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Clinton's Remarks on

Terrorism: 1993-2001
PRESIDENT CLINTON

REMARKS ON TERRORISM

1993-2001
For eight years, the Clinton Administration gave the highest priority to
the fight against terrorism in general, and specifically against the al
Qaeda network as it emerged as a leading sponsor of global terror.

From the earliest days of his Administration, President Clinton saw


terrorism as a national security priority and began sounding the alarm
on global terrorism, continuously raising public awareness of the
terrorist threat, as a central challenge to our country and our future.

- President Clinton addressed terrorism in every State of the Union address


for eight years.

- In his September 1995 Address to the United Nations General


Assembly, President Clinton called upon all nations to join the United
States' fight against terrorism and to impose strong sanctions on states that
sponsor terrorism or tolerate money laundering. He urged all UN member
states to endorse a declaration agreeing to deny sanctuary to terrorists.

- In August 1996, President Clinton delivered a major speech on


international terrorism at the George Washington University, in which he
declared terrorism to be "the enemy of our generation."

President Clinton not only made terrorism an important and intensifying


theme of his presidency, but he backed these public declarations with
concrete actions and elevated the fight against terrorism to a high and urgent
priority.

This binder is a compilation of the hundreds of statements


President Clinton made on terrorism generally and bin Laden
specifically between 1993-2001.
President Clinton: Selected Remarks on Terrorism (1993-2001)

Between 1993-2001 President Clinton made hundreds of statements on terrorism including in


every State of the Union address for eight years.

"The American people need to be reassured by the effectiveness and the determination of our
Federal authorities at the national and at the local level to combat terrorism ... the people who
would engage in these kinds of acts in this country need to know that we're going to be tough on
anyone, anywhere in the world, who threatens or carries out terrorist actions against any
American citizen." - June 26, 1993, The President's Radio Address

"There should be no mistake about the message we intend these actions to convey to Saddam
Hussein ... and to any nation, group, or person who would harm our leaders or our citizens. We
will combat terrorism. We will deter aggression. We will protect our people." - June 26, 1993,
Address to the Nation on the Strike on Iraqi Intelligence Headquarters

"We are pressuring our allies and friends all the time not to support any government, including
Iran, that supports terrorism and assassination ... We must not allow Iraq, Iran, and other agents
of terrorism and assassination to dominate the world politically and to terrorize innocent people."
- July 20, 1993, Interview With Larry King

"... On the terrorism front, I can tell you that every week, several times a week, I get an update
on our efforts. And ... we are making progress. But I believe this is a problem we'll all have to be
very vigilant about for years to come." - August 19, 1994, The President's News Conference

"... We look toward the 21 st century, and we know what our problems are going to
be ... We know we're going to have problems with terrorism. And we know that democracies are
far less likely to tolerate that sort of thing than dictatorships are." - September 14, 1994, Interview
With Wire Service Reporters on Haiti

"... the United States does see a contest... On one side stand the forces of terror and extremism
... To them, I say: You cannot succeed. You will not succeed. You must not succeed ..." -
October 26, 1994, Remarks to the Jordanian Parliament in Amman, Jordan

"As the cowards who bombed the World Trade Center found out, this country will hunt down
terrorists and bring them to justice ... And tonight I call on all our allies ... to join us with
renewed fervor in a global effort to combat terrorism. We cannot permit the future to be marred
by terror and fear and paralysis." - January 24, 1995, Address Before a Joint Session of the
Congress on the State of the Union
"Since the beginning of our administration we have taken broad and swift measures to fight
terrorism here and abroad ... We have taken strong actions against nations who harbor terrorists
or support their bloody trade. We have worked to prevent acts of terror, sometimes with
remarkable success ... Iran and Iraq and Libya ... harbor terrorists within their borders. They
establish and support terrorist base camps in other lands ... Our policy toward these rogue states
is simple: They must be contained." - April 30, 1995, Remarks at the World Jewish Congress
Dinner in New York City

".. .Federal authorities have been successful in heading off at least two other incidents of
terrorism ... I cannot tell you how strongly I believe that this is the major threat to the security of
Americans looking toward the 21st century, that the fundamental problem ..." - May 4, 1995,
Interview With Detroit Free Press and Knight-Ridder Newspapers

"We're cooperating with the Russians to prevent nuclear weapons and bomb-making materials
from falling into the hands of terrorists and smugglers." - May 7, 1995, Remarks to the American
Israel Public Affairs Committee Policy Conference

"Nowhere is cooperation more vital than in fighting the increasingly interconnected groups that
traffic in terror ... So today I call upon all nations to join us in the fight against them ... I now
invite every country to join in negotiating and endorsing a declaration on international crime and
citizen safety." - October 22, 1995, Remarks to the United Nations General Assembly in New
York City

"We have stepped up cooperation with other nations to root out terrorists before they act and to
capture them when they do. We have increased funding, manpower, and training for our law
enforcement agencies to combat terrorism. And our efforts are yielding results. We made swift
arrests after the attacks on the World Trade Center and Oklahoma City. Today those responsible
for the World Trade Center bombing are behind bars. In the last 3 years the United States has
arrested more terrorists than at any time in our history, plucking them from hiding all around the
world and bringing them to justice for their crimes. This progress is dramatic, but we must do
more. Our Nation has felt the lash of terrorism. We know its terrible costs, and we know that
only America can lead the world's fight against it." - March 16, 1996, The President's Radio
Address

"... This is a good day because our police officers are now going to be better prepared to stop
terrorists, our prosecutors better prepared to punish them, our people being better protected from
their designs ... Fighting terrorism is and will for a long time to come be one of the top security
priorities of the United States ... We renew our fight against those who seek to terrorize us ... We
send a loud, clear message today all over the world ... America will never surrender to terror." -
April 24, 1996, Remarks on Signing the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996

"But let me be clear: Just as no enemy could drive us from the field in World War II and the cold
war, we will not be driven from the frontiers of our fight against terrorism today." - June 29,
1996, The President's News Conference in Lyons
"This will be a long, hard struggle. There will be setbacks along the way. But just as no enemy
could drive us from the fight to meet our challenges and protect our values in World War II and
the cold war, we will not be driven from the tough fight against terrorism today. Terrorism is the
enemy of our generation, and we must prevail." - August 5, 1996, Remarks on International
Security Issues at George Washington University

"These forces have nearly destroyed our Nation in the past. They plague us still. They fuel the
fanaticism of terror ... We will stand mighty for peace and freedom and maintain a strong defense
against terror and destruction." - January 20, 1997, Inaugural Address

"... our security is challenged increasingly by nontraditional threats ... terrorists and
International criminals, who cannot defeat us in traditional theaters of battle ... We are taking
strong steps against these threats today ... we will undertake a concerted effort to prevent the
spread and use of biological weapons and to protect our people in the event these terrible
weapons are ever unleashed by a rogue state, a terrorist group ... In our efforts to battle terrorism
and cyberattacks and biological weapons, all of us must be extremely aggressive." - May 22,
1998 , Commencement Address at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis,
Maryland

"Americans are targets of terrorism, in part, because we have unique leadership responsibilities in
the world, because we act to advance peace and democracy, and because we stand united against
terrorism ... we will continue to take the fight to terrorists. Over the past several years, I have
intensified our effort on all fronts in this battle ... The most powerful weapon in our counter-
terrorism arsenal is our determination to never give up ... The bombs that kill innocent
Americans are aimed not only at them but at the very spirit of our country and the spirit of
freedom. For terrorists are the enemies of everything we believe in and fight for: peace and
democracy, Tolerance and security." August 8, 1998, The President's Radio Address

"I have said many times that terrorism is one of the greatest dangers we face in this new global
era ... Today we have struck back. The United States launched an attack this morning on one of
the most active terrorist bases in the world. It is located in Afghanistan and operated by groups
affiliated with Usama bin Ladin, a network not sponsored by any state but as dangerous as any we
face ... Our target was the terrorists' base of operation and infrastructure. Our objective was to
damage their capacity to strike at Americans and other innocent people ... Terrorists must have
no doubt that, in the face of their threats, America will protect its citizens." - August 20, 1998,
Remarks in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, on Military Action Against Terrorist Sites in
Afghanistan and Sudan
"... Good afternoon. Today I ordered our Armed Forces to strike at terrorist-related facilities in
Afghanistan and Sudan ... Our target was terror; our mission was clear: to strike at the network of
radical groups affiliated with and funded by Usama bin Ladin, perhaps the preeminent organizer
and financier of international terrorism in the world today. The groups associated with him ...
have made the United States their adversary precisely because of what we stand for and what we
stand against... America has battled terrorism for many years ... The long arm of American law
has reached out around the world and brought to trial those guilty of attacks ... But there have
been and will be times when law enforcement and diplomatic tools are simply not enough, when
our very national security is challenged, and when we must take extraordinary steps to protect the
safety of our citizens. With compelling evidence that the bin Ladin network of terrorist groups
was planning to mount further attacks against Americans and other freedom-loving people, I
decided America must act. And so this morning, based on the unanimous recommendation of my
national security team, I ordered our Armed Forces to take action to counter an immediate threat
from the bin Ladin network ... Let our actions today send this message loud and clear: There are
no expendable American targets ... We will persist, and we will prevail." - August 20,
1998Address to the Nation on Military Action Against Terrorist Sites in Afghanistan and Sudan

"... I want to talk to you about... the bin Ladin network of radical groups, probably the most
dangerous non-state terrorist actor in the world today ... Our goals were to disrupt bin Ladin's
terrorist network and destroy elements of its infrastructure in Afghanistan and Sudan. And our
goal was to destroy, in Sudan, the factory with which bin Ladin's network is associated, which
was producing an ingredient essential for nerve gas." - August 22, 1998, The President's Radio
Address

"... Its agenda is basically to strike out against the United States, against the West, against the
people in the Middle East it doesn't like. And it is funded entirely from private funds under the
control of Usama bin Ladin, without the kind of objectives that we see that, even on the darkest
days, the Irish parties that were violent had, the PLO had." - September 4, 1998, Exchange With
Reporters Prior to Discussions With Prime Minister Bertie Ahern of Ireland in Dublin

"Terror has become the world's problem. Some argue, of course, that the problem is overblown,
saying that the number of deaths from terrorism is comparatively small, sometimes less than the
number of people killed by lightning in a single year. I believe that misses the point in several
ways. First, terrorism has a new face in the 1990's. Today, terrorists take advantage of greater
openness and the explosion of information and weapons technology ... terrorism is at the top of
the American agenda—and should be at the top of the world's agenda .. .together we say terror is
not a way to tomorrow; it is only a throwback to yesterday. And together--together--we can meet
it and overcome its threats, its injuries, and its fears with confidence." - September 21, 1998,
Remarks to the 53d Session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York City
"... We know Usama bin Ladin's network has made an effort to get chemical weapons. I think
that we need to have an organized response, if you will, to what you might call "homeland
defense" on CBW and cyber or computer terrorism issues. And now we've established a
national coordinator on these issues in the White House ... And if there is never an incident,
nobody would be happier than me 20 years from now if the same critics would be able to say,
"Oh, see, Clinton was a kook; nothing happened." I would be the happiest man on Earth. I would
be the happiest man on Earth. If they could say, "He overexaggerated it; nothing happened; all he
did was make a bunch of jobs for scientists and build the Pentagon budget," I would be elated
20 years from now to be subject to that criticism because it would mean that nothing happened,
and in no small measure because of the efforts we've made." - January 21, 1999, Interview With
Judith Miller and William J. Broad of the New York Times

"... As we approach a new century, we have to ask our firefighters to meet yet a new challenge:
to protect our citizens from terrorists armed with chemical and biological weapons. Today I want
to talk about these new threats and about the efforts we're undertaking to equip and train our
Nation's firefighters to deal with those threats ... In most instances of domestic terror, the first
professionals on the scene will be the firefighters. They're becoming the frontline defenders of
our citizens, not just from accidents and arsonists but from those who would seek to sow terror
and so undermine our way of life. I have been stressing the importance of this issue, now, for
some time. As I have said repeatedly, and I want to say again to you, I am not trying to put any
American into a panic over this, but I am determined to see that we have a serious, deliberate,
disciplined, long-term response to a legitimate potential threat to the lives and safety of the
American people." - March 15, 1999, Remarks to the Legislative Conference of the International
Association of Fire Fighters

"... I have signed an Executive order imposing financial and other commercial sanctions on the
Afghan Taliban for its support of Usama bin Ladin and his terrorist network ... To this day, bin
Ladin and his network continue to plan new attacks against Americans ... The United States has
tried repeatedly, directly and working with other governments, to persuade the Taliban to expel
bin Ladin to the United States for trial or, if that is not possible, to a third country where he will
face justice for his crimes, and to end the safe haven it gives to bin Ladin's network, which lives
and trains in Taliban-controlled Afghanistan ... Those who nurture terrorism must understand that
we will not stand by while those whom they protect target Americans." - July 6, 1999, Statement
on the National Emergency With Respect to the Taliban

"The message to the Taliban is unmistakable: bin Ladin's training camps must be closed; the
threats and operational activity must cease, and bin Ladin must answer for his crimes ... It is time
for the Taliban to heed the will of the United Nations and end the threat of terrorism that
emanates from within Afghanistan." - November 15, 1999, Statement on United Nations
Sanctions Against the Taliban
"First, international terrorism is not new, but it is becoming increasingly sophisticated ... and it is
something we have to be ready for ... In responding to terrorist threats, our own strategy should
be identical to your motto: Semper paratus-always ready. Today I'm adding over $300 million
to fund critical programs to protect our citizens from terrorist threats, to expand our intelligence
efforts ... I have requested now some $9 billion for counterterrorism funding in the 2001 budget.
That's 40 percent more than 3 years ago, and this $300 million will go on top of that. It sounds
like a lot of money. When you see the evidence of what we're up against, I think you will support
it, and I hope you will." - May 17, 2000 Commencement Address at the United States Coast
Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut

"... we have pursued new technologies that could strengthen our defenses against a possible
attack, including a terrorist attack here at home ... In the future, we cannot rule out that terrorist
groups could gain the capability to strike us with nuclear weapons if they seized even temporary
control of a state with an existing nuclear weapons establishment." - September 1, 2000, Remarks
at Georgetown University

"... The idea of common humanity and unity amidst diversity, so purely embodied by those we
mourn today, must surely confound the minds of the hate-filled terrorists who killed them ... To
those who attacked them, we say: You will not find a safe harbor. We will find you, and justice
will prevail." - October 18,2000, Remarks at the Memorial Service for the U.S.S. Cole in
Norfolk, Virginia

",. .dealing with terrorists is harder, as we have seen in the tragedy of the U.S.S. Cole. Why?
Because terrorists, unlike countries, cannot be contained as easily, and it's harder to deter them
through threats of retaliation ... We have succeeded in preventing a lot of terrorist attacks. There
were many planned during the millennium celebration that we prevented. We have arrested a lot
of terrorists, including those who bombed the World Trade Center and those who were involved
in several other killings in this country. And make no mistake about it: We will do the same for
those who killed our brave Navy personnel on the U.S.S. Cole." - December 8,2000, Remarks at
the University of Nebraska at Kearney, Nebraska

"... the forces of integration that have created these good opportunities also make us more
subject to global forces of destruction, to terrorism, organized crime and narcotrafficking ... I'll
leave the Presidency more idealistic, more full of hope than the day I arrived, and more confident
than ever that America's best days lie ahead ... Thank you. God bless you, and God bless
America." - January 18, 2001, Farewell Address to the Nation
1993

January 20, 1993 Inaugural Address

""... [our world is threatened] by ancient hatreds and new plagues ... There is no longer
a clear division today between what is foreign and what is domestic ... the new world is
more free but less stable. Communism's collapse has called forth old animosities and
new dangers."

March 1, 1993 Remarks and a Question-and-Answer Session at the Adult Learning


Center
in New Brunswick, New Jersey

"... I have put the full resources of the Federal Government, every conceivable law
enforcement information resource we could put to work on this [investigating the
bombing of the World Trade Center], we have. I'm very concerned about it. But I think it's
also important that we not overreact to it... I would discourage the American people
from overreacting to this. It's a very serious thing. And I'm heartbroken for the people
who were killed and their families and those who were injured ... But I would plead with
the American people and the good people of New York to right now keep your courage
up, go on about your lives. And we're working as hard as we can to get to the bottom of
this."

March 15, 1993 The President's News Conference With Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin
of
Israel

"... those who seek to subvert the peace process will find zero tolerance here for their
deplorable acts of violence and terrorism."
March 24, 1993 Interview With Dan Rather of CBS News

"... Let me say that I'm more concerned about the Iranian government maintaining its
militance, perhaps supporting, in general, terrorists organizations or engaging in unsafe
proliferation of weapons of mass destruction for its own use or for the benefit of others. I
wish Iran would come into the family of nations. They could have an enormous positive
impact on the future of the Middle East in ways that would benefit the economy and the
future of the people of Iran. I am very troubled that instead of trying to contribute to
alleviating a lot of the problems of the Islamic people to the region, they are seeming to
take advantage of them. I hope that they will moderate their course."

April 6, 1993 The President's News Conference With President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt

"... We're also determined to counter Iran's involvement in terrorism and its active
opposition to the Middle East peace process. Both our nations [US and Egypt] have
suffered from the tragic consequences of terrorism. Both are absolutely determined to
oppose the cowardly cruelty of terrorists wherever we can. We reviewed the common
danger presented by religious extremism which promotes an intolerant agenda through
violent means. We discussed ways of strengthening our cooperation in countering this
and other forms of terrorism. We know that all Americans, including Americans of all
races and all faiths, join us in strongly condemning such terrorism.

"The question was about our policies with regard to Libya. Well, as you know, we have
one huge barrier that overrides everything else right now, and that is the determination
of the United
States to see that the people who have been charged with the Pan Am 103 disaster are
released from Libya and subject to a legitimate trial. And that has to be resolved in a way
that is legal and appropriate before any other issues with regard to Libya can be raised
... it is inevitable that we will press for tougher sanctions if the Government of Libya does
not release the people that have been charged. There's a lot of evidence against them.
They should go on trial. They should be punished if they're found guilty. It should be a
real and legitimate trial. It is an enormous issue in the United States, and nothing else
really can be resolved with regard to Libya until that issue is resolved.

"I think President Mubarak would support my contention that we have tried to step up our
cooperation with the Egyptians in combating international terrorism since I've been
President. In February we sent American officials to Egypt, and they stayed there about
a week working on cooperative exchanges and information ... we are doing everything
we can to minimize the impact of terrorism in this country."

May 1, 1993 Statement on the Death of President Ranasinghe Premadasa of Sri


Lanka

"... I am outraged by the assassination of President Ranasinghe Premadasa of Sri


Lanka. I condemn this brutal act of terrorism ... I hope that the people of Sri Lanka will
join together at this difficult time to renew their commitment to the fight against terrorism
and to underscore their support for their democratic institutions."

