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CompassLearning Math Evaluation

Final Evaluation Project for EdTech 505

8/1/2013 Boise State University Ashley Eivins

Table of Contents
Title Learning Reflection Executive Summary Purpose of Evaluation Background Knowledge Evaluation Design Evaluation Results Discussion of Results Conclusions & Recommendations Appendix A- MAP Score Tables Appendix B- EPD Page Number 1 2 3 4-6 7-9 10-19 20-21 22

Learning Reflection
The evaluation process has been enlightening, reaffirming, and nerve-racking. I was able to connect new knowledge obtained in this class with my practices in the elementary classroom, as well as new information acquired during an RTI conference I attended in June. Several of the readings and activities were helpful in connecting the pieces of information. Perhaps the most enlightening was the importance in planning evaluation. Summative evaluation has always been easy to plan and conduct, however, formative evaluation generally occurs randomly in my instruction and with little planning. I know see better planning of evaluation will not only establish an end goal, but direct my instruction and assist in meeting my students needs more effectively and efficiently. Another enlightening point is examples of student work should land in each level of the rating scale. I think most teachers would agree that we want all students to perform on the higher end of the rating scale, but our wants are not necessarily accurate indications of students abilities to meet the criteria. It is okay for students to lack in certain skills and it is necessary for us to accurately record student achievement so we can help students improve those skills. Modules on problem analysis and data analysis reaffirmed many of my previous ideas about evaluation. I knew I wanted to examine CompassLearning almost immediately after beginning this course. Throughout my M.E.T experience, I have striven to direct assignments and projects toward curriculum taught or resources used in my own classroom, allowing more in-depth reflection. My fourth grade students use CompassLearning and I have questioned the impact it has on test scores. Data analysis is also an aspect of evaluation with which I am familiar. Analyzing graphs and tables have allowed me to process student learning beyond a surface score as I sometimes tend to do. Evaluation has also been nerve-racking. Collaborating with fellow classmates from across the nation or world has been a challenge because I am constantly wondering if we have the same understanding of a task, or if we can possibly complete an assignment on time. Overall, I believe I benefited greatly from this course, yet am extremely relieved to be finished.

Executive Summary
The purpose of this evaluation is to examine CompassLearning, an interactive instructional tool, focusing specifically on math. The evaluation objectives examine whether CompassLearning lessons meet Common Core math standards, as well as if it improves overall math MAP test scores and improves scores in all five strands (Geometry, Number Concepts and Operations, Algebra, Data Analysis and Probability, and Measurement). Fourth grade math standards were collected from the CompassLearning website and commoncorestandards.org. Standards were then compared to identify which standards were met using CompassLearning and which were not met (See Appendix A). Fall, winter and spring math MAP test scores were collected from 14 of my students. Scores include an overall math score, and scores for each individual strand. CompassLearning standards did not align with the majority of Common Core State Standards. Although almost all students improved their overall score, it is clear they are lacking in Number Concepts & Operations, and support is not consistent in Measurement, Algebra, or Geometry. Students scored highest in Data Analysis & Probability.

Purpose of Evaluation
Purpose The purpose of this evaluation is to examine CompassLearning, an interactive instructional tool, focusing specifically on math to determine if the product is effectively meeting the Common Core Standards and improving student Math MAP test scores. Central Questions Does CompassLearning math provide interactive lessons meeting Common Core State Standards for fourth grade? Did students math MAP scores improve overall? Did students math MAP scores improve in all five strands of MAP testing (Geometry, Number Concepts & Operations, Algebra, Data Analysis & Probability, and Measurement)? Impact on Teachers Teachers will experience the greatest impact of this evaluation because they will need to adjust the use of CompassLearning and other instruction to address the areas. CompassLearning does not meet several of the Common Core State Standards and must be used effectively and efficiently to prevent wasted instructional time. Activities and lessons not addressing should not be used during core math instruction. Students lacking in skills can be assigned activities and lessons at a lower level to help scaffold their learning of grade level standards, but should not be allowed free reign. Teachers will need to locate additional instructional material to address the areas CompassLearning does not. This will take time and effort but is also going to benefit both teachers and students in the long run. Impact on Students Students will also be impacted by the evaluation because their time using CompassLearning will better align with the goals of Common Core State Standards and they will be able to obtain a more complete understanding of concepts.

