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ACHARYA NAGARJUNA UNIVERSITY

4-year B.Tech. Degree Course


(Semester System)

INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY

W.E.F. 2004 – 2005


ACHARYA NAGARJUNA UNIVERSITY : NAGARJUNA NAGAR

SCHEME FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY


w.e.f 2005-2006 (Semester System)

I / IV B.Tech., (ANNUAL PATTERN)

Code Subject Periods per Maximum Marks Total


No. week Marks

L/T D/P Sessional Universit


y

BT 101 Mathematics – I 3 - 30 70 100

BT 102 Mathematics – II 3 - 30 70 100

BT 103 Physics 3 - 30 70 100

BT 104 Chemistry 3 - 30 70 100

BT 105 English 3 - 30 70 100

BT 106 Computer 3 - 30 70 100


Programming

BT 107 Engineering 3 - 30 70 100


Mechanics

BT 108 Engineering 3 - 30 70 100


Graphics

BT 151 Physics Lab - 3 25 50 75

BT 152 Chemistry Lab - 3 25 50 75

BT 153 Workshop Practice - 3 25 50 75

BT 154 Computer - 3 25 50 75
Programming Lab

TOTAL 24 12 340 760 1100

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ACHARYA NAGARJUNA UNIVERSITY: NAGARJUNA NAGAR

SCHEME FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY


w.e.f 2005-2006 (Semester System)

II / IV B.Tech., (SEMESTER – I)

Code Subject Periods per Maximum Marks Total


No. week Marks

L/T D/P Sessional Universit


y

CS/IT Mathematics – III 4 - 30 70 100


211

CS/IT Basic Electronics 4+1 - 30 70 100


212

CS/IT Digital Logic Design 4+1 - 30 70 100


213

CS/IT Data Structures 4+1 - 30 70 100


214

CS/IT Object Oriented 4 - 30 70 100


215 Programming

CS/IT Environmental 4 - 30 70 100


216 Education*

CS/IT Electronics Lab - 3 25 50 75


251

CS/IT Data Structures Lab - 3 25 50 75


252

CS/IT OOPS Lab - 3 25 50 75


253

24+3 9 255/225 570/500 825/725

Note: In all laboratories a minimum of 10 programs/experiments are to be


completed.

• *CS/IT 216 is an unaudited course.


• One has to get 40% to pass through.
• Marks are not counted for the award of Degree.

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ACHARYA NAGARJUNA UNIVERSITY : NAGARJUNA NAGAR

SCHEME FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY


w.e.f 2005-2006 (Semester System)

II / IV B.Tech., (SEMESTER – II)

Code No. Subject Periods per Maximum Marks Total


week Marks

L/T D/P Sessional Universit


y

CS/IT 221 Mathematics – IV 4 - 30 70 100

CS/IT 222 Circuit Theory 4 - 30 70 100

CS/IT 223 Computer 4+1 - 30 70 100


Organization

CS/IT 224 Discrete 4+1 - 30 70 100


Mathematical
Structures

CS/IT 225 File Structures 4 - 30 70 100

CS/IT 226 Microprocessors 4+1 - 30 70 100

CS/IT 261 File Structures Lab - 3 25 50 75


(C++)

CS/IT 262 Microprocessors - 3 25 50 75


Lab

2 6 230 520 750


4+3

Note: In all laboratories a minimum of 10 programs/experiments are to be


completed.

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ACHARYA NAGARJUNA UNIVERSITY : NAGARJUNA NAGAR

SCHEME FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY


w.e.f 2005-2006 (Semester System)

III / IV B.Tech., (SEMESTER – I)

Code No. Subject Periods per Maximum Marks Total


week Marks

L/T D/P Sessional Universit


y

CS/IT 311 Operating 4 - 30 70 100


Systems

IT 312 Automata 4+1 - 30 70 100


Theory & Formal
Languages

IT 313 Principles of 4 - 30 70 100


Programming
Languages

IT 314 Computer 4+1 - 30 70 100


Graphics

CS/IT 315 Database 4+1 - 30 70 100


Management
Systems

IT 351 Computer - 3 25 50 75
Graphics Lab

CS/IT 352 DBMS Lab - 3 25 50 75

CS/IT 353 Communication - 3 25 50 75


Skills Lab

20+3 9 225 500 725

Note: In all laboratories a minimum of 10 programs/experiments are to be


completed.

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ACHARYA NAGARJUNA UNIVERSITY : NAGARJUNA NAGAR

SCHEME FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY


w.e.f 2005-2006 (Semester System)

III / IV B.Tech., (SEMESTER – II)

Code No. Subject Periods per Maximum Marks Total


week Marks

L/T D/P Session Universit


al y

IT 321 Systems Software 4 - 30 70 100

IT 322 Compiler Design 4+1 - 30 70 100

CS/IT 323 Software 4+1 - 30 70 100


Engineering

CS/IT 324 Data 4 - 30 70 100


Communications

IT 325 Operations 4+1 - 30 70 100


Research

CS/IT 326 Internet 4+1 - 30 70 100


Programming

CS/IT 361 Internet - 3 25 50 75


Programming Lab

IT 362 System Software - 3 25 50 75


Lab

TOTAL 24+4 6 230 520 750

Note: In all laboratories a minimum of 10 programs/experiments are to be


completed.

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ACHARYA NAGARJUNA UNIVERSITY : NAGARJUNA NAGAR

SCHEME FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY


w.e.f 2005-2006 (Semester System)

IV / IV B.Tech., (SEMESTER – I)

Code No. Subject Periods per Maximum Marks Total


week Marks

L/T D/P Session Universi


al ty

CS/IT Object Oriented 4+1 - 30 70 100


411 Analysis & Design

CS/IT Computer Networks 4+1 - 30 70 100


412

IT 413 Design & Analysis of 4+1 - 30 70 100


Algorithms

IT 414 Elective – I 4 - 30 70 100

IT 415 Elective – II 4 - 30 70 100

CS/IT Computer Networks - 3 25 50 75


451 Lab

CS/IT Software Engineering - 3 25 50 75


452 Lab

CS/IT Term Paper - 3 75 75


453

2 9 275 450 725


0+3

Note: In all laboratories a minimum of 10 programs/experiments are to be


completed.

One Elective is to be offered from each of these Pools.


Elective - I
IT 414 (A) Artificial Intelligence
IT 414 (B) Distributed Systems
IT 414 (C) Real Time Systems
IT 414 (D) Microprocessor Based System Design
IT 414 (E) VLSI Design
IT 414 (F) Image Processing

Elective – II
IT415 (A) Parallel Computing
IT415 (B) Cryptography & Network Security
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IT415 (C) Multimedia Systems
IT415 (D) E-Commerce
IT415 (E) Soft Computing
IT415 (F) Latest Trends in IT *
* Syllabus and the title are to be finalized one semester in advance
by the BOS.

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ACHARYA NAGARJUNA UNIVERSITY : NAGARJUNA NAGAR

SCHEME FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY


w.e.f 2005-2006 (Semester System)

IV / IV B.Tech., (SEMESTER – II)

Code No. Subject Periods per Maximum Marks Total


week Marks

L/T D/P Sessional Universit


y

CS/IT 421 Industrial 4+1 - 30 70 100


Management

IT 422 Web Technology 4+1 - 30 70 100

CS/IT 423 Data 4+1 - 30 70 100


Warehousing &
Data Mining

IT 424 Elective – III 4 - 30 70 100

CS/IT 461 Web Technology - 3 25 50 75


Lab

CS/IT 462 Project - 9 50 100 150

16+3 12 195 430 625

Note: In all laboratories a minimum of 10 programs/experiments are to be


completed.

One Elective is to be offered from this Pool.

Elective III

IT 424 (A) Embedded Systems


IT 424 (B) TCP / IP
IT 424 (C) TSP & PSP
IT 424 (D) Mobile Computing
IT 424 (E) Advanced Software Engineering
IT 424 (F) Software Testing Methodology

9
ACHARYA NAGARJUNA UNIVERSITY: NAGARJUNA NAGAR
Four - Year B. Tech. Computer Science & Engineering
(Semester System)
REGULATIONS
w.e.f. academic year 2004-2005

1.0. Minimum Qualifications for Admission:


A candidate seeking admission into First Year of B. Tech. Degree Course
should have passed either Intermediate examination conducted by the
Board of Intermediate Education of Andhra Pradesh with Mathematics,
Physics and Chemistry as optional subjects or any equivalent examination
recognized by the Nagarjuna University or Diploma in Engineering in the
relevant branch conducted by the Board of Technical Education of Andhra
Pradesh or equivalent Diploma recognized by Nagarjuna University. The
selection is based on the rank secured by the candidate in the EAMCET /
ECET (FDH) examination conducted by A.P. State Council of Higher
Education.
The candidate shall also satisfy any other eligibility requirements
stipulated by the Nagarjuna University and / or the Government of Andhra
Pradesh from time to time.

2.0. Branches of Study:


2.1. The B. Tech. Course is offered in the following branches of study at
one or more of the affiliated colleges:
a) Chemical Engineering
b) Civil Engineering
c) Computer Science & Engineering
d) Electrical & Electronics Engineering
e) Electronics & Communication Engineering
f) Electronics & Instrumentation Engineering
g) Instrumentation Engineering
h) Industrial & Production Engineering
i) Information Technology
j) Mechanical Engineering
k) Production Engineering
l) Electronics & Computer Engineering

2.2. The first year of study is common to all branches except for
Chemical Engineering.
3.0. Duration of the Course and Medium of Instruction:
The duration of the Course is four academic years consisting of two
semesters in each academic year except for the first year. The
medium of instruction and examination is English.
4.0. Minimum Instruction Days:
The first year shall consist of a minimum number of 150 instruction
days and each semester of 2nd, 3rd and 4th years shall consist of
75 days of instruction excluding the days allotted for tests, '
examinations and preparation holidays.

10
5.0. Evaluation:
5.1. The performance of the students in each year / semester shall be,
evaluated subject-wise. The distribution of marks between sessional
work (based on internal assessment) and University Examination will
be as follows:

Nature of the subject Sessional University exam.


Marks Marks
Theory subjects 30 70
Design and / or Drawing 30 70
Practicals 25 50
Project work 50 100 (Viva Voce)

5.2.1. In the First Year there shall be three Mid Term Examinations and
three Assignment Tests in theory subjects, conducted at
approximately equal intervals in the academic year. Assignment;
questions shall be given at least one week in advance and the
students shall answer only two of these, to be specified by the
concerned teacher just before the commencement of the'
Assignment Test. The Sessional marks shall be awarded based on
the best two performances in each of the Sessional and! Assignment
Test, 60% of the sessional marks being allotted for Sessional Tests
(Mid Term exams) and the balance 40% for Assignment Tests.

For Drawing subject (Engineering Graphics), there shall be only


three sessional tests for which 40% marks shall be awarded based
on day-to-day classwork and the remaining 60% marks based on the
best two performances in the three Sessional tests.

5.2.2 In each of the Semesters of 2nd, 3rd and 4th years, there shall be
two Mid Term examinations and two Assignment Tests in theory
subject. The Sessional marks shall be awarded based on the best
one out of the two Mid Term examinations and best one out of the
two Assignment Tests. 60% of the Sessional marks shall be allotted
for Mid Term examinations and the balance 40% marks for the
Assignment Tests.
For Design and / or Drawing subjects, there shall be only two Mid
Term examinations in each semester with no Assignment Tests. In
the case of such subjects, 40% weightage shall be given for day-to-
day class work and the remaining 60% weightage shall be given to
Mid Term examinations taking into account the best performance in
one out of two Mid Term examinations.

In each of the Semesters of 2nd, 3rd and 4th years, there


shall be two Mid Term examinations and two Assignment
Tests in every theory subject. The Sessional marks shall be
awarded giving a weightage of 14 marks out of 18 earmarks
for mid term examination (75% approx.) to the mid term,
examination in which the student scores more marks and
the remaining 4 marks (25% approx) for the mid term
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examination in which the student scores less marks.
Similarly, a weightage of 5 marks (75% approx) out of 7
marks earmarked for assignment tests shall be given for the
assignment test in which the student scores more marks and
remaining 2 marks (25% approx) shall be given for the
Assignment test in which the student scores less marks.
This regulation comes into force for the batch of students
admitted from the academic year 2004-2005.

5.2.3. In the case of practical subjects, the sessional marks shall be


awarded based on the day-to-day laboratory classwork including
submission of record (15 marks) and laboratory examinations & Quiz
/ Vivavoce (10 marks).
In the case of Project work, the sessional marks shall be awarded
based on the weekly progress and based on the performance in a
minimum of two Seminars and the Project Report submitted at the
end of the semester. The allotment of marks for Seminars and for
day-to-day class work shall be 25 and 25.
NOTE: A student who is absent for any test, for any reason
whatsoever, shall be deemed to have scored zero marks in that test
and no make-up test shall be conducted.
The evaluation for University practical Examination shall
have a weightage of 25 marks for experiments, 15 marks for
viva-voce examination and 10 marks for record. This
regulation comes into effect w.e.f. academic year 2004-
2005.

5.3. A student shall secure a minimum of 50% aggregate sessional


marks to become eligible to appear for the year-end / semester- end
University examination.
6.0. Laboratory / Practical Classes:
In the first year, a minimum of 14 out of 20 experiments / exercises
specified in the syllabi for laboratory course shall be conducted by
the students, who shall complete these in all respects and get the
Record certified by the concerned Head of the Department for the
student to be eligible to face the University Examination in that
Practical subject. Similarly, in each Semester of 2nd, 3rd and 4th
years, a minimum of 10 out of 12 experiments / exercises specified
in the syllabi for laboratory course shall be conducted by the
students, who shall complete these in all respects and get the
Record certified by the concerned Head of the Department.
7.0. Attendance Regulations:
7.1. Regular course of study means a minimum average attendance of
75% in all the subjects computed by totaling the number of hours /
periods of lectures, design and / or drawing, Practicals and project
work as the case may be, held in every subject as the denominator
and the total number of hours / periods attended by; the student in
all the subjects, as the numerator.

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7.2. Condonation of shortage in attendance may be recommended on
genuine medical grounds, provided the student puts in at least 65%
attendance as calculated in 7.1 above and provided the principal is
satisfied with the genuineness of the reasons and the conduct of the
student.
7.3. A student who could not satisfy the attendance requirements, as
given above, in any year / semester, shall have to repeat that year/
semester.

A weightage in sessional marks upto a maximum of 5 marks


out of 30 marks in each theory subject shall be given for
those students who put in a minimum of 75% attendance in
the respective theory in a graded manner as indicated
below:-
Attendance of 75% and above but less than 80% - 1
mark
Attendance of 80% and above but less than 85% - 2
marks
Attendance of 85% and above but less than 90% - 3
marks
Attendance of 90% and above but less than 95% - 4
marks
Attendance of 95% and above - 5 marks

8.0. Detention:
A student who fails to satisfy either the minimum attendance
requirements as stipulated in Clause-7, or the requirement of
minimum aggregate sessional marks as stipulated in Clause 5.3,
shall be detained. Such a student shall have to repeat the same
year / semester as the case may be subsequently and satisfy the
above requirements afresh to become eligible to appear for the. ,it
year-end / semester-end University examination.
9.0. University Examination:
9.1. For each theory, design and / or drawing subject, there shall be a
comprehensive University Examination of three hours duration at
the end of First year / each Semester of 2nd, 3rd and 4th years
except where stated otherwise in the detailed Scheme of
Instruction.
Question paper setting shall be entrusted to external examiners
from the panels approved by the respective Boards of Studies.
9.2. For each Practical subject, the University examination shall be
conducted by one internal and one external examiners appointed by
the Principal of the concerned college and the University
respectively, the duration being that approved in the detailed
Schemes of Instruction & Examination.

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9.3. Viva-voce Examination in Project Work shall be conducted by one
internal examiner and one external examiner to be appointed by the
University.
9.4. The University shall conduct a special Supplementary examination
for First Year B.Tech., so as to enable a II year B.Tech. student having
First year backlog subjects to have three chances to pass all First
Year B. Tech. examinations and to become eligible for promotion to
III Year B. Tech. Course.
10.0. Conditions for Pass:
A candidate shall be declared to have passed the University
Examination in individual subjects if he / she secures a minimum of
40% marks in theory and design and / or drawing subjects, and 50%
marks in Practical subjects (including Project Viva-voce).
11.0. Conditions for Promotion:
11.1. A student shall be eligible for promotion to II/IV B. Tech. Course if he
/ she satisfies the minimum requirements of attendance and
sessional marks as stipulated in Clauses 5 and?, irrespective of the
number of backlog subjects.
11.2. A student shall be eligible for promotion to III/IV B. Tech. Course if he
/ she has passed all the subjects of 1/ IV B. Tech., in addition to
satisfying the minimum requirements of attendance and sessional
marks stipulated in Clauses 5 and ? in II/IV B. Tech.
11.3. A student shall be eligible for promotion to IV / IV B. Tech. Course if
he / she has satisfied the minimum requirements of attendance and
sessional marks stipulated in Clauses 5 and? in III/IV B.Tech. and has
passed all the subjects of II/IV B. Tech.