May 29, 1993 Remarks at the United States Military Academy Commencement
Ceremony in West Point, New York

"... Consider what we witness today in the world you will move into: ethnic and religious
conflict, the violent turmoil of dissolving or newly created states, the random violence of
the assassin and the terrorist. These are forces that plagued the world in the early days
of this century. As we scan today's bloodiest conflicts, from the former Soviet Union and
Yugoslavia to Armenia to Sudan, the dynamics of the cold war have been replaced by
many of the dynamics of old war.
In the coming months, our administration will address the dangers from growing
stockpiles of nuclear materials that could be used in these weapons and the risk of
nuclear smuggling
and terrorism."

June 25, 1993 Remarks on the Appointment of Kristine M. Gebbie as AIDS Policy
Coordinator and an Exchange With Reporters

"... Any free society has always some exposure to terrorism. I think what the American
people should do, though, is to feel an enormous sense of pride in the aggressive work
done by the New York Police Department and all the Federal authorities involved in New
York. We are working aggressively on this issue. We will continue to work on it in a very
tough way, and we will put whatever resources the United States has to put in to
combating it.

"I think one of the problems that has plagued much of the world in the 1980's is random
acts of terrorism. And there is always the possibility with increasing political instability in
various places of increased terrorism. But I can tell you that I view the action in New
York as reassuring. And all I can tell you is that we're going to do our best to be as
tough, as intolerant, as effective in dealing with these kinds of problems consistently as
the local and the Federal authorities were in New York."

June 26,1993 The President's Radio Address

"... let me take just a moment to congratulate the FBI, the New York Police Department,
and the United States attorney in New York for breaking up the terrorist ring. The
American people need to be reassured by the effectiveness and the determination of our
Federal authorities at the national and at the local level to combat terrorism. And the
people who would engage in these kinds of acts in this country need to know that we're
going to be tough on anyone, anywhere in the world, who threatens or carries out
terrorist actions against any American citizen."
June 26, 1993 Address to the Nation on the Strike on Iraqi Intelligence Headquarters

"... This past April, the Kuwaiti Government uncovered what they suspected was a car
bombing plot to assassinate former President George Bush while he was visiting Kuwait
City. The Kuwaiti authorities arrested 16 suspects, including 2 Iraqi nationals. Following
those arrests, I ordered our own intelligence and law enforcement agencies to conduct a
thorough and independent investigation. Over the past several weeks, officials from
those agencies reviewed a range of intelligence information, traveled to Kuwait and
elsewhere, extensively interviewed the suspects, and thoroughly examined the forensic
evidence.

"... there is compelling evidence that there was, in fact, a plot to assassinate former
President Bush and that this plot, which included the use of a powerful bomb made in
Iraq, was directed and pursued by the Iraqi intelligence service. We should not be
surprised by such deeds, coming as they do from a regime like Saddam Hussein's,
which is ruled by atrocity, slaughtered its own people, invaded two neighbors, attacked
others, and engaged in chemical and environmental warfare. Saddam has repeatedly
violated the will and conscience of the international community. But this attempt at
revenge by a tyrant against the leader of the world coalition that defeated him in war is
particularly loathsome and cowardly. We thank God it was unsuccessful. The authorities
who foiled it have the appreciation of all Americans.

"It is clear that this was no impulsive or random act. It was an elaborate plan devised by
the Iraqi Government and directed against a former President of the United States
because of actions he took as President. As such, the Iraqi attack against President
Bush was an attack against our country and against all Americans. We could not and
have not let such action against our Nation go unanswered.

"From the first days of our Revolution, America's security has depended on the clarity of
this message: Don't tread on us. A firm and commensurate response was essential to
protect our sovereignty, to send a message to those who engage in state-sponsored
terrorism, to deter further violence against our people, and to affirm the expectation of
civilized behavior among nations.

"Therefore, on Friday I ordered our forces to launch a cruise missile attack on the Iraqi
intelligence service's principal command-and-control facility in Baghdad."

"Saddam Hussein has demonstrated repeatedly that he will resort to terrorism or


aggression if left unchecked. Our intent was to target Iraq's capacity to support violence
against the United States and other nations and to deter Saddam Hussein from
supporting such outlaw behavior in the future. Therefore, we directed our action against
the facility associated with Iraq's support of terrorism, while making every effort to
minimize the loss of innocent life.

"There should be no mistake about the message we intend these actions to convey to
Saddam Hussein, to the rest of the Iraqi leadership, and to any nation, group, or person
who would harm our leaders or our citizens. We will combat terrorism. We will deter
aggression. We will protect our people.

"The world has repeatedly made clear what Iraq must do to return to the community of
nations. And Iraq has repeatedly refused. If Saddam and his regime contemplate further
illegal provocative actions, they can be certain of our response."

June 28,1993 Remarks and an Exchange With Reporters Prior to a Cabinet Meeting

"... Well, the action I took [striking Iraqi intelligence headquarters] I thought was clearly
warranted by the facts. And I think other terrorists around the world need to know that
the United States will do what we can to combat terrorism, as I said in my statement on
Saturday evening. It is plainly what we ought to be doing.

" I think the American people know enough about terrorism to know that it is always a
potential problem, but we are going to be very aggressive in dealing with it, and we're
going to do everything we possibly can to deal with it."
June 29, 1993 The President's News Conference With President Carlos Saul
Menem of
Argentina

"... we damaged [Iraq's] major intelligence facility quite severely... we made it


absolutely clear that we will not tolerate acts of terrorism or other illegal and dangerous
acts. I think it sent a very important message.

"President Menem ... was very supportive of the action we took in Iraq and very
determined that we ought to stand together with other civilized nations against terrorism
everywhere."

July 10, 1993 Remarks to the Korean National Assembly in Seoul

"... our final security priority must be to support the spread of democracy throughout the
Asian Pacific. Democracies not only are more likely to meet the needs and respect the
rights of their people, they also make better neighbors. They [Democracies] do not wage
war on each other, practice terrorism, generate refugees or traffic in drugs and outlaw
weapons."

July 20, 1993 Interview With Larry King

"... we are doing everything we can to impose restrictions on trade with Iran. We are
pressuring our allies and friends all the time not to support any government, including
Iran, that supports terrorism and assassination ... I think it's a very significant problem
We must not allow Iraq, Iran, and other agents of terrorism and assassination to
dominate the world politically and to terrorize innocent people."
July 24, 1993 Remarks to the American Legion Boys Nation

"... We also have to recognize that the world remains a dangerous place, and there are
people running governments who desperately want to develop weapons of mass
destruction
and have very little concern what is done in retaliation to their own citizens. That is a
deeply troubling thing. We still face the threa Increased FEMA funding 500%+ to respond to
WMO attack t of terrorism from people who honestly believe that the best way to achieve
their political objectives is to kill, even if they kill innocent people."

July 27, 1993 Remarks and an Exchange With Reporters on Immigration Policy

"... The simple fact is that we must not, and we will not, surrender our borders to those
who wish to exploit our history of compassion and justice. We cannot tolerate those who
traffic in human cargo, nor can we allow our people to be endangered by those who
would enter our country to terrorize Americans. But the solution to the problem of illegal
immigration is not simply to close our borders ... We must say no to illegal immigration
so we can continue to say yes to legal immigration."

August 3, 1993 Interview With the Nevada Media

"... Let me tell you essentially what we're dealing with. Basically, there are three
substantial alien problems. There is the problem of access to our country by terrorists or
potential terrorists or people who will work with terrorists. And we have enacted some
reforms to change the way we exercise security at airports here in the United States and
security at other airports."
September 1, 1993 Remarks on the Swearing-in of Federal Bureau of Investigation
Director Louis Freeh

"... Today's FBI operates in a new and challenging world ... with new and even more
immediate threats. Terrorism once seemed far from our shores, an atrocity visited on
people in other lands. Now, after the attack on the World Trade Center, we know that
we, too, are vulnerable.

"I want the men and women of the FBI to look back on the 1990's as a decade in which
the FBI became well-known and well-loved for its successes in cracking down on
terrorists and drug lords, just as much as the G-men of the thirties were successful in
cracking down on racketeers and mobsters."

September 13, 1993 Interview With the Arab News Media on the Middle East
Peace Process

Question: Isn't there a difference, Mr. President, between terrorism and freedom
fighting? I mean, someone, a terrorist in someone's eyes might be a freedom fighter in
the other's. What is the defined line that divides between these two?

President Clinton: Well, I suppose it's like beauty, it may be in the eyes of the beholder.
But from the point of view of the United States, there are clear definitions of terrorism,
and one of them clearly is the willful killing of innocent civilians who themselves are not
in any way involved in military combat. That is what we seek to prevent."

September 27, 1993 Remarks to the 48th Session of the United Nations General
Assembly in
New York City

"... And terrorism, which has taken so many innocent lives, assumes a horrifying
immediacy for us here when militant fanatics bombed the World Trade Center and
planned to attack even this very hall of peace. Let me assure you, whether the fathers of
those crimes or the mass murderers who bombed Pan Am Flight 103, my Government is
determined to see that such terrorists are brought to justice.

"As a country that has over 150 different racial, ethnic and religious groups within our
borders, our policy is and must be rooted in a profound respect for all the world's
religions and cultures. But we must oppose everywhere extremism that produces
terrorism and hate. And we must pursue our humanitarian goal of reducing suffering,
fostering sustainable development, and improving the health and living conditions,
particularly for our world's children.

"Growing global stockpiles of plutonium and highly enriched uranium are raising the
danger of nuclear terrorism for all nations. We will press for an international agreement
that would
ban production of these materials for weapons forever."

October 21, 1993 Remarks at a Democratic National Committee Dinner

"... Clearly, we know if we could bring peace to the Middle East, it might revolutionize
the range of options we have with the Muslims all over the world and give us the
opportunity to beat back the forces of radicalism and terrorism that unfairly have been
identified with Islam by so many people.

We know some things for sure. But we also know that we are still working this out. Here
at home, it is the same thing. But I can tell you this: I am convinced that if we will
continue to honestly speak with one another about these issues, we'll find a way to do it."

10
December 21,1993 Remarks at the Groundbreaking Ceremony for the Pan Am
Flight 103 Memorial in Arlington, Virginia

"... On this day, 5 years ago, Pan American flight 103 was torn from the sky over the
hills of Lockerbie, Scotland. Today we assemble in solemn remembrance to dedicate a
simple monument to the victims of a savage act of terrorism.

There were on that day 189 Americans, including 25 members of our Armed Forces,
aboard Pan Am 103. We honor them. This memorial will serve as lasting testament to
the innocent who died, to the grieving who survive them, to the brave who found in
tragedy the strength and the
persistence to ensure that their children, their parents, their brothers and sisters would
not be forgotten.

I know this season must be especially difficult for all of you. I know you still see their
faces and hear their voices and feel their absence, and nothing the rest of us can do can
erase that loss. But I say to you today that our Nation will never stop pursuing justice
against those who caused it, for the attack on Pan Am 103 was an attack not only on the
individuals from 21 nations who were aboard the aircraft, it was an attack on America.

Our creed of freedom and opportunity is not a mere abstraction and neither are its
enemies. Indeed, the states that sponsor terrorism know that the American idea is a
mortal threat to their illegitimate and repressive authority. They know, too, that history,
the rising tide of democracy seen everywhere in the world, is turning against them. And
so with terrorism and any other means at their disposal, they lash back. We saw it in
Pan Am 103. We saw it at the World Trade Center. We saw it in an attempt to
assassinate former President Bush. These outlaws seek to legitimize their voice through
violence, to advance their agenda through threats, to cripple our daily lives through fear.
My friends, you and the efforts you have made are proof that they fundamentally
misunderstand the character of America.

Just a few moments ago, I had the opportunity to meet with some representatives of the
families of Pan Am 103. It was clear to me as never before that the brutality of their

11
crime only fortified your determination, and I can tell you it only fortifies the determination
of your Nation and its Government. That is why we remain determined to see that those
who murdered those who were aboard Pan Am 103 are brought to justice, why we have
demanded the surrender of the two Libyans indicted for this vicious offense, why we
have pushed for and secured tougher international sanctions against Libya, and why we
will not rest until the case is closed.

As we break ground, let us vow again that we will do all we can to protect our people.
And let us draw renewed strength from the lives of the individuals in whose memories
we come to honor."

12
1994

January 4, 1994 Remarks to Central Intelligence Agency Employees in Langley,


Virginia

"... The end of the cold war increases our security in many ways. You helped to win that
cold
war, and it is fitting that a piece of the Berlin Wall stands here on these grounds. But
even now, this new world remains dangerous and, in many ways, more complex and
more difficult to fathom. We need to understand more than we do about the challenges
of ethnic conflict, militant nationalism, terrorism, and the proliferation of all kinds of
weapons. Accurate, reliable intelligence is the key to understanding each of these
challenges. And without it, it is difficult to make good decisions in a crisis or in the long-
term."

January 14, 1994 Exchange With Reporters on Signing the Denuclearization


Agreement With Russia and Ukraine in Moscow

"... Ukraine has enhanced the security of the United States today by agreeing to
remove 1,500 nuclear warheads aimed at our Nation. Ukraine has enhanced the security
of Ukraine and Russia by agreeing to dismantle these warheads, which means that
there is less chance of nuclear accident, nuclear espionage, nuclear terrorism.

And more important, Ukraine has shown an understanding that as we move into the next
century, the greatness of nations will be defined by their ability to work with each other
and to develop the capacities of their people. And I think you will now see people all over
the world

13
more interested in working with Ukraine in partnership because of this very brave and
visionary act. So I believe that Ukraine is a stronger nation today for having done this.
And I think almost everyone else in the world will believe the same thing."

January 20, 1994 Interview With Larry King

"... I think he [Syrian President Assad] really wants to make peace. I think there are a lot
of reasons why it's in the interests of the Syrian people and in his own interest to do it,
and I think he does. I also made it clear that we still had real differences between us in
our bilateral relations, and one of them was what we feel about terrorism. And we talked
about it for an hour. And he gave his side, and I gave mine. But the American people are
entitled to know that. We talked about it for an hour—

Mr. King: Did he deny that he—

The President: We didn't skirt it. He did in a way, and he defined it in a different way, and
he made some arguments about what Syria has done and not done. But the point is, we
got it out on the table. He said what he thought; I said what I thought. And maybe most
important, we
agreed that our Secretary of State, Warren Christopher, and their Foreign Minister, Mr.
Shara, would meet and really try to get beyond the charges to very specific things, that
we would come forward with specific instances of things that we believe have been done
that are a violation of international law that cannot be tolerated, and we would try to work
through them. So I think that it was an honorable meeting from my point of view and
from the point of view of the United States because of that.

14
January 25, 1994 Address Before a Joint Session of the Congress on the State of the
Union

"... Of course, there are still dangers in the world: rampant arms proliferation, bitter
regional conflicts, ethnic and nationalist tensions in many new democracies, severe
environmental degradation the world over, and fanatics who seek to cripple the world's
cities with terror. As the world's greatest power, we must, therefore, maintain our
defenses and our responsibilities.

This year, we secured indictments against terrorists and sanctions against those who
harbor them. We worked to promote environmentally sustainable economic growth. We
achieved agreements with Ukraine, with Belarus, with Kazahkstan to eliminate
completely their nuclear arsenal.

We are working to achieve a Korean Peninsula free of nuclear weapons. We will seek
early ratification of a treaty to ban chemical weapons worldwide. And earlier today, we
joined with over 30 nations to begin negotiations on a comprehensive ban to stop all
nuclear testing.

But nothing, nothing is more important to our security than our Nation's Armed Forces

February 14, 1994The President's News Conference With President Nursultan


Nazarbayev of
Kazakhstan

"... When the Soviet Union dissolved in 1991, there were four of the New Independent
States, Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, who had Soviet strategic nuclear
weapons on their territory. One of my highest national security priorities has been to
ensure that the breakup of the former Soviet Union did not lead to the creation of new
nuclear states. Such a development would increase the risks of nuclear accidents,

15
diversion, or terrorism. That's why when I was in Minsk last month, I praised Belarus for
working to eliminate its nuclear weapons and why last month's historic agreement to
destroy over 1,800 nuclear weapons in Ukraine is so important.

... we hope is that the world will not be polarized in the way it has been in the past. We
understand fully that neither the United States nor any international organization has the
power to wipe all the troubles from the world, that as long as there are civil wars and
people are fighting one another based on differences of race or religion or ethnic group
or for political reasons, those things will probably occur as long as human beings inhabit
this planet. But we
hope the end of the cold war gives us a chance to develop a partnership with people all
around the world based on shared values and shared commitments to democracy and to
economic opportunity and to respecting borders, neighbors' borders, so that we can
focus on fighting things that we all disagree with, including the proliferation of dangerous
weapons and terrorism.

That is what I hope will happen. That is why the idea behind the Partnership For Peace
is to give us a chance to have a Europe which is not divided for the first time since nation
states have occupied the territory of Europe. We're doing our best...

March 4, 1994 The President's News Conference With President Leonid Kravchuk of
Ukraine

Question: Mr. President, the defendants in the World Trade Center bombing were all
convicted today. Do you think Americans have any reason to feel any more secure
against terrorism now than they did one year ago?

President Clinton: Well, I think the authorities did a terrific job in cracking the case. And
I'm glad to see that it has been handled in this way. I think that the signal should go out
across the world that anyone who seeks to come to this country to practice terrorism will
have the full weight of the law enforcement authorities against them, and we will do our
best to crack the cases and to bring them to justice, just as they have today. This will

16
send a very important signal around the world. And I am very gratified by the work that
was done.

March 15, 1994 Remarks at a Town Meeting in Nashua, New Hampshire

"... But let me explain why, if I might. If we can, through the judicious use of this aid,
succeed in making peace between Israel and the PLO, the Palestinians, the Syrians, the
Lebanese, the Jordanians, we will remove the huge possibility not only of another war,
which could send a lot of children from New Hampshire off to fight, but also of spreading
terrorism and weapons of mass destruction arising out of that troubled part of the world.

So can you waste money on foreign aid? You bet we can. Do we have higher priorities
here at home than a lot of things we may do? Yes, we do. Do we need to spend some
money on foreign aid in order to protect our security interest and our economic interests
long-term and diminish the threat of terrorism and the spread of weapons of destruction?
I
believe we do. And I see it now much more clearly, in all candor, than I did when I was a
candidate running. Sitting in the office, I have a totally different view of it than I did before
I came.

March 17, 1994 Remarks at the Celebration of Ireland Dinner

"... It is difficult to know what to make of the latest attacks at Heathrow Airport. Like the
violence in Hebron or in South Africa, they may be a simple reminder that reactionary
forces will always attempt to kill the peace whenever the progress and the prospect of
peace becomes a
possibility. The United States condemns such acts, as it does all acts of terrorism. As
Ireland searches for peace, I assure you that America remains steadfast in our support.

17
April 7, 1994 Statement on the Attacks on Israeli Civilians

"... On behalf of the American people, I condemn in the strongest possible terms the
murders of Israeli citizens on April 6 and 7 and offer condolences to their families. These
brutal slayings of innocent civilians are, like the massacre in Hebron, acts of terrorism
aimed at
stopping the peace negotiations now underway. The enemies of peace have not
hesitated to use violence to achieve their goal. They must not be allowed to succeed.

