Seeger)

If I had a hammer, I'd hammer in the morning; I'd hammer in the evening all over this land I'd hammer out danger; I'd hammer a warning; I'd hammer out love between my brothers and my sisters, All over this land. If I (have) a bell, I'd ring it in the morning; I'd ring it in the evening all over this land. I (ring) out danger; I'd ring out ... I'd ring out love between my brothers and my sisters, All over this... If I had a song, I (sing) it ... I'd sing it in the evening ... I'd sing out danger; I (sing) out a ... I'd sing out love between my brothers and ... All over this ... Well, I've got a hammer, and I've got a bell; And I've got a song to sing all over this land. It's the hammer of justice; it's the bell of freedom; It's the song about love between my brothers and sisters, All over this land.
.

1. What could be done if you had a good song? 2. If you could sing well what would you do? 3. How could a hammer be used? 4. Would you like to have a bell that could ring all over the land?
, .

I WISH I WAS A GRIZZLY BEAR


fuzzy-wuzzy to comb Grizzly bear in a pool ,

. .

I WISH I WAS GmZZLY BEAR


(Nursery rhyme)

I wish I was a Grizzly bear, A Grizzly bear, a Grizzly bear. 'Cause if I was a Grizzly bear I'd never have to comb my hair, I'd never have to comb my hair, my hair, I'd never have to comb my hair. I wish I was a fuzzy-wuzzy fox, A fuzzy-wuzzy fox, a fuzzy - wuzz\' fox. 'Cause if I was a fuzzy-wuzzy fox I'd never have to wash my socks, I'd never have to wash my socks, my socks. I'd never have to wash my socks. I wish I was a gold fish in a pool, A gold fish in a pool, a gold fish in a p o o L 'Cause if I was a gold fish in a pool I'd never have to go to school, I'd never have to go to school, to school. I'd never have to go to school.
. . .

1. Why does the singer want to be a Grizzly bear? 2. Why should you be a Grizzly bear if you don't ^vant to comb your hair? 3. Is there a simpler way to avoid combing your hair?

4. 5. 6. 7.

Is there much simpler way to avoid washing your socks? What wouldn't you have to do if you were a gold fish? What would you have to do if you were a gold fish? Would you like to be a Grizzly bear, fuzzy-wuzzy fox or a gold fish? Why?
bear

Grizzly

A mighty mouse A bulky chap Batman A little dog/pig A nice deer

big bad wolf A beautiful girl A flower Just a mug A new broom, etc.

, : "I wish I was ..."

1 ( 1
FIVE FAT SAUSAGES
. to sizzle pan to sit (sat) to go bang ( ) ; . ,

, Participle I , Participle .

Five fat sausages sitting in a pan sizzle, sizzle, sizzle.


, ? .

What do the sausages do? They ... and ...

"Five Fat Sausages".

FIVE FAT SAUSAGES


(Nursery rhyme)

Five fat sausages sitting in a pan Sizzle, sizzle, sizzle. One goes bang. Four fat sausages sitting in a pan Sizzle, sizzle, sizzle. One goes bang. Three fat sausages sitting in a pan Sizzle, sizzle, sizzle. One goes bang. Two fat sausages sitting in a pan Sizzle, sizzle, sizzle. One goes bang. One fat sausage sitting in a pan Sizzles, sizzles, sizzles. One goes bang. No fat sausages sitting in the pan.
. .

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

What else can sausages do in a pan? Can you go bang only sitting in a pan? Can you sizzle only in a pan? What way can sausages burst? Who/what else can sit in a pan? What else can go bang?

, . , sizzZe . :

to sit sitting to lie, to stand, to float, to burn, to smile, to giggle, to change, to go, to fly, to drive

sizzle.

to grumble, to bubble, to jump, to twist, to sleep, to dream, to roll, to rock


sitting . ( ) , . " F i v e F a t Sausages". -

CLEMENTINE
. , . , .

CLEMENTINE
(Traditional)

In a cavern, by a canyon. Excavating for the mine. Lived a miner, forty-niner,* And his daughter Clementine.
Chorus:

Drove she ducklings to the water Every morning just at nine, Kicked her foot against a splinter. Fell into the foaming brine.
Chorus.

Oh, my darling, oh, my darling. Oh, my darling Clementine, You are lost and gone for ever. Dreadful sorry, Clementine. Light she was, and like a fairy. And her shoes were number nine. Herring boxes without topses Sandals were for Clementine.

So her lips above the water, Blowing bubbles mighty fine, But, alas, I was no swimmer. So I lost my Clementine. How I missed her! How I missed her! How I missed my Clementine! But I kissed her little sister. And forgot my Clementine.
Chorus.

* Forty-niner . . ; ( 1849 .).

1. 2. 3. 4.

Why was Clementine's father called forty-niner? Is number nine in shoes good/suitable for a small or a big woman? Were Clementine's sandals bought at a fashionable shop? What will set the singer's mind at rest?

JINGLE BELLS
11 . , .

JINGLE BELLS
(By John Dierpont, 1857) Jingle bells! Jingle bells! Jingle all the way! O! What fun it is to ride In a one-horse open sleigh! O! What fun it is to ride In a one-horse open sleigh! Dashing thro' the snow In a one-horse open sleigh O'er the fields we go. Laughing all the way. Bell's on bob-tail ring. bright. What fun it is to ride and sing A sleighing song to-night! Jingle bells! Jingle bells! Jingle all the way! 0! What fun it is to ride In a one-horse open sleigh! 0! Jingle bells! Jingle bells! Jingle all the way! O! What fun it is to ride In a one-horse open sleigh! Hey!

11 , . .

What holiday is the song about?

LIMERICK
. to toss broom cobweb [ksbweb] aye-yes to carry basket to brush quoth by-and-by . 1- 3- : , -

. .

a) b) c) d)

tossing tossed toss tosses

a) b) c) d)

going went go goes

There was an old woman ... (i) up in a basket, Seventeen times as high as the moon; Where she was going I couldn't but ask it, For in her hand she carried a broom. Old woman, old woman, old woman, quoth I, Where are you ... (2) to up so high? To brush the cobwebs off the sky! May I go with you? Aye, by-and-by.
.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Can you guess who the old woman can be? Who is the better person for brushing cobwebs off-sky? What is the difference between a witch and the woman in a basket? What else can be brushed off the sky? What can be tossed? Can you toss your head? Can you toss a coin? What for? Would you like to be tossed as high as the moon?