12.0. Eligibility for Award of B. Tech. Degree:


The B.Tech. Degree shall be conferred on a candidate who has'
satisfied the following requirements.
12.1. The candidate must have, after admission to B. Tech. Degree'
Course of the University, pursued the course of study for not less
than four academic years in anyone of the affiliated Engineering
Colleges.
12.2. The candidate must have satisfied the conditions for pass in all the
subjects of all the years as stipulated in clause 10.

13.0. Award of Class:


A candidate who becomes eligible for the award of B. Tech. Degree
as stipulated in Clause 12 shall be placed in one of the following
Classes.
First Class With Distinction : 70% aggregate* or more.
First Class : 60% aggregate or more but less than 70%.
Second Class : 50% aggregate or more but less than 60%
Pass Class : All other candidates eligible for the award
of the
Degree.

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* "Aggregate", for this purpose, shall mean aggregate of the marks
obtained in the University Examinations and Sessional marks put
together in all the four years.
14.0. Improvement of Class:
14.1. A candidate, after becoming eligible for the award of the Degree,
may reappear for the University Examination in any of the theory
subjects as and when conducted, for the purpose of improving the
aggregate and the class. But this reappearance shall be within a
period of two academic years after becoming eligible for the award!
of the Degree.
However, this facility shall not be availed of by a candidate who has
taken the Original Degree Certificate. Candidates shall not be
permitted to reappear either for Sessional Examination or for
University Examinations in Practical subjects (including Project Viva-
voce) for the purpose of improvement.

14.2. The Sessional marks and the University Examination marks shall be
shown separately on the Marks Sheet.
14.3. A single Marks Statement shall be issued to the candidate after
incorporating the marks secured in subsequent improvements.
14.4. A consolidated Marks Statement shall be issued to the candidate
indicating the aggregate percentage of marks of all the four years
along with the Provisional Certificate.
15.0. Award of Rank:
The rank shall be awarded based on the following:
15.1. Ranks shall be awarded in each branch of study for the top ten
percent of the students appearing for the Regular University
Examinations or the top ten students whichever is higher.
15.2. Only such candidates who pass the Final year examination at the
end of the fourth academic year after admission as regular final year
students along with the others in their batch and become eligible for
the award of the Degree shall be eligible for the award of rank.
Candidates who lose one or more years for any reason whatsoever
are not eligible for the award of rank.
15.3. For the purpose of awarding rank in each branch, the aggregate of
marks - University Examination and Sessional marks put together -
in all the four years, secured at the first attempt only shall be
considered.
Students who might have attempted to improve their marks by
appearing at subsequent examinations even after passing any
subject shall also be eligible for the award of rank based on their
first attempt marks.
15.4. Award of prizes, scholarships, or any other Honours shall be based
on the rank secured by a candidate, consistent with the desire of the
Donor, wherever applicable.
16.0. Supplementary Examinations:

15
In addition to the Regular University Examinations held at the end of
each academic year I each semester, Supplementary University
Examinations will be conducted during the academic year. Such of
the candidates taking the Regular / Supplementary .University
examinations as Supplementary candidates may have to take more
than one University Examination per day.
17.0. Transitory Regulations:
17.1. Candidates who studied the four-year B. Tech. Degree Course under
New Regulations (NR) / Revised Regulations (RR) but who got
detained in any year for want of attendance / minimum aggregate
sessional marks may join the appropriate year / semester in the
Semester system applicable for the batch and be governed by the
Regulations of that batch from then on.
17.2. University Examinations according to NR / RR shall be conducted in
subjects of each year five times after the conduct of the last set of
regular examinations under those Regulations.
17.3. Candidates who have gone through the entire course of four
academic years and have satisfied the attendance and minimum
aggregate sessional marks in each year under NR / RR, but who
have yet to pass some subjects even after the five chances stated in
Clause 17.2, shall appear for the equivalent subjects in the
Semester system, specified by the University / Board of Studies
concerned.
18.0. Amendments to Regulations:
The University may, from time to time, revise, amend or change the
Regulations, Schemes of Examinations and Syllabi.

16
BT-101 MATHEMATICS-I
(Common to all Branches)

Lectures: 3 Periods/ week Sessional Marks:


30
University Exam. : 3 hrs University Exam. Marks
: 70

Unit -1
Ordinary differential equations - Formation - Separable equations - Exact equations
- Integrating factors - Linear first order differential equations - Bernoulli's equation
- Orthogonal trajectories.
Linear equations of higher order with constant coefficients –Oscillations of a
spring - L.C.R. Circuits. (20
Periods)

Unit - II
Linear dependence of solutions - Method of variation of parameters -Equations
reducible to linear equations - Cauchy's homogeneous linear equation -
Legendre's linear equation - Simultaneous linear equations with constant
coefficients.
Statistics: Normal distribution - Method of least squares –Correlation - linear
regression. (20
Periods)

Unit - III
Laplace Transforms: Transforms of elementary functions –Properties of L.T.
existence conditions - Inverse transforms – transforms of integrals - Multiplication
by tn division by t – Convolution theorem Application to ordinary differential
equations. (20 Periods)

Unit - IV
Partial Differential Equations: Formation - Solutions of p.d.e -Equations
solvable by direct integration - Linear equations of the first order - Non linear
equations of the first order - Charpit's method -Homogeneous linear equations with
constant coefficients, Non-homogeneous linear equations.
(15 Periods)

Text Book:
1. Higher Engineering Mathematics by B.S. Grewal

Reference Books:
1. Advaned Engineering Mathematics by Erwin Kreyszig
2: A text book on Engineering Mathematics by N.P. Bali

17
18
BT-102 MATHEMATICS-II
(Common to all Branches)
Lectures: 3 Periods /week Sessional Marks:
30
University Exam. : 3 hrs University Exam.
Marks : 70

Unit-I
Matrices: Inverse of a matrix by elementary transformations – Rank of a matrix -
Solution of system of linear equations - Eigen values and Eigen Vectors
Cayley-Hamilton theorem (without proof)-Quadratic forms-Hermitian and Skew-
Hermitian matrices. (20
Periods)

Unit-II
Differential Calculus: Rolle's Theorem - Lagrange's Mean Value Theorem -
Taylor's Series (without proof) - Maxima and Minima of functions of two variables
- Lagrange's multipliers - Curvature - radius of curvature.
(15 Periods)

Unit-III
Integral Calculus: Double integrals - Evaluation in Cartesian and Polar coordinates
- Changing the order of integration - Evaluation of areas using double integrals -
Evaluation of triple integrals - Evaluation of volume using triple integrals.
Special Functions: Beta, Gamma functions, Error functions. (20
Periods)

Unit-IV
Scalar and Vector fields - Differentiation of scalar and vector point functions
Directional derivatives - gradient of Scalar fields - divergence and curl
- Line and surface integrals - Green's theorem in a plane
proof) - Gauss's divergence theorem (without proof) - Stoke's theorem
(without proof) (20
Periods)
Text Books:
1. Higher Engineering Mathematics - B.S. Grewal
2. Differential Calculus - Shanti Narayan
Reference Books:
1.Advanced Engineering Mathematics - Erwin Kreyszig
2.A text book on Engineering Mathematics by N.P. Bali

19
BT-103 PHYSICS
(Common to all Branches)
Lectures: 3 Periods/week Sessional Marks: 30
University Exam. : 3 hrs University Exam. Marks :
70

Unit -1
Acoustics: Equation of state of SHM - Energy in SHM - Combination of SHM,
Lissajou's Figures for time periods with ratios 1:1 and 1:2. Equation of Harmonic
Wave - Characteristics of waves. Ultrasonics by Magnetostriction and Piezo
electric oscillator methods - Detection by Acoustic grating and applications of
ultrasonics in medicine and industry - Medical ultrasound.
Optics: Interference - Young's double slit experiment (intensity and fringe width
expressions) - Coherence - Stokes Principle - Interference in thin films • Anti
reflection coatings - Newton's rings (Reflected System), Wedge shaped film -
Michelson's interferometer - Principle and its uses in determination of
wavelength and for resolution of two closely lying wavelengths.
Diffraction: Principle of diffraction - diffraction due to a single slit
(Quantitative treatment) - diffraction grating - dispersive and resolving powers of
a grating.
Polarisation: Polarisation by reflection - Double refraction - Circular and
elliptical polarisation - Nicol Prism - Quarter wave plate - Production and detection
of circular and elliptical polarizations - Optical activity.
(20 Periods)

Unit-II
Electromagnetism: Gauss's law and its applications - Electric potential - Potential
due to a point charge and a charged disc - Capacitor with dielectric. Magnetic
field - Hall effect - Circulating charge and cyclotron principle - Biot-Savart's law-
B for a long wire and circular loop. Electromagnetic induction - Faraday's law -
Lenz's law-Induced - electric fields - Inductance - Displacement current -
Maxwell's equations (qualitative treatment) - Velocity of electromagnetic
waves - Electromagnetic oscillation in LC Circuits-Series RLC Circuits –
Resonance. (15 Periods)
Unit - III
Modern Physics: Blackbody radiation - Quantum nature of radiation - Einstein's
theory of photo electric effect - Compton effect - matter waves - de Broglie's
concept - Electron waves - Davisson and Germer experiment. Heisenberg's
Uncertainty principle and applications. Schrodinger's wave equation (one
dimensional) - Physical significance of the wave function - Application of
Schrodinger's wave equation to particle in a box. Nuclear radiation detectors - G.M.
counter - Scintillation counter and solid state detector. Radio-isotopes and
applications in industry and medicine.
Elementary concepts of MB, BE and FD statistics (no derivations) - Fermi-
Dirac distribution function.
Semiconductor Physics: Energy bands in solids - Conductor,
Semiconductor and insulator, p-type and n-type semiconductors - Fermi
level - Basic concept of P-N Junction. (20
Periods)

Unit - IV
ADVANCED APPLICATIONS:

20
Lasers and Fiber Optics: Spontaneous emission, stimulated emission
-Population inversion - Solid state (Ruby) laser- Gas (He-Ne) laser -Semiconductor
(Ga As) laser - Applications of lasers. Fiber optics - Types of optical fibres -
Numerical aperture - Fiber optics in communications. Holography and its
applications.
Super Conductivity: Meissner effect - Types of superconductors and their
applications - High temperature superconductors.
Opto Electronic Devices: Kerr and Faraday effects -Photo diode and photo
transistor characteristics - LED and LCD - Applications to display devices.
Alternate Sources of Energy: Nuclear power generation - Solar energy and
photovoltaic generation - Solar cell and its efficiency. Advanced materials in
Nuclear engineering and Space engineering.
(20 Periods)

Books Recommended:
1. Physics part I and II - Halliday and Resnick.
2. Optics-A.Ghatak.
3. Engineering Physics - M.Arumugam ;
4. Concepts of modern physics - A.Beiser,
5. Physics of semiconductor devices - S.M.Sze.
6. Energy sources - G.D. Rai
7. Super conductivity - T.V.Ramakrishnan & C.N. R.Rao
8. Nuclear radiation detectors - V.S. Ramamurthy& S.S. Kapoor.
9. Science of Engineering Materials - C.M.Srivastava & C.Srinivasan
10. Physics for Engineers - M.R. Srinivasan

21
BT-104 CHEMISTRY
(Common to all Branches except Chemical Engineering)
Lectures: 3 Periods/week Sessional Marks: 30
University Exam. : 3 hrs University Exam. Marks :
70

Unit – 1
Water technology: Various impurities in water – WHO standards of water –
Purification of water for Municipal Supply – Sedimentation, Coagulation and
filtration – Sterillisation and disinfection of Water – Hardness of Water – Estimation
by EDTA method – Boiler troubles due to hard water Softening of water – Methods :
lime – Soda process and demineralization – desalination of brackish water methods
– Electrodialysis and reverse osmosis. (18)

Unit – 2
Solid State Chemistry: Crystal systems, Bravais lattices, Bragg’s equation
(derivation excluded) – Ionic solids, radius ratio – Coordination number – Shape of
Crystals, Metallic bonding – Electron sea model.

Types of Crystals – point defects – Band theory of Solids – Conductors, semi


conductors and insulators.

Polymer Chemistry: Polymers – Definition, macro molecule, resin, plastic,


eiastomer – classification of polymers – polymerization process – Mechanism of free
radical, cationic, anionic and coordination polymerization – Addition polymerization
– examples – condensation polymerization – examples – Thermoplastics and
thermosetting plastics – compounding of plastics. Ethyl cellulose, PVC, Teflon,
Bakelite, urea formaldehyde, polyester.

Unit – 3
Rubber: Introduction – Natural rubber, drawbacks of natural rubber – vulcanization
– synthetic rubber – Buna-S, Buna-N, GR-M, polyurethane rubber.

Electro Chemistry: Review of the concepts of electrode potential, Electro


chemical series and its importance, Galvanic series, Nemst equation (Derivation
excluded) and problems related (simple substitution), EMF of reversible cells,
Reference electrodes – calomel electrode, glass electrode, determination of pH
using glass electrode.

Electro chemistry of the three most common battery systems -primary batteries
-zinc-carbon battery, secondary batteries - lead -acid battery, nickel - cadmium
battery, modern lithium batteries-Advantages and applications. Electro Chemistry
of lithium batteries based on organic solvents.
Fuel Cells: Concept of fuel cell, E.g. H2-O2 alkaline fuel cell. (19
Periods)
Unit – 4
Corrosion and Prevention: Introduction - Corrosion by purely chemical reactions
- Electro Chemical Theory of corrosion, Corrosion due to dissimilar metals,
Corrosion due to differential aeration cells.
Types of Corrosion - Galvanic Corrosion, Pitting Corrosion, Water - Line Corrosion,
Inter Granular Corrosion, Stress Corrosion, Thermo Galvanic Corrosion,
Microbiological Corrosion - Factors Affecting Corrosion.

22
Protection against corrosion - Prevention by proper design and material selection,
Cathodic protection - Impressed current method -Sacrificial anodes - Anodizing -
corrosion Inhibitors - Electroplating (principle, requirements method, surface
preparation, applications).

Materials Used in Information Technology : Liquid crystals polythiophene,


Cellulose acetate, silicon metal -Germanium, Gallium arsenide - Gallium phosphide
Arsenic - boron - Iron oxide (Feo) – Iron Sulphide (FeS) - Zinc Oxide (Zno) -
Cadmium sulphide (CdS) - Cesium -
Lithium - Ferric Chloride (FeCI3). (19
Periods)

Text Books:
1.Engineering Chemistry by P.O. Jain, Dhanpat Rai & Sons, New Delhi.
2.Essentials of Physical Chemistry by B.S. Bahl and G.D. Tuli.
3.Engineering Chemistry by S.S. Dara.
4.Chemistry of Engineering Materials, C. V. Agarwal.
5.Text book of Engineering Materials, M.S.N. Raju.

23
BT-105 ENGLISH
(Common to all Branches)
Lectures: 2 Periods / week Sessional Marks:
30
University Exam. : 3 hrs University Exam. Marks :
70

TECHNICAL ENGLISH COMMUNICATION SKILLS

Objectives: This course endeavors to appraise the learners of different aspects of


authentic communication in real life situations. The areas of technical communication
assay to make learners linguistically aware and communicatively competent. Special
attention has been paid to the contemporary tests on language and industrial
needs keeping in mind the current societal demands.
Unit-I (16
Periods)
General Communication Skills: This area exposes the learners to some standard
varieties of linguistic communication.
(a) Guided composition
(i)Paragaraph writing
(ii) Rephrasing
(iii) Essay
(b)Reading Comprehension
(c)Letter writing (Indented letter writing)

Unit-II (16
Periods)
Technical Communication Skills: This area falls under English for Specific Purposes
(ESP) which trains the learners in basic technical communication.
(a)Report writing (Informational, Analytical and Special)
(b)Corporate Information
(c)Technical words
(d)Information processing and presentation
Unit-III (10
Periods)
Vocabulary and Basic Language Skills: This unit offers the learners sc basic
aspects of language like vocabulary, structure and usage which are common to
many contemporary tests.

Basic word list (a list of 1000 words will be given which are frequently given in many
standard examinations)
Unit – IV (8 Periods)
(a)Idioms and phrases and their use
(b)Correction of sentences and sentence completion

Course Material:

24
Sources:
1.English for Engineers and Technologists. Skills Approach volume
I & II (Orient Longman).
2.College writing Skills with Readings - John Langan (McGraw Hill
International)
3.Reading Comprehension for TOEFL (penguin)
4.Paragraph writing - Schaum Series

Reference:
1.Dictionary of technical Terms F S Cripsin (Oxford I B H)
2.Collins Cobuild Dictionary for usage
3.Harrap's Dictionary of Idioms
4.Modern English Usage - Michael Swan
5.McGraw Hill's Hand Book of English
6.Cambridge preparation Guide for TOEFL
7.Monarch's preparation manual for TOEFL Business Communication by John
Jortside.