I call upon all those committed to the cause of peace to redouble their efforts and to
condemn unequivocally these crimes. The negotiating process holds the promise of a
better future for Israelis and Arabs alike. Prompt agreement and early implementation of
the Israel-Palestinian Declaration of Principles and progress on the bilateral negotiating
tracks are the best means to realize this goal.

April 13, 1994 Statement on the Bombing in Hadera, Israel

"... The United States strongly condemns this terrorist act. On behalf of the American
people, I want to express my condolences to the families of the innocent victims killed on
Israel's day of remembrance for those who fell in war. This action, like those before it, is
a further attempt by
extremists to derail the peace process. They must not be allowed to succeed.

We strongly support Prime Minister Rabin's pledge that he will continue the peace
negotiations regardless of such terrorist acts. We also welcome Chairman Arafat's
rejection of attacks on innocent Israeli civilians intended to strike at the peace process.
We believe the best response to the enemies of peace is to demonstrate that
negotiations can change realities on the ground and give hope to Israelis and
Palestinians for a peaceful future.

18
April 30, 1994 The President's Radio Address

"... There are other threats today that also demand our active engagement, from North
Korea's nuclear program to the efforts of Iran and other backlash states to sponsor
terrorism. We're meeting those threats with steadiness and resolve.

May 28, 1994 The President's Radio Address

"... In an age of increasing interdependence, our mission is to provide for our own
security, fighting terrorism, fighting proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, fighting
conventional threats; then to help other nations achieve economic reforms and
prosperity and become more democratic. A world of free and stable trading partners is
not only good for our economic security, it's important for our national security.

June 5, 1994 Interview With Sam Donaldson of ABC News

"... The real question is could we have what has been called a coalition of the willing
that included as many nations as would observe the sanctions as possible? The answer
to that is we would certainly consider that if we
failed at the United Nations. But keep in mind, China and Russia have both moved
toward the West. And both have interests like Japan's, South Korea's, and the United
States. None of us wish North Korea to be a nuclear power. And all of us know they
promised they wouldn't be one. All of us know they still deal with other rogue states who
support
terrorists. And we don't think this is a very good trend. So I think we'll work together. I
predict to you that we'll work out a common course. And of course what I hope is that the
North Koreans will turn away and come back to us."

19
June 7, 1994 Interview With the French Media in Paris

"... Let me make sure I understand your question by restating our position [re Algeria].
We have tried to support the current government in working with France, for example, to
reschedule their debt. But we have also encouraged this government to reach out to
dissident groups who are not involved in terrorism, who disavow terrorism. We have had
some very low-level contacts with people who, themselves, have not been involved in
terrorism. We don't support people who pursue violent means like that anywhere, and
we won't.

We hope that the present Algerian government will be able to broaden its base and
reach out and deal with those with whom it has difficulties, who feel shut out, but who
are committed to a peaceful resolution of these problems.

We are very concerned about the rise of militant fundamentalism in the Islamic states.
And the potential is enormous. There are--17 of the 22 Islamic states in the world have
declining incomes. Seventy percent of the Muslims in the world today are young people.
The potential for explosion is great. And we have a great stake in promoting
governments
like the Moroccan government, for example. King Hassan has run a very responsible
regime, has been helpful in peace in the Middle East, in many other ways. And we share
the concern that the French have for the potential of the situation in Algeria getting out of
hand. But what the
United States wants to do is to stand up against terrorism and against destructive
fundamentalism, but to stand with the people of Islam who wish to be full members of
the world community, according to the rules that all civilized people should follow.

June 8, 1994 Remarks on Receiving a Doctorate in Civil Law From Oxford University in
Oxford, United Kingdom

"... But our obligations surely go beyond memory. After all, when the soldiers of D-Day
broke through at Normandy, when the sons and daughters of democracy carried on their

20
struggle for another half-century, winning the cold war against the iron grip of totalitarian
repression, they
fought not for the past but for the present and the future. And now it falls to us to use that
hard-won freedom, to follow through in this time, expanding democracy, security,
prosperity, fighting bigotry, terrorism, slaughter, and chaos around the world.

There are-make no mistake about it-forces of disintegration at work in the world today,
and to some extent even within our own countries, that could rob our children of the
bright future for which so many of our parents gave their lives.

There are also, to be sure, forces of humanity in progress which, if they prevail, could
bring human history to its highest point of peace and prosperity. At this rare moment, we
must be prepared to move forward, for in the end, the numberless sacrifices of our
forebears brought us to precisely this, an age in which many threats to our very
existence have been brought under control for the moment.

So what shall we do with the moment? Our challenge is to unite our people around the
opportunities of peace, as those who went before us united against the dangers of war
and oppression. The great Oxford don Sir Isaiah Berlin once said, "Men do not live only
by fighting
evils; they live by positive goals, a vast variety of them, seldom predictable, at times
incompatible."

History does not always give us grand crusades, but it always gives us opportunities. It
is time to bring a spirit of renewal to the work of freedom-to work at home to tap the full
potential of our citizens, to strengthen our families and communities, to fight indifference
and intolerance; and beyond our borders, to keep our nations strong so that we can
create a new security, here especially, all across Europe; to reverse the environmental
destruction that feeds the civil wars in Africa; to halt the spread of nuclear weapons and
terrorism; to light
the lives of those still dwelling in the darkness of undemocratic rule.

21
Our work in this world, all of it, will surely take all of our lifetimes and more. But we must
keep at it, working together with steadiness and wisdom, with ingenuity and simple faith.
To those of you
here in this ancient temple of learning and those beyond who are of a younger
generation, I urge you to join this work with enthusiasm and high hope.

July 9, 1994 The President's News Conference in Naples

Question: Mr. President, could you explain to us your reluctance to clearly condemn
Islamic terrorism in Algeria, and is it a part of the global strategy vis-a-vis the Arab
world?

President Clinton: First of all, I don't think we've been reluctant at all to condemn Islamic
terrorism in Algeria or anyplace else. We deplore it, and we condemn it.

What we have sought to do in Algeria is to support a process which would enable the
government to successfully govern and to limit terrorism while recognizing any other
legitimate concerns of opposition in the country. That is our position. We do not condone
terrorism, we
condemn it, and we will continue to do so.

July 10, 1994 The President's News Conference With President Boris Yeltsin of Russia
in Naples

"... the United States and Russia joined all of the nations in expressing regret over the
death of the Italian sailors at the hands of terrorists in Algeria and reaffirmed our
opposition to terrorism anywhere, anytime."

22
July 26, 1994 The President's News Conference With King Hussein of Jordan and
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel

"... I have continued to press with our friends and neighbors, our allies, the importance
of standing up against nations which support terrorism. Trying to stem the expansion of
terrorism is a major objective of the United States. And I think that there is a good
chance that this agreement between Jordan and Israel, juxtaposed against the horrible
events in Buenos Aires and the attempt at a horrible result in London, may stiffen the
resolve of other countries around the world to help us to move against this.

And I think we must all try to do more. I am committed to do more. I think everyone in
the United States would want us to do more against terrorism. And we're going to have
to have some more help from our allies. We cannot allow the enemies of peace to
prevail.

August 19,1994 The President's News Conference

"... On the terrorism front, I can tell you that every week, several times a week, I get an
update on our efforts. And while, as you could appreciate, I cannot discuss many of
them in great detail, I believe that we are making progress. But I believe this is a
problem we'll all have to be very vigilant about for years to come.

August 24, 1994 Teleconference Remarks With B'nai B'rith

"... Building peace is extraordinarily hard work. We know that the dark forces of hatred
and terror remain deeply entrenched. In recent weeks, terrible attacks against Jews in
Argentina, Panama, and England have underscored the heinous acts some will commit
to undermine this peace process.

Among you today are members of those communities, including Joseph Harari from
Panama, who lost a nephew on the plane that was bombed from the skies over his

23
country. Mr. Harari, I pledge to you and to everyone else in this room, we'll do all that we
can to help bring the
perpetrators of this crime and the other crimes to justice. Our policy is clear: to weaken
and isolate those who reject a more peaceful future for the peoples of the troubled
region.

Two key obstacles of that future are Iraq and Iran and the radical groups they
continue to support. In the case of Iraq, we must maintain the international consensus in
favor of strict sanctions. This clear expression of international will has compelled
Saddam Hussein finally to
begin to cooperate with U.N. weapons inspectors. But the true nature of Saddam's
regime remains clear. Relief workers and weapons inspectors face constant harassment
and intimidation. Terrorism plagues the Iraqi people. Witness last month's tragic death of
a prominent Shiite leader, the summary executions of bank managers, and the recent
assassination of an Iraqi dissident in Beirut by Iraqis credited as diplomats. Baghdad
still refuses to recognize the sovereignty and borders of Kuwait. And the regime
continues to destroy the lives of the marsh Arabs of southern Iraq. These facts serve as
reminders of why we must and why we will maintain the sanctions.

Of equal importance is our effort to contain Iran, the world's leading state sponsor of
terrorism, the pledge to work with like-minded countries to meet the challenge of Iran's
support for terrorist groups, its efforts to acquire weapons of mass destruction, and its
campaign to subvert moderate regimes that have opted for peace. We must do this. We
call upon all our allies to recognize the true nature of Iranian intentions and to help us
convince Tehran that we will not tolerate rogue behavior.

Let me tell you what we are doing. First of all, you can see from the results of our efforts
to solve the World Trade Center bombing case that we are very aggressive in pursuing
these cases. We are intensifying our international cooperation, working with Argentina,
Great Britain, and Panama, and other countries, to try to help resolve who did these
terrible acts of terrorism and apprehend the perpetrators.

24
In addition to that, we are increasing our cooperation through intelligence and law
enforcement services with countries throughout the globe to try to prevent such acts
from occurring in the first place. So we're trying to intensify our efforts at prevention and
intensify our efforts at catching people when they do these terrible things.

And I think we will have some considerable success. But we must not be naive. There
are
a lot of people who have a big, vested interest in the continued misery of people in the
Middle East, the continued anxiety of Arabs, and particularly Palestinians and others.
And they hate the fact that peace is winning converts and making progress.

So as we move through the peace process, if we continue to have success, the enemies
of peace will continue to look for opportunities to make innocent people pay the price, so
that they can continue to make money and accumulate political power on the human
misery that has
dominated the Middle East for decades. So they'll be there, but we're doing what we
can, and we are putting more resources into the effort to stop them before they do it and
to catch and punish them if we're unsuccessful in stopping them in the first place.

September 12,1994 Remarks to Organizations of the Jewish


Community

"... Nurturing peace is hard work. The dark forces of terror remain deeply entrenched, as
horrible attacks against Jews in Argentina, Panama, and England recently
demonstrated. But despite these terrible acts, it's essential that the American Jewish
community continue its
support for peace and the peace process.

As we move ahead, I urge you to keep the faith, because Israel, for the first time in its
history, has the opportunity to achieve real peace. And I pledge to you that we will do our
part to make sure that it is a lasting and secure peace.

25
September 14, 1994 Interview With Wire Service Reporters on Haiti

"... We look toward the 21 st century, and we know what our problems are going to
be. We know we're going to have problems with small-scale weapons of
mass destruction. We know we're going to have problems with terrorism.
And we know that democracies are far less likely to tolerate that sort
of thing than dictatorships are. Furthermore, we know that an enormous
percentage of our economic growth and prosperity is tied to the growth
of democracy and an open trading system south of our borders. And we
have to keep it going. So those three things, human rights, immigration,
democracy, are very important.

September 17, 1994 Remarks at the Congressional Black Caucus


Foundation Dinner

"... What I want to say to you tonight is this: Our security interests in
the world are many and varied. We must first finish the work of the cold
war and remove the nuclear threat from our children's future. And we are
making real progress there. We must try to limit the spread of all
weapons of mass destruction and contain terrorism and the truly
astonishing new threat of global organized crime. We must also try to
spread a system of free economies and open trading so that as people
work together and deal with each other, their suspicions and animosities
and hatreds go down, and their sense of the practical benefits of being
more open and more free and more democratic come to them.
But we also have a special responsibility here in our own
neighborhood, even as other countries do in their own neighborhoods, to
deal with things which the world community condemns. And that is why we

26
have sought for 3 years to restore democracy to Haiti, to end violence
and terrorism and human rights violations, to see that all parties lived
up to their commitments, to keep democracy on the move in our hemisphere
and encourage those fledgling democracies to be brave and to go forward,
to stabilize the borders and the territorial integrity of all countries,
including ours.

September 26, 1994 Remarks to the 49th Session of the United Nations General
Assembly in
New York City

"... The dangers we face are less stark and more diffuse than those of
the cold war, but they are still formidable: the ethnic conflicts that
drive millions from their homes; the despots ready to repress their own
people or conquer their neighbors; the proliferation of weapons of mass
destruction; the terrorists wielding their deadly arms; the criminal
syndicates selling those arms or drugs or infiltrating the very
institutions of fragile democracy; a global economy that offers great
promise but also deep insecurity and, in many places, declining
opportunity; diseases like AIDS that threaten to decimate nations; the
combined dangers of population explosion and economic decline which
prompted the world community to reach the remarkable consensus at the
Cairo conference; global and local environmental threats that demand
that sustainable development becomes a part of the lives of people all
around the world; and finally, within many of our nations, high rates of
drug abuse and crime and family breakdown with all their terrible
consequences. These are the dangers we face today.

The United States and Russia also recognize that we must cooperate
to control the emerging danger of terrorists who traffic in nuclear

27
materials. To secure nuclear materials at their sources, we have agreed
with Russia to stop plutonium production by the year 2000, to construct
a storage facility for fissile materials and buying up stocks of
weapons-grade fuels, and to combat the criminals who are trying to
smuggle materials for nuclear explosives.
Our two nations and Germany have increased cooperation and engaged
in joint terrorist training. Soon, under the leadership of our Federal
Bureau of Investigation, we will open a law enforcement training academy
in Europe, where police will learn how to combat more effectively
trafficking of nuclear weapons components as well as the drug trade,
organized crime, and money laundering.
The United States will also advance a wide-ranging nonproliferation
agenda, a global convention to halt production of fissile materials,
efforts to curb North Korea's nuclear ambitions, transparent procedures
for dismantling nuclear warheads, and our work to ban testing and extend
the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

September 27, 1994 Remarks Welcoming President Boris Yeltsin of


Russia

"... Together, we are working to bring peace to Bosnia, to the Middle


East, to Nagorno-Karabakh. Together, we will build an international
space station and explore the solar system. Together, we will carry the
fight against transnational problems like terrorism, environmental
degradation, and organized crime. Together, we can and we will make a
difference not only for our own people but also for men, women, and
children all around the world.

28
October 15, 1994 The President's Radio Address

"... Good morning. I want to begin by expressing my profound shock and


abhorrence at the death of Corporal Nahshon Waxman as a result of his
kidnaping by Hamas terrorists.
On behalf of the American people, Hillary and I want to convey our
deepest sympathy to the Waxman family and to the people of Israel at
this dark moment. Nahshon Waxman was a son of Israel, but he was also a
son of America.
Terrorists must know that these acts will not defeat the process
that is bringing peace to Israel and her Arab neighbors. In the face of
such cowardly and evil actions, I know it's hard to go forward. But we
owe it to all those who have paid such a heavy price to persist and
finally to prevail in the pursuit of peace in the Middle East.
Our efforts to achieve a comprehensive peace in the Middle East are
part of an overall strategy to enhance American security and broaden
American opportunities in the post-cold-war world by promoting
democracy, increasing trade, and reducing the threat of terror, chaos,
and weapons of mass destruction.

October 17, 1994 Remarks to the International Association of Chiefs of Police in


Albuquerque, New Mexico

"... I want to tell you a story about the-since this is an international


organization, one of the things that I have really tried to do as
President is to build international cooperation in law enforcement. It's
important in dealing with drugs. It's important in dealing with
terrorism. It's important in dealing with organized crime.
Lee Brown and Tom Constantine, both of them, as you know, have major
responsibilities that go beyond our Nation's borders, as you would
expect, in dealing with the drug problems. But the FBI Director, Mr.
Freeh, also took a very popular trip to Europe and to Russia not very

29
long ago, and slightly after that, when I was following him instead of
the other way around, I went to Riga, Latvia, to celebrate the
withdrawal of Russian forces from Eastern Europe for the first time
since World War II and from the Baltic States. And we had this meeting
with the heads of the government of Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia. And
so help me, the first thing the President of Latvia said is, "Can we
have an FBI office in Riga?" [Laughter]
Now, it's funny, and it's flattering, but it's also serious. Why?
Because as these countries convert from totalitarian societies to free
societies, as they become much more open, they become much more
vulnerable to organized crime because they haven't developed their
banking system and their trading rules and their business rules. And
that relates to whether they, themselves, then become more vulnerable to
drug trafficking and to terrorism and to trafficking in weapons of mass
destruction or stolen nuclear materials or any of that sort of thing. So
I say to you, I'll make you a prediction: For the next 10 years when you
meet, more and more and more, your concentration will have to be on the
international aspects of the crime problem which affects what you do on
the streets in your cities and towns throughout the United States.

October 19, 1994 Statement on the Terrorist Attack in Tel Aviv, Israel

"... The terrorist bombing this morning in Tel Aviv is an outrage against
the conscience of the world. Our thoughts and prayers are with the
Government and people of Israel at this terrible moment, especially the
families of those killed and wounded in this criminal act.
This attack comes at a moment when we are rejoicing in the progress
which has been made toward a real and lasting peace in the Middle East.
The terrorists who committed this act are enemies of that peace and
enemies of all those who are working to create a better future for the
people of the region. Their violence is aimed at destroying the hopes of
the Palestinian people as surely as it is directed at the people of

30
Israel. They must not be allowed to succeed. I call upon leaders in the
Middle East and throughout the world to condemn this act and to ensure
that there is no haven or support for those responsible. Together, we
will ensure that the promise of peace for which we have worked so long
is realized.

October 24, 1994 Interview With Chuck Meyer of WWWE Radio in Cleveland, Ohio

"... But I'm going to Syria because achieving a full peace in the Middle
East requires a peace between Israel and Syria, which will make possible
a peace between Israel and Lebanon. And that would be a huge plus for
the United States and all the world to have a comprehensive peace there.
I'm going because progress has been made. Terrorism is still an issue
with Syria, and it will continue to be. But it seems clear to me that
the best way to end terrorism in the Middle East is to have a
comprehensive peace settlement there. And I do believe we're making
progress. And I think if I go to Syria we will make further progress.
Since I am in the region, I think that I ought to keep working and not
just celebrate what we've done already, but to keep making progress
toward the future.