. . tossed going. : . ... , ? . , . , ! ? , . !

. . Five little pussy cats sitting i n a r o w , Blue ribbons, r o u n d each neck, fastened i n a b o w . H e y pussies! H o pussies! A r e y o u r faces clean? D o n ' t y o u k n o w you're sitting t h e r e so as t o be seen?

lODflL m ^ AND YOUR BIRD CAN SING


.
bird wonder to prize possessions to swing (swang, swung) to wear down to bring down

. , ?

... And your bird can sing

. , .

AND YOUR BIRD CAN SING


(The Beatles)

You tell me that you've ev'ry thing you want. And your bird can sing. But you don't get me, You don't get me. You say you've seen seven wonders. And your bird is green. But you can't see me, You can't see me. When your prized possessions Start to wear you down. Look in my direction. I'll be round, I'll be round. When your bird is broken Will it bring you down? You may be awoken I'll be round, I'll be round. Tell me that you've heard ev'ry sound there is. And your bird can swing. But you can't hear me. You can't hear me.
, .

What can the bird do? It can ... and ... .


. . . .

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why is the bird green? What do you know about swinging? What are the seven wonders? What kind of possessions can be called prized? Is this song a love story? Why do you think so? Why not?

: 1. : You can't ... :

kiss, love, hate, touch, find, meet, lose


2. : You ... be awoken, :

have, should, might, could, do, ought, must, will


3. : You may be ... II :

forget, take, throw, choose, speak, steal, grow


. .

YOUR MOTHER SHOULD

KNOW

, should.

YOUR MOTHER SHOULD KNOW


(The Beatles)

Let's all get up and dance to a song that was a hit before your Mother was bom Though she was bom a long long time ago your Mother should know your Mother should know sing it again. Lift up your hearts and sing me a song that was a hit before your Mother was bom Though she was bom a long long time ago your Mother should know your Mother should know

your Mother should know your Mother should know sing it again. Though she was bom a long long time ago your Mother should know your Mother should know your Mother should know your Mother should know your Mother should know your Mother should know.

. , . .

1. What old hits do you know? 2. Have you ever danced to any of them?
.

LOVE ME
^

DO

. , .

LOVE ME DO
(The Beatles)

Love, love me do, you know I love you. I'll always be true so please love me do, who ho love me do. Love, love me do, you know I love you. I'll always be true so please love me do, who ho love me do. Someone to love, somebody new. Someone to love, someone like you. Love, love me do, you know I love you. I'll always be true so please love me do, who ho love me do. Love, love me do, you know I love you. I'll always be true so please love me do, who ho love me do.
.

Is the person who sings this song happy? Why? Why not?

do ,

Love me ... .

indeed, too, a little, possibly


will , :

I'll always be tnie.

... I am always true. certainly, maybe, perhaps, firstly


, do will:

,
( . )

, ! . , . . , ! . , , .

. . , ! . , . .

LIMERICK
. kettle casually stout

have, could, may, should. (By Edward Lear)

There was an Old Man, who when little Fell casually into a Kettle; But, growing too stout, He ... never get out, So he passed all his life in that Kettle.

, .

1. 2. 3. 4.

What was the Man doing How big was the Kettle? What did the Man do in How happy was the Man

when he fell into a Kettle? (may) (must) the Kettle? (would) in the Kettle? (might)

. : ( . )

- , , . , , .


HONEY PIE
honey pie silver screen to drive frantic , ( )

Honey pie, you are making me crazy. I'm in love but I'm lazy.
, ?

^ . , .

H O N E Y PIE
(The Beatles)

She was a working girl North of England way. Now she's hit a big time In the USA And if she could only hear me This is what I'd say. Honey pie you are making me crazy. I'm in love but I'm lazy. So won't you please come home. Oh, honey pie, my position is tragic. Come and show me the magic Of your Hollywood Song. You became a legend of a silver screen And now the thought of meeting you Makes me weak in the knee. Oh, honey pie, you are driving me frantic. Sail across the Atlantic To be where you belong. Honey pie, come back to me. Will the wind that blew her boat Across the sea Kindly send her back to me. Honey pie, you are making me crazy. I'm in love but I'm lazy. So won't you please come home. Come, come back to me, Honey pie.
. , . . .

1. Where does Honey pie come from? 2. What did she do in her home country?

3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

How did she travel abroad? What does she do abroad? How happy is she now? Is she going to come back? Why do you think so? Why not? What do you think about her character and appearance?

* "Honey Pie", . . , . :

She was working girl North of CHINA way. Now she's hit a big time In INDIA. And if she could only hear me This is what I'd say. Honey pie, you are making me crazy. I'm in love but I'm lazy. So won't you please come home. Oh, honey pie, my position is tragic. Come and show me the magic Of your BOMDAY Song. You became a legend of a silver screen And now the thought of meeting you Makes me weak in the knee. Oh, honey pie, you are driving me frantic. RIDE across the HIMALAYAS To be where you belong. Honey pie, come back to me. Will the YAK that CARRIED her BAGS Across the MOUNTAINS Kindly send her back to me. Honey pie, you are making me crazy. I'm in love but I'm lazy. So won't you please come home. Come, come back to me, Honey pie.
.

100

I'VE G O T A F E E L I N G
, .

I'VE GOT FEELING


(The Beatles)

I've got a feeling, a feeling deep inside Oh yeah. Oh yeah. I've got a feeling, a feeling I can't hide Oh no. Oh no. Oh no. Yeah, I've got a feeling. Oh please, believe me I'd hate to miss the train Oh yeah, Oh yeah. And if you leave me I won't be late again. Oh no. Oh no. Oh no. Yeah, I've got a feeling, yeah. All these years I've been wandering around, Wondering how come nobody told me All that I was looking for was somebody Who looked like you. Ev'rybody had a hard year Ev'rybody had a good time Ev'rybody had a wet dream, Ev'rybody saw the sunshine Oh yeah. Oh yeah. Oh yeah. Ev'rybody had a good year, Ev'rybody let their hair down, Ev'rybody pulled their socks up Ev'rybody put their foot down Oh yeah. Oh yeah. Oh yeah.
' . , . . .