25
BT-106 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING WITH C
(Common to all Branches)
Lectures: 2 Periods I week Sessional Marks:
30
Tutorial: 1 Period/Week University Exam. Marks : 70 University
Exam. : 3 hrs

NOTE: The programming exercises pertaining to each unit are given at the end of
each unit.
Unit – I (18
Periods)

Character set, Variables, Keywords, Data types and sizes, Type qualifiers, Numeric
Constants and their forms of representation, Character Constants, String
Constants, Declarations and Initialization of variables.
Arithmetic operators and expressions, Type-conversion rules, Coercion,
Assignment operators and expressions, Increment and decrement operator,
Conditional operator, Statements, Preprocessor directives, Input/ Output functions
and other library functions.
Relational operators and expressions. Boolean operators and expressions.
Blocks, If-Else statement, Else-lf statement and Switch statement.
Programming Exercises for Unit I :
C-Expressions for algebraic expressions, Evaluation of arithmetic and boolean
expressions. Syntactic errors in a given program, Output of a given program, Values
of variables at the end of execution of a program fragment, Filling the blanks in
a given program, Computation of values using scientific and Engineering
formulae, Finding the largest of three given numbers, Computation o discount on
different types of products with different ranges of discount Finding the type of
triangle formed by the given sides, Computation o income-tax, Computation of
Electricity bill, Conversion of lower case character to its upper case, Finding the
class of an input character.

Unit – II (20
Periods)
While loop, For loop, Do-While loop, Break, and continue.
Functions, Parameter passing mechanism, Scope rules, Storage Classes Multi-file
compilation, and Recursion.
Programming Exercises for Unit - II:
Sum of the digits of a given number, Image of a given number, To find whether a
given number is-prime; Fibonacci; abundant; perfect;
deficient, Prime factors of a given number, Computation of Statistical parameters
of a given list of numbers, Counting the number of characters, words and lines in a
given text, Table of values of f (x,y) varying x and y, Graphic patterns, To print
prime numbers and Fibonacci numbers in a given range, and Amicable numbers.

Unit – III (19


Periods)
One - dimensional and character arrays, Two-dimensional numeric arrays.
Pointers, Character arrays and pointers, Dynamic memory allocation of arrays,
Pointer arrays and Command-line arguments.

26
Programming Exercises for Unit - III:
Homer method, An interactive program to perform array operations - insertion;
deletion; print, Insertion sort, Bubble sort, Binary search, Merging of lists,
Transpose of a matrix, Product and sum of matrices, String processing-length of
a string; comparison of strings; reversing a string; copying a string, Sorting of
names using pointer arrays.

Unit – IV (18 Periods)


Structures, Arrays of structures, Pointers to structures, Unions, Sequential file
processing.
Programming Exercises for Unit - IV:
Operations on complex numbers, operations on rational number (p/q form), Matrix
operations with size of the matrix as a structure.
Frequency count of keywords in an input program, Sorting a list of birth records on
name and date of birth using static and dynamic allocation, Student marks
processing, Library records processing - sorting on name, author.

Text Book:
1. Programming with C (Schaum's Outlines) by Byron Gottfried, Tata Mcgraw-Hill.
Reference Books:
1.The C programming language by Kernighan B W and Ritchie O M,
Prentice Hall.
2.Programming with C by K R Venugopal & Sudeep R Prasad, TMH.

27
BT-107 ENGINEERING MECHANICS
(Common to all Branches except Chemical Engineering)
Lectures: 3 Periods / week Sessional Marks: 30
Tutorial: 1 Period/Week University Exam. Marks : 70 University Exam.: 3hrs

NOTE : Only Chapter 5 - on "Forces in Space" - to be dealt in Vector notation.

Unit – I: (25
Periods)

1.Introduction:
(2)
What is Mechanics, Fundamental concepts and principles, Systems of Units, Conversion
from one system of Units to another, Method of problem solution, Numerical accuracy

2. Force In a Plane:
(10)
a)Concurrent Forces: Resultant and Equilibrium of coplanar forces. Introduction, Force
on a particle, Resultant of two forces, Resultant of several concurrent forces, Resolution
of a force into components, Rectangular components of a force. Addition of forces by
summing X and Y components, Equilibrium of a particle, Newton's first law of motion,
Problems involving the equilibrium of a particle, Free-Body diagram.
b)Moment of a force about a point: Introduction, External & Internal forces, Principle
of transmissibility. Equivalent forces, Moment of a force about a point, Varignon's theorem.
c)Equilibrium in two dimensions: Introduction, Free-Body diagram, Reactions at
supports and connections for a two-dimensional structure, Equilibrium of a rigid body in
two dimensions, Definition of statistical indeterminacy, Equilibrium of a two-force body.

3. Analysis of Structures: (7)


Introduction, Definition of a Truss, Simple Trusses, Analysis of Trusses by the method of
Joints, Analysis of Trusses by the method of Sections.

4. Friction: (6)
Introduction, The laws of dry friction. Coefficients of friction, Angle of friction,
Problems involving dry friction, Wedges.

Unit – II
(25)

5. Forces in Space:
(12)

a) Space Forces: Resultant

Rectangular components of a force in space, force defined by its magnitude and


two points on its line of action. Addition of concurrent forces in space. Equilibrium
of a practice in space.

b) Space Forces: Method of Moments

28
Vector products expressed in terms of rectangular components, Moment of force
about a point, Varighon’s theorem, Rectangular components of the moment of
force, Scalar product of two vectors, Mixed triple product of three vectors,
Moment of a force about a given axis, Moment of a couple, Equivalent couples,
Addition of couples, Couples may be represented by vectors, Resolution of a
given force into a force at origin and a couple, Reduction of a system of forces to
one force and one couple, Equivalent systems of forces, Further reduction of a
system of forces.

c) Space Forces: Equilibrium in three dimensions

Reactions at supports and connections for a three-dimensional structure,


Equilibrium of a rigid body in three dimensions.

6. Distributed forces: Centroids and centres of gravity


(6)

Introduction:

Areas and lines

Centre of gravity of a two-dimensional body, Centroids of areas and lines, First


moments of areas and lines, Composite plates and wires, Determination of
centroids (by integration), of Triangle, Quarter ellipse, Spandrel (y=kxn), Circular
sector and circular arc. Theorems of Pappus-Guldinus, Distributed loads on
beams.

Volumes:

Centre of gravity of a three-dimensional body. Centroid of a volume, Composite


bodies, Determination of centroids of volumes by integration.

7. Moments of Inertia of Area:


(7)

Introduction, Second moment, or Moment of inertia of an area, Determination of


the moment of inertia of an area of common geometric shapes, by integration,
Polar moment of inertia, Radius of gyration of an area, Parallel axis theorem,
moment of inertia of composite areas, product of inertia, Principal axis, and
Principal moments of inertia.

Unit – III
(26)

8. Method of Virtual Work: (4)

Introduction, work of a force, Principle of virtual work, Applications of the


principle of virtual work for ideal systems.

29
9. Kinematics of Particles :
(14)

Rectilinear motion of particles:

Introduction to Dynamics, Displacement, Velocity and Acceleration Determination of


the motion of a particle, Uniform rectangular motion Accelerated rectangular motion,
Motion of several particles, Graphical solution of rectilinear motion problems, Other
graphical methods.

Curvilinear motion of particles:


Displacement, velocity and acceleration, rectangular components of velocity and
acceleration, projectiles, tangential and normal components, radial and transverse
components.
10. Kinetics of Particles :
Newton's Second Law : (8)
Introduction, Newton's second law of motion, linear momentum of a particle. Rate of
change of linear momentum systems of units, equations of motion, dynamic equilibrium.

Unit - IV: (24


Periods)
11. Kinetics of Particles : Energy and Momentum Methods :
(10)

Introduction, Work of a force, Kinetic energy of a particle: Principle of work and energy,
Applications of the principle of work and energy, Potential energy, Conservation of energy,
Principle of impulse and momentum, Impulsive motion, Impact, Direct central impact.
12. Moments of Inertia of
Masses:
(5)
Moment of inertia of a mass, Parallel-axis theorem, Moments of inertia of thin plates,
Determination of the moment of inertia of a three dimensional body by integration.
13. Dynamics of Rigid
Bodies:
(9)
Introduction to kinematics of rigid bodies, Translation, Rotation about a fixed axis.
Equations defining the rotation of a rigid body about a fixed axis, Introduction to kinetics
of rigid bodies, Equations of motion for a rigid body.

Text Books:
Vector Mechanics for Engineers, Volume-l: Statics; Volume-ll: Dynamics, by P.P. Beer &
E.R. Johnston, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited.

References:
1.Engineering Mechanics by S.P. Timoshenko and D.H. Young
2.Engineering Mechanics, Statics and Dynamics by F.L.Singer
3.Engineering Mechanics by Meriam and Kraig. S

30
31
BT-108 ENGINEERING GRAPHICS
(Common to all Branches)
Lectures: 2 Periods I week Sessional Marks:
30
Drawing: 4 Period/Week University Exam. Marks : 70 University
Exam. : 3hrs
(To be taught & examined in First angle projection)

Unit – l
General: Use of Drawing instruments, Lettering - Single stroke letters,
Dimensioning, Representation of various type lines – Geometrical
Constructions. (2+4)
1.Scales: Construction and use of plain and diagonal scales. (3
+6)
2.Curves: Curves used in Engineering practice - conic sections –general construction
method for ellipse, parabola and hyperbola. Special methods for conic sections;
cycloidal curves - cycloid, epi-cycloid and hypo-cycloid; involute of circle and
Archemedian spiral. (10+20)

Unit – II
3. Method of Projections: Principles of projection - First angle projection and third
angle projection of points and straight lines. Traces of lines.
(10+18)
4.Projection of Planes: Projections of planes, projections on auxiliary planes.
(5+8)

Unit – Ill
5.Projections of Solids: Projections of simple solids such as Cubes, Prisms,
Pyramids, Cylinders and Cones with varying positions.
(5+12)
6. Sections of Solids: Sections of solids such as Cubes, Prisms, Pyramids,
Cylinders and Cones, true shapes of sections. (Limited to the Section Planes
perpendicular to one of the Principal Planes)
(4+6)

Unit - IV
7.Development of Surfaces: Lateral development of cut sections Cubes Prisms,
Pyramids, Cylinders and cones. (7+6)
8.Interpenetration of Solids: Inter penetration of Prism in Prism, (Treatment
is limited to triangular & square prisms) and Cylinder in cylinder with their axes
perpendicular. (4+6)

Unit - V
9. Orthographic Projections: Conversion of pictorial views into
orthographic views. (Treatment is limited to simple castings).
(2+6)
10.Isometric Projections: Isometric Projection and conversion of
orthographic Projections into isometric views. (Treatment is limited to simple
objects only). (4+8)

32
Text Book:
1. Elementary Engineering Drawing by N.D. Bhatt & V.M. Panchal. (Charotar
Publishing House, Anand).
Reference Book:
1. Text Book on Engineering Drawing by Prof. K. L. Narayana & Prof. P.
Kannaiah.

Note: University Examination Question paper consists of FIVE questions, TWO


questions from each unit, with internal choice.

33
BT-151 PHYSICS LABORATORY
(Common to all Branches)
Lectures: 2 Periods I week Sessional
Marks:25
University Exam.: 3 hrs University Exam. Marks
: 50

LIST OF EXPERIMENTS

Not less than fifteen experiments must be completed during the academic year:

1. Compound pendulum – measurement of ‘g’.


2. Lissajous figures – calibration of audio oscillator.
3. Determination of damping coefficient of a medium by logarithmic
decrement – Torsional pendulum.
4. Determination of dispersive power of the prism using spectrometer and
mercury light.
5. Diffraction grating – Measurement of wavelength.
6. Newton’s Rings – Measurement of wavelength of sodium light.
7. Measurement of thickness of a foil using wedge method.
8. Brewster’s Law – Verification.
9. Fibre optics – Numerical aperture calculation.
10. Optical measurements with laser.
11. Determination of band gap of a semiconductor.
12. Determination of e / m of an electron by Thomson’s method.
13. Measurement of temperature coefficient of resistance-Carey Foster’s
bridge.
14. Sensitive galvanometer – Figure of merit.
15. Hall effect – Measurement of Hall potential.
16. Photo tube – Study of V-I characteristics, determination of work function
and Planck’s constant.
17. Variation of magnetic field along the axis of a current-carrying circular coil.
18. AC Sonometer – Determination of line frequency.
19. LCR circuit – Resonance.
20. Characteristics of Geiger – Muller tube.
21. Solar cell – Determination of Fill Factor.

34
35
BT-152 CHEMISTRY LAB
(Common to all Branches)
Lectures: 2 Periods I week Sessional
Marks:25
University Exam.: 3 hrs University Exam. Marks
: 50

LIST OF EXPERIMENTS

1.Determination of temporary, permanent hardness of water by


EDTA method
2.Determination of total alkalinity of water
3.Determination of chlorides in water - argentometry
4.Determination of available chlorine in bleaching powder
5.Determination of percentage purity of washing soda
6.Estimation of Mohr's salt by permanganometry
7.Estimation of Mohr's salt by dichrometry
8.Estimation of copper in brass
9.Estimation of calcium in lime stone by permanganometry
10.Determination of zinc by EDTA method.
11.Estimation of electrolytic strength of acid in a lead-acid battery
12.Determination of calcium in cement by volumetric method

DEMONSTRATION EXPERIMENTS
13.PH metric titrations
14.Conductometric titrations
15.Analysis of materials by spectrophotometry
16.Colorimetric analysis
17.Potentiometric titrations

36
BT-153 WORKSHOP
(Common to all Branches)
Lectures: 2 Periods / week Sessional Marks:
25
University Exam.: 3 hrs University Exam. Marks
: 50

1. Carpentry
To make the following jobs with hand tools
a)Lap joint .
b)Lap Tee joint
c)Dove tail joint
d)Mortise & Tenon joint
e)Cross-Lap joint
2. Welding using electric arc welding process/gas welding. The following
joints to be welded.
a)Lap joint
b)Tee joint
c)Edge joint
d)Butt joint
e) Corner joint
3. Sheet metal operations with hand tools.
a)Safe edge
b)wired edge
c)lapseam
d)grooved seam
e)funnel
4. House wiring
a)To connect one lamp with one switch
b)To connect two lamps with one switch
c)To connect a fluorescent tube
d)Staircase wiring
e)Godown wiring
5. Lathe machining
a)Step cutting
b)Thread cutting

37
BT-154 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING LAB
(Common to all Branches)
Lectures: 3 Periods /week Sessional Marks:
25
University Exam.: 3hrs University Exam.
Marks: 50

List of programs (to be recorded)


1.A menu driven program to display the characteristics of a number
(prime, fibonacci, perfect.......)
2.A program for electricity bill taking different categories of users,
different slabs in each category.
3.A menu driven program to display statistical parameters (mean,
mode, median, variance, standard deviation)
4.A menu driven program to compute sin x, cos x, tan x using series evaluation
with options
(i) number of terms, (ii) precision.
5. A menu driven program with options (using array)
(i) to insert an element into array
(ii) to delete an element
(iii) to print elements
(iv) to print elements in reverse order
(v) to sort elements (vi) to remove duplicates
6. A menu driven program with options (using two dimensional array)
(i) to read a matrix
(ii) to print the matrix
(iii) to find transpose of matrix
(iv) to interchange two specified rows
(v) to find position of biggest and smaller elements
7. A program to compute the determinant of a square matrix
8. A menu driven program with options (two dimensional array)
(i) to compute A+B
(ii) to compute A-B
(iii) to compute A x B
(iv) to compute B x A
(v) to check A = B
Where A and B are matrices. Conditions related to size to be tested
9. A menu driven program with options
(i) to insert a student name
(ii) to delete a name
(iii) to sort names in alphabetical order
(iv) to print list of names
(v) to print names having maximum length, min. length
10. Problem 5 with dynamic memory allocation and pointer expressions
11. Problem 6 with dynamic memory allocation and pointer expressions.
12. A menu driven program with options - sorting with different methods,
searching, merging (using pointers)
13. Create a student data file (roll no., name, date of birth, rank) and code a
program with options (use pointers)
(i) listing names, dob sorted on names
(ii) listing names, dob sorted on dob
(iii) listing names, dob sorted on names, dob
14. A program to count the frequencies of words in a given file.
38
CS/IT 211 MATHEMATICS- III

UNIT-I

FOURIER SERIES: Introduction, Euler's Formulae, Conditions for a Fourier


expansion, Functions having points of discontinuity, change of interval, odd and
even functions, Expansions of odd and even periodic functions, Half - range
series, typical wave forms, Parseval's formula, complex form of Fourier series,
practical Harmonic analysis.

UNIT-II

INTEGRAL TRANSFORMS: Introduction, Definition, Fourier integrals, Fourier sine


and cosine integrals - complex form of Fourier integrals. Fourier transforms,
Fourier sine and cosine transforms - Finite Fourier sine and cosine transforms,
Fourier transforms of the derivatives of a function.

Solution of Algebraic and Transcendental Equations : Introduction, Bisection


method, Iteration method, Method of false position, Newton - Raphson method,
Solution of simultaneous linear equations - Gauss elimination and Gauss - Seidel
iterative methods.

UNIT-III

INTERPOLATION : Introduction, Finite Differences - Forward, Backward, Central


Differences, Symbolic Relations, Differences of a polynomial, Newton's formula
for interpolation, Central difference interpolation formulae -Gauss's, Sterling’s,
Bessel's formulae Interpolation with unequal intervals - Lagrange's and Newton's
Interpolation formulae.