October 25, 1994 Remarks on Departure for the Middle East

"... For all the progress toward peace, indeed, because of that progress,
we have witnessed a new wave of terrorism and violence. No step on this
long journey requires more patience, more discipline, more courage than
the steps still to come. At this crucial moment, the people of the
Middle East stand at a crossroads. In one direction lies the dark past
of violence, terrorism, and insecurity that desperate enemies of peace
seek to prolong. In the other lies a brighter future, a brighter future
that Israel and all her Arab neighbors can achieve if they have

31
the courage to stand up to violence, to terrorism, to mistrust, to build
that future.
Above all else, I go to the Middle East to deliver one clear
message: The United States stands by those who, in the words of the
Psalms, "seek peace and pursue it." And we stand up to those who
threaten to destroy the dream that has brought us to this historic
moment.
Standing up for peace in this region includes countering the
aggressive acts of Iraq's toward its neighbors. Like our troops around
the world, the men and women of our Armed Forces stationed in Kuwait are
the strength behind our pledge to support peace and security. They are
doing a magnificent job, and I want them to know how proud all Americans
are of their efforts. When I visit them on Friday, I know I'll carry the
good wishes of all their fellow Americans, just as I know all Americans
will pray this week for the progress toward peace as we witness this
historic treaty and carry the peace process forward.
Thank you very much.

October 26, 1994 Remarks to the Jordanian Parliament in Amman, Jordan

"... Now, at a time when those who preached hate and terror
pose the greatest threat to the cause of peace, President Eisenhower's
response still holds true. Thirty-five years ago he told Your Majesty,
"Our country knows what you have done. Believe me, we won't let you
down."
Both of us, Jordan and America, are fighting the same battle. Today,
that battle is the struggle for peace. And I say again, on behalf of the
United States, we will not let you down.

But in the Middle East, as elsewhere across the world, the United

32
States does see a contest, a contest between forces that transcend
civilization, a contest between tyranny and freedom, terror and
security, bigotry and tolerance, isolation and openness. It is the age-old
struggle between fear and hope.
This is the conflict that grips the Middle East today. On one side
stand the forces of terror and extremism, who cloak themselves in the
rhetoric of religion and nationalism but behave in ways that contradict
the very teachings of their faith and mock their patriotism. These
forces of reaction feed on disillusionment, on poverty, on despair. They
stoke the fires of violence. They seek to destroy the progress of this
peace. To them, I say: You cannot succeed. You will not succeed. You
must not succeed, for you are the past, not the future.

October 26, 1994 The President's News Conference With President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt in
Cairo

"... We also discussed a matter of great urgency, the absolute necessity


to combat Hamas and all other extremist groups using terror to
perpetuate hatred. We agreed that the same courage is needed to fight
the enemies of peace that Chairman Arafat showed in making peace.
I want to reaffirm that the United States will stand with all
friends of peace. Terrorists must not be allowed-must not be allowed-
to intimidate the peoples of this region into abandoning the peace
process. At this moment of opportunity, those who perpetuate violence
pose the greatest threat to the Palestinian people and to all Arab
people. The enemies of peace are desperate, but they must not defeat the
hopeful forces of the future.

... let me say that what we want to do with regard to Hamas and these other
terrorist groups is to try to move to put pressure on all points of support for them
that we are able to determine. And that would include an effort that would go

33
beyond Iran.
Obviously, there are things that can be done that are well-known to
all of you in the form of refraining from having economic relations. And
we're going to ask all of our friends throughout the world to support
this, all the people who are the friends of peace and the enemies of
terrorism. We ask them to recognize that they cannot have it both ways.

October 27, 1994 Remarks to the Knesset in Jerusalem, Israel

"... We grieve with the families of those who are lost and with all the
people of Israel. So long as Jews are murdered just because they are
Jews or just because they are citizens of Israel, the plague of anti-
Semitism lives, and we must stand against it. We must stand against
terror as strongly as we stand for peace, for without an end to terror
there can be no peace.
The forces of terror and extremism still threaten us all. Sometimes
they pretend to act in the name of God and country. But their deeds
violate their own religious faith and make a mockery of any notion of
honorable patriotism.
As I said last night to the Parliament in Jordan, we respect Islam.
Millions of American citizens every day answer the Moslem call to
prayer. But we know that the real fight is not about religion or
culture. It is about a worldwide conflict between those who believe in
peace and those who believe in terror, those who believe in hope and
those who believe in fear.
Those who stoke the fires of violence and seek to destroy the peace,
make no mistake about it, have one great goal. Their goal is to make the
people of Israel, who have defeated all odds on the field of battle, to
give up inside on the peace by giving in to the doubts that terror
brings to every one of us. But having come so far, you cannot give up or
give in. Your future must lie in the words of a survivor of the carnage
of bus number 5 who said, "I want the peace process to continue. I want

34
to live in peace. I want my children to live in peace."
So let us say to the merchants of terror once again: You cannot
succeed. You must not succeed. You will not succeed. You are the past,
not the future. The peacemakers are the future.

October 27, 1994 The President's News Conference With President Hafiz al-Asad of
Syria
in Damascus

"... Peace must also be secure for both sides. Security for one side
should not come at the expense of the other's security. Peace must
guarantee security against surprise attack by any side. And peace must
enable the parties to invest in economic development, rather than
military might.
All sides must enjoy stability and tranquillity. Violence must
cease. Borders must no longer be subject to aggression, terrorist
infiltration, violent acts, or bombardment. The murderous acts of terror
that we have witnessed over the past weeks have two targets: first,
innocent people who have been killed and wounded; and second, the very peace that
President Asad supports. All who work for peace must condemn these
terrorist acts. President Asad and I agree that the peace process allows
no place for the killing of innocent civilians.
I also told President Asad of my desire to see the relations between
our two nations improve. In an era of peace, improved relations would
benefit both countries and improve regional stability and security.
Finally, I want to tell the Syrian people how very glad I am to have
the opportunity to visit your country, if only briefly. Like your
neighbors in Israel, you have waited too long and have suffered too much
to be further denied the hope for a new and better future.
On behalf of the American people, I pledge that I will work with
President Asad to do everything possible to make real this new and
peaceful future.

35
October 28, 1994 Remarks to United States and Coalition Troops at Tactical
Assembly Area Liberty in Kuwait

"... Our ultimate goal is peace, and that requires even more than
military might. It requires the courage to go beyond conflict to
reconciliation. Two days ago I witnessed a brilliant example of that
along the border between Israel and Jordan. I applaud the leaders of
Israel, Jordan, and others in the Middle East who are turning away from
a violent past toward a future of peace. This is difficult and dangerous
work, as the vicious terrorist attacks in recent days have shown. The
people behind those acts want to prevent peace. They want to perpetuate
hatred. They want to undermine your mission. They cannot succeed. They
must not succeed. And they will not succeed.

November 11,1994 Remarks at the Anchorage Museum of Art and


History

"... The most amazing part of the trip I took to the Middle East, when
Hillary and I went over there for the signing, that didn't-l don't
think it made a lot of impression here at home, and it had the biggest
impact, I think, there-the opportunity I had to stand in the Jordanian
Parliament and tell those folks that we had millions of Americans that
answered the Muslim call to prayer every day and that we respected
Islam. We knew there was nothing in their religion that would divide us,
that would promote terrorism, that would be destructive of our values,
and that the things that we opposed that we saw-the terrorism there in
the Middle East is something that we oppose anywhere, anyplace, coming
from any group of people. And it was stunning. They had never really
thought about it before, that America was a place that all who share our
values and obey our laws can call home.

36
November 23, 1994 Remarks on the General Agreement on Tariffs and
Trade

" . . . I also want to make a brief announcement today. As part of our


ongoing nonproliferation efforts, Kazakhstan has delivered into our
security nuclear materials capable of making some 20 nuclear weapons.
That means that one more threat of nuclear terrorism and proliferation
has been removed from the world. Today-this is a good day-we are
making progress toward making our people more secure and more
prosperous.

37
1995

January 22, 1995 Statement on the Terrorist Bombing in Israel

I condemn in the strongest possible terms this horrendous act of


terrorist violence. Once again, the enemies of peace have struck down
innocent people in an evil effort to destroy the hopes of peaceful
coexistence between Israelis and Arabs.
I call on all those who have chosen the path of peace to condemn
this act and redouble their efforts to achieve a secure and lasting
peace. The perpetrators of terrorism and their sponsors are determined
to stop us from achieving this goal. I repeat what I said to them in the
Middle East last October: "You cannot succeed. You will not succeed.
You must not succeed, for you are the past, not the future."
On behalf of the American people, I extend our condolences and
deepest sympathy to the families of the victims.

January 24, 1995 Address Before a Joint Session of the Congress on the State of the
Union

This year I'll submit to Congress comprehensive legislation to


strengthen our hand in combating terrorists, whether they strike at home
or abroad. As the cowards who bombed the World Trade Center found out,
this country will hunt down terrorists and bring them to justice.
Just this week, another horrendous terrorist act in Israel killed 19
and injured scores more. On behalf of the American people and all of
you, I send our deepest sympathy to the families of the victims. I know
that in the face of such evil, it is hard for the people in the Middle
East to go forward. But the terrorists represent the past, not the
future. We must and we will pursue a comprehensive peace between Israel
and all her neighbors in the Middle East.

38
Accordingly, last night I signed an Executive order that will block
the assets in the United States of terrorist organizations that threaten
to disrupt the peace process. It prohibits financial transactions with
these groups. And tonight I call on all our allies and peace-loving
nations throughout the world to join us with renewed fervor in a global
effort to combat terrorism. We cannot permit the future to be marred by
terror and fear and paralysis.
From the day I took the oath of office, I pledged that our Nation
would maintain the best equipped, best trained, and best prepared
military on Earth. We have, and they are. They have managed the dramatic
downsizing of our forces after the cold war with remarkable skill and spirit. But to make
sure our military is ready for action and to provide the pay and the
quality of life the military and their families deserve, I'm asking the
Congress to add $25 billion in defense spending over the next 6 years.
I have visited many bases at home and around the world since I
became President. Tonight I repeat that request with renewed conviction.
We ask a very great deal of our Armed Forces. Now that they are smaller
in number, we ask more of them. They go out more often to more different
places and stay longer. They are called to service in many, many ways.
And we must give them and their families what the times demand and what
they have earned.

January 31, 1995 Statement on the Terrorist Attack in Algeria

The United States condemns in the strongest possible terms the


terrible atrocity in Algiers yesterday which took the lives of dozens of
innocent Algerians and wounded hundreds more. On behalf of the American
people, I want to express my deepest sympathy to the Government of
Algeria and to the families of the victims. Such indiscriminate and
senseless terror cannot be excused or justified. It can only serve to
deepen the profound crisis and increase the suffering through which
Algeria is now living.

39
This outrage comes just one week after a similar terrorist bombing
in Israel. Whether in Netanya or Algiers, extremism, violence, and
terror must not silence the voices of those who work for peace and
reconciliation. It is our profound hope that reason and dialog can
transcend violence and hate and that a better future can be realized for
all the people of Algeria.

February 8, 1995 Statement on the Apprehension of Ramzi Ahmed Yusuf

This evening in New York, Ramzi Ahmed Yusuf, one of the world's most
sought after suspected terrorists, was placed in Federal detention.
Yusuf is under indictment as a key figure in the 1993 bombing of the New
York World Trade Center. He was on the FBI's Most Wanted List.
Yusuf was recently arrested by Pakistan and turned over to U.S.
authorities in accordance with the requirements of international law.
I especially want to thank all involved in this important process.
This arrest is a major step forward in the fight against terrorism.
Terrorism will not pay. Terrorists will pay. We will continue to work
with other nations to thwart those who would kill innocent citizens to
further their own political aims.
The Executive order I signed last month to stop fundraising for
Middle East terrorist groups and my proposed omnibus antiterrorism act
will greatly strengthen our abilities to act quickly and decisively
against this threat to peace. The budget I submitted earlier this week
maintains the vigorous law enforcement, intelligence, and diplomatic
capabilities the United States requires to act effectively against
terrorism on all fronts.
We and other members of the international community will continue to
dedicate ourselves to the cause of peace and to unite against those who
threaten innocent lives.

40
February 9, 1995 The President's News Conference With Chancellor Helmut Kohl of
Germany

Q. Mr. President, what can you tell us about the arrest of this
terrorist suspect in Pakistan? And what are the ramifications, in your
opinion, for terrorist cells or networks or the breakup of these groups
here in the United States and abroad?

The President: I can tell you that I'm very pleased about it, and
that-obviously, there are some things that are better left unsaid, but
I would refer back to the statement that I issued. This country is
serious about combating terrorism. We are going to put a lot of
resources and effort into it. The Attorney General today is releasing
the legislation that we are sending to the Hill that we very much hope
will pass with bipartisan support. And this should be further evidence
that we take this problem very seriously, for ourselves, and for our
friends, and the friends of freedom around the world. And we continue to
stay after it. And I'm very pleased about it.

February 12, 1995 Remarks at a Meeting With Middle Eastern Leaders

Thank you, Mr. Secretary. And thank you, all of you, for coming to
this very important meeting. It is no secret to anyone in the world that
we are at a critical moment in the peace process. We cannot allow the
rise of terror again to threaten this peace, or as Chairman Arafat said
the other day, we cannot allow it to kill the Palestinian dream.
We are prepared in this country to redouble our efforts to get the
peace process back in full gear. We are doing what we can on our own and
with others to deal with the problem of terror.
I want to begin by saying a special word of appreciation to
President Mubarak for the Cairo summit. He has been involved in this

41
process all along, and I think that the Cairo summit produced a clear
statement by the leaders of all of you here represented that we are not
going to let terror hold sway, that we are not going to let the peace
process collapse. Today it is for us to begin to take the specific steps
necessary to have the message of peace and renewed commitment carried
out.
I think it's clear that we have to complete phase two of the Israel-
Palestinian Agreement. I think it's clear that we have to fully
implement the peace treaty between Jordan and Israel. I think it is
clear that we have to bring some economic benefits of peace as quickly
as we possibly can.

The negotiations that you have already concluded have built a


framework for peace. What we have to do now is to have specific
achievements, lasting achievements. We will do our part. We are as
committed today as we have ever been to a comprehensive peace. I wish
the representatives of Syria and Lebanon were around this table; they
are not here only because there has been no peace agreement signed with
them. But I know you all join me in saying that our work will never be
completed until we are all around a table as partners working for peace.
Now, there are many other things I could discuss today, but I mostly
want to say to you, the United States is still committed to this, more
strongly than ever. We are ready to do our part. We are ready to do our
part economically. We are certainly ready to do our part in fighting
terror. But we all have to do this together. And I hope that this
meeting will produce further specific steps that we can all take to keep
doing it together. We cannot let people believe that they can disrupt
the rational, humane, decent course of history by terror.

42
March 1,1995 Remarks to the Nixon Center for Peace and Freedom Policy
Conference

"... from our first day in office, this administration has


chosen to reach out, not retreat. From our efforts to open markets for
America, to support democracy around the world, to reduce the threat
posed by devastating weapons and terrorists, to maintaining the most
effective fighting force in the world, we have worked to seize the
opportunities and meet the obligations of this moment.

But above all now, I ask you to imagine the dangers that our
children and grandchildren, even after the cold war is over, still can
face if we do not do everything we can to reduce the threat of nuclear
arms, to curb the terrible chemical and biological weapons spreading
around the world, to counter the terrorists and criminals who would put
these weapons into the service of evil. As Arthur Vandenberg asked at
the dawn of the nuclear age, after a German V-1 attack had left London
in flames and its people in fear, "How can there be isolation when men
can devise weapons like that?"

Now, in this year of decision, our ambition for the future must be
even more ambitious. If our people are to know real lasting security, we
have to redouble our arms control, nonproliferation, and antiterrorism
efforts. We have to do everything we can to avoid living with the 21st
century version of fallout shelters and duck-and-cover exercises, to
prevent another World Trade Center tragedy.

March 8,1995 Statement on the Terrorist Attack in Pakistan

The attack on American diplomatic personnel in Pakistan today


outrages all Americans. I have instructed relevant U.S. Government
agencies to work with the Government of Pakistan to apprehend the

43
perpetrators of this cowardly act. I want to thank the Government of
Pakistan for the excellent cooperation it has already provided.
Our hearts go out to the families of Gary Durell, a communicator,
and Jacqueline van Landingham, a consulate secretary, who were killed.
We pray for the speedy recovery of Mark McCloy, a consulate spouse, who
was wounded.
Attacks such as these should make the international community
rededicate itself to efforts to stamp out terrorism everywhere.

April 5, 1995 The President's News Conference With President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt

Egypt and the United States share a determination to confront and to


defeat all those who would undermine peace and security through the use
of terror and weapons of mass destruction. President Mubarak told me of
Egypt's regional proliferation concerns and of its commitment to a
strong, universal Non-Proliferation Treaty and to a Middle East that is
free of all weapons of mass destruction. The United States shares those
goals.
To create the confidence and security that will make those aims a
reality, we must continue to do all we can to bring a comprehensive and
lasting peace to the Middle East. For the same reason, I believe we must
ensure that the NPT is strong and as enduring as possible. Indefinite
and unconditional extension of NPT is vital to achieving the goals that
we both share.
When President Mubarak and I first met here 2 years ago, he told me
that together we could help to make a just and comprehensive peace in
the Middle East. He was right. We have worked side by side to fulfill
that vision. Doing so, we have deepened the friendship between our two
nations. Our goal is now within grasp, and America is proud to be
Egypt's partner on this great mission.

44
April 11, 1995 The President's News Conference With Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto
of Pakistan

In our talks the Prime Minister and I also discussed issues of


global concern, including peacekeeping and the fight against terrorism
and narcotics trafficking. I want to thank Prime Minister Bhutto and the
Pakistani officers and soldiers who have worked so closely with us in
many peacekeeping operations around the globe, most recently in Haiti,
where more than 800 Pakistanis are taking part in the United Nations
operation.
On the issue of terrorism, I thank the Prime Minister for working
with us to capture Ramzi Yusuf, one of the key suspects in the bombing
in the World Trade Center. We also reviewed our joint efforts to bring
to justice the cowardly terrorist who murdered two fine Americans in
Karachi last month. I thanked the Prime Minister for Pakistan's effort
in recent months to eradicate opium poppy cultivation, to destroy heroin
laboratories, and just last week, to extradite two major traffickers to
the United States. We would like this trend to continue.

April 19, 1995 Exchange With Reporters Prior to Discussions With Prime Minister
Tansu Ciller of Turkey

"... for the Europeans, as you move toward the Customs Union and other things, these
issues are quite important. And they're very important to the United States. But I have
tried to also view them in the context of the imperative to fight terrorism and to promote
human rights. And I think you have to do both. Preserving a democracy in which people
have human freedom is a delicate operation. And it requires not only a lot of sensitivity
and understanding, it requires a lot of discipline and respect for other people's rights as
well. And the biggest threat to human rights all over the world today, after the—in the
aftermath of the cold war when people now know that dictatorial political systems don't
work, that totalitarian systems don't work, the biggest threat to human rights is the

45
reaction caused by terrorism everywhere. And that is something we have to be sensitive
to, whether it's a car bomb blowing up in the Middle East or a religious fanatic taking a
vial of sarin into the subway in Japan. All these things threaten the fabric of human
rights.

So we have to continue to push governments all over the world to be more open to
human rights and combat terrorism at the same time.

April 20, 1995 The President's News Conference With President Fernando Cardoso
of Brazil

I would say, first of all, that we are working very hard to strengthen the ability of the
United States to resist acts of terror. We have increased our efforts in law enforcement,
through the FBI and the CIA. We have increased our ability to cut off money used for
such purposes. We have increased our capacity to track the materials that can be used
to destroy people. I have sent legislation to the Congress, as you know, that would
increase this capacity even further.