1. What feeling is this song about? 2. What else could ev'rybody have? And do?

DIG
Dig F.B.I.

IT

, () (Federal Bureau of Investigation) .. (Central Intelligence Agency). ... (British Broadcasting Corporation). . . King , Doris Day , 506- Matt Busby , "Manchester United".
, .

DIG IT
(The Beatles)

Like a Rolling Stone Alike a Rolling Stone Like the F.B.I. And the C.I.A. And the B.B.C. B.B. King and Doris Day Matt Busby. Dig it. Dig it. Dig it, dig it, dig it, Dig it, dig it, dig it, dig it, dig it, dig it, dig it, dig it, dig it, dig it.
. . .

1. What does this song call for? 2. Is the person who sings this song happy? Why do you think so? Why not?
. .

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
: balalaika, drums, harp, violin, flute, pipes, piano, trumpet, guitar, synthesizer

. Who can play the ... ? ... can play the ... . : Who can play the PIANO? MY SISTER can play the PIANO.


:
addicted curl expansive

. (By Edward Lear)

There was ... Young Lady of Firle, Whose Hair was addicted to curl; It curled up ... Tree, And all over ... Sea, That expansive Young Lady of Firle.
e , .

1. 2. 3. 4.

What What What What

did the Lady do? (a) color of hair did she have? (the) tree did her hair curl up? (a) sea did her hair curl over? (the)

. : ( . )

- , . . , .

DlOdli
GET BACK
Jojo = Joseph Calofornio Grass = Calofornia Gross Volley loner to last to belong , she's got it coming OHO e :

Jojo left his home in Tucsan, Arisona


, ?

. , .

GET BACK
'^' ^ ' (The Beatles)

Jojo was a man who thought he was a loner But he knew it couldn't last. Jojo left his home in Tucsan, Arisona For some California Grass. Get back, get back. Get back to where you once belonged. Get back, get back. Get back to where you once belonged. Get back, Jojo. Go home. Get back, get back. Get back to where you once belonged Get back, get back. Get back to where you once belonged. Get back, Jo. Sweet Loretta Martin thought she was a woman But she was another man. All the girls around her say she's got it coming But she gets it while she can. Get back, get back. Get back to where you once belonged. Get back, get back. Get back to where you once belonged. Get back, Loretta. Go home. Get back, get back. Get back to where you once belonged. Get back, get back. Get back to where you once belonged. Get back, Loretta.
, .

What should Jojo and Loretta do? They should ... back and go ... .
.

10

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Where did Jojo hve? What country did he hve in? Did he go abroad or about the country? Was Jojo young or not? Why do you think so? Have you ever thought you are a loner? Why? Why not?

1. back get back :

around, away, behind, by, down, in, on, over, through ?


2. get get back :

be, come, drive, fly, go, move, ride, run, sail, walk. ?
3. home , : come, return . . .

EVERYBODY'S GOT SOMETHING TO HIDE EXCEPT FOR ME AND M Y MONKEY


, .

EVERYBODTS GOT SOMETHING HIDE EXCEPT FOR ME AND MY MONKEY


(The Beatles)

Come on come on come on come on Come on is such a joy Come on is such a joy Come on is take it easy Come on is take it easy. Take it easy take it easy. Everybody's got something to hide except for me and my monkey. The deeper you go the higher you fly. The higher you fly the deeper you go. So come on come on Come on is such a joy Come on is such a joy Come on is make it easy Come on is make it easy. Take it easy take it easy. Everybody's got something to hide except for me and my monkey. Your inside is out and your outside is in. Your outside is in and your inside is out. So come on come on Come on is such a joy Come on is such a joy Come on is make it easy Come on is make it easy. Make it easy make it easy. Everybody's got something to hide except for me and my monkey.
^ . , .

1. What have you got to hide? 2. What is COME ON for you: TAKE or MAbCE IT EASY?
108

, .

- , -
( . )

, , , . , . , . , ! , ! , ! - \, . , . , . , ! , ! , ! - \, . , . , . , . , . , ! , ! - >. . , , , . , . , . , . , ! , ! - . . , , .

MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR


, up away.

MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR


(The Beatles)

Roll up, roll up for the Mystery Tour. Roll up, roll up for the Mystery Tour, (roll up) and that's an invitation Roll up for the Mystery Tour, (roll up) to make a reservation Roll up for the Mystery Tour. the Magical Mystery Tour is waiting to take you away waiting to take you away. Roll up, roll up for the Mystery Tour. Roll up, roll up for the Mystery Tour. (roll up) we've got ev'rything you need (roll up) for the Mystery Tour. (roll up) satisfaction guaranteed Roll up for the Mystery Tour. the Magical Mystery Tour is hoping to take you away hoping to take you away now The Magical Mystery Tour roll up, roll up for the Mystery Tour. (roll up) and that's an invitation Roll up for the Mystery Tour. (roll up) to make a reservation Roll up for the Mystery Tour. the Magical Mystery Tour is coming to take you away coming to take you away. The Magical Mystery Tour is dying to take you away dying to take you away take you today.
^ . , .

. .

1. Why is the Tour Magical? 2. What Mystery is there in the Tour?

3. Why is satisfaction guaranteed? 4. Have you ever made reservation?


roll , :

come, keep, put, stay ... up


take , :

take you away take you ... out, in, off, over.

LIMERICK
gown to adorn

in, down, up, on

AN OLD MAN ON A HILL


(By Edward Lear)

There was an Old Man on a hill. Who seldom, if ever, stood still; He ran ... and ... In his grandmother's gown. Which adorned the Old Man on a hill.
e , .

1. 2. 3. 4.

Where did the Old Man live? (up) How did he spend his time? (around) What did the Old Man do with the gown? (on) How did people like him? (away)

. : ( . ) , . ; . . .

. pmwmms
OCTOPUS'S GARDEN
ocfopus cave

: I'd like to be under the sea , ?

. , .