Numerical Differentiation - finding first and second order differentials using


Newton's formulae.

UNIT-IV

NUMERICAL INTEGRATION - Trapezoidal rule, Simpson's rule and Gauss


quadrature formula.

Numerical solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations - Euler's


method, Taylor's series method Picard's method. Runge - Kutta method of 4th
order (for first order equations only), Boundary value problems, Solution of
Laplace's and Poisson's equations by iteration methods.

Textbooks:
1. B.S.Grewal, ‘Higher Engineering Mathematics’, 36th edition, Khanna Publishers,Delhi.
2. S.S.Sastry, ‘Introductory Methods of Numerical Analysis’, PHI,New Delhi.

Reference Books:
1. Erwin Kreyszig, ‘Advanced Engineering Mathematics’. New Age International (P) Ltd.
Wisely
Eastern Ltd.
2. M.K.Jain, S.R.K.lyengar, R.K.Jain, ‘Numerical Methods for Scientific and Engineering
Computation’ Wisely Eastern Ltd.,

39
3. M.K.Venkata Raman, ‘Engineering Mathematics’, 5th edition, The National Publishing
Co.,
Chennai.

40
CS/IT 212 BASIC ELECTRONICS

UNIT-I

SEMICONDUCTOR DIODES : Semiconductor Diode, Resistance levels, Diode


Equivalent circuits, Zener diodes, Load line Analysis, Series diode configurations
with D.C Inputs, Half-Wave rectification, Full-Wave rectification, Clippers and
Clampers.

BIPOLAR JUNCTION TRANSISTOR: Transistor construction, Transistor operation,


Common base configuration. Transistor amplifying action, Common emitter
configuration, Common collector configuration, Operating Point, Fixed Bias
circuit, Emitter Stabilized Bias circuit, Voltage divider Bias, Transistor h-
parameter model, Analysis of transistor amplifier using h-parameters.

UNIT-II

UNIPOLAR DEVICES: Construction and characteristics of JFETs, Transfer


characteristics. Depletion type MOSFETs, Enhancement type MOSFETs, Fixed bias
configuration, Self-bias configuration, FET small signal model. Source Follower
Circuit, Common Gate circuit, Uni junction Transistor

OPTICAL DEVICES: Light Emitting Diodes, Liquid Crystal Display, Photo Diodes,
Photo Conductive Cells, Solar Cells, Principles of Cathode Ray Tube.

UNIT-III

FEEDBACK AND OSCILLATOR CIRCUITS: Feedback concepts. Feedback


-Connection types, Barkhaussen Criteria, Phase-Shift Oscillator, Wien Bridge
Oscillator, Harteley Oscillator, Colpitts Oscillator.

POWER AMPLIFIERS: Amplifier types, Series-fed Class A Amplifiers, Class B


Amplifier operation, Class C and D Amplifiers.

UNIT-IV

OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS: Differential and Common Mode operation, Op-Amp


basics. Op-Amp specifications, Voltage Summing, Voltage Buffer, Differentiator
and Integrator.

LINEAR I.C’s - Timer IC unit operation. Voltage Controlled Oscillator.


VOLTAGE REGULATORES: I.C. Voltage regulators,

Textbooks:
1. Robert Boylestad and Louis Nashelsky, ‘Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory’, 6th
Edition,PHI
2. NN Bhargava & Kulasresta, ‘Basic Electronics’, Tata McGraw Hill Pubs.

Reference Books:
1. Milliman & Halkies, ‘Integrated Electronics’, Tata McGraw Hill Pubs.
2. S.Salivahanan & Vallavaraj, ‘Electronic Devices & Circuits’, Tata McGraw Hill Pubs.

41
CS/IT 213 DIGITAL LOGIC DESIGN

UNIT – I :
Review of Number systems & codes, Representation of integers and
Floating point numbers, Accracy. Introduction to integer arithmetic
operations.

BOOLEAN ALGEBRA AND LOGIC GATES: Basic Definitions, Axiomatic


definition of Boolean Algebra, Basic theorems and Properties of Boolean
Algebra, Boolean functions, Canonical and Standard Forms, Other
operations, Digital Logic Gates.

SIMPLIFICATION OF BOOLEAN FUNCTIONS: The Map Method, Two and three


variable Maps, Four-variable Map, Five and six-variable Maps, Product of
Sums Simplification, NAND and NOR implementation, other two-level
implementations, Don't-Care conditions, The Tabulation Method,
Determination of Prime Implicants, Selection of Prime-lmplicants.

UNIT – II
COMBINATIONAL LOGIC: TTL family, Volatage levels, Positive and negative
logics., Design Procedure, Adders, Subtractors, Code Conversion, Analysis
Procedure,

COMBINATIONAL LOGIC WITH MSI AND LSI: Binary Parallel Adder, Decimal
Adder, Magnitude Comparator, Decoders, Multiplexers.

UNIT – III
SEQUENTIAL LOGIC : Flip Flops, Triggering of Flip-Flops, Sequential
machines; Classification, Synchronous and Asynchronous machines.
Synthesis and Analysis of Clocked Sequential Circuits, State tables and
State diagrams. State Reduction and Assignment, Flip-Flop Excitation
tables, Design Procedure, Design of Counters, Design with state equations.

Introduction to Asynchronous Sequential circuits, synthesis and flow


tables. Minimization and realizations. Introduction to races and Hazzards.

UNIT – IV
REGISTES, COUNTERS Registers, Shift Registers, Ripple Counters,
Synchronous Counters, Timing Sequences.

Memories : Classification of ROMs, Eproms, EEProms, RAMs, Staic and


Dynamic Memories.

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC : Read – Only Memory (ROM), Programmable Logic


Device (PLD), Programmable Logic Array (PLA), Programmable Array Logic
(PAL).

Text Book : Donald e Givone, Digital principles and Design, TMH

Reference Books:
1. M.Morris Mano, ‘Computer Engineering Hardware Design’, PHI.
2. M.Morris Mano, ‘Digital Logic and Computer Design’, PHI.

42
CS/IT 214 : DATA STRUCTURES

Unit – I:
Algorithm Analysis: Mathematical Back Ground, Model, What to Analyze,
Running Time Calculations.

Lists: Abstract Data Types, The List ADT, Singly Linked List ADT, Doubly Linked
List ADT, Circular Linked List ADT, Polynomial ADT.

Unit – II:
STACKS AND QUEUES: The Stack ADT and its applications such as Infix to
Postfix expression conversion, Evaluation of Postfix expressions, Delimeter
Matching. The Queue ADT, The Circular Queue ADT.

Searching: Linear and Binary Searching.

Unit – III:
Internal Sorting: Preliminaries, Insertion Sort, Shell Sort, Heap Sort, Merge Sort,
Quick Sort, Bucket Sort, Comparision of Sorting interms of Timing Complexities.

Unit – IV:
Binary Trees: Implementation, Expression Tress.
Search Trees: Binary Search Trees, Implementation.
AVL Trees : Single Rotations, Double Rotations.
Splay Trees: A Simple Idea, Splaying, B-Trees, B+Trees.

TEXT BOOK:
1. Mark Allen Weiss, “Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C”, Second
Edition, Pearson Education.

REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Langsam, Augenstein & Tenenbaum, ‘Data Structures using C and C++’,
2nd Edition, Pearson Education.
2. Robert L.Kruse, Leung and Tando, ‘Data Structures and Program Design in
C’, PHI.

43
CS/IT 215 : OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING

Unit – I

Introduction to OOPS :
The origins of C++, What is Object Oriented Programming?, Some C++ fundamentals, A
Closer look at Headers & Name Spaces, Introducing C++ Classes, Function overloading,
Operator overloading, Inheritance, Constructors & Destructors, Two new Data types.

A closer look at Classes & Objects :


Parameterized Constructors, Friend functions, Default function arguments.
Classes & Structures are related, Unions & classes are related, Inline functions, Passing
objects to functions, Returning objects, Object assignment, Arrays of objects, Pointers to
objects.

Unit-II

Function & Operator Overloading:


Overloading constructor functions, Localizing variables, Function overloading &
Ambiguity, Finding the address of an overloaded function, The this Pointer, Operator
overloading, References, Using reference to overload a unary operator, Overloading [],
overloading ( ),Applying operator overloading.

Inheritance, Virtual Functions and polymorphism:


Inheritance and the access specifiers, Constructors and Destructors in derived classes,
Multiple Inheritance, Passing parameters to a basic class, Pointers and references to
derived types, Virtual Functions, Why virtual functions?, Pure virtual functions and
abstract types, Early Vs Late binding.

Unit-III

The C++ 1/0 Class Library:


C++ streams, The C++ Stream classes, Creating your own inserter and extractors,
Formatting I/O, Creating your own manipulator functions, File I/O, Unformatted and Binary
I/O.

Miscellaneous C+ + topics:
Dynamic allocation using new and delete, static class members, Virtual base classes,
const member functions and mutable, volatile member functions, Using the asm
keyword, linkage specification, The .* and ->* operators, Creating conversion functions,
Copy constructors, Granting access, namespaces, Explicit constructors, typename and
export, Differences between C and C++.

Unit - IV

Templates: Generic Functions, Generic classes

Exceptions: Exception Handling, fundamentals, options The uncaught_exception(),


Applying exception Handling, and RTTI, casting operators

The standard Template Library and the String Class: An overview of the STL

Text Book:
1. The Complete Reference - Borland C++Builder - Herbert Schieldt.

Reference Books:
1. C++ - How to Program – Dietel & Dietel
2. Programming in C++ - Barkakati

44
3. Starting out with OOP in C+ + - Tony Gaddis, Tndy Walters, Godfrey Murganda
Dreamtech Publishing.
4. Mastering C++ By K.R.Venugopal, TMH.

45
CS/IT216 : ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

CORE MODULE SYLLABUS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Unit 1: The Multidisciplinary nature of environmental studies


Definition, scope and importance
Need for public awareness. (10
lectures)
Natural Resources: Renewable and non-renewable resources :
Natural Resources and associated problems.
a) Forest resources: Use and over-exploitation, deforestation,
case studies. Timber extraction, mining, dams and their
effects on forests and tribal people.
b) Water resources: Use and over-utilization of surface and
ground water. floods, drought, conflicts over water, dams-
benefits and problems.
c) Mineral resources: Use and exploitation, environmental effects
of extracting and using mineral resources, case studies.
d) Food resources: World food problems. changes caused by
agriculture and overgrazing, effects of modern agriculture,
fertilizer-pesticide problems, water logging, salinity, case
studies.
e) Energy resources: Growing energy needs, renewable and non
renewable energy sources, use of alternate energy sources.
Case studies.
f) Land resources: Land as a resource, land degradation, man
induced landslides, soil erosion and desertification.

• Role of an individual in conservation of natural resources.


• Equitable use of resources for sustainable lifestyles.
Unit 2: Ecosystems (14 Lectures)
. Concept of an ecosystem.
. Structure and function of an ecosystem.
. Producers, consumers and decomposers.
. Energy flow in the ecosystem.
. Ecological succession.
. Food chains, food webs and ecological pyramids.
. Introduction, types, characteristic features, structure and function of the
following
ecosystem :-

a. Forest ecosystem
b. Grassland ecosystem
c. Desert ecosystem
d. Aquatic ecosystems (ponds, streams, lakes, rivers, oceans,
estuaries)
Biodiversity and its conservation
. Introduction - Definition: genetic, species and ecosystem diversity.
. Biogeographical classification of India.

46
. Value of biodiversity: consumptive use, productive use, social, ethical,
aesthetic and option values.
. Biodiversity at global, National and local levels. . India as a mega-
diversity nation.
. Hot-spots of biodiversity.
. Threats to biodiversity: habitat loss, poaching of wildlife, man- wildlife
conflicts.
. Endangered and endemic species of India.
. Conservation of biodiversity: In-situ and Ex-situ conservation of
biodiversity.

Unit 3 : Environmental Pollution (15


Lectures)
Definition
. Causes, effects and control measures of;-
a. Air pollution
b. Water pollution
c. Soil pollution
d. Marine pollution
e. Noise pollution
f. Thermal pollution
g. Nuclear hazards
. Solid waste Management: Causes, effects and control
measures of urban and industrial wastes.
. Role of an individual in prevention of pollution.
. Pollution case studies.

. Disaster management: floods, earthquake, cyclone and


landslides.
Social Issues and the Environment
. From Unsustainable to Sustainable development
. Urban problems related to energy
. Water conservation, rain water harvesting, watershed
management
. Resettlement and rehabilitation of people; its problems and
concerns.
Case studies.
. Environmental ethics :
. Issues and possible solutions.
. Climate change, global warming, acid rain, ozone layer
depletion, nuclear accidents and holocaust. Case studies.
. Wasteland reclamation.
. Consumerism and waste products.
. Environment Protection Act.
. Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act.
. Water (Prevention and control of Pollution) Act
. Wildlife Protection Act . Forest Conservation Act
. Issues involved in enforcement of environmental legislation.
. Public awareness.

47
Unit 4 : Human Population and the Environment (6
Lectures)
. Population growth, variation among nations.
. Population explosion - Family Welfare Programme.
. Environment and human health.
. Human Rights.
. Value Education.
. HIV / AIDS.
. Women and Child Welfare.
. Role of Information Technology in Environment and human
health.
. Case Studies.

Field work
. Visit to a local area to document environmental assets-river /
forest / grassland / hill mountain
. Visit to a local polluted site – Urban / Rural / Industrial /
Agricultural
. Study of common plants, insects, birds.
. Study of simple ecosystems-pond, river, hill slopes, etc. (Field
work Equal to 5 lecture hours)
REFERENCES:
1. Agarwal, K.C.2001 Environmental Biology, Nidi Publ. Ltd. Bikaner.
2. Bharucha Erach, The Biodiversity of India, Mapin Publishing Pvt. Ltd.
, Ahmedabad - 380 013, India, Email: mapin@icenet.net (R)
3. Brunner R.C., 1989, Hazardous Waste Incineration, McGraw Hill
Inc.480p
4. Clark R.S., Marine Pollution, Clanderson Press Oxford (TB)
5. Cunningham, W.P.Cooper, T.H.Gorhani, E & Hepworth, M. T.2001,
Environmental Encyclopedia, Jaico Publ. House, Mumbai, 1196p
6. De A.K., Environmental Chemistry, Wiley Eastern Ltd.
7. Down to Earth, Centre for Science and Environment (R)
8. Gleick, H.P. 1993. Water in crisis, Pacific Institute for Studies in Dev.,
Environment & Security. Stockholm Env. Institute. Oxford Univ.
Press. 473p
9. Hawkins R.E, Encyclopedia of Indian Natural History, Bombay
Natural History Society, Bombay (R).
10. Heywood, V.H & Watson, R.T. 1995. Global Biodiversity Assessment.
Cambridge Univ. Press 1140p.
11. Jadhav, H & Bhosale, V.M. 1995. Environmental Protection and Laws.
Himalaya Pub. House, Delhi 284 p.
12. Mckinney, M.L. & Schocb. R.M. 1996. Environmental Science
systems & Solutions, Web enhanced edition. 639p.
13. Mhaskar A.K, Matter Hazardous, Techno-Science Publications (TB)
14. Miller T.G. Jr., Environmental Science, Wadsworth Publishing Co. (TB)
15. Odum, E.P. 1971. Fundamentals of Ecology. W.B.Saunders Co. USA,
574p
16. Rao M N.& Datta, A.K. 1987. Waste Water treatment. Oxford & IBH
Publ. Co. Pvt.Ltd. 345p.
17. Shamla B.K., 2001. Environmental Chemistry. Goel Publ. House,
Meerut.
18. Survey of the Environment, The Hindu (M)
19. Townsend C., HarperJ, and Michael Begon, Essentials of Ecology,
Blackwell Science (TB)

48
22. Trivedi R.K., Handbook of Environmental Laws, Rules, Guidelines,
Compliances and Standards, Vol I and ll, Enviro Media ( R )
23. Trivedi R.K. and P.K. Goel, Introduction to air pollution, Techno-
Science Publications (TB)
24. Wagner K.D.,1998. Environmental Management. W.B. Saunders Co.
Philadelphia, USA 499p

(M) Magazine (R) Reference (TB) Textbook

49
CS/IT 221 MATHEMATICS – IV

UNIT-I

Complex Analysis: Introduction, continuity, Cauchy-Riemann equations. Analytic


functions, Harmonic function, Orthogonal systems

UNIT-II

Complex integration, Cauchy's integral theorem, Cauchy's integral formula,


Poisson’s integral formula, Taylor's series, Laurent's series, Zeros and
singularities.

UNIT-III

Residue theorem, calculation of residues, evaluation of real definite integrals (by


applying the residue theorem)

Series solutions of differential equations: Introduction, series solution, validity of


series solution, general method (Frobenius method), forms Of Series solution.

UNIT-IV

Series solution of Bessel's and Legendre’s equation. Recurrence formulae,


generating functions, Rodrigue's formula. Orthogonality of Bessel's functions and
legendre polynomials.

Textbook:
1. B.S.Grewal, ‘Higher Engineering Mathematics’, 36th edition, Khanna
Publishers,Delhi.