I have done everything I could and our administration has to bring home suspected
terrorists for trial from Pakistan, from Egypt, from the Philippines, from elsewhere. We
are moving aggressively. Today I have ordered new steps to be taken to secure Federal
facilities throughout the United States.

April 21, 1995 Remarks and an Exchange With Reporters on the Oklahoma City
Bombing

Today I want to say a special word of thanks to the Justice


Department, under the able leadership of the Attorney General, to
Director Freeh and all the hundreds of people in the FBI who have worked
on this case, to the men and women of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and

46
Firearms, to all the Federal authorities, and to all the State and local
enforcement officials, especially those in Oklahoma who have been
working on this case. And of course, I'd like to say a personal thanks,
as I know all Americans would, to the Oklahoma lawman whose vigilance
led to the initial arrest of the suspect.
As I said on Wednesday, justice for these killers will be certain,
swift, and severe. We will find them. We will convict them. And we will
seek the death penalty for them.
Finally, I know I speak for all Americans when once again I extend
our deepest thanks to the brave men and women who are still involved in
the rescue teams. Let us not forget them. There is a lot of work for
them still to do. It is difficult, and it is often heartbreaking now.

Maybe it would be helpful-let me just take a few moments to talk


about what we have been doing for the last couple of years before the
Oklahoma City incident, because I think it is apparent to any observant
person that all civilized societies have to be on their guard against
terrorism.
We have increased the countertenrorism budgets and resources of the
FBI and the CIA. We arrested a major terrorist ring in New York before
they could consummate their plans to blow up the U.N. and tunnels in New
York City. We've retrieved terrorists who have fled abroad, as I said
yesterday, from Pakistan, the Philippines, from Egypt, and elsewhere. We
broke up a major terrorist ring before they could consummate their plans
to blow up airplanes flying over the Pacific. We brought together all
the various agencies of the Federal Government that would be involved in
rescue and in response to a terrorist action and did a comprehensive
practice earlier. And some of that work, I think, was seen in the very
efficient way that they carried out their work at Oklahoma City.
And finally, let me say, there's been a lot of activity that the
public does not see, most of which I should not comment on. But let me

47
give you one example. There was one recent incident of which I was~or
with which I was intimately familiar, which involved a quick and secret
deployment of a major United States effort of FBI and FEMA and Public
Health Service and Army personnel because we had a tip of a possible
terrorist incident, which, thank goodness, did not materialize. But we
went to the place, and we were ready. We were ready to try to prevent
it. And if it occurred, we were ready to respond.
So we have been on top of this from the beginning. Finally, let me
say, I issued the Executive order which gives us the ability to try to
control funding more strictly. And I have sent counterterrorism
legislation to the Hill, which I hope will be acted upon quickly when
they return.

I think Americans can be secure that our country has


able law enforcement officials, that we work together well, that we have
prevented terrorist activities from occurring, that, obviously, every
civilized society is at risk of this sort of thing. I cannot, I must not
comment on any of the specific people involved in this investigation at
this time.

April 23, 1995 Interview on CBS1 "60 Minutes"

I have sent a counterterrorism-a piece of legislation to Capitol Hill which


hope Congress will pass. And after consultation with the Attorney
General, the FBI Director, and others, I'm going to send some more
legislation to Congress to ask them to give the FBI and others more
power to crack these terrorist networks, both domestic and foreign.
We still will have freedom of speech. We'll have freedom of
association. We'll have freedom of movement. But we may have to have

48
some discipline in doing it so we can go after people who want to
destroy our very way of life.
You know, we accepted a minor infringement on our freedom, I guess,
when the airport metal detectors were put up, but they went a long way
to stop airplane hijackings and the explosion of planes and the
murdering of innocent people. We're going to have to be very, very tough
and firm in dealing with this. We cannot allow our country to be subject
to the kinds of things these poor people in Oklahoma City have been
through in the last few days.

I've renewed my call in the Congress to pass the antiterrorism


legislation that's up there, that I've sent. I have determined to send
some more legislation to the Hill that will strengthen the hand of the
FBI and other law enforcement officers in cracking terrorist networks,
both domestic and foreign. I have instructed the Federal Government to
do a preventive effort on all Federal buildings that we have today. And
we're going to rebuild Oklahoma City.
Now, over and above that, I have asked the Attorney General, the FBI
Director, and the National Security Adviser to give me a set of things,
which would go into a directive, about what else we should do. I don't
want to prejudge this issue.

We have been working hard to try to get the legal support we need to
move against terrorism, to try to make sure that we can find out who's
doing these kind of things before they strike. But I do think there are
some other things that we can do.
At one point people thought we couldn't do anything about airplanes,
but we made some progress, significant progress, because of things like
airport metal detectors and other sophisticated devices. And we'll

49
tackle this. We'll make progress on this. We'll unravel it. But it is
true that in a free society that is very open, where technological
changes bring great opportunity, they also make it possible to do
destructive things on the cheap-to use your phrase.
So we're going to have to double up, redouble up our efforts and
then figure out what to do about this. But we'll move on it, and I am
confident that I'll have some further recommendations in the near
future.

April 26, 1995 Remarks on Counter-terrorism Initiatives and an Exchange With


Reporters

I asked the leaders of Congress from both parties to


come to the White House today because I know that we have a shared
commitment to do everything we possibly can to stamp out the kind of
vicious behavior we saw in Oklahoma City. Everyone here is determined to
do that, and I want us to work together to get the job done.
On Sunday, I announced the first series of steps we must take to
combat terrorism in America. Today I'm announcing further measures,
grounded in common sense and steeled with force. These measures will
strengthen law enforcement and sharpen their ability to crack down on
terrorists wherever they're from, be it at home or abroad. This will arm
them with investigative tools, increased enforcement, and tougher
penalties.
I say, again: Justice in this case must be swift, certain, and
severe. And for anyone who dares to sow terror on American land, justice
must be swift, certain, and severe. We must move on with law enforcement measures
quickly. We must move so that we can prevent this kind of thing from happening again.
We cannot allow our entire country to be subjected to the horror that the people of
Oklahoma
City endured. We can prevent it and must do everything we can to prevent

50
it. I know that we would do this together without regard to party, and
I'm looking forward to this discussion of it.

April 28, 1995 Remarks on Presenting the Teacher of the Year Award

Sunday I announced the first in a series of new steps to combat


terrorism in America, whatever its source. Wednesday I invited
Republican and Democratic leaders from the Congress to the White House
to do more. I announced at that time I would send to Congress new
legislation designed to crack down on terrorism. These new measures will
give law enforcement expanded investigative powers, increased
enforcement capacities, and tougher penalties to use against those who
commit terrorist acts.
I'm encouraged so far by the response from Members of Congress in
both parties. And I say again, Congress must move quickly to pass this
legislation. The American people want us to stop terrorism. They want us
to put away anyone involved in it. We must not allow politics to drag us
into endless quibbling over an important national item. We must not
delay the work we have to do to keep the American people safe and to try
to prevent further acts of this kind. We must allow the American people
to get on with their lives, and all of that is caught up in this
measure. I have put tough legislation on the table. It reassures the
American people that we are doing all we can to protect them and, most
importantly, their children. We must not dawdle or delay. Congress must
act and act promptly.

April 30, 1995 Remarks at the World Jewish Congress Dinner in New York City

Since the beginning of our administration we have taken broad and


swift measures to fight terrorism here and abroad. We have brought to

51
trial the alleged bombers of the World Trade Center, who struck at the
heart of this city. We have actively pursued those who crossed the line
into illegal and violent activity. We have taken strong actions against
nations who harbor terrorists or support their bloody trade. We have
worked to prevent acts of terror, sometimes with remarkable success. And
in a world where open borders and new technologies make our job harder,
we have worked closer and closer with other nations to unravel the
networks of terror and hunt down those who threaten our people.
But the tragedy of Oklahoma City and its aftermath have made it
clear that we must take stronger steps. This week I asked Congress to
approve my antiterrorism initiatives: the power to hire 1,000 new
Federal officials in law enforcement and support to create a new
counterterrorism center under the direction of the FBI; to authorize the
military to use its special capabilities in incidents involving
chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons of terror in our country. Our
proposals would also allow us to tag materials used to make bombs so
that suspects could be more easily traced.
Although no one can guarantee freedom from terror, at least these
common sense steps will help to make our people safer. So tonight I
appeal again to Congress to pass these measures without delay.

While we take these actions at home, we must also continue and


strengthen our fight against terror around the world. Tonight I want to
speak to you about terrorism in the Middle East, about rogue nations who
sponsor death in order to kill peace and what we can do further to
contain them.
From the beginning of my Presidency, our policy in the Middle East
has run on two tracks. Support for the peace process that reconciles
Israel and her neighbors: I have been honored to work with Prime
Minister Rabin and Foreign Minister Peres and their government and the
people of Israel in that regard. And the policy of the United States has
been the correct one, that we would never seek to impose a peace on
Israel and her neighbors, but if Israel takes risks for peace we will be

52
there to minimize those risks and maximize the chances of success. And
we are ahead of where we were 2 years ago, and by God's grace, we will
continue to make progress in the years ahead. I am especially proud of
this work that we have all been able to do and particularly proud of the
work of Secretary Christopher in this regard.
But the second part of our policy in the Middle East is also
important: opposition to all those who would derail the peace process,
promote terrorism, or develop weapons of mass destruction. The dangers
remain great. The closer we come to achieving peace and normalcy in the
region, the more desperate become the enemies of peace. On buses and
along busy streets, terrorist attacks have claimed innocent lives, and
we grieve with the families of the victims.
We have strengthened our efforts to act against groups like Hamas
and Hezbollah, and we are encouraging Chairman Arafat in his efforts to
crack down on arrests and prosecute those extremists who resort to
violence. But individuals and extremist groups are not the only threat.
Israel shares the lands of the Middle East with nations who still seek
to destroy the peace, nations like Iran and Iraq and Libya. They aim to
destabilize the region. They harbor terrorists within their borders.
They establish and support terrorist base camps in other lands. They
hunger for nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction. Every day,
they put innocent civilians in danger and stir up discord among nations.
Our policy toward these rogue states is simple: They must be contained.
Iran has presented a particular problem to the peace process of the
peoples of the Middle East. From the beginning of our administration, we
have moved to counter Iran's support of international terrorism and in
particular its backing for violent opponents of peace in the Middle
East.

My fellow Americans, I speak especially to you when I say that many


people have argued passionately that the best route to change Iranian

53
behavior is by engaging the country. Unfortunately, there is no evidence
to support that argument. Indeed, the evidence of the last 2 years
suggest exactly the reverse. Iran's appetite for acquiring and
developing nuclear weapons and the missiles to deliver them has only
grown larger. Even as prospects for the peace in the Middle East have
grown, Iran has broadened its role as an inspiration and paymaster to
terrorists. And there is nothing to suggest that further engagement will
alter that course.

I am convinced that instituting a trade embargo with Iran is the most


effective way our Nation can help to curb that nation's drive to acquire
devastating weapons and its continued support for terrorism.

It would be wrong to do nothing. It would be wrong to do nothing as


Iran continues its pursuit of nuclear weapons. It would be wrong to
stand pat in the face of overwhelming evidence of Tehran's support for
terrorists that would threaten the dawn of peace.
Securing a lasting and comprehensive peace must be our urgent
priority. The heart of our efforts, of course, is the continuing strong
relationship between the United States and Israel. But we must make it
work by standing against those who would wreck the peace and destroy the
future even if peace is made.

the great challenge for the 21st century will be how to see the opportunities presented by
technology, by free movement of people, by the openness of society, by the shrinking of
the borders between nations without being absolutely consumed by the dangers and
threats that those same forces present.

54
That is the challenge of the 21st century because evil has not been
uprooted from human nature, and the more open and the more flexible we
are, the more vulnerable we are to the forces of organized evil. That is
what you saw in Oklahoma City. That is what you saw in the terrible
incident with the religious fanatic taking a little vial of poison gas
in the subway in Japan. That is what I see when I go to Russia and what
they really want from me now is an FBI office because organized crime is
taking over their banks. Or when I went to the Baltics, and in Riga what
they really want is some law enforcement help because now that the
totalitarian regime has been stripped away from the Baltics, they are
worried that their port will become a conduit for drugs and other
instruments of destruction.

This can be a great time for human history, and our children and grandchildren can
have a great future ... But the challenge is clear: Can we make the forces of terror the
past? Yes, we can, but we have to work at it.

May 1, 1995 Remarks at the Women Voters Project Kickoff Luncheon

We also see it, unfortunately, in our families. Violence can do a


lot of damage in a country and it certainly has here. In Oklahoma City,
we suffered a terrible wound because it was an act of terrorism. And as
we mourn the dead and heal the injured, console the grieving and begin
the rebuilding, we must also spare no effort to bring to justice those
responsible. We must also understand that even punishing the guilty will
not be enough if we cannot protect the innocent in the future. So I say
to you my fellow Americans: I take a back seat to no one in my devotion
to the Constitution. But we can protect the Constitution and our freedom
and be tougher on terrorism in America, and we must.

55
I have sent to Congress a large number of suggestions that will
strengthen our hand in dealing with this issue. And again, I urged them
to act on it and act on it without delay. The stories you do not read in
the newspaper are those that are most important-the bombs that don't go
off, the schemes that are thwarted before they succeed-and we must be
better and better and better at that. Whether terrorism is hatched
abroad or within our borders, we must be better.
But we must also stand up against those who say that somehow this is
all right, this is somehow a political act, people who say, "I love my
country, but I hate my Government." These people, who do they think
they are, saying that their Government has stamped out human freedom?
I don't know if there's another country in the world that would, by
law, protect the right of a lot of these groups to say what they want to
say to each other over the shortwave radio or however else they want to
say it, to assemble over the weekend and do whatever they want to do,
and to bear arms, which today means more than the right to keep and bear
arms, it may mean the right to keep and bear an arsenal of artillery. Is
there a-who are they to say they have no freedom in this country? Other
countries do not permit that.
I plead with you, do not lose your concentration on this issue. This
is a big issue. Remember what I said earlier: The forces that are
lifting up the world have a dark underside. What makes the global
society work? What makes the information age work? Openness. Free
movement. Low barriers to the transfer of people, ideas, and
information. What does that mean? You can have a terrorist network on
the Internet exchanging information about building bombs. What does that
mean? You can build the bomb in one State and get in your truck and
drive somewhere else freely and without being interrupted. What does it
mean? It's easier to get into other countries where you want to make
mischief. The open society is at more risk to the forces of organized
evil.
Don't forget about the people in Oklahoma City. Don't forget about
their families. Don't forget about what they need to rebuild, and don't

56
forget about what we need to try to prevent future incidents of this
kind. Do not lose your interest in this issue as it fades into the past.
We have a lot of work to do.
Let me also say that I hope that this incident will focus us a
little more on the general problem of the extraordinary level of
violence in our society, to find its common roots as well as to understand the
differences in the different kinds of violence we have. I have to say
this, and maybe it's an old-fashioned view, but I believe that it is
innate in human nature that there is the capacity to do wrong and to
harm others. And we are all balanced in different ways, subject to
different forces. There are always excuses or reasons that can be given.
I'm sorry for whatever terrible thing happened to the suspect in the
Oklahoma City bombing case, but we have to stop making excuses and start
thinking about what we can do to build a responsible, nonviolent
society.

May 3, 1995 Remarks to the White House Conference on Aging

I want to mention just a couple of things that have happened since


1981 that are very important with reference to your agenda. First,
briefly, since 1981, you and your generation won the cold war and the
battle against communism, and you can be very proud of that. And we are
now trying to finish that work so that for the first time since the dawn
of the nuclear age there are no Russian missiles pointing at the
American people.
But we know there are still threats to our security, and we were
reminded of it very painfully in the last few days. So I ask all of you
as you focus on crime to remember that we need to continue the fight to
lower the crime rate. And with a strategy of punishment, police, and
prevention, we can do that. But we must focus on the special problems of
terrorism to which all open societies are vulnerable. I have sent

57
legislation to the Congress to address this terrorism problem. It has
broad bipartisan support. The leaders of the Congress are working with
me on it. We must pass it and pass it this month. And I urge you to take
a stand for that on behalf of all Americans.

May 4, 1995 Interview With Laurie Montgomery of the Detroit Free Press and
Angie Cannon of Knight-Ridder Newspapers

"... if you look at Israel, for all the terrible


incidents they have endured, well over half of the planned terrorist
incidents in Israel never occur because they have the capacity to defang
them. We have endured this awful bombing in Oklahoma City and the World
Trade Center bombing, which came from a group outside this country that
infiltrated here. We also-our Federal authorities have been successful
in heading off at least two other incidents of terrorism that we know
about that they were able to stop from occurring.
We just believe-l cannot tell you how strongly I believe that this
is the major threat to the security of Americans looking toward the 21st
century, that the fundamental problem-it's not just in America. It's
the same thing with that group of religious fanatics where the guy broke
the vial of sarin gas in the Japanese subway. It's exactly the same
thing. The things which will make life exciting for all of our young
college graduates-high technology society, free flow of people, goods,
technology, and information, a highly open world society-make people
very, very vulnerable to the forces of organized evil.

May 4, 1995 Remarks to the American Jewish Committee

"... we have sought to do is to contain those who would


upset the balance of forces for peace in the Middle East. We have taken
strong stands against Iraq, we have demanded that Libya give up the

58
people that are accused of downing Pan Am 103, and we have taken strong
stands against Iran. For 2 years I hoped against hope that Iran would be
persuaded to stop trying to develop weapons of mass destruction and
supporting terrorist groups. It became clear to me that that would not
happen, and therefore I have imposed the embargo which was announced
last Sunday, which I thank you for your support on. I hope that we will
be able to persuade others that terrorism and the proliferation of
weapons of mass destruction have no place in the modern world.
Let me close by asking you to think of this: The 21st century should
and I believe will be the most exciting time in all of human history,
the time that is most full of human potential. It can be a very great
time for America if we face our problems at home first and if we make
sure that all of our people can compete, which means more than anything
else we must solve the education deficit in the United States and create
a system of lifetime learning that all people can access.
But I believe that the great threats to security in the 21st century
will be very different from those of the 20th century. The history of
this century is littered with the blood of millions
and millions and millions of people who were killed either because two
different countries were fighting with each other over land or an
oppressive government was prepared to kill millions of its citizens to
maintain its power. The realities of the global economy, the explosion
of the information age make those things less likely to occur. We'll
always have to fight abuse of power at home and abroad, wherever it
occurs, but that is less likely to mark the 21st century.
In the 21st century, which will be characterized, as we already
know, by lightning flashes of exchange of information and money and
technology and great mobility of people, all of the forces that are
bringing us to a more integrated world and making people see that it
makes sense to stop killing each other and to make peace, whether it be
in the Middle East or Northern Ireland or any other place in the world,
all those forces of integration have a dark underside of disintegration
and make us very, very vulnerable, the more open we are, to the forces

59
of organized evil.
That is what we lived through in Oklahoma City. That is what we
endured at the World Trade Center. That is what the Japanese people
suffered in the subway when a religious fanatic could walk in with a
little vial of sarin gas and break it open and kill 60 people. And make
no mistake about it, that is why innocent Israelis are still being
killed by car bombs in the Middle East. Why? Because the only way peace
in the Middle East can work is if the Palestinians and the Israelis stay
integrated. And if the Israeli people can be rendered insecure so that
the Israeli Government has to raise the border again, so that the
Palestinians can't come to Israel and their incomes drop, then they
won't believe in the peace anymore, and the enemies of peace will win.
So all through the next decades you and I will be involved in a
constant struggle, with our friends from the diplomatic corps-and there
are countries that are here present-to try to get the benefits of all
these forces that are bringing us together without being undermined by
the forces of disintegration that move into open societies and open
interchanges between countries and choke the life out of hope.
That is the challenge of the 21st century. That is why I've asked
the Congress to pass this antiterrorism legislation. And before he gets
here, I thank Senator Dole for committing to pass that bill and put it
on my desk by the end of the month. It was a good and noble thing and a
great gesture. I thank him for that.
These are the things we often work together on. There is no room for
partisanship here. Nor should there be differences of religion or
culture or nationality across international borders. All of us that want
ordered societies where human potential can be expressed and peace can
be achieved must stand against the forces of organized evil that cross
national borders and kill without a second thought, whether they are
paranoid forces rising up from within or people flying in from without.
That is our challenge.
So now the challenge in the Middle East is the challenge at home.
Let us keep working for peace, and let us determine to defend ourselves

60
against those that would undermine the glorious potential of the century
upon which we are about to enter.
Thank you, and God bless you all.