Background Information
CompassLearning CompassLearning is an online program providing interactive activities and lessons in language arts, math, social studies and science. Activities and lessons are differentiated in hopes of meeting each childs individual learning needs. Students are assigned activities and lessons in two ways: 1. Based off of NWEA MAP test scores in individual strands (Ex. Math strands include Geometry, Number Concepts & Operations, Algebra, Data Analysis & Probability, and Measurement).; and 2. Assigned by the classroom teacher. Each strand assessed is represented with a folder full of activities, lessons, and assessments (online and printable) at each childs independent learning level which was established using MAP testing. Additional folders can be created and assigned by the classroom to individual students or whole groups. Teachers may assign new activities or lessons to reinforce classroom instruction or to front-load upcoming concepts. Below is an example of the Student Launch Pad. Math folders are accessed through the math button.

Image provided by 400 244 - mrslindsayskids.blogspot.com.

Why CompassLearning? CompassLearning.com provides the following rationale describing the companys beliefs and efforts toward improving education: At Compass Learning, we believe in the power of personalized learning to empower teachers, keep students engaged, and ultimately ensure results that meet or exceedState and Common Core Standards. We achieve this through:

Personalized learning: Creating an environment in which the needs of individual students are valued and integrated into a personalized learning experience helps every student reach his or her full potential. Empowering teachers: Empowering teachers to do their jobs means success for students, schools, and districts. Academic rigor: Compass Learnings standards-aligned and research-based learning solutions deliver real results. Our approach: Our curriculum covers every grade and every course, and includes solutions for Advanced Placement, College Readiness, Credit Recovery, ELL/ESL, Gifted and Talented, Response to Intervention, and Summer/Extended Day. Professional development: Were as committed to teachers as teachers are to their students. CompassLearning Impact Teacher Academy empowers teachers to simply do more. Support services: With our wide range of support options, youll find what best fits your needs.

To summarize, CompassLearning tries to provide differentiated that is appropriately aligned with standards in order to achieve success for all. CompassLearning in CCSD CompassLearning was brought to CCSD in 2011. The 2013-2014 school will be the third year the instructional tool is used in the classroom. Those involved in the decision included the districts Superintendent of Instruction, Facilitators of language arts, math, social studies, science, and technology, as well as other leaders in the district. The interactive instructional tool was brought as an effort to improve student test scores, engagement, motivation, and accountability. CompassLearning can be used to supplement instruction or act as an intervention. The current recommended use is 30 minutes a day and the tool is the only supplemental resource/tool allowed due to the purchase of a new core math program.
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There were no products providing this level of differentiation based off of student performance, teachers choice, or grade-level curriculum previously used by the district. Classroom Use The 14 students whose data was used for this evaluation were engaged in CompassLearning math activities and lessons for a minimum of 20 minutes per day, three days per week. Lessons and activities provided were based on both MAP scores and assigned by the teacher. Assigned activities are also differentiated based on student performance in the classroom. For example: Students struggling with fourth grade fraction concepts will be assigned third grade CompassLearning activities and lessons on fractions to reinforce basic skills and provide scaffolding for on-level concepts.

Evaluation Design
Evaluation Model The model used for this evaluation is the Goal-Based Model. The control group involved is a class of 14 fourth graders. Each student uses CompassLearning math a minimum of 20 minutes per day, three days per week. Evaluation Questions Does CompassLearning math provide interactive lessons meeting Common Core State Standards for fourth grade? Did students math MAP scores improve overall? Did students math MAP scores improve in all five strands of MAP testing (Geometry, Number Concepts & Operations, Algebra, Data Analysis & Probability, and Measurement)?