Reference Books:
1. Erwin Kreyszig, ‘Advanced Engineering Mathematics’. New Age International (P)
Ltd. Wisely Eastern Ltd.

50
CS/IT 222 CIRCUIT THEORY

UNIT-I

INTRODUCTION : The unit of charge, Voltage, Current, Power and Energy, Circuit
Elements; Circuit concept, Resistance, Inductance and capacitance, KVL and KCL,
Series and parallel combination of network elements types of sources, energy
stored inductors and capacitors.

METHODS OF ANALYSING CIRCUITS: Mesh analysis, Nodal analysis, Source


transformations.

UNIT-II

NETWORK THEOREMS: Star-Delta transformation, Superposition Thevenin,


Norton, Reciprocity, compensation, Maximum power, Tellagan and Application of
theorems to DC & AC circuits

ALTERNATING PERIODIC WAVEFORMS: Instantaneous current, voltage and power,


peak, effective and average voltage and current, Crest factor and form factor,
phase and phase difference.

SINUSODIAL STEADY STATE ANALYSIS: ‘J’ notation and phasor representation.


Response of RLC, series, parallel and series parallel circuits to sinusoidal
excitation, computation of active, reactive and complex power, power factor.

UNIT-III

TWO-PORT NETWORK: Two-port Network, Open circuit impedance (Z), short


circuit admittance (Y), Hybrid parameters.

RESONANCE: Series and parallel resonance, selectivity, bandwidth and Q of


tuned circuits. Time constant

UNIT-IV

POLYPHASE CIRCUITS: Polyphase system, Advantages of three phase systems,


Generation of 3-phase voltages, phase sequence, interconnection of 3 phase
sources and loads, star to delta and delta to star transformation. Voltage,
current and power in star and delta connected systems, 3-phase balanced
circuits.

Textbooks:
1. William H, Hayt & Jack E. Kemmerly, ‘Engineering Circuit Analysis’, 5th edition, McGraw
Hill Co.
2. A.Sudhakar & S.P.Shyammohan, ‘Circuits & Networks : Analysis and Synthesis’, 2nd
edition,
Tata McGraw Hill Co.
3. Edminister, ‘Electric Circuits’, 3rd edition, Schaum Series, Tata McGraw Hill Pubs.

Reference Books:
1. M.E.Vanvalkanberg, ‘Network Analysis’, 3rd edition, PHI,New Delhi
2. F.F.Kuo & Franklin,F, ‘Network Analysis & Synthesis’, 2nd edition, Johnwiley Pubs.

51
CS/IT 223 COMPUTER ORGANISATION

UNIT-I

REGISTER TRANSFER AND MICRO-OPERATIONS: Register Transfer Language,


Register Transfer, Bus and memory Transfers, Arithmetic Micro-operations, Logic
Micro-operations, Shift Micro-operations, Arithmetic Logic Shift Unit.

BASIC COMPUTER ORGANIZATION AND DESIGN: Instruction codes, Computer


Registers, Computer Instructions, Timing and Control, Instruction cycle, Memory-
Reference Instruction, Input-Output and Interrupt, Design of Basic Computer,
Design of Accumulator Logic.

UNIT-II

MICRO PROGRAMMED CONTROL: Control Memory, Address Sequencing, Micro-


Program example, Design of Control Unit.

CENTRAL PROCESSING UNIT: General register Organization, Stack Organization,


Instruction Formats, Addressing Modes, Data Transfer and Manipulation, Program
Control, Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC).

UNIT-III

COMPUTER ARITHMETIC: Addition and Subtraction, Multiplication Algorithms,


Division Algorithms Floating-point Arithmetic operations.

MEMORY ORGANIZATION: Memory Hierarchy, Main Memory, Auxiliary memory,


Associative Men Cache Memory, Virtual Memory, Memory Management
hardware.

UNIT-IV

INPUT-OUTPUT ORGANIZATION: Peripheral Devices, Input-output Interface,


Asynchronous Data Transfer, Modes of Transfer, Priority Interrupt, Direct Memory
Access (DMA),Input-Output Processor, Serial Communication.

Textbook:
Morris M. Mano, ‘Computer Systems Architecture’, 3rd edition, (Chapters: 4,5,7 to 13).

Reference Books:
1. John P Hayes, ‘Computer Architecture and Organization’, 2nd edition.
2. V.Carl Hamacher et.al, ‘Computer Organization’ 2nd edition.

52
CS/IT 224 DISCRETE MATHEMATICAL STRUCTURES

UNIT-I

Foundations: Sets, Relations & functions, Proof & Problem Solving, Fundamentals
of Logic, Logical Inferences, Methods of Proof of an implication, First Order Logic
& Other methods of proof, Rules of Inference and quantified propositions.

UNIT-II

Mathematical Induction, Elementary Combinations, Basics of counting,


Combinations and permutations with & without repetitions, Fuzzy sets.

UNIT-III

Recurrence relations, Generations Functions, Recurrence relations, Solving


recurrence relations, The methods of characteristics roots

UNIT-IV

Relations & Digraphs, Relations & Directed graphs, Equivalence relations,


Ordering relations, Lattics & enumerations, Operations on Relations, Paths &
Closures, Directed graphs & Adjacency matrices

Textbook:
1. Joe L.Mott, Abrabam Kandel & Theodore P.Bakev, ‘Discrete Mathematics for
Computer Scientists & Mathematics’ PHI.

REFERENCE BOOKS
1. C.L.Liu, ‘Elements of Discrete Mathematics’
2. Rosen, ‘Discrete Mathematics’

53
CS/IT 225 : FILE STRUCTURES

Unit – I:

Hashing: General Idea, Hash Function, Separate Chaining, Open Addressing,


Rehashing, Extendible Hashing.

Graph Algorithms: Definitions, Topological Sort.

Unit – II:

Shortest-path Algorithms: Unweighted Shortest paths, Dikstra’s Algorithm,


Acyclic Graphs, All-Pairs shortest-path, A simple maximum-flow Algorithm.
Minimum Spanning Trees: Prim’s Algorithm, Kruskal’s Algorithm.

Applications of Depth-First Search: Undirected Graphs, Biconnectivity, Euler


Circuits, Directed Graphs, Finding Strong Components.

Unit – III:

File Structures: Fundamental File Processing Operations.


Secondary Storage and System Software.
Fundamental File Structure Concepts.
Managing files of records.

Unit – IV:

Indexing, Cosequential, Processing and the sorting of Large Files.

Text Books:

1. Mark Allen Weiss: “Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C”, Second
Edition, Pearson Education.
2. MiChael J.Folk: “File Structures” An Object Oriented Approach with C++,
Pearson Education.

Reference Books:

1. Langsam, Augenstein & Tenenbaum, “Data Structures Using C and C++”, 2nd
Edition, Pearson Education.

54
CS/IT 226 MICROPROCESSORS

UNIT-I

1. An introduction to Micro-Computers and Micro-Processors: Objectives,


Computers. 8086, 80186, 80188 & 80286 Microprocessors, 8086 internal
Architecture, Introduction to programming the 8086.

2. 8086 Family Assembly Language Programming: Program development


steps, Constructing the machine codes for 8086 instructions, Writing
Programs for use with an Assembler, Assembly language Program
development tools

3. 8066 Assembly Language Programming Techniques; Practice with simple


sequence programs, Flags, Jumps and WHILE-DO implementation. REPEAT-
Until implementation and examples Debugging Assembly Language
Programs.

UNIT-II

4. If-Then-Else Structures, Procedures and Macros. If -Then. If-then-Else and


Multiple If-Then-Else Programs, Writing and using procedures, Writing and
using Assembler Macros

5. 8086 Instruction Descriptions and Assembler directives: Instruction


descriptions. Assembler directives

UNIT-III

6. 8085 Systems Connections and Timing: 8086 Hardware review, Addressing


Memory and ports in Micro-computer Systems

7. Interrupts and Interrupt Service Procedures. 8085 Interrupts and interrupt


Responses, Hardware Interrupt applications.

UNIT-IV

8. Multiple Micro-Processor Systems and Buses: The 8086 Maximum mode.


Direct Memory Access (DMA) data transfer, Interfacing and Refreshing
Dynamic RAM, The 80186 and 80188 Processors with integrated
peripherals. The 8087 Main Coprocessor, Multiple Bus Micro Computer
Systems.

Textbook :
1. Douglas V.Hall, ‘Micro-processors and Interfacing Programming and Hardware’, 2nd
edition, Tata McGraw Hill Pubs.

Reference Book:
1. Brey, ‘Intel Microprocessor’s-The 8086, 8088, 80186, 80286, 80386, 80486
Architecture, Programming & Interlacing’, 4th edition, PHI.
2. Liu Gibson, ‘Microcomputer System Design – Using 8086,8088,’

55
CS/IT 311 OPERATING SYSTEMS

UNIT–I

Introduction : Definition, Simple Batch System, Multi-programmed Batched


Systems, Time Sharing Systems, Personal Computer System, Parallel System,
Distributed System, Real-time System.
Computer-System Structure : Operation, I/O Structure, Storage Structure, Storage
Hierarchy, Hardware Protection, General System Architecture.
Process : Concept, Process Scheduling, Operation on Processes, Co-operating
Processes, Threads, Inter-process Communication.

UNIT–II

CPU Scheduling : Concepts, Scheduling Criteria, Algorithm, Multiple-Process


scheduling, Real time Scheduling, Inter-process communication.
Process Synchronization : Background, Critical-Section Problem, Synchronization
Hardware, Semaphores, Classical problem of synchronization, Critical Region,
Monitors, Synchronization in Solaris, Atomic transaction.

UNIT–III

Deadlock : Model, Characterization, Methods for Handling Deadlocks, Prevention,


Avoidance, Detection, Recovery, Combined Approach to Deadlock Handling.
Memory Management : Background, Logical Vs. Physical Address space,
Swapping, Contiguous Allocation, Paging, Segmentation, Segmentation with
paging.

UNIT–IV

Virtual Memory : Background, Demand Paging, Performance of Demand Paging,


Page Replacement, Page Replacement Algorithm, Allocation of frames,
Thrashing, Other Consideration, Demand Segmentation.
File Systems Interface : Concept, Access methods, Direct Structure Protection,
Consistency, Semantics.
File-System Structure, Allocation Methods, Free Space Management, Directory
Implementation, Efficiency & Performance, Recovery.

Textbook:
1. Silberschatz & Galvin, ‘Operating System Concepts’, 5th edition, John Wiley & Sons
(Asia) Pvt.Ltd.,2001.

Reference Books:
1. Charless Crowley, ‘Operating Systems : A Design-Oriented Approach’, Tata McGraw
Hill Co.,1998 edition.
2. Andrew S.Tanenbaum, ‘Modern Operating Systems’, 2nd edition,1995, PHI.

56
IT 312 : AUTOMATA THEORY & FORMAL LANGUAGES

UNIT-I

FINITE AUTOMATA & REGULAR EXPRESSIONS :

Finite State Systems; Basic Definitions; Non-Deterministic Finite Automata;


Finite Automata with E-Moves; Regular Expressions;
Finite Automata with output

UNIT-II

PROPERTIES OF REGULAR SETS

The Pumping Lemma for regular sets; Closure Properties of Regular Sets;

Design Algorithms for regular sets; The MYHILL – NERODE Theorem and
minimization of Finite Automata

CONTEXT FREE GRAMMARS : Context Free Grammars; Derivation Trees;


Simplification of context free grammars

UNIT-III

Chomsky Normal Form; Greibach Normal Form; Pushdown Automata;

Informal Description; Definitions; Pushdown Automata Context Free Languages;


Properties of Context Free Languages; The Pumping Lemma For CFL’s

UNIT-IV

Closure Properties of CFL’s; Decision Algorithms for CFL’s

TURING MACHINES : Introduction; The Turing Machine Model; Computable


Languages and functions; Techniques of Turing Machine Construction;

UNDECIDABILITY: Properties of Recursive and Recursively Enumerable


Languages; Universal Turing Machines (without any reference to undecidable
problems)

Textbook:
1. John E Hopcroft & Jeffery D Ullman’ ‘Introduction to Automata Theory & Languages
and Computation’, Narosa Publishing House.

Reference Books:
1. Cohen, ‘Computer Theory’,
2. KLP Mishra & N.Chandrasekharan, ‘Theory of Computation’, PHI.

57
IT 313 PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES

UNIT-I

Preliminaries : Reasons, Programming Domains, Language: Evolution Criteria,


Categories, Design Trade-offs, Implementation, Programming Environments,
Evolution of Programming Languages.
Describing syntax and Semantics : General Problems, Describing Syntax, Recursive
Descent Parsing, Attribute Grammar, Dynamic Semantics.
Primitive data types and variables : Names, variables, Concept of Binding, Type
checking, Strong typing, Type compatibility, Named Constants, Variable Initialization.

UNIT-II
Scope and Extent : Scope, Scope and Life Time, Referencing Environments.
Data Types : Primitive, character string, User-defined, Array, Associative Arrays, Record,
Union, Set, Pointer.
Expression and the Assignment Statement : Arithmetic Expressions, Overloading,
Type Conventions, Relational and Boolean, Short Circuit, Assignment, Mixed mode
Assignment.
Statement level Control Structures : Compound, Selection, Iterative Statements,
Unconditional Branching, Guarded Commands.

UNIT-III
Subprograms : Fundamentals, Design Issue, Local Referencing Environment, Parameter
Passing, Parameters that are sub-program names, Overloaded Sub-programs, Generic,
Separate and Independent Compilation, Design Issues for functions, Non-local
environments, User Defined Overloaded Operators, Co routines.
Implementing Subprograms : Fortran 77, Algol-like languages, Blocks, Dynamic
Scoping, Implementing Parameters that are sub-program names.
Data Abstraction : Concepts, Encapsulation, Data, Introduction, Design Issues,
Examples, Parameterized Abstract Data Types.

UNIT-IV
Symmetric and Concurrent Subprograms : Support for Object Oriented
Programming, Design Issues, Smalltalk, Support for Object Oriented Programming in ;
C++, Java, ADA 95, Implementation
Concurrency : Sub-program level, Semaphores, Monitors, Message Passing,
Concurrency in ADA 95, Java Threads, Statement level concurrency.
Exception handling : Introduction, Exception Handling in : PL1, ADA, C++, Java.

Textbook:
1. Robert W.Sebesta, ‘Concepts of Programming Languages’, Addison Wesley Longman
Inc.,199.

Reference Books:
1. Ellis Horowitz, ‘Fundamentals of Programming Languages’, Galgotia Publications (P)
Ltd., 1994.
2. Pratt Terrence.W, ‘Programming Languages, Design & Implemented’ Prentice Hall of
India, 1993.

58
IT 314 COMPUTER GRAPHICS

UNIT-I

Geometry and line Generation : Introduction – Lines – Line segments –


Perpendicular lines – Distance between a point and a line – vectors – Pixels and
Frame buffers – vector generation – Bresenhams Algorithms – Antialiasing of lines
– Thickline segments – character generation – Displaying the frame buffer –
Exercises – Programming problem.

Graphic Primitives : Graphics primitives – Introduction – Display devices –


primitive operations – The display – File interpreter – Normalized device co-
ordinates – Display file structure – Display file algorithms – Display control – Text
– The line style primitive – Exercises – Programming problems.

UNIT-II

Point Plotting Techniques : Co-ordinate systems – Incremental Methods Line


drawing algorithms – The symmetrical DDA – The simple DDA – Bresenhams
Algorithms – Circle generators – Exercises.

Line drawing displays : Display devices and controllers – Display devices – CRT –
Inherent memory devices – Storage tube display – Refresh line drawing display.

UNIT-III

Polygons : Introduction – Polygons – Polygons representation – entering polygons


– Inside test – Polygon interfacing algorithms – Filling polygons – Exercises –
Programming problems.

Segments : Introduction – segment table – segment creation – closing a segment


– Deleting a segment – Renaming a segment – Visibility – Image transformation –
Other display file structure.

UNIT-IV

Transformation : Introduction – Matrices – Scaling transformations – Sine and Cos


– Rotations – Homogeneous coordinates and translation – Co-ordinate
transformations – Rotation about an Arbitrary point – Other transformations –
Inverse transformations – Transformation routines – Exercises – Programming
Problems.

Windowing and Clipping : Introduction – The viewing transformations – viewing


transformation implementations – clipping – the Cohen – Sutherland outcode
algorithm – the Sutherland – hodgman algorithm – the clipping of polygons –
adding clipping to the system – generalized clipping – position relative to an
arbitrary line – multiple windowing – exercises – Programming problems.
Textbooks:
1. Steven Harrington, ‘Computer Graphics – A Programming Approach’, 2nd
edition.Tata McGraw Hill Co.
2. W.M.Newman & RF Sproull, ‘Principles of Interactive Computer Graphics’, 22nd
edition. (Unit: II, 3 & 4 chapters), Tata McGraw Hill Co.
Reference Books:
1. Foley & Vandam et al, ‘Computer Graphics’, 2nd edition in C, Pearson Education
Asia.
2. Donald Hearn & M.Pauline Baker, ‘ Computer Graphics’,2nd edition, PHI.