May 5, 1995 Remarks at the Michigan State University Commencement Ceremony


in East
Lansing, Michigan

"... The dark possibilities of our age are visible now in the smoke, the
horror, and the heartbreak of Oklahoma City. As the long and painful
search and rescue effort comes to an end with 165 dead, 467 injured, and
2 still unaccounted for, our prayers are with those who lost their loved
ones and with the brave and good people of Oklahoma City, who have moved
with such strength and character to deal with this tragedy.
But that threat is not isolated. And you must not believe it is. We
see that threat again in the bombing of the World Trade Center in New
York, in the nerve gas attack in the Tokyo subway, in the terrorist
assault on innocent civilians in the Middle East, in the organized crime
plaguing the former Soviet Union now that the heavy hand of communism
has been lifted. We see it even on the Internet, where people exchange
information about bombs and terrorism, even as children learn from
sources all around the world.
My fellow Americans, we must respond to this threat in ways that
preserve both our security and our freedoms. Appeasement of organized
evil is not an option for the next century any more than it was in this
century. Like the vigilant generations that brought us victory in World
War II and the cold war, we must stand our ground. In this high-tech
world, we must make sure that we have the high-tech tools to confront
the high-tech forces of destruction and evil.
That is why I have insisted that Congress pass strong antiterrorism
legislation immediately, to provide for more than 1,000 new law
enforcement personnel solely to fight terrorism, to create a domestic

61
antiterrorism center, to make available the most up-to-date technology
to trace the source of any bomb that goes off, and to provide tough new
punishment for carrying stolen explosives, selling those explosives for
use in a violent crime, and for attacking members of the Uniformed Services
or Federal workers.
To their credit, the leaders of Congress have promised to put a bill
on my desk by Memorial Day. I applaud them for that. This is not and
must never be a partisan issue. This is about America's future. It is
about your future.
We can do this without undermining our constitutional rights. In
fact, the failure to act will undermine those rights. For no one is free
in America where parents have to worry when they drop off their children
for day care or when you are the target of assassination simply because
you work for our Government. No one is free in America when large
numbers of our fellow citizens must always be looking over their
shoulders.

May 7, 1995 Remarks to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee


Policy Conference

We're destroying thousands of nuclear weapons at a faster rate than


our treaties require. We have removed nuclear weapons from Kazakhstan,
and Ukraine and Belarus soon will follow. We're cooperating with the
Russians to prevent nuclear weapons and bomb-making materials from
falling into the hands of terrorists and smugglers. We're working
together to extend indefinitely the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.
For the first time in half a century, there are no Russian troops in
Central Europe or the Baltics. Almost 60 percent of the Russian economy
is now in private hands, and the elements of a free society-elections,
open debate, and a strong, independent media, whether the politicians
like it or not~are beginning to take root.

62
The United States, and I believe all the Western nations, have an
overriding interest in containing the threat posed by Iran. Today Iran
is the principal sponsor of global terrorism, as the Prime Minister has
said. It seeks to undermine the West and its values by supporting the
murderous attacks of the Islamic Jihad, Hezbollah, and other terrorist
groups. It aims to destroy the Middle East peace process.
You know the need for firm action here as well as I do. And I thank
you for your long history of calling attention to Iran's campaign of
terror. I thank you for urging a decisive response, and I thank you for
supporting the action we have taken. We have worked to counter Iran's
sponsorship of terrorism, its efforts to acquire nuclear weapons. We led
our G-7 allies to ban weapons sales, tightening trade restrictions on
dual-use technology, and in preventing Iran from obtaining credit from
international financial institutions. But more has to be done. That's
why I ordered an end to all U.S. trade and investment with Iran.
I understand this will mean some sacrifice for American companies
and our workers. But the United States has to lead the way. Only by
leading can we convince other nations to join us. I hope you will help
us convince other nations to join us.
Let me mention two other nations. We have also taken a strong stand
against Libya. We remain determined to bring those responsible for the
bombing of Pan Am 103 to trial. And make no mistake about it, though
U.N. sanctions have weakened Saddam Hussein, he remains an aggressive,
dangerous force. He showed that last October, menacing Kuwait until our
Armed Forces' swift and skillful deployment forced him to back down. As
long as he refuses to account for Iraqi weapons programs, past and
present, as long as he refuses to comply with all relevant Security
Council resolutions, we cannot agree and we will not agree to lift the
sanctions against Iraq. We will not compromise on this issue, and we
value the support we have received from the Prime Minister and the State
of Israel.

63
Our measures to contain these rogue nations are part of a larger
effort to combat all those who oppose peace, because even as we achieve
great strides in resolving the age-old conflict between Arabs and
Israelis, there remains a struggle between those searching for peace and
those determined to deny it, between those who want a better future and
those who seek a return to the bloody past in the Middle East. No one
should doubt the determination of the United States. We will oppose the
enemies of peace as relentlessly as we support those who take risks for
peace.

In the wake of the tragedy in Oklahoma City, about which the Prime
Minister spoke so eloquently, I think our Americans now feel more
strongly than ever and understand more clearly than ever the sense of
horror and outrage at terrorism, at the bus bombings, the attacks on
soldiers, the killings in the streets of Jerusalem. The cost of all this
inhumanity and cowardice has been appalling. We grieve with the families
of the victims. We thank the Prime Minister for going to see the family
of Alicia Flatow, and we honor the memories of Alicia and Corporal
Waxman and so many others.
We are encouraging Chairman Arafat to continue and to intensify his
efforts to crack down on extremists. He is now taking concrete steps to
prosecute those who plan and carry out acts of violence. These measures
and others to confront terror and establish the rule of law must be
continued. The peace will never succeed without them.
As I said in the Knesset last fall, the enemies of peace will not
succeed, because they are the past, not the future. We will continue to
do everything in our power to make that statement true.

But we also know that all these forces of integration have a dark
side as well, for they make us vulnerable in new ways to organized
destruction and evil, in terrorism terms and in terms of proliferating

64
weapons of mass destruction. We see that not only at the terrible
tragedy in Oklahoma City or the World Trade Center or the streets of
Israel, we also see it in the subway stations of Japan. The more open
and flexible our people become, the more we move around and relate to
each other, the more vulnerable we will be, and the more vigilant we
must become.
In the Middle East, as nowhere else, these two forces of integration
and disintegration are locked in a deadly struggle: a strong Israel,
backed by a strong America, building peace with its neighbors, a new
openness in the region, but on the other side, these continuing
desperate attempts of fanatics eager to keep old and bloody conflicts
alive.

May 8, 1995 Remarks on Antiterrorism Legislation

Before I leave on this trip, I want to say a word about the


antiterrorism legislation that I have sent to the Congress.
I sent that bill to Congress because it will strengthen our ability
to investigate and prosecute and to deter-to deter the kinds of
problems we saw and the kind of horror we endured at Oklahoma City and
of course at the World Trade Center.
I applaud the fact that the leadership in Congress has said that
they will have that bill on my desk by Memorial Day. That is only 3
weeks away. And so, before I leave, I want to urge Congress again to
pass this legislation and to do it without delay.
Nothing can justify turning this bill into a political football. We
have kept politics completely out of our fight against terrorism. We
kept it out of our mourning. We kept it out of our law enforcement
efforts. We're going to keep it out of the rebuilding efforts in
Oklahoma. And we must keep it out of this legislative effort.
The Government needs the ability to deal with the technological
challenges presented by terrorism in the modern age. This legislation

65
does it, and there is simply no reason to delay it. Nothing can justify
it. And it needs to pass and pass now.
Thank you.

May 10, 1995 The President's News Conference With President Boris Yeltsin of
Russia
in Moscow

"... Terrorism knows no borders. Unfortunately, U.S. citizens recently


were confronted with that barbarous phenomenon. I believe that everybody
would agree that we should fight this evil jointly, and we have agreed
upon that.
During the talks, we had a fruitful exchange of views on the meeting
of the political eight in Halifax, and not of the political but also of
the economic eight. We also discussed a number of other international
issues.

Fifthly, we agreed that we should step up our efforts in combating


terrorism and organized crime, a problem that affects not only our two
nations but also many others in the world, as we have sadly seen. And we
discussed some fairly specific things that we might do together to
intensify our efforts.

First of all, President Yeltsin and I and the leaders of many other
countries in the world are quite concerned that the great security
threat of the 21st century might not be all those we had been
discussing, either explicitly or by implication here in the last few
moments. They instead might be coming from often nongovernmental sources

66
in terms of terrorism and organized crime and the proliferation of
weapons of mass destruction, getting into the hands of terrorists and
organized criminals. So we discussed how we could cooperate more with
law enforcement and intelligence. I think you know that the Federal
Bureau of Investigation is opening an office here in Moscow, and we have
been working with Russia for sometime now.
We discussed how we could make sure we each were as technologically
advanced as possible, because many of the adversaries we face are very
advanced. And we discussed how we might work together to try to limit
the destructive capacity of terrorists and organized criminals and limit
their ability to proliferate the weapons, particularly in the biological
and chemical area. It's a great concern to me, and both Russia and the
United States probably have some resources there that we can bring to
bear.
And I think in light of what happened in Japan, all advanced
countries should be very, very concerned about the prospect of the
merger of terrorism with weapons of mass destruction, biological,
chemical, and small-scale nuclear weapons.

Both our countries are committed to the fight against terrorism.


Both our countries are committed to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and its
indefinite
extension. Both our countries are dismantling our own nuclear arsenals
at a more rapid rate than our treaties require ..."

May 18, 1995 Remarks at the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus
Institute Dinner

"... And let me say one other thing that we must focus on and that I hope
you will all be thinking about and celebrating tonight. As we define our

67
security as a people and our strength as a people, we have to protect
ourselves against destruction from within and without. That's what the
crime bill is all about, putting more police on the street, having more
prisons, having more prevention programs. It's what the antiterrorism
legislation I sent to the Congress is all about. But let us never forget
the real security we have as Americans comes from the positive things
about this country. The real security we have as Americans comes from
the fact that almost all of us are devoted to our families, raise our
children as best we can, put in a full day's work every day, pay our
taxes as best we can legally, and otherwise obey the law and respect the
differences in this country.
Now, we have free speech and free association. And we are proud of
our differences. I am proud of the fact that you live in a country which
encourages you to gather here because you share a common ethnic and
geographic heritage. I am proud of that.
I am proud of the fact that Hispanics and African-Americans and
Polish-Americans and other Americans have that same opportunity. I am
proud of the fact that people who have different religious convictions
that lead them to different political conclusions have the freedom to
organize and speak their mind even if they think I am wrong on
everything. I am proud of that. That's what America is all about. I am
proud of that.

May 20, 1995 The President's Radio Address

"... First, let me make it clear that I will not in any way allow the
fight against domestic and foreign terrorism to build a wall between me
and the American people. I will be every bit as active and in touch with
ordinary American citizens as I have been since I took office.
Pennsylvania Avenue may be closed to cars and trucks, but it will remain
open to the people of America. If you want to visit the White House, you
can still do that just as you always could, and I hope you will. If you

68
want to have your picture taken out in front of the White House, please
do so. If you want to come here and protest our country's policies, you
are still welcome to do that as well. And now you will be more secure in
all these activities because it will be less likely that you could
become an innocent victim of those who would do violence against symbols
of our democracy.
Closing Pennsylvania Avenue to motor vehicles is a practical step to
protect against the kind of attack we saw in Oklahoma City, but I won't
allow the people's access to the White House and their President to be
curtailed. The two blocks of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White
House will be converted into a pedestrian mall. Free and public tours
will continue as they always have. For most Americans, this won't change
much beyond the traffic patterns here in Washington. For people who work
in Washington, DC, we will work hard to reroute the traffic in
cooperation with local officials in the least burdensome way possible.
Now let's think for a minute about what this action says about the
danger terrorism poses to the openness of our society or to any free
society. The fact that the Secret Service feels compelled to close
Pennsylvania Avenue is an important reminder that we have to come
together as a people and hold fast against the divisive tactics of
violent extremists.
We saw in the awful tragedy of Oklahoma City and the bombing of the
World Trade Center that America, as an open and free society, is not
immune from terrorists from within and beyond our borders who believe
they have a right to kill innocent civilians to pursue their own
political ends or to protest other policies. Such people seek to instill
fear in our citizens, in our whole people. But when we are all afraid to
get on a bus or drive to work or open an envelope or send our children
off to school, when our children are fixated on the possibility of
terrorist action against them or other innocent children, we give
terrorists a victory. That kind of corrosive fear could rust our
national spirit, drain our will, and wear away our freedom.
These are the true stakes in our war against terrorism. We cannot

69
allow ourselves to be frightened or intimidated into a bunker mentality.
We cannot allow our sacred freedoms to wither or diminish. We cannot
allow the paranoia and conspiracy theories of extreme militants to
dominate our society.
What we do today is a practical step to preserve freedom and peace
of mind. It should be seen as a step in a long line of efforts to
improve security in the modern world that began with the installation of
airport metal detectors. I remember when that started, and a lot of
people thought that it might be seen as a restriction on our freedom.
But most of us take it for granted now, and, after all, hijackings have
gone way down. The airport metal detectors increased the freedom of the
American people, and so can this.
But more must be done to reduce the threat of terrorism, to deter
terrorism. First, Congress must pass my antiterrorism legislation. We
mustn't let our country fight the war against terrorism ill-armed or
ill-prepared. I want us to be armed with 1,000 more FBI agents. I want
the ability to monitor high-tech communications among far-flung
terrorists. I want to be able to have our people learn their plans
before they strike. That's the key. Congress can give us these tools by
passing the antiterrorism bill before them. And they should do it now.
Congressional leaders pledged to pass this bill by Memorial Day, in the
wake of the terrible bombing in Oklahoma City. This is a commitment
Congress must keep.
On a deeper level, we must all fight terrorism by fighting the fear
that terrorists sow. Today the Secret Service is taking a necessary
precaution, but let no one mistake: We will not relinquish our
fundamental freedoms. We will secure the personal safety of all
Americans to live and move about as they please, to think and to speak
as they please, to follow their beliefs and their conscience, as our
Founding Fathers intended.
Thanks for listening.

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May 27, 1995 The President's Radio Address

Good morning. It has now been over 5 weeks since the tragic bombing
in Oklahoma City. In the days immediately after that tragedy,
congressional leaders pledged to have the legislation I proposed to
crack down on terrorism on my desk by Memorial Day. The Senate is now
considering the antiterrorism bill. I'm glad they're working on it. At
the same time, I disagree with the position of some Senators from both
parties that three crucial weapons in the fight against terrorism should
be stripped from the bill.
The first concerns my proposal to expand the wiretap capabilities of
Federal investigators. Terrorists move around. They don't want to be
caught. They go from State to State, from motel to motel, from pay phone
to pay phone. We need the power to move our taps and surveillance as
fast as the terrorist moves his base of operations. But those who want
to weaken my antiterrorism bill want law enforcement to go back to court
for a new wiretap order each and every time a terrorist moves, unless we
can specifically show that he's trying to evade our surveillance.
We should protect citizens' privacy rights. But we shouldn't force
law enforcement to lose valuable time by making them get a court to
agree that a terrorist is trying to knowingly evade us. Have you ever
heard of a terrorist who wasn't trying to evade the police? I don't care
whether a terrorist is trying to knowingly evade the police. I care that
he or she may be trying to plan another Oklahoma City bombing. And I want the police
to stop those
people cold.
The restrictive view taken by some people in Congress would handicap
our ability to track terrorists down, follow them when they move, and
prevent their attacks on innocent people.
The second disagreement I have is about my request that we should be
able to use the full resources of the military to combat terrorists who
are contemplating the use of biological or chemical weapons. In general,
the military should not be involved in domestic law enforcement in any

71
way. That's why it's against the law. But there is a limited exception
to this authority, granting the authority to cooperate with law
enforcement to the military where nuclear weapons are involved. There's
a good reason for this. The military has the unique technical expertise,
sophisticated equipment, and highly specialized personnel to fight a
nuclear threat. Well, the same is true for biological and chemical
weapons, which seem even more likely to be used in terrorist attacks in
the future, as we saw recently in the terrible incident in the Japanese
subway.
Therefore, I can't understand how some Senators could actually
suggest that it's okay to use the military for nuclear terrorism but not
to use them for chemical and biological terrorism. We need their unique
knowledge in all instances. I want law enforcement to have the authority
to call in the military to deal with these chemical or biological
weapons threats when they lack that expertise, equipment, or personnel.
There's simply no reason why we should use anything less than the very
best we have to fight and stop the extraordinary threat now posed by
chemical and biological terrorism all around the world.
Finally, I strongly disagree with Senators who want to remove a
provision of my bill that will help us track down terrorists by marking
the explosive materials they use to build their weapons. It would be a
relatively simple matter to include something called a taggant in
materials used to build explosive devices. That way, law enforcement
could track bomb materials back to their source and dramatically
increase their ability to find and apprehend terrorists.
There is no reason to delay enactment of a law that would require
taggants in explosive materials. Every day that goes by without a law
like that is another day a terrorist can walk into a store and buy
material that is virtually untraceable. As long as the basic building
blocks of bombs are sold without taggants, we can only hope they're not
being bought by terrorists.
The Senators who want to oppose my bill on these points simply argue
that these provisions will open the door to an overly broad domestic use

72
of military troops, to overly invasive wiretapping, or to an erosion of
the constitutional rights of those who buy explosives. I disagree.
Constitutional protections and legal restrictions are not being
repealed. We are simply giving law enforcement agencies who are
committed to fighting terrorists for us the tools they need to succeed
in the modern world.
I want to work with Congress to resolve these differences and to
make my antiterrorism bill the law as soon as possible.
On this Memorial Day weekend, we honor those who fought and died in
our Nation's wars to keep America free. In the 21st century, the
security of the American people will require us to fight terrorism all
around the world and, unfortunately, here at home. It's a fight we have
to be able to win.
Thanks for listening.