Objectives and Goals CompassLearning was evaluated using the following program goals or objectives: Provide interactive lessons and activities in alignment with Common Core State math standards Improve overall math MAP scores (fall to spring) Improve math MAP scores in all five strands (Geometry, Number Concepts & Operations, Algebra, Data Analysis & Probability, and Measurement)

Activities Observed The evaluator will compare fourth grade CompassLearning math standards and fourth grade Common Core Math Standards to determine standards met and not being met by CompassLearning. Additionally, the evaluator will examine individual student growth in overall math MAP test scores (fall to spring) and individual student growth in each math strand of the MAP test (Geometry, Number Concepts & Operations, Algebra, Data Analysis & Probability, and Measurement). Data Sources Membership is required to access both CompassLearning and NWEA MAP scores, so data for both will be provided by the classroom teacher. The classroom teacher will provide a list of CompassLearning math standards, similar to fourth grade Common Core Math Standards, for the evaluator to align and determine
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standards met and not being met by CompassLearning. The evaluator will provide fourth grade Common Core Math Standards and use a table to compare the standards and determine similarities and differences. The classroom teacher will also provide math MAP scores from fall, winter, and spring testing. Scores will include an overall score from each test, as well as scores from each of the five math strands for each test. Each math strand provides a score range rather than a set score. Scores are determined by averaging the highest and lowest scores in the range. For example: If a students Geometry score range was 200-214, the teacher would determine the average (200+214=414; 414/2=207) to be 207. Population Sample MAP math test scores are from 14 of 15 students in a fourth grade general education classroom. The 15th student does not receive math instruction in the general ed. classroom and data from that student would not be consistent with that of others. Data was available for all students, with exception of scores for Student 7 in individual strands during the winter test. An accurate overall score was provided for Student 7 during the winter test. Student 7s missing data will appear blank on both the tables and graphs provided in the Results section. Data Collection Design Data collected and analyzed included tri-annual test data (including individual scores in all five math strands and an overall math score) from the 2012-2013 school year. CompassLearning standards collected and compared included the most recent information available to the classroom teacher, which are the most similar to fourth grade Common Core Math Standards. Fourth grade Common Core Math Standards were retrieved from: http://www.corestandards.org/assets/CCSSI_Math%20Standards.pdf. Responsibility Classroom Teacher The classroom teacher will be responsible for providing: Tri-annual test data (including individual scores in all five math strands and an overall math score) from the 2012-2013 school year. Most recent CompassLearning standards available, which are similar to fourth grade Common Core Math Standards.
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Evaluator The evaluator will be responsible for providing: Fourth grade Common Core Math Standards. Tables and graphs representing growth in student test scores. Tables and graphs comparing CompassLearning Standards to fourth grade Common Core Math Standards. A narrative explaining results and a recommendation for the use of CompassLearning during math instruction.

Data Analysis Data analysis will show: Variances between tri-annual test results (including individual scores in all five math strands and an overall math score) from the 2012-2013 school year. A descriptive analysis of standards, especially including standards and objectives not met by CompassLearning.

Audience Program staff, or classroom teachers, will be provided with results to inform them of the effectiveness of using CompassLearning during math instruction and future recommended use. Program sponsors, or administration, will be provided with the results from the evaluation so it can be used to guide future use of CompassLearning in math instruction.

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Evaluation Results
Overall MAP Math Test Score

Overall MAP Math Scores


230 220 RIT Score 210 200 190 180 170 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Student Number Fall Winter Spring

All 14 students overall MAP math scores improved from fall to spring testing. Four students scored higher on the winter test than in spring. 50% of students met the spring RIT Norm (End of 4th grade) score of 212. Geometry

Geometry
240 230 220 210 200 190 180 170 160 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Student Number

RIT Score

Fall Winter Spring

Eleven students Geometry scores improved from fall to spring testing. Of the remaining three students, one students score stayed the same from fall to spring, and two students scores stayed nearly the same. Six students achieved the RIT Norm score of 212 and one student was within 1 point.
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Number Concepts & Operations