59
60
CS/IT 315 DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

UNIT-I

1. Databases and Database users.


2. Database systems concepts and Architecture.
3. Data Modeling using the Entity-Relationship model.

UNIT-II

4. The Relational Data Model, Relational constraints, and the Relational


Algebra.
5. SQL-The Relational Database Standard.
6. ER and EER – to – Relational mappings, and other Relational languages.

UNIT-III

7. Functional Dependencies and Normalizations for Relational Databases.


8. Relational Database Design Algorithms and Further Dependencies.
9. Database system Architectures and the system catalog.

UNIT-IV

10.Transactions Processing Concepts.


11.Concurrency Control Techniques.

Textbook:
1. Elmasri and Navathe, ‘Fundamentals of Database Systems’, 3rd edition,
Addison Wesley, Pearson Education,Inc.2000.

Reference Books:
1. Bipin C.Desai, ‘An Introduction to Database Systems’, West Publishing
Company,2000.
2. CJ Date, ‘An Introduction to Database Systems’, 6th Edition, Addison Wesley
Longman Inc-1999.

61
IT 321 SYSTEM SOFTWARE

UNIT – I
Introduction to IBM 360/370 machine structure – Data Formats – Instructions –
Registers, Design of Assembler – Pass1 & Pass2.

Simple one pass Macro Processor , One Pass Macro Processor handling macro
calls within macro definition, Implementation of macro processor within an
assembler.

UNIT – II
Loaders. Text Editors, Debugging systems

UNIT – III
General Overview of the UNIX system, Introduction to the kernel, Buffer Cache,
Internal representation of files.

UNIT- IV
System calls for the file system
I/O subsystem
Inter process communication

Text Books:
1. ‘Systems programming ‘ by John J. Donovan (Tata Mc Graw Hill Edition)
2. UNIX Operating system design – by BACH (PHI)

Reference Books:
1. ‘Systems Programming’ by DM Dhamdhere (Tata Mc Graw Hill Edition )
2. ‘ Unix Programming concepts & Applications’ by Sumitha Bha Das, Tata McGraw-Hill.

62
IT 322 COMPILER DESIGN

UNIT-I

Introduction to compilers; Lexical Analysis :- the role of lexical analyzer, A simple


approach to the design of lexical analyzer, lex tool; Parsing :- Top – down parsing.

UNIT-II

Predictive parser; Automatic Construction of efficient parsers; YAAC tool.

UNIT-III

Syntax – Directed Translation, Record Structures & Procedure calls, Symbol


tables.

UNIT-IV

Run – time storage administration – Implementation of simple stack allocation


scheme, Implementation of block – structured languages; Error detection and
recovery, Code Generation: A simple code generator.

Textbook:
1. Aho, Ravi Sethi, JD Ullman, ‘Compilers Principles, Techniques and Tools’,
Addison-Wesley Publishing Co.
2. Alfred V.Aho, Jeffrey D. Ullman, ‘Principles of Compiler Design’, Narosa
Publishing.

Reference Books:
1. Allen I.Holub, ‘Compiler Design in C’, PHI.

63
CS/IT 323 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

UNIT-I

INTRODUCTION TO SOFTWARE ENGINEERING:

The Evolving Role of Software, Software, The Changing Nature Of Software,


Legacy Software, Software Myths.

A GENERIC VIEW OF PROCESS:

Software Engineering - A Layered Technology, A Process Framework, The CMMI,


Process Patterns, Process Assessment, Personal and Team Process Models, Process
Technology, Product and Process.

PROCESS MODELS:

Prescriptive Models, The Waterfall Model, Incremental Process Models,


Evolutionary Models, Specialized Process Models, The Unified Process

AN AGILE VIEW OF PROCESS:

What Is Agility? , What Is an Agile Process? , Agile Process Models.

UNIT-II

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING PRACTICE:

Software Engineering Practice, Communication Practices, Planning Practices,


Modeling Practices, Construction Practice, Deployment.

SYSTEM ENGINEERING:

Computer-Based Systems, The System Engineering Hierarchy, Business Process


Engineering: An Overview, Product Engineering: An Overview, System Modeling.

REQUIREMENTS ENGINEERING:

A Bridge To Design and Construction, Requirements Engineering Tasks, Initiating


the Requirements Engineering Process, Eliciting Requirements, Developing Use-
cases, Building the Analysis Model, Negotiating Requirements, Validating
Requirements.

BUILDING THE ANALYSIS MODEL:

Requirements Analysis, Analysis Modeling Approaches, Data Modeling Concepts,


Flow-Oriented Modeling, Creating a Behavioral Model.

UNIT-III

DESIGN ENGINEERING:

Design within the Context of Software Engineering, Design Process and Design
Quality, Design Concepts, The Design Model, Pattern-Based Software Design.

CREATING AN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN:

64
Software Architecture, Data Design, Architectural Styles and Patterns,
Architectural Design, Assessing Alternative Architectural Designs, Mapping Data
Flow into Software Architecture.

MODELING COMPONENT-LEVEL DESIGN:

What Is a Component? , Designing Class-Based Components, Conducting


Component-Level Design, Designing Conventional Components.

PERFORMING USER INTERFACE DESIGN:

The Golden Rules, User Interface Analysis and Design, Interface Analysis,
Interface Design Steps, Design Evaluation.

UNIT-IV

TESTING STRATEGIES:

A Strategic Approach to Software Testing, Strategic Issues, Test Strategies for


Conventional Software, Test Strategies for Object-Oriented Software.

TESTING TACTICS:

Software Testing Fundamentals, Black-Box and White-Box Testing, White-Box


Testing, Basis Path Testing, Control Structure Testing, Black-Box Testing, Object-
Oriented Testing Methods, Testing Methods Applicable at the Class Level,
Interclass Test Case Design, Testing for Specialized Environments, Architectures,
and Applications, Testing Patterns.

PRODUCT METRICS:

Software Quality, A Framework for Product Metrics, Metrics for the Analysis Model,
Metrics for the Design Model, Metrics for Source Code, Metrics for Testing, Metrics
for Maintenance.

Text Book:

1. Roger S.Pressman, 'Software Engineering- A Practitioner's Approach', Sixth


Edition, McGraw-Hill International.

Reference Books:

1. Ian Sommerville, 'Software Engineering', Sixth Edition, Pearson Education.

2. Carlo Ghezzi, Mehdi Jazayeri, Dino Mandrioli, 'Fundamentals of Software


Engineering', Second Edition, PHI.

3. RajibMall, ‘Fundamentals of Software Engineering’, Second Edition, PHI.

65
CS/IT-324 DATA COMMUNICATIONS

UNIT – I

Data Communications and Net Working overview, Protocol Architecture, Data


Transmission, Guided Transmission Media, Wireless Transmission Media.

UNIT – II

Signal Encoding Techniques, Digital Data Communication Techniques.

UNIT – III

Data Link Control, Multiplexing.

UNIT – IV

Local Area Network Over view, High speed LANs

TEXT BOOK

1) Data and Computer Communications, 7/e, William Stallings, Pearson Education

REFERENCE BOOKS

1) Introduction to Data Communications and Networking, May 2004, Wayne Tomasi, PHI
2) Data Communications, Computer Networks & Open systems, 4/e, Fred Halsall,
Pearson Education, Asia.

66
IT 325 OPERATIONS RESEARCH

UNIT-I

Introduction to Operation Research: Introduction, Modeling in Operations


Research, Phases of OR study, Scope of OR.
Linear Programming and its Applications: Linear Programming Problem –
Graphical solution of LP Problem. Simplex method, Revised Simplex method, Dual
Simplex method.

UNIT-II

Transportation and Assignment models: Introduction – Methods of basic feasible


solution, Optimality test, Degeneracy in transportation problem, Unbalanced
transportation Problem, Hungarian method for assignment problem, Traveling
salesman problem.
Theory of Games: Introduction, to solve the rectangular two person zero sum
games, solution of rectangular games in terms of mixed strategies, solution of
2x2 games without saddle point, solution of a two person zero sum 2Xn game,
Graphical method for 2Xn and nX2 games.

UNIT-III

Inventory Control: Introduction – EOQ with uniform rate of demand, Economic lot
size with finite rate of replenishment, Quantity discounts, Deterministic model
with Shortages, ABC analysis of inventory.
Dynamic Programming: Introduction, The recursive equation approach,
Computational Procedure in dynamic Programming, An application to inventory
Control.

UNIT-IV

Project Management by PERT/CPM: Introduction, Basic steps in PERT/CPM


techniques, Network diagram presentation, Rules of drawing network diagram,
Fulerson’s rule, Time estimates and Critical path in network analysis, Project
evaluation and review technique, Application areas of PERT/CPM techniques.
Simulation: Introduction, Monte-carlo Simulation, Application to Inventory
Control, Application to Queuing Problems.

Textbooks:
1. SD Sharma, ‘Operations Research (units: I, IV)’ Kedarnath, Ramnath & Co.,Meerut.
2. BS Goel & S.K.Mithal, ‘Operations Research (Units: II,III)’ Pragati Prakasham,
Meerut.

Reference Book:
1. Kanthi Swarup, PK Gupta & Manmohan, ‘Operations Research’ Sultanchand &
Sons, New Delhi.

67
68
CS/IT 326 INTERNET PROGRAMMING

UNIT-I
Introduction to Java
Classes
Inheritance
Packages & Interfaces
Exception handling
Multi threaded programming

UNIT-II
Applet class
Event handling
AWT

UNIT-III
Swing
Java database connectivity
Servlets

UNIT-IV
RMI
Networking
Java Beans

Textbooks:

1. Herbert Schildt, ‘The Complete Reference Java2’, 5th Edition ( Tata McGraw Hill
) (for Units- I and II )

2. Deitel & Deitel ‘JAVA – How to program’ (Pearson Education/PHI) (for Units-III and IV)

69
CS/IT 411 OBJECT ORIENTED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

UNIT - I

Introduction: Overview – Software Engineering Approaches – Visual Modeling – Software


Development Methods – Representation, Process, Techniques and Tool.

Structural Modeling and Analysis: Overview – What is an Object? – What is a Class –


and what are Instances? – Structural Modeling Techniques – Structural Models – Examples
– Summary of UML Notation for Structural Modeling – Structural Analysis – Techniques –
Domain – Modeling and Analysis Process

UNIT – II

Use Case Modeling and Analysis: Requirements Elicitation – Use Case Modeling –
Techniques – Use Case Models. Examples – Use Case Analysis Techniques – Use Case
Modeling and Analysis Process.

Dynamic Modeling and Analysis: Overview – Scenario Modeling Techniques –


Interaction Diagram - Examples of Scenario Modeling – Dynamic Modeling Techniques –
using State Chart Diagrams – Dynamic Analysis Techniques – Dynamic Modeling and
Analysis Process.

UNIT - III
Implementing UML Specification: Introduction – Implementing Class Diagram –
Implementing Persistent Class Using Rational Databases – Implementing Activity
Diagrams – Implementing State Diagrams – Implementing Interaction Diagrams – Case
Study.

UNIT -IV
View Alignment Techniques and Method Customization: Software Development
Methods – Why Traditional Software methods did not work Miracles – Unified Modeling
Language Verses Software Methods – Hurdles in Applying the Object – Oriented Approach
– Current Object – Oriented Development Approaches – View Alignment Techniques –
Method Creation or Customization Using View Alignment Techniques – Method Creation :
A Case study

A Case Study : Applying the Activity Analysis Approach: Overview – The Case
Study – Business Modeling – Requirements – Analysis – Design – Applying the Activity
Analysis Approach with UML.

Text Book:
1. Object Orient Technology by Curtis HK Tsang, Clarence SW LAu, Ying K Leung –
McGraw Hill Publication.

Reference:
1. Object Oriented Systems Development using UML by Ali Bahrami – McGraw Hill
Publication.
2. Introduction to Object Oriented Analysis and Design with UML and the Unified
Process – By Stephen R.Schach - Tata McGraw Hill

70
CS/IT 411 OBJECT ORIENTED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

UNIT - I

What is Object-Orientation: Basic Concepts, The Origins of Object-


Orientation, Object-Oriented Languages Today, Summary; Agate Ltd Case Study
– Introduction, Introduction to Agate, Existing Computer Systems, Business
Activities in the Current System, Summary of requirements;
Modelling Concepts: Models and diagrams, Drawing Activity Diagrams, A
Development Process;
Requirements Capture: User Requirements, Fact Finding Techniques, User
Involvement, Documenting Requirements, Use Cases, Requirements Capture and
Modelling, Agate Ltd Agate Ltd Case study – Requirements Model
Requirements Analysis: What Must a Requirements Model Do?, Use Case
Realization, The Class Diagram, Drawing a Class Diagram, CRC (Class
Responsibility Collaboration) Cards, Assembling the Analysis Class Diagram.
Agate Ltd Case study – Requirements Analysis

UNIT - II

Refining the Requirements Model: Component based development, Adding


further structure, Software development patterns.
Object Interaction: Object Interaction and Collaboration, Interaction Sequence
Diagrams, Collaboration Diagrams, Model Consistency;
Specifying Operations: The Role of Operation Specifications, Contracts,
Describing Operation Logic, Object Constraint Language, Creating an Operation
Specification;
Specifying Control: States and Events, Basic Notation, Further Notation,
Preparing a Statechart, Consistency Checking, Qualify Guidelines;
Agate Ltd Case study – Further Analysis
Moving Into Design: How is Design Different from Analysis?, Logical and
Physical Design, System Design and Detailed Design, Qualities and Objectives of
Analysis and Design, Measurable Objectives in Design, Planning for Design.

UNIT - III
System Design: The Major Elements of System Design, Software Architecture,
Concurrency, Processor Allocation, Data Management Issues, Development
Standards, Prioritizing Design Trade-offs, Design for Implementation;
Object Design: Class Specification, Interfaces, Criteria for Good Design,
Designing Associations, Integrity Constraints, Designing Operations,
Normalization;
Design Patterns: Software Development Patterns, Documenting Patterns-
Pattern Templates, Design Patterns, How to Use Design Patterns, Benefits and
Dangers of Using Patterns;
Human-Computer Interaction: The User Interface, Approaches to User
Interface Design, Standards and legal Requirements;
Designing Boundary Classes: The Architecture of the Presentation Layer,
Prototyping the User Interface, Designing Classes, Designing Interaction with
Sequence Diagrams, The Class Diagram Revisited, User Interface Design
Patterns, Modelling the Interface Using Statecharts;
Agate Ltd Case Study - Design

71
UNIT - IV

Implementation: Software Implementation, Component Diagrams,


Development Diagrams, Software Testing, Data Conversion, User Documentation
and Training, Implementation Strategies, Review and Maintenance;
Reusable Components: Why Reuse?, Planning a Strategy for Reuse,
Commercially Available Componentware, Case Study Example;
Managing Object-Oriented Projects: Resource Allocation and Planning,
Managing Iteration, Dynamic Systems Development Method, Extreme
Programming, Software Metrics, Process Patterns, Legacy Systems, Introducing
Object Oriented Technology;
Systems Development Methodologies: ‘Method’ and ‘Methodology’, Why
Use a ‘Methodology’?, A Brief Historic Review, The Unified Software Development
Process, Participative Design Approaches, Issues in Choosing a Methodology,
Hard versus Soft Methodologies. Notation Summary.

Text Book:
1. Object-Oriented Systems Analysis And Design Using UML – Simon Bennett,
Steve McRobb and Ray Farmer – Tata McGraw-Hill Edition – Second Edition

Reference:
1. James Rumbaugh, Jacobson, Booch, ‘Unified Modeling Language Reference
Manual’, PHI.
2. Jacobson et al., ‘The Unified Software Development Process’, AW, 1999.
3. Atul Kahate, Object Oriented Analysis & Design, The McGraw-Hill Companies,
2004.

72
CS/IT412 COMPUTER NETWORKS

UNIT – 1

Network Layer : Design Issues, Routing Algorithms, Congestion Control


Algorithms, Quality of Services, Internet Working, Network Layer in the
Internet: IP, Protocol, IP Address, Internet Control Protocols : ICMP, ARP, RARP.

UNIT – 2

Transport Layer : Transport Services, Elements of Transport Protocols, Simple


Transport Protocol, Internet Transport Protocols : TCP & UDP.

UNIT – 3

Application Layer : DNS, E-mail, WWW: Architectural Overview, Multimedia:


Introduction to Digital Audio, Audio Compression, Introduction to Video, Video
Compression, Video on Demand.

UNIT – 4

Network Security : Cryptography, Symmetric Algorithms, Public-key Algorithms,


Digital Signatures, Management of Public Keys, Authentication Protocols, E-mail
Security.

Text book:
1. Tanenbaum, ‘Computer networks’ 4th edition

Reference Books:
1. Kurose & Ross, ‘Computer networks – A Top-down Approach Featuring the
Internet’, Pearson Education.
2. Stallings, ‘Cryptography and Network Security – Principles and Practice’ 2nd
edition, Pearson Education.

73
IT 413 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS

UNIT-I

Introduction, Divide and Conquer , The Greedy Method - Knapsack Problem, True
vertex splitting, Job sequencing, Minimum-cost spanning trees, Kruskal’s
algorithm, Optimal storage on tapes, Optimal merge pattern, Single source
shortest paths.