OCTOPUS'S GARDEN
(The Beatles)

I'd like to be under the sea In an octopus's garden in the shade He'd let us in, he knows where we've been In his octopus's garden in the shade I'll ask my friend to come and see An octopus's garden with me I'd like to be under the sea In an octopus's garden in the shade We would be warm below the storm In our little hideaway beneath the waves Resting our heads on the sea bed In an octopus's garden near a cave We would sing and dance around Because we'd know we can't be found I'd like to be under the sea In an octopus's garden in the shade We would shout and swim about The coral that lies beneath the waves Oh, what joy for every girl and boy bCnowing they're happy and they're safe We would be so happy, you and me No one there to tell us what to do I'd like to be under the sea In an octopus's garden with you In an octopus's garden with you In an octopus's garden with you.
, .

Where would we be warm? We would be warm ... the storm and ... the waves.
. ; .

. . 1. Where does the octopus hve? 2. Who is invited to the octopus's garden? 3. Why is it warm in this garden? 4. Where does the coral lie? 5. Where would you feel happy and safe? Why? , , . . :

HEDGEHOG'S GARDEN

I'd like to be IN THE FOREST In a HEDGEHOG'S garden in the shade He'd let us in, he knows where we've been In his HEDGEHOG'S garden in the shade I'll ask my friend to come and see A HEDGEHOG'S garden with me I'd like to be IN THE FOREST In a HEDGEHOG'S garden in the shade We would be COOL UNDER the FIRTREES In our little hideaway AMONG the LEAVES Resting our heads on the STUB In a HEDGEHOG'S garden OUTSIDE a HOLE We would sing and dance around Because we'd know we can't be found I'd like to be IN THE FOREST In a HEDGEHOG'S garden in the shade We would shout and jump BELOW The branches that HANG ABOVE the BUSHES Oh, what joy for every girl and boy Knowing they're happy and they're safe We would be so happy, you and me No one there to tell us what to do I'd like to be IN THE FOREST In a HEDGEHOG'S garden with you In a HEDGEHOG'S garden with you In a HEDGEHOG'S garden with you. .

/1 17 MEAN MR. MUSTARD


mean paper bob getter obscene

, in up out.

MEAN MR. MUSTARD


(The Beatles)

Mean Mr. Mustard sleeps in the park, Shaves in the dark Trying to save paper. Sleeps in a hole in the road Saving up to buy some clothes. Keeps a ten-bob note up his nose. Such a mean old man, such a mean old man. His sister Pam works in a shop. She never stops, she goes further. Takes him out to look at the Queen, Only place that he's ever been. Always shouts out something obscene. Such a dirty old man, dirty old man.

. , . .

1. How do you like the way Mr. Mustard saves up? 2. Why does he shout out obscene things?

LUCY IN T H E S K Y W I T H D I A M O N D S
tangerine marshmallow incredibly plasticine turnstile

e , . . LUCY I N T H E SKY W I T H D L O N D S (The Beatles) Picture yourself in a boat on a river. With tangerine trees and marmalade skies. Somebody calls you, you answer quite slowly, A girl with kaleidoscope eyes. Cellophane flowers of yellow and green. Towering over your head. Look for the girl with the sun in her eyes. And she's gone. Lucy in the sky with diamonds. Follow her down to a bridge by a fountain Where rocking horse people eat marshmallow pies. Everyone smiles as you drift past the flowers. That grow so incredibly high. Newspaper taxis appear on the shore. Waiting to take you away. Climb in the back with your head in the clouds. And you're gone. Lucy in the sky with diamonds. Picture yourself on a train in a station, With plasticine porters with looking-glass ties. Suddenly someone is there at the turnstile, The girl with kaleidoscope eyes. Lucy in the sky with diamonds.

. , . .

. 1. Where do tangerine trees grow?

2. 3. 4. 5.

Have you ever eaten marshmallow pies? Where? What shore has newspaper taxis? What stations are served by plasticine porters? Where does Lucy live?

. , .

(VERY SHORT) HISTORY OF

THE

BEATLES

The Beatles were probably the most important pop and rock group (in/of) all time. They were together (for/in) only eight years, but their influence has lasted much longer. The Beatles came (from/of) Liverpool, England. They started playing together (at/in) 1962, although Paul McCartney and John Lennon had played together in another group. They started (by/of) playing rock-'n'-roll songs, but they quickly developed their own style. (At/By) 1963, they had become Britain's top rock group. A year later they toured the United States, where they attracted millions (of/with) fans. By the time The Beatles broke (away/up) in 1970, they had changed the nature of rock and pop music. They had introduced new sounds and rhythms, and they had experimented (by/with) different types of musical instruments. They recorded hundreds of songs and they sold millions and millions of records. They made many films and won many awards (for/with) their music. Today, The Beatles songs are still very famous all (in/over) the world.

LIMERICK
owl to scream the rest depressing COBO ,

: in, of, with, on

OLD PERSON OF CROWLE


(By Edward Lear)

There was an Old Person of Crowle, Who lived in the Nest ... an Owl; When they screamed ... the Nest, He screamed out ... the rest. That depressing Old Person of Crowle.

, .

1. 2. 3. 4.

Why did the Old person live in the nest? (from) What exactly did he do in the nest? (with) Why did he choose an Owl Nest? (among) Why was he depressing? (by)

. : ( . )

, . , . , .

SOMETHING
woo stick around , ()

. I don't want to leave her now. , ? . , .

SOMETHING
(The Beatles) Something in the way she moves Attracts me like no other lovers Something in the way she woos me I don't want to leave her now. You know I believe and how

Somewhere in her smile she knows That I don't need no other lovers Something in her style that she shows me You know I believe and how You're asking me where my love grows. I don't know, oh I don't know You stick around now it may show I don't know, I don't know Something in the way she knows And all I have to do is think of her Something in the things she shows me I don't want to leave her now You know I believe and how
, . What is there in her style? (There is)... in her style ... . . .

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

What What What What What

way to move attracts you? way to woo do you prefer? kind of smile do you like? style would you choose for yourself? other attractive things can people show?

something . :

SOME GRACE in the way she moves ...


. , something someone. , . : someone in the office she works in ... . . ?

FROM ME TO YOU
, anything.