May 31, 1995 Remarks at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colorado

"... We have seen painfully in the United States in the last several
months, first at the World Trade Center and then at the awful incident
at Oklahoma City, that our security can be threatened in a global
economy with open borders and lots of personal freedom here at home as
well as beyond our borders. We had those two terrorist incidents: One of
them occurred from people I believe were deeply disturbed and way off
track within our country; another occurred because this is a free
country and people can come and go here, and people who bore us ill will
and wanted to destroy a symbol of American democracy came into this
country and set that bomb at the World Trade Center.
I'm also happy to tell you that other sentinels of freedom working
to thwart terrorism stopped two terrible incidents that were planned,
one to blow up another bomb in New York and another that was designed to
take some aircraft out of the air, flying out of the West Coast going
over the Pacific.

73
But we now know that the security threats we'll face in the future,
rooted in terrorism and organized crime and drug trafficking, are
closely tied to things the military has had to work on
for years, trying to stem the proliferation of weapons of mass
destruction, stand up to rogue states, and protect our security
interests around the world. We're going to have to fight on all these
fronts, and you're going to have to continue to be the best trained,
best equipped, best motivated, most flexible military in the world for
us to succeed.
I am committed to making sure that you always are that and to doing
whatever we have to do to improve the quality of life and the conditions
of living, so that the best people in America want to be in the military
and want to stay in the military.
Since I have been President, I have twice had to go back to Congress
to ask for large appropriations totaling over $35 billion to help to
maintain our training, our readiness, and our quality of life. And this
year I asked the Congress for a supplemental appropriation to cover
contingencies in the Defense Department so we could fund a pay increase
at the maximum legal level allowable and continue to make improvements
in readiness and the quality of life. We are going to continue to do
that. If you're committed to serving America, the people who make the
decisions about investments in your future should be committed to making
sure that you can serve and succeed, that you can have good families and
a good life in the United States military. And we are very grateful to
you for that.
Let me say, what I most wanted to do was to have a chance to say
thank you personally and to go down the row and shake hands with the
children. And while I am very good at stopping the rain, I am not good
at keeping it away forever. So I'm going to terminate my remarks with a
heartfelt thank-you to all of you for your service to the United States.
God bless you all, and thank you. Thank you very much.

74
May 31, 1995 Remarks at the United States Air Force Academy Commencement
Ceremony in Colorado Springs, Colorado

"... In the post-cold-war world, the objectives are


often more complex, and it is clear that American security in the 21st
century will be determined by forces that are operating both beyond and
within our own borders.

We understand now that the openness and freedom of


society make us even more vulnerable to the organized forces of
destruction, the forces of terror and organized crime and drug
trafficking. The technological revolution that is bringing our world
closer together can also bring more and more problems to our shores. The
end of communism has opened the door to the spread of weapons of mass
destruction and lifted the lid on age-old conflicts rooted in ethnic,
racial, and religious hatreds. These forces can be all the more
destructive today because they have access to modern technology.

I believe we must look at all of these problems and all these


opportunities in new and different ways. For example, we see today that
the clear boundaries between threats to our Nation's security from
beyond our borders and the challenges to our security from within our
borders are being blurred. One once was clearly the province of the
armed services, the other clearly the province of local law enforcement.
Today, we see people from overseas coming to our country for terrorist
purposes, blurring what is our national security. We must see the
threats for what they are and fashion our response based on their true
nature, not just where they occur.
In these new and different times, we must pursue three priorities to
enhance our security. First, we have to combat those who would destroy

75
democratic societies, including ours, through terrorism, organized
crime, and drug trafficking. Secondly, we have to reduce the threat of
weapons of mass destruction, whether they're nuclear, chemical, or
biological. Third, we have to provide our military, you and people like
you, with the resources, training, and strategic direction necessary to
protect the American people and our interests around the world.
The struggle against the forces of terror, organized crime, and drug
trafficking is now uppermost on our minds because of what we have
endured as a nation, the World Trade Center bombing, the terrible
incident in Oklahoma City, and what we have seen elsewhere, the nerve
gas attack in Tokyo, the slaughter of innocent civilians by those who
would destroy the peace in the Middle East, the organized crime now
plaguing the former Soviet Union-so much that one of the first requests
we get in every one of those countries is "Send in the FBI; we need
help"-the drug cartels in Latin America and Asia that threaten the
open societies and the fragile democracies there. All these things we
know can emerge from without our borders and from within our borders.
Free and open societies are inherently more vulnerable to these kinds of
forces. Therefore, we must remain vigilant, reduce our vulnerability,
and constantly renew our efforts to defeat them.
We work closely with foreign governments. We share intelligence. We
provide military support. We initiate anticorruption and money-
laundering programs to stop drug trafficking at its source. We've opened
an FBI office in Moscow, a training center in Hungary to help combat
international organized crime. Over the past 2 years, we've waged a
tough counterterrorism campaign, strengthening our laws, increasing
manpower and training for the CIA and the FBI, imposing sanctions on
states that sponsor terrorism.
Many of these efforts have paid off. We were able to arrest and
quickly convict those responsible for the World Trade Center bombing, to
stop another terrible planned attack in New York as well as a plan to
blow up American civilian airliners over the Pacific, and help to bring
to justice terrorists around the world.

76
In the aftermath of Oklahoma City, our top law enforcement officers
told us they needed new tools to fight terrorism, and I proposed
legislation to provide those tools: more than 1,000 new law enforcement
personnel solely working on terrorism; a domestic antiterrorism center;
tough new punishment for trafficking in stolen explosives, for attacking
members of the Uniformed Services or Federal workers; the enabling of
law enforcement officials to mark explosive materials so they can be
more easily traced; the empowering of law enforcement officials with
authority to move legal, and I emphasize legal, wiretaps when terrorists
quickly move their bases of operation without having to go back for a
new court order; and finally, in a very limited way, the authority to
use the unique capacity of our military where chemical or biological
weapons are involved here at home, just as we now can call on those
capabilities to fight nuclear threats.

I'm sure every graduate of this Academy knows of the posse comitatus
rule, the clear line that says members of the uniformed military will
not be involved in domestic law enforcement. That is a good rule. We
should honor that rule. The only narrow exception for it that I know of
today is the ability of law enforcement in America to call upon the
unique expertise of the military when there is a potential threat of a
nuclear weapon in the hands of the wrong people. All we are asking for
in the aftermath of the terrible incident in the Tokyo subway is the
same access to the same expertise should chemical and biological weapons
be involved.
The congressional leadership pledged its best efforts to put this
bill on my desk by Memorial Day. But Memorial Day has come and gone, and
only the Senate has taken the bill up. And even there, in my judgment,
there are too many amendments that threaten too much delay.
Congress has a full agenda of important issues, including passing a
responsible budget. But all this will take time. When it comes to
terrorism, time is a luxury we don't have. Some are even now saying we
should just go slow on this legislation. Well, Congress has a right to

77
review this legislation to make sure the civil liberties of American
citizens are not infringed, and I encourage them to do that. But they
should not go slow. Terrorists do not go slow, my fellow Americans.
Their agenda is death and destruction on their own timetable. And we
need to make sure that we can do everything possible to stop them from
succeeding.
Six weeks after Oklahoma City, months after the first antiterrorism
legislation was sent by the White House to Congress, there is no further
excuse for delay. Fighting terrorism is a big part of our national
security today, and it will be well into the 21st century. And I ask
Congress to act and act now.
Our obligations to fight these forces of terror is closely related
to our efforts to reduce the threat of weapons of mass destruction. All
of us, I'm sure, ached and wept with the people of Japan when we saw
what a small vial of chemical gas could do when unleashed in the subway
station. And we breathed a sigh of relief when the alert officers there
prevented the two chemicals from uniting and forming poison which could
have killed hundreds and hundreds of people just a few days after that.
The breakup of the Soviet Union left nuclear material scattered
throughout the Newly Independent States and increased the potential for
the theft of those materials and for organized criminals to enter the
nuclear smuggling business. As horrible as the tragedies in Oklahoma
City and the World Trade Center were, imagine the destruction that could
have resulted had there been a small-scale nuclear device exploded
there.

We have to now go even further. There is no excuse for the Senate to


go slow on approving two other vital measures, the START II treaty and
the Chemical Weapons Convention. START II will enable us to reduce by
two-thirds the number of strategic warheads deployed at the height of
the cold war. The Chemical Weapons Convention requires the destruction
of chemical weapon stockpiles around the world and provides severe

78
penalties for those who sell materials to build these weapons to
terrorists or to criminals. It would make a chemical terror, like the
tragic attack in the Tokyo subway, much, much more difficult.

This then will be our common security mission, yours and mine and
all Americans': to take on terrorism, organized crime, and drug
trafficking; to reduce the nuclear threat and the threat
of biological and chemical weapons; to keep our military flexible and
strong. These must be the cornerstones of our program to build a safer
America at a time when threats to our security have no respect for
boundaries and when the boundaries between those threats are
disappearing.

June 5, 1995 Remarks on the National Homeownership Strategy

Before I get into my remarks, I think it's important for me to make


a brief reference to another subject. Congress is coming back to work
today after a break, and the anti-terrorism bill that I sent to Congress
is being considered in the Senate. It will give law enforcement the
tools it needs to crack down on terrorists that they, people in law
enforcement, asked me to seek from Congress, first a couple of months
before the Oklahoma City tragedy, to deal especially with the problems
of international terrorism coming into the United States, and then some
more things that were asked for in the wake of Oklahoma City.
This is very, very serious legislation. The Congress not only has
the right, it has the responsibility to review the bill and to hear
those who think that in some ways its law enforcement provisions are too
tough. There ought to be a full debate. But we cannot afford to let
scores of unnecessary amendments drag down this process. In that I agree
with the statements made by the majority leader of the Senate, Senator

79
Dole. So I call upon my fellow Democrats and Republicans to limit
amendments, curb politics, ignore narrow interests, to agree to the
simple pact that there should be no excuses, no games, no delays. The
time is now to enact this important legislation.
You can be sure that terrorists around the world are not delaying
their plans while we delay the passage of this bill. It is within our
reach now to dramatically strengthen our law enforcement capabilities
and to enhance the ability of people in law enforcement to protect all
kinds of Americans. We have an obligation to do that. And so I would
urge the Congress to take this bill up and to get on with it, to limit
the number of amendments as soon as possible so that we can go forward.

June 5, 1995 Interview With Larry King

Mr. King: Where's your terrorism bill? Flying in the Senate, stopped
in the House?

Vice President Gore: Well, the President's been working extremely


hard on that, and I have to tell you—he won't say this the same way I
do-l would personally like to say I'm very frustrated with what the
House of Representatives is doing. The President's made it clear why
this is necessary for our country, and it's not right for the House of
Representatives to sit on this because some of the Members of Congress
are scared that some of these antigovernment sentiments are so strong
that they'll be expressed against them if they increase the ability of
the Government to fight against lawbreakers.

President Clinton: I'd like to say, though, that this is not just a-
this is not necessarily a partisan deal. Senator Dole, so far as we
speak tonight, has done what he's said he'd do. He asked me and the
Democratic leadership to try to reduce the number of amendments offered
by the Democrats. He said he'd try to reduce the number of amendments

80
offered by Republicans. They did that today. They adopted a major
amendment that I wanted to put taggants in illegal explosives, or
explosives that could be held illegally, so we could trace them. They're
moving that bill. And it seems to me that we're moving in the right
direction in the Senate.
I was quite disturbed at the people in the House saying, "Well,
maybe we ought to go slow on this." Look, I had an antiterrorism bill
in the Congress 2 months before Oklahoma for foreign terrorists. Then
the FBI and others said, "We'd like some changes to deal with domestic
terrorism," and we presented that. The bill is moving in the Senate. It
must move in the House. We can't go slow on it. We can't.

Mr. King: What's stopping you in the House?

President Clinton: Well, we don't know. Nothing has happened yet. We


hope, if we can get this bill out of the Senate, that the House will
then move rapidly.

Mr. King: What has Mr. Gingrich said about it?

Vice President Gore: Well, he said that they might have to go slow.
And the terrorists aren't going slow.

Mr. King: So you're saying tonight to the House, get a move on?

President Clinton: Look, this is a big deal, and this should not be
partisan. And I know that some of these groups that hate the Government
think that their civil liberties may be infringed here. The Congress has
the right, indeed, the responsibility, to review the provisions of this
act, but not to go slow. The people who do this terrorist work, they
operate on their own timetable; they don't sit around and wait for
Congress to enact laws.

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We know that we can do a better job in stopping things from
happening. Let me say, in spite of the horror of Oklahoma City and the
World Trade Center, our people stopped another planned bombing in New
York, stopped a plan to explode some airplanes flying out of the West
Coast airports over the Pacific. We can do more of this. In Israel now,
with all of their problems with terrorism, they head off the vast
majority of terrorist threats. We can prevent this, but we're not used
to dealing with it. We need more tools. That's what this legislation is
for, and we can't delay.

June 7, 1995 Statement on Senate Passage of Antiterrorism Legislation

I am gratified that the Senate has passed a sweeping, bipartisan


antiterrorism bill, as I called for in the wake of the bombing in
Oklahoma City. This legislation will give law enforcement the tools it
needs to do everything possible to prevent this kind of tragedy from
happening again. It will also help us prosecute and punish terrorists
more effectively. I urge the House to do its part and get a bill on my
desk without delay.

June 15, 1995 Remarks on Departure for the Group of Seven Summit

"... Finally, together with Russia, we will examine the challenges to our
safety and well-being that no country can resolve alone. We'll look at
new ways we can work together to combat the scourges of terrorism,
nuclear smuggling, drug trafficking, and organized crime. And of course,
we will discuss a lot of the security issues that concern us all,
including Bosnia and Iran's nuclear ambitions.
When I arrive in Halifax today, I'll be meeting with Prime Minister
Murayama of Japan. Our relationship is strong, and we are cooperating on
a broad variety of issues, including North Korea, which is terribly

82
important to both of us, the environment, and the problems of terrorism
which have visited both our nations recently.

June 16, 1995 The President's News Conference in Halifax

The leaders at Halifax are also discussing new security threats that
no nation should face alone. And we'll have more to say about that
tomorrow. But let me say we have agreed that the G-7 must work together
far more energetically and comprehensively to counter the growing
dangers posed by terrorists, international criminals, nuclear smugglers,
and drug traffickers. We must cooperate more closely to counter
terrorism and criminal activities sponsored by states, groups, and
individuals. These are among the foremost challenges of the post-cold-
war world.
These are issues which affect the lives of the American people in a
very direct way. How we deal with them, whether and how we strengthen
the international financial system and reform its institutions and how
we fight challenges like terrorism will in no small way determine our
citizens' future prosperity and security, how they feel about themselves
and the future their children will enjoy.

June 17, 1995 Exchange With Reporters Prior to Discussions With President Boris
Yeltsin of Russia in Halifax

"... It is also true that we believe that terrorism everywhere is wrong,


that terrorism in the Middle East is wrong, that people blowing up our
Federal building in Oklahoma City is wrong, and people taking over a
hospital in your country and killing innocent civilians is wrong, and
has to be resisted strong.

83
I want to mention one other issue because it won't be in the
headlines, but it's terribly important. When President Yeltsin and I
were together in Moscow for the anniversary of the end of World War II,
we talked about the problem of nuclear security. And I told him then I
thought it was very important that we work closely together on the
problem of nuclear security, not just in Russia but in other countries
where this is an issue, and on the problem of nuclear smuggling, because
with so many terrorist groups around the world, we don't want small-
scale nuclear weapons being added to their already impressive arsenals.
So when he came to this meeting, President Yeltsin suggested that we
have a summit next year in Moscow dealing with these issues and
involving many, many countries that have this problem. And I think we
all agree. We think it's a very constructive suggestion. And we believe
that, together, by next year we can make some real progress in making
the world more secure for this problem in reducing the likelihood of
nuclear smuggling and, ultimately, the likelihood of these small-scale
weapons being used to further the cause of terrorism.
So that is one of the positive things that came out of this summit,
from my point of view, along with the agreement we all made to work
together more closely in fighting terrorism and the agreement we made to
try to prevent further Mexican crisis and continued reform of the
international financial institutions.
So from my point of view, this has been a very successful meeting. I
know that the problem in Chechnya is occupying everyone's attention. The
gripping scene at the hospital must have a hold on the imagination of
the Russian people, very much like the explosion in Oklahoma City had on
our people. And we join the Russian people in condemning terrorism in
the strongest possible terms.
But we hope that in the end all the people of Russia, including the
people in Chechnya, can be reconciled so that your democracy can
flourish everywhere and the cycle of violence can be broken. And that is
our prayer, and that is our policy.

84
Thank you very much.

June 26, 1995 Statement on the Attempted Assassination of President Hosni


Mubarak of Egypt

On behalf of the American people, I wish to express my outrage at


the attempt made today by terrorists to assassinate President Mubarak of
Egypt. I am relieved that President Mubarak was not harmed and has now
returned safely to Cairo.
The United States stands by Egypt-our partner for peace and
prosperity in the Middle East and around the world-at this moment. The
enemies of peace will not be allowed to thwart the peaceful hopes of the
peoples of the region, and the efforts of President Mubarak and the
peace makers to make those hopes a reality.

June 26, 1995 Remarks on the 50th Anniversary of the United Nations Charter
in San Francisco, California

Yet we know that these new forces of integration also carry within
them the seeds of disintegration and destruction. New technologies and
greater openness make all our borders more vulnerable to terrorists, to
dangerous weapons, to drug traffickers. Newly independent nations offer
ripe targets for international criminals and nuclear smugglers. Fluid capital
markets make it easier for nations to build up their economies but also make
it much easier for one nation's troubles first to be exaggerated, then to spread
to other nations.
Today, to be sure, we face no Hitler, no Stalin, but we do have
enemies, enemies who share their contempt for human life and human
dignity and the rule of law, enemies who put lethal technology to lethal
use, who seek personal gains in age-old conflicts and new divisions.

85
Our generation's enemies are the terrorists and their outlaw nation
sponsors, people who kill children or turn them into orphans, people who
target innocent people in order to prevent peace, people who attack
peacemakers, as our friend President Mubarak was attacked just a few
hours ago, people who in the name of nationalism slaughter those of
different faiths or tribes and drive their survivors from their own
homelands. Their reach is increased by technology. Their communication
is abetted by global media. Their actions reveal the age-old lack of
conscience, scruples, and morality which have characterized the forces
of destruction throughout history.
Today, the threat to our security is not in an enemy silo but in the
briefcase or the car bomb of a terrorist. Our enemies are also
international criminals and drug traffickers who threaten the stability
of new democracies and the future of our children. Our enemies are the
forces of natural destruction, encroaching deserts that threaten the
Earth's balance, famines that test the human spirit, deadly new diseases
that endanger whole societies.