UNIT-II

Dynamic Programming - General method, Multistage graph, All pairs shortest


path,
Single-source shortest path, Optimal Binary search trees, String Editing, 0/1
Knapsack, Reliability design, The traveling salesman problem, Flow shop
scheduling.

UNIT-III

Basic traversal & search techniques - Techniques for binary trees, techniques for
graphs, connected components & spanning trees, Bi-connected components &
DFS.

Back tracking - The General Method, The 8-Queens Problem, Sum of subsets,
Graph coloring, Hamiltonian cycle, Knapsack problem.

UNIT-IV

Branch and Bound - The method, 0/0 Knapsack problem, Traveling salesperson,
Efficiency considerations.

NP hard and NP Complete Problems - Basic concepts, Cook’s Theorem, NP-Hard


Graph problems, NP-Hard Scheduling problem, Some simplified NP-Hard
problems.

Textbook:
1. L Ellis Horwitz, Sartaj Sahni, ‘Fundamentals of Computer Algorithms’, Galgotia Pubs.

Reference Books:
1. Aho, Hopcroft & Ullman, ‘The Design and Analysis of Computer Algorithms’,Addison
Wesley.
2. Thomas H.Corman et al, ‘Introduction to Algorithms’, PHI.

74
CS/IT 414(A) ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

UNIT-I

PROBLEMS, PROBLEM SPACES AND SEARCH: Defining the Problem as a State


space Search, Production Systems, Problem Characteristics, Production system
characteristics, Issues in the Design of Search Programs.
HEURISTIC SEARCH TECHNIQUES: Generate-and-test, Hill Climbing, Best-First
Search, Problem Reduction, Constraint Satisfaction, Means-Ends Analysis.

UNIT-II

KNOWLEDGE REPRESENTATION USING PREDICATE LOGIC: Representing Simple


Facts in logic, Representing Instance and Isa Relationships, Computable
Functions and Predicates, Resolution, Question answering.
REPRESENTING KNOWLEDGE USING RULES - Procedural versus Declarative
Knowledge, Logic Programming, Forward versus Backward Reasoning, Matching,
Control Knowledge.
Semantic Nets

UNIT-III

Conceptual dependency, Scripts.


Hopfield Networks, Perceptrons, Back propagation networks, generalization,
Applications of Neural networks, Expert systems.

UNIT-IV

PROLOG Language: Facts, Objects and predicates, Variables, Rules, Input and
Output, Arithmetic Operations, Cut, Fail, Recursion, string operations, Dynamic
databases, Lists.

Textbooks:

1. Elaine Rich & Kevin Knight, ‘Artificial Intelligence’, 2nd Edition, (Tata
McGraw Hill Edition)
2. Carl Townsend, ‘Introduction to TURBO PROLOG’, BPB Publications.

Reference Books:

1. Patrick Henry Winston, ‘Artificial Intelligence’, Pearson Education,


2. Russel and Norvig, ‘Artificial Intelligence’, Pearson Education, PHI

75
CS/IT 414(B) DISRIBUTED SYSTEMS

UNIT- I
Introduction:-Definition of a distributed system, Goals, Hardware concepts,
Software concepts, The Client-Server model.

Communication:-Remote procedure call- Basic RPC operation, Parameter passing,


Extended RPC models. Remote object Invocation- Distributed objects, Binding a
Client to an object, Static versus Dynamic Remote method Invocations,
parameter passing. Message-oriented Communication: -Persistence and
Synchronicity in communication, Message oriented transient and persistent
communication.

UNIT- II
Processes:- Threads, clients, servers, code migration

Naming:- Naming Entities -Names, Identifiers and addresses, Name resolution,


The implementation of a name space. Locating mobile entities, Removing
unreferenced entities

UNIT- III
Synchronization:-Clock synchronization. Logical clocks, Election algorithms,
Mutual Exclusion.

Consistency and Replication:-Introduction, Data- centric consistency models,


client –centric consistency models, Distribution protocols, Consistency protocols.

UNIT- IV:
Fault tolerance:-Introduction to fault tolerance, Process Resilence, Reliable client-
server communication, Reliable Group Communication, Distributed Commit
,Recovery.

Distributed File Systems:-Sun Network File System, The Coda File System.

Text book:
1. Andrew S.Tanenbaum, Maarten Van Steen “Distributed Systems:
principles and paradigms”, 2002, Pearson Education, PHI.

Reference books:
1. Coulouris, Dollimore, Kindberg, ”Distributed Systems-Concepts and
Design” 3rd edition, Pearson Education.

76
CS/IT 414(C) REAL-TIME SYSTEMS

UNIT – I

Typical Real-Time applications, Hard versus Soft Real-Time systems, A reference


model of Real-Time Systems.

UNIT – II

Commonly used approaches to Real-Time scheduling, Clock-Driven scheduling,


Pros and Cons of Clock-driven scheduling.

UNIT – III

Priority-Driven scheduling of Periodic tasks: static assumption, Fixed-Priority


versus Dynamic-Priority algorithms, Optimality of the RM and DM algorithms, A
schedulability test for Fixed-Priority tasks with short response times and arbitrary
response times, sufficient schedulability conditions for the RM and DM
algorithms;

Scheduling Aperiodic and Sporadic jobs in priority-Driven systems: Deferrable


Servers, Sporadic Servers, Constant Utilization, Total Bandwidth and weighted
Fair-Queuing Servers, Scheduling of sporadic Jobs.

UNIT – IV

Resources and Resources Access Control, Scheduling Flexible computations and


tasks with temporal distance constraints.

Text book:

Jane W.S.Liu, ‘Real-Time Systems’, Pearson Education Asia.

Reference books:

C.M.Krishna and G.Shin, ‘Real-Time Systems’, Tata McGraw Hill Co. Inc., 1997.

77
CS/IT 414(D) MICROPROCESSOR BASED SYSTEM DESIGN

Unit – I
General classification : Device Specific Controller systems, General Purposes
Systems, Introduction to Bus architectures, General principals of firmware
control, control mechanisms. Signals, measurements, feed back, A/D and D/A
convertions, Data Loggers, Time response studies, Time critical systems,
Parameter modeling for control, Adjustability corrections modes – Manual and
Automatic methods, Sensors and interfacing, Storage organization

Unit – II
General principals of Device controllers, Communication Interfaces,
communications – Serial and parallel modes, Block diagram approach, Design
methodology and case studies. Case studies of line printers, dot matrix printers,
Graphic devices, Linear and stepper motor Controls and Applications. Control
Logic and firmware design. Process Control applications, Bandwidth Calculations,
High speed controls, Introduction to ASICs

Unit – III
General Purpose Systems: general Principles and methodology of designing
Computer Systems, General Busses, standards, serial and Parallel
communications, Control logics, Simplex and high end systems.

Unit – IV
Applications like Games, Mobile communications, Domestic Appliances,
Introduction to Fuzzy logic control for smaller units. Add more examples from
automotive industry and test zigs and circuits as additional topics. Interfaces to
General Purpose Computers. Large monitoring systems, Introduction to
Distributed and Networked control applications.

Text Book:
“Microprocessor based system design” by Suprata Ghoshal, Mac Millan Publishers

Reference Books

1. Systems Design with advanced Microprocessors, By John Freer, Wheeler


Publishing, Allahabad
2. Microprocessor Based Design by Michael Slater, PHI, New Delhi
3. Modern processor deisgn, Fundamentals of super scalar processors, John Paul
Shen and Mikko H Lipasti, TMH, New Delhi

78
CS/IT 414(E) VLSI DESIGN

UNIT-I

Introduction to MOS technology, BICMOS technology, Basic Electrical properties


of MOS and BiCMOS circuits- MOS and BiCMOS Circuit design process.
Basic circuit concepts – Sheet resistance, Area capacitance of layers, The delay
units. Scaling of MOS circuit, Scaling models and scaling factors.

UNIT–II

Sub – systems Design and layout – Architectural issues, Switch logic, Gate logic,
Structured design

UNIT–III

Memory Registers system timing consideration-Storage and memory elements.


array of memory cell. Random access memory cell.

UNIT–IV

Introduction to CAD Tools for design and simulation –Test and testability, Ultra
fast VLSI circuits and system. Introduction to Ga-As technology.

Text Book:

1. Pucknell Douglas A., and Kamran Eshraghian, Basic VLSI Design, Third
Ed., PHI, 1995

2. Geiger R.L. Allen P.E., and Stradeer N.R.,VLSI Design Techniques for Analog &
Digital Circuits, MC-Graw Hill Intl. Ed., 1990

79
CS/IT 414(F) IMAGE PROCESSING

Unit – I

INTRODUCTION: Digital Image Processing, Fundamental Steps in Digital


Image Processing, Components of an Image Processing System.
DIGITAL IMAGE FUNDAMENTALS: Elements of Visual Perception, Image
Sensing and Acquisition, Image Sampling and Quantization, Some basic
Relationships Between Pixels.

Unit – II

IMAGE ENHANCEMENT IN THE SPATIAL DOMAIN: Some Basic Gray Level


Transformation, Histogram Processing, Enhancement Using
Arithmetic/Logic Operations, Basics of Spatial Filtering, Smoothing spatial
Filters, Sharpening spatial Filters.
IMAGE ENHANCEMENT IN THE FREQUENCY DOMAIN: Introduction to the
Fourier Transform and the Frequency Domain, Smoothing frequency-
domain Filters, Sharpening frequency-domain Filters, Homomorphic
Filtering, Implementation.

Unit – III

IMAGE RESTORATION: A Model of the Image Degradation/Restoration


Process, Linear, Position-Invariant Degradations, Inverse Filtering,
Minimum Mean Square Error (Wiener) Filtering, Constrained Least Squares
Filtering.
WAVELETS AND MULTIRESOLUTION PROCESSING: Multiresolution
Expansions, Wavelet Transforms in one Dimension, The Fast Wavelet
Transform, Wavelet Transforms in Two Dimensions.

Unit – IV

IMAGE COMPRESSION: Image Compression Models, Error-free


Compression, Lossy Compression, Image Compression Standards.
IMAGE SEGMENTATION: Detection of Discontinuities, Edge Linking and
Boundary Detection, Thresholding, Region-Based Segmentation.

Text Book:
1. Rafael C.Gonzalez, Richard E.Woods, ‘Digital Image Processing’
Addison Wesley Pubs (Second Edition).

Reference Books:
1. Milan Sonka, Vaclav Hlavac, Roger Boyle Image Processing.
Analysis, and Machine Vision (Second Edition).
2. A.K.Jain, ‘Image Processing Fundamentals’ BPB publications.
3. Philips, ‘Image Processing in C’, BPP Publications.

80
IT 415 (A) PARALLEL COMPUTING

UNIT – I
Parallel Computer Models:
The state of computing, Classification of parallel computers, Multiprocessors and
multicomputers, Multivector and SIMD computers.
Program and network properties:
Conditions of parallelism, Data and resource Dependences, Hardware and
Software parallelism, Program partitioning and scheduling, Grain Size and
latency, Program flow mechanisms, Control flow versus data flow, Data flow
Architecture, Demand driven mechanisms, Comparisons of flow mechanisms.
System Interconnect Architectures:
Network properties and routing, Static interconnection Networks, Dynamic
interconnection Networks, Multiprocessor system Interconnects, Hierarchical bus
systems, Crossbar switch and multiport memory, Multistage and combining
network.

UNIT – II
Advanced Processors:
Advanced processor technology, Instruction-set Architectures, CISC Scalar
Processors, RISC Scalar Processors, Superscalar Processors, VLIW Architectures,
Vector and Symbolic processors.
Pipelining:
Linear pipeline processor, nonlinear pipeline processor, Instruction pipeline
Design, Mechanisms for instruction pipelining, Dynamic instruction scheduling,
Branch Handling techniques, branch prediction, Arithmetic Pipeline Design,
Computer Arithmetic principles, Static Arithmetic pipeline, Multifunctional
arithmetic pipelines.

UNIT – III
MULTI Processors:
Multiprocessor System Interconnect, Cache Coherence and Synchronization
Mechanisms, Message-passing Mechanism.
Scalable, Multi-Threaded and Dataflow Architectures:
Latency-Hiding Techniques, Principles of Multithreading, Scalable and
Multithreaded Architecture, Dataflow and Hybrid Architectures.

UNIT – IV
Parallel Models, Languages and Compilers:
Parallel Programming Models, Parallel Languages and Compilers, Dependence
analysis of Data Arrays.
Parallel Program Development and Environment:
Parallel Programming Environment, Synchronization and Multiprocessing Modes,
shared variable program structures, Message Passing Programming
Development.

Textbooks:
1. Kai Hwang, “Advanced Computer Architecture”; TMH.

Reference Books:
1. D.A.Patterson and J.L.Hennessey, “Computer organization and Design”, Morgan
Kaufmann, 2nd Edition.
2. V.Rajaram & C.S.R.Murthy, “Parallel Computer”, PHI.

81
CS/IT 415(B) CRYPTOGRAPHY & NETWORK SECURITY

UNIT – I

Classical Encryption Techniques: Symmetric Cipher Model,


substitution techniques, Transposition techniques, Rotor machines,
Stegnography.
Block Ciphers and the Data Encryption standard: Simplified DES,
Block Cipher Principles, The Data Encryption Standard, The Strength of
DES, Differential and Linear Cryptanalysis, Block Cipher Modes of
Operation.

UNIT – II
Introduction to Number Theory: Prime Numbers, Fermat’s and
Euler’s Theorems, Testing for Primality, The Chinese Remainder
Theorem, Discrete Logarithms.
Message Authentication and Hash Functions: Authentication
Requirements, Authentication Functions, Message Authentication
Codes, Hash Functions, Security of Hash Functions and MACs.
Hash Algorithms: MD5 Message Digest Algorithm, Secure Hash
Algorithm

UNIT – III
Authentication Applications: Kerberos, X-509 Authentication
Service.
IP Security: IP Security Overview, IP Security Architecture,
Authentication Header, Encapsulating Security Payload, Combining
Security Associations, Key Management.
Malicious Software: Viruses and Related Threats, Virus
Countermeasures.

UNIT – IV
Web Security: Web Security Considerations, Secure Sockets Layer
and Transport Layer Security, Secure Electronic Transaction.
Intruders: Intruders, Intrusion Detection, Password Management.
Firewalls: Firewall Design Principles, Trusted Systems.

Text Book:
William Stallings ‘Cryptography And Network Security’ (Pearson
Education/ PHI)

Reference Books:

Atul Kahate ‘Cryptography and Network Security’ (Tata Mc Graw Hill


Edition)

82
CS/IT – 415 (C) MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS

UNIT – I

Multimedia Systems : An Introduction, multimedia elements, multimedia


applications, multimedia systems Architecture, Evolving technologies for
multimedia systems, defining objects for multimedia systems, multimedia data
interface standards, the need for data compression, multimedia databases

UNIT – II

Compression & Decompression Techniques: Types of compression, Binary Image


Compression Schemes, Color Gray Scale and Still – Video image compression,
Video Image Compression, Audio compression.

UNIT – III

Data and file format standards: T\RICH text format, TIFF file format, Resource
interchange file format, MIDI file format, JPEG DIB file format, MPEG standards.

Multimedia Input/Output Technologies: Key Technology issues, Pen Input, Video


and Image display systems, print output technology, Image scanners, Digital
voice and audio, digital camera, video images and animation, full motion video.

UNIT – IV

Multimedia Communications: Specialized computational processors, LAN/WAN


connectivity, distributed object models, multimedia application design:
Multimedia application classes, types of multimedia systems, virtual reality
design, components of multimedia systems, organizing multimedia databases.

Text Book:

Multimedia Systems Design by Prabhat K Andleigh & Kiran Thakrar PHI

Reference:

Ron Goldberg “Multimedia Producer’s bible, complex computer publishing 1996

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CS/IT – 415 (D) e-COMMERCE

UNIT – I

Electronic Commerce: Revolution.


E-Commerce Business models and concepts
The Internet and World Wide Web: E-commerce infrastructure

UNIT – II

Building an E-Commerce web site


Security and Encryption
E-Commerce payment systems

UNIT – III

E-Commerce Marketing concepts


E-Commerce Marketing communications
Ethical, Social and Political issues in E-Commerce

UNIT – IV

Retailing on the Web


Online Service industries
B2B E-Commerce: supply chain management and collaborative commerce

Text Book:

Kenneth C.Laudon, Carol G.Traver ‘E-Commerce’ (Pearson Education)

Reference:

1. Daniel Minoli, Emma Minoli, ‘Web Commerce Technology Handbook’, (Tata


McGraw-Hill Pubs.)
2. Elias M.Awad ‘ Electronic Commerce’ (PHI)

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CS/IT 415 (E) SOFT COMPUTING

UNIT – I

ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

Basic concepts - Single layer perception - Multilayer Perception - Supervised and


Unsupervised learning – Back propagation networks - Kohnen's self organizing
networks - Hopfield network.

UNIT – II

FUZZY SYSTEMS

Fuzzy sets and Fuzzy reasoning - Fuzzy matrices - Fuzzy functions -


Decomposition - Fuzzy automata and languages - Fuzzy control methods - Fuzzy
decision making.