FROM ME YOU
(The Beatles)

If there's anything that you want, If there's anything I can do. Just call on me and I'll send it along. With love from me to you. I've got ev'rything that you want. Like a heart that's oh so true. Just call on me and I'll send it along. With love from me to you. I got arms that long to hold you. And keep you by my side, I got lips that long to kiss you. And keep you satisfied. If there's anything that you want. If there's anything I can do, Just call on me and I'll send it along. With love from me to you. Just call on me and I'll send it along, With love from me to you. I got arms that long to hold you. And keep you by my side, I got lips that long to kiss you, And keep you satisfied. If there's anything that you want. If there's anything I can do. Just call on me and I'll send it along. With love from me to you.
^ . , .

1. Is this song love story? Why do you think so? Why not? 2. Is this a boy's or a girl s song? Why do you think so?

ACROSS THE
Universe to slither sorrow to drift caress gonna = going to to meander to tumble laughter to incite Jai Guru Da Va O m

UNIVERSE
rope ()

, nothing.

ACROSS THE UNIVERSE


(The Beatles) Words are flying out like endless rain into a paper cup. They slither while they pass, they slip away across the universe. Pools of sorrow, waves of joy are drifting through my open mind. Possessing and caressing me. Chorus: Jai Guru Da Va Nothing's gonna Nothing's gonna Nothing's gonna Nothing's gonna

Om change change change change

my my my my

world world world world

Images of broken light which dance before me like a million eyes, That call me on and on across the universe. Thoughts meander like a restless wind inside a letter box They tumble blindly as they make their way across the Universe. Chorus. Sounds of laughter, shades of earth are ringing Through my open ears inciting and inviting me. Limitless undying love which shines around me Like a million suns, it calls me on and on across the Universe. Chorus.

. . .

1. Who is Guru of the Universe? 2. Have you got your own guru? Who is he or she?
e , nothing anything something. ? , ; nothing.
*


( . )

, , , ; . , , . : Jai Guru Da Va , .. , . , , , . , , . . . , , . , . . .

, . , anything, nothing, something: Something was thrown through the window. Nothing was touched on the ceihng. There isn't anything in the corner, etc.

LIMERICK
abruptious to boil to remain peculiar whimsical ,

: anything, nothing, something. . (By Edward Lear)

There was an Old Man of Thames Ditton, Who called out for ... to sit on; But they brought him a Hat, And said: "Sit upon that. You abruptious Old Man of Thames Ditton."
(By Edward Lear)

There was an Old Man of Thermopylae, Who never did ... properly; But they said: "If you choose To boil Eggs in your Shoes, You shall never remain in Thermopylae."
(By Edward Lear)

There was an Old Man of Apulia, Whose conduct was very peculiar; He fed twenty sons On ... but buns. That whimsical Man of Apulia.
. : ( . )

- . - . , : .

, . : , , , ! - , . . . .

( 1 1
TEXTS FOR READING
TEXT 1
.

POP MUSIC
There has always been "music which is popular", but until 1950 or so, popular music meant the working classes. Since 1955, or thereabouts, we have had "pop music" which is classless. A musician might tell us that causes of "pop culture" a complex. He might say modern pop music is the result of a mixing, a blending of Black American rhythm and blues with White American country and western music. We are interested in the effects of pop music, and no account of its origins can explain its world wide popularity. This is almost certainly due ... once again ... to changes in technology. I would say that pop music as we know it is a direct consequence of the invention of the transistor. The transistor gave teenagers their own source of music, which was cheap and portable, that is to say the transistor radio. As a result teenagers were freed from the family radio, broadcasting bland music for a family audience. A demand was created for specifically teenage music, and as usual, industry responded. At the same time, the invention of the 48 r.p.m. vinyl record, which was almost unbreakable, led to greatly increased record sales.

TEXT 2
account beat to amplify to boil down to drive gibberish incomprehensible message , ,

THE LANGUAGE OF ROCK


(By Nick Cohn)

Modern pop began with rock-'n'-roll in the middle fifties. What was new about it was its aggression, its sexuality, its sheer noise and most of this came from its beat. This was bigger and louder than any beat before it, simply because it was amplified. Mostly, pop boiled down to electric guitars. Rock-'n'-roll was very simple music. All that mattered was the noise it made, its drive, its aggression, its newness. All that was taboo was boredom. The lyrics were mostly non-existent, simple slogans one step away from gibberish. This wasn't just stupidity, simple inability to write anything better. It was a kind of teen code, almost a sign language, that would make rock entirely incomprehensible to adults. For instance, the first record I ever bought was by Little Richard and, at one throw, it taught me everything I ever need to know about pop. The message went: "Tutti frutti all rootie, tutti frutti all rootie, tutti frutti all rootie, awopbopaloobop alopbamboom!". As a summing up of what rock-'n'-roll was really all about, this was nothing but masterly.
i 2.

1. When do you think pop music began? 2. Are you fond of pop music? 3. What are the roots of modern pop music? 4. What are the reasons of its popularity? What do you think? 5. What do you know about rock-'n'-roll? 6. What matters most in rock-'n'-roll? 7. Do you agree that words in rock-'n'-roll are simple slogans, almost gibberish? 8. Can you give messages of some rock-'n'-roll songs?

TEXT 3
. , .

ALL ABOUT ... THE MUSIC INDUSTRY


(In the Studio)

In the 1960s, it took pop and rock groups one or two days to record their songs. Nowadays, it can take months and months. Many rock groups begin by recording only one instrument, for example, the voice. Then they record other instruments electric piano, sinthesizer, guitars, drums and so on. Next, they (perhaps: might/should) use a computer to add special effects. Finally, they "mix" the instruments until they get the sound that they want. This means that a CD or cassette (certainly: may/will) always sound very different from a live concert.

Music Is Big Business


Most of us listen to the music for pleasure, but for the record companies, music is a product, the same as soap powder. When a record company finds a new group (or "band"), they first try to develop the band's "profile". They (definitely: could/will) try to create an "image" for the band, that they think will attract young people. They will often tell the band what they (are recommended to: can/should) wear, what they (had better: should/might) say and how they should sing and play. In recent years, many rock groups have started their own record companies because they say that the big companies are too commercial.

New Technology: Singing Ghosts?


Music engineers have developed a new computer program that will change the future of music. A computer (is able to: can/should) analyze a singer's voice. Then, if you give the computer the lyrics and music of a song, the computer (is capable to: can/may) "sing" it in that voice. This means that a singer only (is required: has/needs) to record one song and the computer can then "sing" other songs in the singer's own voice. Such "singers" can sing new songs many years after they have died.