Number Concepts & Operations


230 220 RIT Score 210 200 190 180 170 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Student Number Fall Winter Spring

Eleven students Number Concepts & Operations scores improved from fall to spring testing. Two students scores decreased from fall to spring testing, and one students score stayed the same. All three students scores improved from fall to winter. Two students achieved the RIT Norm score of 212, and five students were within 4 points. Algebra

Algebra
240 230 220 RIT Score 210 200 190 180 170 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Student Number Fall Winter Spring

Twelve students Algebra scores improved from fall to spring testing. One students score decreased, and one students score stayed the same but increased from fall to winter. Five students achieved the RIT Norm score of 212 and five students scored within 4 points of the norm.
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Data Analysis & Probability

Data Analysis & Probability


240 230 220 RIT Score 210 200 190 180 170 160 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Student Number Fall Winter Spring

Twelve students Data Analysis & Probability scores improved from fall to spring. The remaining two students scores improved from fall to winter. Eight students achieved the RIT Norm score of 212 and two students were within 2 points. Measurement

Measurement
230 220 RIT Score 210 200 190 180 170 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Student Number Fall Winter Spring

Twelve students Measurement scores improved from fall to spring testing. Nine students scored higher in the winter than in the spring. Three students achieved the RIT Norm score of 212, and two others were within one point.
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Math Strand Number Operations & Concepts

CompassLearning

District/CCS Standards
Generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers.
1. Recognize that in a multi-digit whole number, a digit in one place represents ten times what it represents in the place to its right. For example, recognize that 700 70 = 10 by applying concepts of place value and division. Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. Compare two multidigit numbers based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons. Use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place.

Analysis
Standards Met: Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. Round multi-digit whole numbers to any place. Fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm. Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number, and multiply two two-digit numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Find whole-number quotients and remainders with up to four-digit dividends and one-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Recognize equivalent fractions. Compare fractions with different numerators and denominators. Add two fractions with a denominator 10 and a denominator 100. Use decimal notation for fractions with denominators 10 or 100. Compare two decimals to the hundredths place. Standards Not Met:

Convert numbers containing two to nine digits from standard form to expanded form and vice versa.

2.

Round numbers to the nearest ten, hundred, thousand, ten thousand, and hundred thousand.

3.

Add whole numbers. (4-digits, up to 3 numbers) Subtract 4-digit numbers with multiple zeros. Multiply 1-digit numbers with 2-digit and 3-digit numbers. Use partial products and mental multiplication as strategies. Multiply 2-digit numbers with 2 and 3-digit numbers Divide dividends up to four-digits by one-digit with and without remainders. (Include quotients with 0's) Solve two-digit division problems with and without remainders.

Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.
4. Fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm. Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number, and multiply two two-digit numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models. Find whole-number quotients and remainders with up to four-digit dividends and one-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.

5.

6.

Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering.

Apply concepts of place value and division. Compare two multiple digit numbers based on meanings of digits using >, =, and <. Multiply multi-digit numbers using illustrations and explaining the calculation with equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models. Divide multi-digit numbers using illustrations and explaining the calculation with equations,

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Recognize equivalent fractions. Reduce fractions to lowest terms.

1.

Explain why a fraction a/b is equivalent to a fraction (n a)/(n b) by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions. Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators, e.g., by creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark fraction such as 1/2. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.

rectangular arrays, and/or area models. Explain visual fraction models and generate equivalent fractions.
Understand a fraction a/b with a > 1 as a sum of fractions 1/b. Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction by a whole number.

Order fractions with like and unlike denominators 1 through 12 and compare fractions using the symbols <, >, and =.

2.

Justify the conclusion when comparing two decimals to the hundredths place using a visual model.

Build fractions from unit fractions by applying and extending previous understandings of operations on whole numbers.
3. Understand a fraction a/b with a > 1 as a sum of fractions 1/b. Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction by a whole number.

4.

Understand decimal notation for fractions, and compare decimal fractions.


Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators up to 12.
5. Express a fraction with denominator 10 as an equivalent fraction with denominator 100, and use this technique to add two fractions with respective denominators 10 and 100.4 For example, express 3/10 as 30/100, and add 3/10 + 4/100 = 34/100. Use decimal notation for fractions with denominators 10 or 100. For example, rewrite 0.62 as 62/100; describe a length as 0.62 meters; locate 0.62 on a number line diagram.

Read and write decimals as fractions.

6.

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Order decimals and compare the values of two decimals using the signs <, >, and = up to the thousandths place.

7.

Compare two decimals to hundredths by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two decimals refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual model. Standards Met: Recognize right triangles as a category, and identify right triangles. Standards Not Met: Draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures. Classify two-dimensional figures based on the presence or absence of parallel or perpendicular lines, or the presence or absence of angles of a specified size. Recognize a line of symmetry for a twodimensional figure as a line across the figure such that the figure can be folded along the line into matching parts. Identify line-symmetric figures and draw lines of symmetry.

Geometry

Draw and identify lines and angles, and classify shapes by properties of their lines and angles. Define, name, and identify points, lines, line segments, rays and angles. Identify and classify angles as right, obtuse, or acute. Classify plane figures as having line symmetry, point symmetry, both, or none. 3. 1. Draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures. Classify two-dimensional figures based on the presence or absence of parallel or perpendicular lines, or the presence or absence of angles of a specified size. Recognize right triangles as a category, and identify right triangles. Recognize a line of symmetry for a twodimensional figure as a line across the figure such that the figure can be folded along the line into matching parts. Identify line-symmetric figures and draw lines of symmetry.

2.

Measurement

Define units of length. (centimeter, decimeter, meter) Estimate and compare length. Measure to the nearest centimeter. Convert measurements of length to new units.

Solve problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements from a larger unit to a smaller unit. 1. Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz.; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two column table. 2. Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals of time, liquid volumes, masses of objects, and money, including problems involving simple fractions or decimals, and problems that require expressing measurements given in a larger unit in terms of

Standards Met: Know and compare measurement units. Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems. Standards Not Met: Use the four operations to solve word problems involving measurement and converting measurement. Represent measurement quantities using diagrams such as number line diagrams that feature a measurement scale. Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8). Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions by

Define units of mass. (gram, kilogram) Estimate and compare mass. Convert measurements of mass to new units. Tell and show time to the 5 and 1 minute intervals.

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Find perimeter by counting units and by adding lengths. Measure to find the perimeter. Select appropriate label for measurement. Find area by counting units. Multiply to find area. Select appropriate labels of measurement.

a smaller unit. Represent measurement quantities using diagrams such as number line diagrams that feature a measurement scale. 3. Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems. Represent and interpret data.

using information presented in line plots. Recognize angles as geometric shapes that are formed wherever two rays share a common endpoint, and understand concepts of angle Measurement. Measure angles in whole-number degrees using a protractor. Sketch angles of specified measure. Recognize angle measure as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram in real world and mathematical problems, e.g., by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure.

Display and interpret data in line and stem-and-leaf plots, compare data, and draw conclusions.

4. Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8). Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions by using information presented in line plots. Geometric measurement: understand concepts of angle and measure angles. 5. Recognize angles as geometric shapes that are formed wherever two rays share a common endpoint, and understand concepts of angle Measurement. 6. Measure angles in whole-number degrees using a protractor. Sketch angles of specified measure. 7. Recognize angle measure as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram in real world and mathematical problems, e.g., by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure. Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve problems.

Algebra

Interpret a multiplication equation.

1.

Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35= 5 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations.

Standards Met: Interpret a multiplication equation. Determine factors and multiples of a given whole number 1-100. Generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule. Standards Not Met: Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as

An introduction to the basics of

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problem solving. Use diagrams, build charts, make lists, and build addition and subtraction equations to solve problems. Determine which arithmetic operation is represented in word problems.

2.

Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. Solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and having whole-number answers using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must be interpreted. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.

3.