NEURO - FUZZY MODELING

Adaptive networks based Fuzzy interface systems - Classification and Regression


Trees - Data clustering algorithms - Rule based structure identification - Neuro-
Fuzzy controls - Simulated annealing – Evolutionary computation.

UNIT – III

GENETIC ALGORITHMS

Survival of the Fittest - Fitness Computations - Cross over - Mutation -


Reproduction - Rank method - Rank space method.

UNIT – IV

SOFTCOMPUTING AND CONVENTIONAL AI

AI search algorithm - Predicate calculus - Rules of interference – Semantic


networks - Frames - Objects - Hybrid models - Applications.

Text Book:

1. Jang J.S.R., Sun C.T. and Mizutani E, "Neuro-Fuzzy and Soft computing",
Prentice Hall 1998.

References:

1. Timothy J.Ross, "Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications", McGraw Hill,


1997.
2. Laurene Fausett, "Fundamentals of Neural Networks", Prentice Hall, 1994.
3. George J. Klir and Bo Yuan, "Fuzzy sets and Fuzzy Logic", Prentice Hall, USA
1995.
4. Nih J.Nelsson, "Artificial Intelligence - A New Synthesis", Harcourt Asia Ltd.,
1998.
5. D.E.Goldberg, "Genetic Algorithms: Search, Optimization and Machine
Learning", Addison Wesley, NY, 1989.

85
86
IT 415 (F) LATEST TRENDS IN IT*
*Syllabus and Title are to be finalized one semester in advance by the BOS.

87
CS/IT 421 INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT

UNIT-I

GENERAL MANAGEMENT: Principles of Scientific Management; Brief Treatment of


Managerial Functions.

FORMS OF BUSINESS ORGANISATION: Salient features of sole proprietorship, Partnership,


Joint Stock Company – Private limited and public limited companies.

UNIT-II

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT: Concept of interest, Compound interest, Equivalent cash flow


diagram.

ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVES: The annual equivalent method, Present worth


method, Future worth method.

DEPRECIATION – purpose, Types of Depreciation; Common methods of depreciation; The


straight line method, Declining balance method, the sum of the years digits method.

UNIT-III

PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT: Job analysis, Job design, Leadership and motivation. The
personal function-Staff role of the personnel department, personnel functions,
organization for the personnel function

JOB DESIGN AND ANALYSIS: Job design, job information and personnel management,
Analyzing jobs-Obtaining job information, Functional job analysis.
Human resource planning: Reasons for human resource planning, The planning process:
Goals and plans of the organizations, Implementation programs: Brief treatment of
recruitment, selection, placement, performance appraisal, career development,
promotion, transfer, retirement, training and development, motivation and
compensation.

UNIT-IV

MATERIAL MANAGEMENT: Importance, Scope-MRP, Definition, objectives, procedure-


purchasing, objectives, procedure, source selection, vendor rating, value analysis.
INVENTORY CONTROL Definition, objectives, reasons, and requirements for inventory
management, ABC Analysis, VED, XYZ, Cost information.

Economic Order Quantity models-Basic EOQ, Economic Production run size, quantity
discounts.

MARKETING MANAGEMENT: Functions of Marketing, Product life cycle, Channels of


distribution, Advertising & sales promotion, Market Research.

MANAGING MARKETING EFFORT: Marketing implementation and evaluation- appraisal and


prospects.

Textbooks:
1. K.K.Ahuja, ‘Industrial Management’ Vol. I & II,
2. E.Paul Degarmo, John R.Chanda, William G.Sullivan, ‘Engineering Economy’.

Reference Books:
1. Philip Kotler, ‘Principles of Marketing Management’
2. Gopalkrishna, ‘Materials Management’
3. Koontz & Weirich, ‘Management’

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89
IT 422 WEB TECHNOLOGY

UNIT – I

J Script: Introduction to scripting, Control Structures-I, Control Structures-II,


Functions, Arrays, Objects.

UNIT – II

Dynamic HTML: Cascading style sheets, Object model and collections, Event
Model, Filters and Transitions.

UNIT – III

Web Servers
Active Server Pages
XML

UNIT – IV

Java Server Pages


Java Mail

Textbooks:

1. Deitel & Deitel & Goldberg, ‘Internet & World Wide Web – How to Program’,
Pearson Education, Asia (for Units-I, II & III)
2. Justin Couch & Daniel H.Steinberg ‘J2EEBible’ Wiley – Dream Tech India (P)
Ltd., (for Unit-IV).

Reference Books:

1. Daniel Minoli, ‘Internet and Intranet Engineering Technologies – Protocols


and Applications’, Tata McGraw Hill Co.
2. Herbert Schildt, ‘The Complete Reference Java2’, 5th Edition, Tata McGraw
Hill Co,.
3. Scan Mc Grath, ‘XML by example’, Prentice Hall India.

90
CS/IT 423 DATA WAREHOUSING & DATA MINING

UNIT – I

Data Warehouse – Introduction, A Multi-dimensional data model, Data Warehouse


Architecture, Data Warehouse Implementation.

Data Mining – Introduction, Data Mining, on what kind of Data, Data Mining
Functionalities, Classification of Data Mining Systems, Major issues in Data
Mining.

UNIT – II

Data Preprocessing – Data cleaning, Data Integration & Transformation, Data


Reduction, Discretization & Concept Hierarchy Generation, Data Mining
Primitives.

Mining Association roles in large databases – Association rule mining, mining


single-dimensional Boolean Association rules from Transactional Databases,
Mining Multi-dimensional Association rules from relational databases & Data
Warehouses.

UNIT – III

Classification & Prediction – Introduction, Classification by Decision tree


induction, Bayesian Classification.

Other Classification Methods, Classification by Backpropagation, Prediction,


Classifier accuracy.

UNIT – IV

Cluster Analysis – Introduction, Types of data in Cluster analysis, A categorization


of major clustering methods, partitioning methods, Hierarchical methods,
Density-Based Methods: DBSCAN, Grid-based Method: STING; Model-based
Clustering Method: Statistical approach, Outlier analysis.

Textbooks:

Data Mining Concepts & Techniques – Jiawei Han Micheline Kamber – Morgan
Kaufmann Publishers.

Reference Books:

1. Data Warehouse Toolkit – Ralph Kinball – John Wiley Publishers.


2. Data Mining (Introductory and Advanced Topics) – Margaret H.Dunham –
Pearson Education.
3. Data Warehousing in the real world – A Practical guide for Building decision
support systems – Sam Anahory, Dennis Murray – Pearson Education.

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CS/IT 424 (A) EMBEDDED SYSTEMS

UNIT – I

A First Look at the Embedded Systems: Examples of Embedded Systems


(Telegraph, cordless Bar-code scanner, Laser Printer, underground tank monitor,
Nuclear Reactor Monitor), Typical Hardware.

Hardware Fundamentals: Terminology, Gates, A few other basic


considerations, Timing Diagrams, Memory.

Advanced Hardware Fundamentals: Micro Processors, Buses, Direct Memory


Access, interrupts, other common parts, Built-ins on the Micro Processor,
conventions used on the Schematics.

Interrupts: Micro Processor Architecture, Interrupt Basics, the shared data


problem, Interrupt Latency.

UNIT – II

Survey of Software Architectures: ROUND-ROBIN, ROUND-ROBIN with


Interrupts, Function-Queue-Scheduling Architecture, Real Time Operating System
Architecture, Selecting an Architecture.

Introduction to Real Time Operating Systems: Tasks and Task states, Tasks
and data Semaphores and shared data.

UNIT – III

More Operating System Services: Message Queues, Mail boxes and pipes,
Timer Functions, Events, Memory Management, Interrupt Routines in an RTOS
environment.

Basic Design Using a Real Time Operating System: Overview, Principles, An


Example, Encapsulating Semaphores and Queues, Hard Real Time
Considerations, Saving Memory Space, Saving Power.

UNIT – IV

Embedded Software Development Tools: Host and Target Machines,


Linker/Locators for Embedded Software, Getting Embedded Software into the
target System.

Debugging Techniques: Testing on Host Machine, Instruction Set Simulators,


the assert macro, using Laboratory Tools.

Textbooks:
David E.Simon, ‘An Embedded Software Primer’, Pearson Education Asia.

Reference Books:
1. D.Gajski, F.Vahid, S.Narayan, J.Gong, ‘Specification and Design of
Embedded Systems’, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.,
2. Raj Kamal, ‘Embedded Systems Architecture & Programming’, Tata
McGraw-Hill.

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93
CS/IT 424 (B) TCP / IP

UNIT – I

Introduction, TCP/IP Suite, Network Technologies, Internetworking, Internet


Address (Classful, Classlers & Subnet)

UNIT – II

ARP, RARP, IP (Connectionless Datagram Delivery, Routing IP datagrams, Error &


Control Messages).

UNIT – III

UDP, TCP, Routing

UNIT – IV

Client-Server Model, Socket Interface, TCP/IP Over ATM Networks, Mobile IP,
DHCP

Textbooks:

Internetworking with TCP/IP, Volume-1, 4/e (Principles, Protocols & Architectures)


– Douglas E.Comer, PHI.

Reference Books:

1. Internetworking with TCP/IP, Volume-II, 3/e (Design, Implementation &


Internals) – Douglas E-Comer, David L.Stevens.
2. Internetworking with TCP/IP, Volume-II, 2/3 (Client-Server Programming &
Applications) – Douglas E.Comer, David L.Stevens.

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CS/IT 424 (C) PERSONAL SOFTWARE PROCESS

UNIT – I

• The Software Engineers Job.


• Time Management
• Tracking Time
• Period of Product Planning
• Product Planning

UNIT – II

• Product size
• Managing your Time
• Managing Commitments
• Managing Schedules
• The Project Plan

UNIT – III

• The Software Development Process


• Defects
• Finding Defects
• The code Review checklist
• Projecting Defects

UNIT – IV

• The Economics of Defects Removal


• Design Defects
• Product Quality
• Process Quality
• A personal Commitment to Quality

Textbooks:

1. Watts S.Humphrey, ‘Introduction to the Personal Software Process’, 1997,


Addison – Wesley.

Reference:

1. Watts S.Humphrey, ‘Introduction to the Team Software Process’, 1997,


Addison – Wesley.

95
CS/IT 424 (D) MOBILE COMPUTING

UNIT – I

Introduction – Applications – A market for Mobile Communications – A simplified


reference model.
Wireless Transmission – Frequencies – Signals – Signal Propagation –
Multiplexing – Modulation – Spread Spectrum.
Medium Access Control – Motivation for a specialized MAC – SDMA – FDMA –
TDMA – CDMA – Comparison.

UNIT – II

Wireless LAN – Infrared Vs. Radio transmission – Infrastructure and ad hoc


networks – IEEE 802.11 – HIPERLAN – Bluetooth.
Wireless ATM – Motivation for WATM – Wireless ATM services – Reference model
– Functions – Radio Access layer – Handover – Location Management –
Addressing – Mobile quality of service – Access point control protocol.

UNIT – III

Mobile Network Layer – Mobile IP – Dynamic host configuration – Ad hoc


networks.
Mobile Transport Layer – Traditional TCP – Indirect TCP – Snooping TCP –
Mobile TCP – Fast retransmit / fast recovery – Transmission / time-out freezing –
Selective retransmission – Transaction oriented TCP.

UNIT – IV

Wireless Application Protocol – Architecture – Wireless datagram protocol –


Wireless transport layer security – Wireless transaction protocol – Wireless
session protocol – Wireless application environment – Wireless markup language
– WML Script – Wireless telephony application – Example stacks with WAP.

Textbooks:

J.Schiller, Mobile communications, Addison-Wesley, 2003

Reference Books:

1. Wireless Internet & Mobile Business-How to Program, by Deitel, et al.,


Prentice Hall, 2002.
2. J2ME in a Nutshell by Kim Topley; O’Reilly, 1st Ed., March, 2002.

96
CS/IT 424 (E) ADVANCED SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

UNIT -I

PROJECT MANAGEMENT:
The Management Spectrum, The People, The Product, The Process, The Project,
The W5HH Principle, Critical Practices.

METRICS FOR PROCESS AND PROJECTS:


Metrics in the Process and Project Domains, Software Measurement, Metrics for
Software Quality, Integrating Metrics within the Software Process, Metrics for
Small Organizations, Establishing a Software Metrics Program.

ESTIMATION:
Observations on Estimation, The Project Planning Process, Software Scope and
Feasibility, Resources, Software Project Estimation, Decomposition Techniques,
Empirical Estimation Models, Estimation for Object-Oriented Projects, Specialized
Estimation Techniques, The Make/Buy Decision.

PROJECT SCHEDULING:
Basic Concepts, Project Scheduling. Defining a Task Set tor the Software Project,
Defining a Task Network, Scheduling. Earned Value Analysis.

UNIT -II

RISK MANAGEMENT:
Reactive Vs. Proactive Risk Strategies, Software Risks. Risk Identification. Risk
Projection, Risk Refinement, Risk Mitigation, Monitoring and Management, The
RMMM Plan.

QUALITY MANAGEMENT:
Quality concepts. Software Quality Assurance, Software Reviews, Formal
Technical Reviews, Formal Approaches to SQA, Statistical Software Quality
Assurance, Software Reliability, The ISQ 9000 Quality Standards, The SQA Plan.

CHANGE MANAGEMENT:
Software Configuration management, The SCM Repository, The SCM Process,
Configuration Management for Web Engineering.

FORMAL METHODS:
Basic Concepts, Mathematical Preliminaries, Applying Mathematical Notation for
Formal Specification. Formal Specification Languages, Object Constraint
Language (OCL), The Z Specification Language, The Ten Commandments of
Formal Methods, Formal Methods- The Road Ahead.

UNIT-III

CEANROOM SOFTWARE ENGINEERING:


The Cleanroom Approach, Functional Specification, Cleanroom Design.
Cleanroom Testing.

97
COMPONENT BASED DEVELOPMENT:
Engineering of Component-Based Systems, The CBSE Process, Domain
Engineering, Component-Based Development, Classifying and Retrieving
Components, Economics of CBSE.

REENGINEERING:
Business Process Reengineering, Software Reengineering, Reverse Engineering,
Restructuring, Forward Engineering, The Economics of Reengineering.

WEB ENGINEERING:
Attributes of Web-Based Systems and Applications, WebApp Engineering Layers,
The Web Engineering Process, Web Engineering Best Practices.

UNIT-IV

INITIATING A WEBAPP PROJECT:


Formulating Web-Based Systems, Plam1ing for Web Engineering Projects, The
Web Engineering Team, Project Management Issues for Web Engineering, Metrics
for Web Engineering and WebApps, "Worst Practices " for WebApps Projects.

ANALYSIS FOR WEBAPPS:


Requirements Analysis for WebApps, The Analysis Model for WebApps, The
Content Model, The Interaction Model, The Functional Model, The Configuration
Model, Relationship-Navigation Analysis.

DESIGN FOR WEBAPPS:


Design Issues for Web Engineering, The WebE Design Pyramid, WebApp Interface
Design, Aesthetic Design, Content Design, Architecture Design, Navigation
Design, Component Level Design, Hypermedia Design Patterns, Object-Oriented
Hypermedia Design Method(OOHDM), Design Metrics for WebApps.

TESTING FOR WEBAPPS:


Testing Concepts for WebApps, The Testing Process-An Overview, Content
Testing. User Interface Testing, Component-Level Testing, Navigation Testing,
Configuration Testing, Security Testing, Performance Testing.

Text Book:

1. Roger S.Pressman, 'Software Engineering- A Practitioner's Approach', Sixth


Edition, McGraw-Hill International.

Rejoence Books:

1. Ian Sommerville, 'Software Engineering', Sixth Edition, Pearson Education.

2. WAMAN S JAWADEKAR., 'Software Engineering Principles and Practice', Tata


McGraw Hill. 2004.

3. Shari Lawrence Fleeger, 'Software Engineering - Theory & Practice',


Pearson Education Asia.

98
IT 424 (F) SOFTWARE TESTING METHODOLOGY

Unit – I

Introduction:- Purpose of testing, Dichotomies, model for testing, consequences


of bugs, taxonomy of bugs.

Flow graphs and Path testing:- Basics concepts of path testing, predicates, path
predicates and achievable paths, path sensitizing, path instrumentation,
application of path testing.

Unit – II

Transaction Flow Testing:- Transaction flows, transaction flow testing techniques.


Dataflow testing:- Basics of dataflow testing, strategies in dataflow testing,
application of dataflow testing.

Domain Testing: Domains and paths, Nice and Ugly domains, domain testing,
domains and interfaces testing, domain and interface testing, domains and
testability.

Unit – III

Paths, path products and Regular expressions:-


Path products & Path expression, reduction procedure, applications, regular
expressions and flow anomaly detection.

Logic Based Testing:- Overview, decision tables, path expressions, kv charts,


specifications.

Unit – IV

State, State Graphs and Transition Testing:- State Graphs, good and bad state
graphs, state testing, testability tips.

Graph matrices and Application:- Motivational overview, matrix of graph


relations, power of a matrix, node reduction algorithm, building tools.

Text Books:

1. Software Testing Techniques – Baris Beizer, International Thomson Computer


Press, second edition.
2. The craft of software testing – Brian Marick, Prentice Hall series in innovative
technology.

99