What Next?
Technology is changing very fast. A new way of playing recorded music appears every few years. For most of us, this is a big problem. Very soon.

it will be impossible to play the discs and cassettes that we have at home. For the record industry, this is a big advantage. When compact discs appeared in 1983, for example, many record companies produced all their old recordings again. New technology is new business. Sony, for example, owns a recording company and makes compact-disc and compact-disc players, so it is in their interest to develop new technology.
.

1. Which parts are about technology? Which parts are about business? 2. When did compact discs first appear? 3. What is another word for "group"? 4. How long does it take to record a new CD or cassette? 5. Why have some rock groups started their own record companies? 6. What will happen to jobs in recording studios and the work of a singer? 7. Can you think of a similar problem with other new technologies? (cameras, TVs, radios, motor cars, ...) 8. In the last part, find eight examples of the word "they". Who is "they" in each sentence?

TEXT 4
. , .

A (VERY SHORT) HISTORY OF ROCK MUSIC


Rock music in one form or another is now ... most popular type of music all over ... world. But where did it come from?

Black Music
Rock began in ... USA in ... early 1950s. At that time, "rhythm and blues" music was very popular with ... black Americans. "R & B" was ... mixture of ... black religious music ("gospel") and ... jazz. It had strong rhythms that you could dance to and simple, fast lyrics.

Rock-'n'-roll
Noticing the success of R & B music, white musicians started to copy

... same style. By ... mid 1950s, this new white R & B music, called ... rock-'n'-roll, had become veiy popular. Singers like ... Elvis Presley and ... Bill Haley attracted millions of teenage fans. Their music was ... fast and loud. Many older people thought that rock "n" roll was very dangerous. By ... early 1960s, even rock "n" roll had become old-fashioned. Many of the songs had begun to sound ... same. It was at that time that ... new group from ... England became popular: The Beatles.

The Beatles
The Beatles first started by singing ... American style songs, but they soon developed their own style, with more complicated melodies. They also introduced different instruments, such as ... Indian sitar. Groups like ... Beatles had ... very important influence on ... style of popular music. By ... early 1970s, ... rock-'n'-roll had developed into ... new form of music. Electronics had replaced the amplified guitars and drums of rock'n'-roll. "Rock" had arrived.

Rock Today
Rock music has continued to change and develop. It has combined with ... music from different parts of ... world. Today, there are hundreds of different types of rock music, and almost every country has its own form of rock. There is ... "heavy metal" which is extremely loud, with hard rhythms, "reggae", from ... Jamaica, that combines rock with jazz and Latin rhythms, "rap" that developed on the streets of ... New York, "disco", a type of soft rock music for dancing, "Afro-rock" that combines rock with African rhythms, "Mex-rock", which combines rock with traditional Mexican melodies ... and many, many more. . 1. What do these musical labels mean? R & B, goSpel rock-'n'-roll, rock, reggae, rap, disco 2. What type of music do you like? 3. What type of music don't you like? 4. Who are your favorite musicians?

9 () . 1. 2. 3456. 78. 910. The early 1950s The mid 1950s Mixture Lyrics Popular Old-fashioned Such as Replace Combine Develop a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) i) j) Different things together For example Grow Join together Out of date 1954, 1955, 1956 ... many people like it take the place of something the words of a song 1951, 1952, 1953 ...

TEXT 5
. , . LOUIS ARMSTRONG: A N A M E R I C A N ORIGINAL The time was New Year's Eve of 1913. The place was New Orleans, Louisiana. A boy (of/for) 13 pulled a gun from his shirt. He fired six shots (in/into/to) the air. He and his companions continued to laugh and sing as they walked (along/away). Then the boy reloaded his gun and prepared to fire again. Suddenly a stranger came (into/up) behind him. His companions run and the boy quickly turned (around/over). A police detective stood (behind/under) him. The boy pleaded (for/with) the man, but it was (by/of) no use. He had to spend the night in jail and the next year in an Orphans' Home for boys. Years later that same boy now a man looked (back/up) on that holiday celebration as one (of/in) the most important events (in/of) his life. For it had taught him to play the trumpet. The man was Daniel Louis Armstrong, a giant (among/between) American jazz musicians. To most people he was just "Satchmo", a name he received (by/with) accident, when a British newspaper editor misunderstood the name "satchelmouth", originally given to him because of his large, laughing mouth. But whatever he was called, his trumpet, his gravel voice, and his ever-present white handkerchief endeared Louis Armstrong to millions the world (above/over). Louis Armstrong was born (at/in) New Orleans in 1900. His father worked in a turpentine plant and his mother was a domestic servant. (At/

By) the time Louis was five, his parents had separated and his hfe never an easy one soon became even more difficult. At times he lived with his grandmother, at others with his mother. As a member of a strolling sidewalk quartet he often sang (for/of) pennies in the streets of New Orleans. Even as a child he showed musical interests. Frequently he listened (at/to) the bands that played outside the neighborhood cafs. And then came New Year's Eve (in/of) 1913. His life as a musician began at the Orphans' Home for Boys. Peter Davis, a music instructor (at/of) the Home, invited young Louis to join the school band. At first, Louis played the tambourine and the drums. Soon, he began playing the bugle. Finally, Davis asked him to try the cornet. (Beyond/Within) a few weeks the eager, young musician was leading the brass band. "It was sure the greatest thing that ever happened (by/to) me," Armstrong said later. "Me and music got married at the Home." After one year at the Home, Louis was still too young to play his horn professionally. And so (in/on) order to support himself, he delivered coal, ran errands, and sold newspapers. As payment (for/to) his errands he ran for Mrs. Joe Oliver, her husband, "King" Oliver, gave Louis music lessons. Oliver was a great jazz cornetist and the leader of the famous Creole Jazz Band. Soon, however, Oliver moved (at/to) Chicago. Louis stayed (along/ behind) in New Orleans. (For/In) three years, Louis played with Fate Marable's band on a Mississippi riverboat. There he wrote songs and learned the ways of the world of music. And then (in/on) 1922, Oliver asked Louis to join him in Chicago. Many consider their brief association during those next two years as one of the epochal moments in American jazz history. In 1924 Louis joined Fletcher Henderson's orchestra in the Roseland Ballroom in New York City. (For/In) the first time, he found himself with musicians who had been educated in a music school. With Henderson's orchestra, Louis improved his skills on the trumpet (to which he switched in 1925) and made several classic recordings with the great blues singer, Bessie Smith. (During/For) this same period, he also invented "scat" singing, using his voice to sing wordless variations on the melody. In 1925 Armstrong returned to Chicago where he recorded a series of jazz classics with his "Hot Five" and "Hot Seven" bands. These recordings soon earned him a worldwide reputation and a position as the unchallenged leader of the world of jazz. Because of Satchmo, the style of jazz changed. Not only did his influence bring (about/up) a new rhythmic freedom for the performer, but the accent in a jazz performance was now on the soloist instead of on the