Gain familiarity with factors and multiples. 4. Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1100 is prime or composite.

multiplication equations. Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison. Solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and having wholenumber answers using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must be interpreted. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1100 is prime or composite. Identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself

Identify factors of a given number and common factors of two given numbers. Define multiples, and list multiples of a given number. Identify common multiples of two given numbers.

Generate and analyze patterns. 5. Generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule. Identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself. For example, given the rule Add 3 and the starting number 1, generate terms in the resulting sequence and observe that the terms appear to alternate between odd and even numbers. Explain informally why the numbers will continue to alternate in this way.

Identify and extend patterns and apply pattern rules using shapes, colors, and numbers. (repeating, growing patterns)

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Identify and apply pattern rules using sequences of related numbers. (arithmetic, geometric sequence Apply the appropriate rule to complete a chart including input/output tables. Solve problems associated with a given relationship using a table of values.

Summary of Standards Met: Number Concepts & Operations Place value Using all four operations Finding equivalent fractions Comparing fractions and decimals

Geometry Recognizing and identifying right angles

Measurement Know and compare measurement units Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems.

Algebra Multiples and factors Shape patterns

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Summary of Standards Not Met: Number Concepts & Operations Apply concepts of place value and division. Compare two multiple digit numbers Multiply/divide multi-digit numbers using illustrations and explaining the calculation with equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models. Explain visual fraction models and generate equivalent fractions. Multiply a fraction by a whole number.

Geometry Classify and draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Recognize and draw a line of symmetry

Measurement Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram in real world and mathematical problems Use the four operations and diagrams to solve word problems involving measurement and converting measurement Make a line plot to solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions Recognize angles as geometric shapes that are formed wherever two rays share a common endpoint, and understand concepts of angle Measurement Measure and sketch angles in whole-number degrees using a protractor

Algebra Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations Solve multistep word problems using letters standing for the unknown quantity Determine whether a number 1-100 is prime or composite
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Discussion of Results
Does CompassLearning math provide interactive lessons meeting Common Core State Standards for fourth grade? CompassLearning math provides few lessons aligning with CCSS for fourth grade. Concepts and standards met include basic place value, operations, fractions, decimals, right angles, area and perimeter, measurement, multiples and factors, and shape patterns. However, CompassLearning does not provide lessons aligned with CCSS requiring students to combine operations, provide visuals, apply most geometry, solve word problems combining measurement and operations, use letters for unknown quantities, or find prime and composite numbers. Did students math MAP scores improve overall? All 14 students math MAP scores improved overall from fall to spring testing. Additionally, 4 students scored higher in winter testing than in spring testing. Half of the students met or exceeded the end of fourth grade RIT Norm score of 212. Did students math MAP scores improve in all five strands of MAP testing (Geometry, Number Concepts & Operations, Algebra, Data Analysis & Probability, and Measurement)? At least 11 of 14 students math MAP scores improved in each of the five strands of MAP testing. Here is a breakdown of each strand: Geometry- Eleven students Geometry scores improved from fall to spring testing. Of the remaining three students, one students score stayed the same from fall to spring, and two students scores stayed nearly the same. Six students achieved the RIT Norm score of 212 and one student was within 1 point. Number Concepts & Operations- Eleven students Number Concepts & Operations scores improved from fall to spring testing. Two students scores decreased from fall to spring testing, and one students score stayed the same. All three students scores improved from fall to winter. Two students achieved the RIT Norm score of 212, and five students were within 4 points. Algebra- Twelve students Algebra scores improved from fall to spring testing. One students score decreased, and one students score stayed the same but in creased from fall to winter. Five students achieved the RIT Norm score of 212 and five students scored within 4 points of the norm.

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Data Analysis & Probability- Twelve students Data Analysis & Probability scores improved from fall to spring. The remaining two students scores improved from fall to winter. Eight students achieved the RIT Norm score of 212 and two students were within 2 points. Measurement- Twelve students Measurement scores improved from fall to spring testing. Nine students scored higher in the winter than in the spring. Three students achieved the RIT Norm score of 212, and two others were within one point.