group. This influence lasted for many years, extending even (into/on) the "cool" jazz of the 1950s and early 1960s. Armstrong's achievements as an ambassador of American culture are well-known. In 1932 he made his first trip abroad (in/to) London. There, during a performance for King George V, Satch displayed his lively personality and his unaffected style. So absorbed was he in his music that just before the start of a hot trumpet tune, he announced the dedication of his trumpet solo to the King (at/by) saying simply, "This one's for you. Rex!" During the summer and winter of 1933, Armstrong traveled in Scandinavia, Holland, Belgium, France, and Italy. After World War II, his travels took him all over the world notably to Japan in 1954, to Africa in i960, and to Eastern Europe in 1965. In East Berlin, he received one of the greatest receptions ever given to a popular entertainer there. In Budapest 91,000 people gathered to hear "Ambassador Satch" play his horn. Armstrong's contributions (in/on/to) the development of American jazz were little short of monumental. His fellow musicians have described them best. According to Dizzy Gillespie: "Never before in the history of black music has one individual so completely dominated an art form as the Master, Daniel Louis Armstrong. His style was equally copied (by/of) saxophonists, trumpet players, pianists and all of the instrumentalists who make up the jazz picture." Pianist Teddy Wilson, who once played with Armstrong, wrote this opinion: "I think Louis is the greatest jazz musician that's ever been. He has a combination of all the factors that make a good musician. He has balance this most (for/of) all. Tone. Harmonic sense. Excitement. Technical skill. Originality ... He has no weak point." In Miles Davis's view, "You can't play anything (in/on) a horn that Louis hasn't played." But perhaps the most memorable tribute came (from/up) Duke Ellington, himself a great jazz artist: "If anybody was Mr. Jazz it was Louis Armstrong. He was the epitome of jazz and always will be. He is what I call an American standard, an American original." (In/Of) short, Satchmo revolutionized jazz. Because of his peculiar genius, the classic music of black Americans became the music of all Americans. Finally, there was Louis Armstrong, the man. Although wealthy, Armstrong lived a comparatively simple life. His home in Queens, Long Island, was a small house in the working man's section of the city. Its plain appearance was surprising (for/of) a person of Armstrong's financial position. And yet his home reflected the simple qualities of a man who was a friend to his neighbours and a favourite (of/with) the children in his neighborhood.

Similarly, his generosity was often quiet and unassuming (at/in) addition to his concern for the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Louis gave generously to the Home for Boys of his early childhood. He also helped many other individuals. According (by/to) Ebony magazine, the widow of an old-time musician friend had been receiving $50 a week for years from Armstrong. Louis escaped (away/from) the poverty of his childhood, but he never forgot others. Making people happy, whether as a musician or a friend, was a hallmark of Satchmo's life. In his own words, "A man's satisfaction is better than all the dough in the world." Armstrong's music, what the French called "le jazz hot," inspired musicians from (around/away) the world. Whether in Europe, Africa, South America, or Asia, one can still hear the off beat Armstrong style influencing the music of jazz, blues, or soul. When Louis Armstrong died peacefully (at/in) his sleep, June 6, 1971, tributes came from all over the world. The audience for his music was global; his influence is timeless.

. 1. What is the source of Louis Armstrong's nickname "Satchmo"? 2. Where is Armstrong's birthplace? 3. Who was Armstrong's first music teacher? 4. What was Armstrong's first musical instrument? 5. Which orchestra did Armstrong play with in New York? 6. What are the names of two bands which Armstrong organized himself? 7. What definition of factors which make a good musician did pianist Teddy Wilson give? 8. How did the French describe Armstrong's music?

TEXT 6
spiritual origin mist rhythm choral slave to give rise to opposing ',

hymn puritans to adopt to worship preacher salvation sinner to intone psalm congregation in chorus improvisation intentiveness to blend to clap to tap oppressed deprived of to be based upon the Bible Israel Moses bondage to lead (led) the Promised Land generation to improvise to shape

, , , ( , ) , ,

, .

SPIRITUALS

The origin of spirituals is lost in the mists of centuries. Some characteristics, particularly the strong rhythm and the manner of choral singing, gave rise to the theory that spirituals were brought to America with African slaves. An opposing opinion is that spirituals are of white origin and were made from hymns sung by Puritans. When Negroes were brought to America as slaves they adopted the new religion and its songs, but changed them to their own style. There is no room for doubt that blacks and whites worshiped and sang together at camp meeting during the first half of the 19th century.

Travelling preachers gathered people, and spoke to them about the salvation of sinners. An important part of these meetings was hymn singing. The congregation repeated after the preacher to a familiar melody. This explains why spirituals are sung in chorus or with a leader. Most psalm books published the words alone, so improvisation was necessary, and Negroes were extremely rich in musical inventiveness. They blended like an organ, and helped themselves with hand clapping and foot tapping. Oppressed so hard, deprived of everything, Negroes could only dream and sing about freedom. Slavery broke up their families, separated children from their parents and husbands from their wives. The words of Negro spirituals are based upon the Bible and show a deep belief in a better life. They thought of themselves as the modern children of Israel and hoped one day a black Moses would take them out of bondage and lead them to the Promised Land. For generations American slaves had sung and produced these simple and moving songs, carrying them from one plantation to another. They were free to improvise and shaped the songs to their feelings. That is why there are so many versions of them. But until the Civil War their music had been unknown to the rest of the world. The songs were recorded for the first time during the conflict between the North and South. A number of white officers of Negro regiments wrote down the traditional melodies and in 1867 the first collection of them, Slave Songs of the United States, was published. In the 1870s a group of singers, known later as Jubilee Singers, introduced spirituals to America and to Europe and started a tide enthusiasm for Negro songs. From that time on musicians and scholars, and especially the Negro universities of the South, have worked to search out and write down the stories of this purely American music.

TEXT 7 MOTHER
(A word that means the world to me)

When I was but a baby. Long before I learned to walk. While lying in my cradle,

I would try my best to talk. It wasn't long before I spoke, And all the neighbors heard. My folks were very proud of me For "mother" was the word. Although I'll never lay a claim to fame, I'm satisfied to sing her lovely name: "M" is for the million things she gave me. "O" means only that she's growing old. "T" is for the tears she shed to save me. "H" is for her heart of purest gold. "E" is for her eyes, with lovelights shining. "R" means right, and right she'll always be. Put them all together; they spell "mollier", A word that means the world to me. "M" is for the mercy she possesses. "O" means that I owe her all I own. "T" is for her tender sweet caresses. "H" is for her hands that made a home. "E" means everything she's done to help me. "R" means real and regular, you see. Put them all together; they spell "mother", A word that means the world to me.

ammm
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. An Anthology of English and American Verse. M., 1972. British and American Songs. Leipzig, 1978. English for Enjoyment. M., 1980. Esther Y. Nelson. The World Best Funny Songs. 1988. In the Realm of Beauty. M., 1967. Lear Edward. Nonsense Songs. London, 1965. Mother Goose Rhymes. M., 1988. Poems to Enjoy. M., 1988. The Beatles Song Book. M., 1994. Tree Centuries of Enghsh Poetry. London, 1985-

mm\m \t (hh mmm


www.thesea.escd.net www.scoutsongs.com www.34istbombgroup.org www.sterlingtimes. org www.songtexten.org www.links2love.com www.niehs.nih.gov www. spiritlij n. com www.kididdles.com www.theteachersguide.com www.crystal-reflections.com www. angel-stardust. com www.etni.org.il www.letrascanciones .org

. ( ( M H C J I H
1 CD
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. My Bonnie I Am a Nut You Are a Grand Old Flag Lx)ve Is Mother Three Wheels on My Wagon She Is Leaving Home Walking with the Clouds And I Love Her The Farmer in the Dell Love Stoiy The Muffin Man The Ants Go Marching (1 lo ) Aura Lee Dip-dip-lo-docus The Twelve Days of Christmas Magic Boat The Witch Doctor I Have got Exams He's got the Whole World in His Hands Erie Canal The Lady in Red Battle Hymn of the Republic The Night Before Alice's Song A Hard Day's Night I Am Sitting All Along When You Wake Tomorrow Blue Moon You Made Me Love You

2 CD
1. Paint It Black 2, Let My People Go 3, Last Night I Had the Strangest Dream 4, Frozen 5, Love for Sale 6. If I Give My Heart to You 7, If You Are in the Dark 8, The Hammer Song 9. I Wish I Was a Grizzly Bear 10, Five Fat Sausages 11, Clementine 12. Jingle Bells 13. And Your Bird Can Sing 14. Your Mother Should Know 15. Love Me Do 16. Honey Pie 17. I've got a Feeling 18. Dig It 19, Get Back 20. Everybody's got Something to Hide Except for Me and My Monkey 21, Magical Mystery Tour 22. Octopus's Garden 23, Mean Mr. Mustard 24, Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds 25, Something 26. From Me to You 27. Across the Universe

: i CD 75 , 2 CD 75 .

My Bonnie

3 4 4

1. Present Simple, the Verb "to be" 7 v I Am a Nut 7 You Are a Grand Old Flag 9 Love Is 10 Mother 11 What Are People Made of? 12 2. Present Continuous Three Wheels on My Wagon 9^.1 -ir, : She Is Leaving Home Walking with the Clouds . 3. Present Simple -ll-.ll And I Love Her The Farmer in the Dell .. Love Stoiy The Muffin Man The Ants Go Marching... 14 14 17 19 21 21 22 24 25 26

5. Have got /Has got 37 I Have got Exams 37 He's got the Whole World in His Hands 41 Erie Canal 42 6. Present Perfect 43 The Lady in Red 43 Battle Hymn of the Republic 46 I Have got a Mistake . . . . 47 The Good Little Girl . . . . 48 7. Past Continuous Biography -Ir.jU, The Night Before Alice's Song 49 49 52 53

8. Present Perfect Continuous 55 Five 55 I -IrlB^ Hard Day's Night 58 I Am Sitting All Along . . 59 9. Future Continuous . . . . 62 When You Wake Tomorrow 62 10. Complex Object Blue Moon You Made Me Love You -^ Paint It Black Let My People Go 65 65 67 68 69

4. Past Simple, Irregular Verbs 29 Aura Lee 29 V Dip-dip-lo-docus 32 The Twelve Days of Christmas 33 Magic Boat 34 V The Witch Dotor 35

11. Passive Voice Last Night I Had the Strangest Dream Frozen Love for Sale 12. Conditionals If Give My Heart to You If You Are Lonely If You Are in the Dark .. Patty and the Jug of Milk Hold Fast to Dreams The Hammer Song V I Wish I Was a Grizzly Bear 13. Participles Five Fat Sausages Clementine Jingle Bells Limerick 14. Modal Verbs

70 71 73 74 76 76 78 79 80 82 82 84 86 86 88 89 90 92

Musical Instraments Limerick

103 104

i6. Idioms 105 Get Back 105 ir.jup Everybody's got Something to Hide Except for Me and My Monkey 108 -irJ^ Magical Mystery T o u r . . . . 110 Limerick 17. Particles, Prepositions -i'v"'Octopus's Garden Mean Mr. Mustard Luc>' in the Sl^ with Diamonds Limerick i8. Pronouns Something From Me to You Across the Universe Limerick . Texts for Reading , CD- 111 113 113 116 117 118 120 120 122 123 126

co^i^ i l S And Your Bird Can Sing 92 H Your Mother Should ICnow 94 I ir.-<5 Love Me Do 95 15. Articles irj^ Honey Pie ir,// I've got a Feeling ir.-/^ Dig It 98 98 101 102

128 140 140 141

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English Songs Sing and Study


ISBN 5-89815-713-1

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