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Conclusions & Recommendations


1) Immediate Conclusions Overall, CompassLearning only addresses basic math concepts. Many of the standards met involve the four basic number operations. Areas most lacking include Number Concepts & Operations and measurement. Many of these standards combine math concepts with operations or require application and interpretation in a word problem. Students did not show consistent improvement on MAPs math testing from fall to spring in Number Concepts & Operations, Measurement, Data Analysis & Probability, or Algebra. Students in each of these strands decreased scores from winter to spring, the most of which (9) decreased in Algebra. 2) Long-Range Planning CompassLearning can continue to be used to supplement math instruction, but should be used mostly for areas aligned to CCSS. The classroom teacher will need to locate additional resources or provide specific instruction to address the remaining CCSS for fourth grade math. Teachers are encouraged to follow any changes and efforts made to align CompassLearning activities and lessons with CCSS so it can be a more valuable tool to supplement instruction. In addition, teachers are encouraged to following changes to MAP testing as the NWEA works to align tests to the CCSS. 3) Evaluation Insights The initial evaluation plan included examining time each student spent on-task while completing assignments and lessons in CompassLearning. Unfortunately, this information is not available over the summer. If I were to do this evaluation again, I would wait until next summer because the NWEA will be updating MAP testing to align with the CCSS. Fortunately, I now know how CompassLearning aligns and can focus on evaluating a newly adopted core math program to determine the effect it has on MAP scores.

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Appendices
Appendix A- MAP Score Tables

Overall MAP Math Score


Student 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Fall Winter Spring 200 213 215 212 221 222 207 218 216 189 208 212 202 206 212 180 185 190 176 189 188 206 209 208 207 205 210 202 199 215 188 204 200 203 209 214 183 193 195 204 202 208

Measurement
Student 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Fall 200 221 205 189 210 172 179 195 205 204 186 203 175 204 Winter Spring 208 211 226 211 225 215 211 204 204 216 179 176 183 213 201 209 200 198 208 203 206 225 221 204 191 221 202

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Data Analysis & Probability


Student 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Fall 207 214 208 187 194 191 169 204 219 208 187 203 187 206 Winter 230 233 216 201 210 195 208 214 209 218 211 192 202 Spring 232 224 231 227 210 204 186 214 222 210 190 226 189 216

Algebra
Student 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Fall 205 219 211 183 206 175 178 216 202 204 195 202 180 206 Winter Spring 213 208 223 233 211 213 208 204 215 219 182 190 190 204 208 202 218 206 230 201 195 198 210 193 211 191 208

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Number Concepts & Operations


Student 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Fall Winter 194 209 196 207 209 210 188 204 192 197 182 187 186 208 204 200 203 198 185 189 191 205 206 184 182 195 195 Spring 208 214 205 210 209 182 192 209 201 221 188 209 194 204

Geometry
Student 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Fall Winter Spring 193 204 213 216 219 230 204 227 218 198 214 216 207 205 206 179 184 199 168 188 208 216 212 208 198 213 198 201 205 184 199 204 206 206 205 188 190 200 211 209 211

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Appendix B- EPD CompassLearning Math Evaluation Program Goals/Objectives Provide interactive methods meeting math standards Improve overall MAP math scores and in all five strands (Geometry, Number Concepts & Operations, Measurement, Data Analysis & Probability, and Algebra)

Activities to Observe Compare CompassLearning standards to CCS standards Examine overall growth in MAP math scores Examine growth in individual strands of MAP math

Data Sources CompassLearning standards and CCS standards Fall, winter, and spring MAP math test scores

Population or Sample MAP and Compass data for 14 of 15 4th graders in the general ed. class

Design Tri-annual test data (including individual and overall scores) collected and analyzed from 2012-2013 school year Standards compared upon availability

Data Analysis Variance between tri-annual test results Descriptive analysis of standards, especially including standards not addressed by CompassLearning

Audience Program Staff and Sponsors

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