From the Persian Gulf to the Caribbean, U.N. economic and political
sanctions have proved to be a valuable means short of military action to
isolate regimes and to make aggressors and terrorists pay at least a
price for their actions:

in Iraq, to help stop that nation from developing weapons of mass


destruction or threatening its neighbors again; in the Balkans, to
isolate aggressors; in North Africa, to pressure Libya to turn over for
trial those indicted in the bombing of Pan Am flight 103.

First and foremost, the U.N. must strengthen its efforts to isolate
states and people who traffic in terror and support those who continue

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to take risks for peace in the face of violence. The bombing in Oklahoma
City, the deadly gas attack in Tokyo, the struggles to establish peace
in the Middle East and in Northern Ireland, all of these things remind
us that we must stand against terror and support those who move away
from it. Recent discoveries of laboratories working to produce
biological weapons for terrorists demonstrate the dangerous link between
terrorism and the weapons of mass destruction.
In 1937, President Roosevelt called for a quarantine against
aggressions, to keep the infection of fascism from seeping into the
bloodstream of humanity. Today, we should quarantine the terrorists, the
terrorist groups, and the nations that support terrorism. Where nations
and groups honestly seek to reform, to change, to move away from the
killing of innocents, we should support them. But when they are
unrepentant in the delivery of death, we should stand tall against them.
My friends, there is no easy way around the hard question: If nations
and groups are not willing to move away from the delivery of death, we
should put aside short-term profits for the people in our countries to
stop, stop, stop their conduct.

July 11, 1995 Remarks Prior to a Meeting With Congressional Leaders and an
Exchange With Reporters

"... Ladies and gentlemen, I want to welcome the


congressional leadership back here today. There are many things that we
will discuss today. We have a lot of work to do. This summer we are
working on finishing the rescission bill, and I very much hope we can
succeed in passing the terrorism legislation and welfare reform.

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July 14, 1995 Remarks at the Central Intelligence Agency in Langley, Virginia

Now instead of a single enemy, we face a host of scattered and


dangerous challenges, but they are quite profound and difficult to
understand. There are ethnic and regional tensions that threaten to
flare into full-scale war in more than 30 nations. Two dozen countries
are trying to get their hands on nuclear, chemical, and biological
weapons. As these terrible tools of destruction spread, so too spreads
the potential for terrorism and for criminals to acquire them. And drug
trafficking, organized crime, and environmental decay threaten the
stability of new and emerging democracies and threaten our well-being
here at home.

Earlier this year I set out in a Presidential decision directive


what we most want you to focus on, priorities that will remain under
constant review but still are clear enough at the present time. First, the
intelligence needs of our military during an operation. If we have to
stand down Iraqi aggression in the Gulf or stand for democracy in Haiti,
our military commanders must have prompt, thorough intelligence to fully
inform their decisions and maximize the security of our troops. Second,
political, economic, and military intelligence about countries hostile
to the United States. We must also compile all source information on
major political and economic powers with weapons of mass destruction who
are potentially hostile to us. Third, intelligence about specific
transnational threats to our security, such as weapons proliferation,
terrorism, drug trafficking, organized crime, illicit trade practices,
and environmental issues of great gravity.

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July 24, 1995 Statement on the Terrorist Attack in Tel Aviv, Israel

On behalf of all Americans, I offer my deepest condolences to the


Government and people of Israel at this tragic moment. Our thoughts and
prayers are with the victims of this terrorist atrocity and their loved
ones.

We join with all those working for peace in expressing our outrage
and condemning in the strongest possible manner this brutal act. Those
responsible are seeking to deny to Israelis and Palestinians alike the
realization of a new and better life of peace and hope. But they shall
not be allowed to succeed. Their vision is of the past, not of the
future, of hatred, not the reconciliation which Israeli and Palestinian
peacemakers are striving to achieve.

Peace requires courage. The people of Israel have demonstrated


enormous resolve and determination in pursuing the path of peace.
Through times of suffering as well as rejoicing, the Government and
people of the United States stand with them.

September 28, 1995 Remarks at the Signing Ceremony for the Israeli-Palestinian
West Bank Accord

The enemies of peace have fought the tide of history with terror and
violence. We grieve for their victims, and we renew our vow to redeem
the sacrifice of those victims. We will defeat those who will resort to
terror. And we revere the determination of these leaders who chose
peace, who rejected the old habits of hatred and revenge. Because they
broke so bravely with the past, the bridges have multiplied, bridges of
communication, of commerce, of understanding. Today, the landscape
changes and the chasm narrows.

89
And let me close with this simple thought. As the cold war has given
way to a global village in which the enemies of peace are many and
dispersed all across the world, the United States is honored and
obligated to be a force for peace, from Northern Ireland to Southern
Africa, from Bosnia to Haiti, to reducing the nuclear threat and the
threat of biological and chemical weapons to fighting against terrorism
and organized crime.
But this is special, for it is in this place that those of us who
believe that the world was created by, is looked over by, and ultimately
will be accountable to one great God. All of us came from there, whether
we find that wisdom in the Torah or the Koran or the Christian Holy
Bible. If we could all learn in that place to find the secret of peace,
then perhaps the dream of peace on Earth can truly be realized.
Thank you, and God bless you all.

September 28, 1995 Remarks at a Reception for Heads of State

" ...And that brings me to the second point: What are our obligations,
the rest of us? We can clap for them. But they have to go back to work
tomorrow. When the glamour is gone and the applause has died out, they
will be back at the hard work. There are two things we can do for them.
The first thing we have to do is to stand with them against terrorism.
It is the enemy of peace everywhere.
Now we in America know what it is like to see parents grieving over
the bodies of their children and children grieving over the bodies of
their parents because people believe that terrorism is simply politics
by other means. We have had our hearts ripped out, and now we know
better. So we must stand with them against terrorism.

The second thing we have to do is to work with them to achieve the


benefits of peace, for the peace has to bring people the opportunity to
work with dignity, to educate their children, to clean up their

90
environment, to invest in their future. Hundreds and hundreds of Arab-
Americans and Jewish-Americans have the capacity to work with these
people in partnership to transform the future of the Middle East. And I
say again, let us do our part.

We know that in this era where we have gone from the bipolar world
of the cold war to a global village with all kinds of new and different
threats to our security, only the United States can stand consistently
throughout the world for the cause of freedom and democracy and
opportunity. We know that, and we must continue to do that, not simply
for the people of the Middle East but for ourselves as well. For when we
work for peace in Northern Ireland, in Southern Africa, in Haiti, in
Bosnia, when we work to dismantle the threat of nuclear war and fight
terrorism, we help ourselves and our children's future.

October 6, 1995 Remarks at a Freedom House Breakfast

"... When it comes to the pursuit of these goals, it is important that we


never forget that our values and our interests are one in the same.
Promoting democracies that participate in this new global marketplace is
the right thing to do. For all their imperfections, they advance what
all people want and often fight and die for: human dignity, security,
and prosperity. We know these democracies are less likely to go to war,
less likely to traffic in terrorism, more likely to stand against the
forces of hatred and intolerance and organized destruction.

We're working hard to make sure


nuclear materials don't wind up in the hands of terrorists or
international criminals. And I hope and pray that next year we'll
succeed in getting a comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty.
Americans are safer because of the tough counterterrorism campaign
we have been waging, including closer cooperation with foreign

91
governments, sanctions against states that sponsor terrorism, and
increasing the funding, the manpower, the training for our own law
enforcement. These have helped us to get results, big, visible results,
like the conviction just this week of those who conspired to wage a
campaign of terror in New York, and things that aren't so visible but
are very important, the planned terrorist attacks that have been
thwarted in the United States and on American citizens, the arrests that
have been secured in other countries through our cooperation.

We have an obligation to work more and more and more on this. And if
there is any area in the world where there is no difference between
domestic and foreign policy, surely it is in our common obligation to
work together to combat terrorism.
That is why, even before Oklahoma City, I had sent legislation to
the Hill asking for additional resources and help to deal with the
threat of terrorism. And after Oklahoma City, I modified and
strengthened that legislation. The Senate passed the bill quickly, but I
am very disappointed that the bill is now stalled in the House. We need
this legislation.
I believe Federal law enforcement authorities must be held
accountable. I believe we must be open about whatever has happened in
the past. But that has nothing to do with our obligation to make sure
that the American people have the tools that they need to combat the
threat of terrorism. So, once again, I say I hope the antiterrorism
legislation will pass. We need it. The threat is growing, not receding.

October 10, 1995 Remarks Prior to Discussions With President Ernesto Zedillo of
Mexico and an Exchange With Reporters

Question: Mr. President, earlier you mentioned the derailment of the train.
And after you spoke to us, your Press Secretary talked about the

92
unhappiness within the administration about Congress' failure to pass
the terrorism bill. I wondered if you could give us your thoughts on
that and whether you think there's any legitimacy in what some Members
are saying, that is, the FBI behavior at Waco and Government behavior at
Ruby Ridge have made people a little bit leery about passing that kind
of legislation.

President Clinton: First of all, what we asked for in the


antiterrorism bill would not make more likely any kind of actual or
alleged abuse of police authority. It would just give us the ability to
deal with terrorism.

Secondly, I have been very eager to be accountable and to see this


administration accountable and to see Government generally accountable
for the mistakes that are made in the past, whether it was on--whether
someone believes we did something wrong at Waco-we've had an
independent review of that--or on the Ruby Ridge thing, which happened
before I became President, or what we've done with the announcement we
made on the radiation experiments, which happened a long time before I
became President.
So I think the answer is, give us the tools we need to fight the
problems of today and tomorrow with antiterrorism, but hold us strictly,
strictly accountable. That's the answer. That's the balanced, fair
answer. We can achieve both.
There are some things--if the House, for example, wanted to make
some modifications in the habeas corpus provisions, some other things to
try to guard against abuse or protect people, they could do that. We
could work that out. But to do nothing is a mistake. That's the point I
want to make. It's a mistake to do nothing.

October 15, 1995 Remarks at the University of Connecticut in Storrs

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"...while fascism and communism are dead or discredited, the forces of hatred and
intolerance live on as they will for as long as human beings are permitted to exist on this
planet Earth. Today, it is ethnic violence, religious strife, terrorism.
These threats confront our generation in a way that still would spread
darkness over light, disintegration over integration, chaos over
community. Our purpose is to fight them, to defeat them, to support and
sustain the powerful worldwide aspirations of democracy, dignity, and
freedom.

So promoting democracy does more than advance our ideals. It


reinforces our interests. Where the rule of law prevails, where
governments are held accountable, where ideas and information flow
freely, economic development and political stability are more likely to
take hold and human rights are more likely to thrive. History teaches us
that democracies are less likely to go to war, less likely to traffic in
terrorism and more likely to stand against the forces of hatred and
destruction, more likely to become good partners in diplomacy and trade.
So promoting democracy and defending human rights is good for the world
and good for America.

October 22, 1995 Remarks to the United Nations General Assembly in New York City

All over the world, people yearn to live in peace. And that dream is
becoming a reality. But our time is not free of peril. As the cold war
gives way to the global village, too many people remain vulnerable to
poverty, disease, and underdevelopment. And all of us are exposed to
ethnic and religious hatred, the reckless aggression of rogue states,
terrorism, organized crime, drug trafficking, the proliferation of
weapons of mass destruction.

94
The emergence of the information and technology age has brought us
all closer together and given us extraordinary opportunities to build a
better future. But in our global village, progress can spread quickly,
but trouble can, too. Trouble on the far end of town soon becomes a
plague on everyone's house. We can't free our own neighborhoods from
drug-related crime without the help of countries where the drugs are
produced. We can't track down terrorists without assistance from other
governments. We can't prosper or preserve our environment unless
sustainable development is a reality for all nations. And our vigilance
alone can't keep nuclear weapons stored half a world away from falling
into the wrong hands.
Nowhere is cooperation more vital than in fighting the increasingly
interconnected groups that traffic in terror, organized crime, drug
smuggling, and the spread of weapons of mass destruction. No one is
immune: not the people of Japan, where terrorists unleash nerve gas in
the subway and poison thousands; not the people of Latin America or
Southeast Asia, where drug traffickers wielding imported weapons have
murdered judges, journalists, police officers, and innocent passers-by;
not the people of Israel and France where hatemongers have blown up
buses and trains full of children with suitcase bombs made from smuggled
explosives; not the people of the former Soviet Union and Central
Europe, where organized criminals seek to weaken new democracies and
prey on decent, hard-working men and women; and not the people of the
United States, where homegrown terrorists blew up a Federal building in
the heart of America and foreign terrorists tried to topple the World
Trade Center and plotted to destroy the very hall we gather in today.
These forces jeopardize the global trend toward peace and freedom,
undermine fragile new democracies, sap the strength from developing
countries, threaten our efforts to build a safer, more prosperous world.
So today I call upon all nations to join us in the fight against
them. Our common efforts can produce results. To reduce the threat of
weapons of mass destruction, we are working with Russia to reduce our
nuclear arsenals by two-thirds. We supported Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and

95
Belarus in removing nuclear weapons from their soil. We worked with the
states of the former Soviet Union to safeguard nuclear materials and
convert them to peaceful use. North Korea has agreed to freeze its
nuclear program under international monitoring. Many of the nations in
this room succeeded in getting the indefinite extension of the Non-
Proliferation Treaty.

To take on terrorists, we maintain strong sanctions against states


that sponsor terrorism and defy the rule of law, such as Iran, Iraq,
Libya, and Sudan. We ask them today again to turn from that path.
Meanwhile, we increase our own law enforcement efforts and our
cooperation with other nations.
Nothing we do will make us invulnerable, but we all can become less
vulnerable if we work together. That is why today I am announcing new
initiatives to fight international organized crime, drug trafficking,
terrorism, and the spread of weapons of mass destruction, initiatives we
can take on our own and others we hope we will take together in the form
of an international declaration to promote the safety of the world's
citizens.
First, the steps we will take: Yesterday, I directed our Government
to identify and put on notice nations that tolerate money laundering.
Criminal enterprises are moving vast sums of ill-gotten gains through
the international financial system with absolute impunity. We must not
allow them to wash the blood off profits from the sale of drugs from
terror or organized crimes. Nations should bring their banks and
financial systems into conformity with the international anti-money-
laundering standards. We will work to help them to do so. And if they
refuse, we will consider appropriate sanctions. Next, I directed our
Government to identify the front companies and to freeze the assets of
the largest drug ring in the world, the Cali cartel, to cut off its
economic lifelines and to stop our own people from dealing unknowingly

96
with its companies. Finally, I have instructed the Justice Department to
prepare legislation to provide our other agencies with the tools they
need to respond to organized criminal activity.
But because we must win this battle together, I now invite every
country to join in negotiating and endorsing a declaration on
international crime and citizen safety, a declaration which would first
include a no-sanctuary pledge, so that we could say together to
organized criminals, terrorists, drug traffickers, and smugglers, "You
have nowhere to run and nowhere to hide."
Second, a counterterrorism pact, so that we would together urge more
states to ratify existing antiterrorism treaties and work with us to
shut down the gray markets that outfit terrorists and criminals with
firearms and false documents.

Fifth, we need an illegal arms and deadly materials control effort


that we all participate in. A package the size of a child's lunch bag
held the poison gas used to terrorize Tokyo. A lump of plutonium no
bigger than a soda can is enough to make an atomic bomb. Building on
efforts already underway with the states of the former Soviet Union and
with our G-7 partners, we will seek to better account for, store, and
safeguard materials with massive destructive power. We should strengthen
the Biological Weapons Convention, pass the comprehensive test ban
treaty next year, and ultimately eliminate the deadly scourge of
landmines. We must press other countries and our own Congress to ratify
the Chemical Weapons Convention and to intensify our efforts to combat
the global illegal arms network that fuels terrorism, equips drug
cartels, and prolongs deadly conflicts. This is a full and challenging
agenda, but we must complete it, and we must do it together.

97
October 25, 1995 Remarks at a United Jewish Appeal Reception

The United States will remain a force for peace. We will continue to
support those who take risks for peace, and yes, we will continue to do
everything we can to minimize those risks. We will continue also and we
will intensify our efforts to fight the forces of terror who would turn
back the march of history. And we will continue to defend human rights
and human dignity for all the people on this planet.

October 30, 1995 Remarks to the White House Conference on Travel and Tourism

"... We also know that there are new


threats to our security that go across all national boundaries, that the
organized forces of destruction and terror know no nationalism.
We saw terrorism at home blow up the Federal building in Oklahoma
City and foreign terrorists try to take the World Trade Center down,
plan to bomb the United Nations. We see abroad when a religious fanatic
sect can take a small vial of sarin gas into a subway in Japan and break
it open and kill scores of people and injure hundreds of others. And we know we have to
work together, together with other countries, to reduce the menace of terrorism and
violence and drug trafficking and organized crime in this world. That
was the subject of the speech I gave to the United Nations last week on
the occasion of its 50th anniversary.

October 31,1995 Remarks on the Balkan Peace Process and an Exchange With
Reporters

Making peace will advance our goal of a peaceful, democratic, and


undivided Europe, a Europe at peace with extraordinary benefits to our
long-term security and prosperity, a Europe at peace with partners to
meet the challenges of the new century, challenges that affect us here

98
at home like terrorism and drug trafficking, organized crime, and the
spread of weapons of mass destruction. A peaceful, democratic, undivided
Europe will be that kind of partner.

November 3, 1995 Remarks at the Dedication of the Pan American Flight 103
Memorial Cairn in Arlington, Virginia

"... Since Pan Am 103, there have been other attacks of terrorism on our
own soil, the bombing of the World Trade Center, the tragedy in Oklahoma
City. After each, our Nation has drawn closer, and some of the families
here of the victims at Lockerbie have helped in that process. I thank
all of you who reached out to those who were grieving most recently in
Oklahoma City.
Despite the passage of time, nothing has dimmed our recollection of
that day when death commanded the heavens. Nothing has diminished our
outrage at that evil deed. Today the people of the United States
understand terrorism better. We know it can strike anyone, anywhere. We
know that each act of terrorism is a terrible assault on every person in
the world who prizes freedom, on the values we share, on our Nation and
every nation that respects human rights.
Today, America is more determined than ever to stand against
terrorism, to fight it, to bring terrorists to answer for their crimes.
We continue to tighten those sanctions on states that sponsor terrorism,
and we ask other nations to help us in that endeavor.
We are strengthening our ability to act at home and around the
world. Recently, we have been successful in apprehending terrorists
abroad and in preventing planned terrorist attacks here in the United
States. We are redoubling our efforts against those who target our
liberties and our lives. And just a few days ago in the United Nations,
I asked the nations of the world to join me in common cause against
terrorism.
In the case of Pan Am 103, we continue to press for the extradition

99
of the two Libyan suspects. We want to maintain and tighten the
enforcement of our sanctions, and we want to increase the pressure on
Libya. This cairn reminds us that we must never, never relax our efforts
until the criminals are brought to justice.
I thank those who have spoken before for their reference to this
hallowed ground. It is fitting that this memorial to the citizens of 21
nations has been erected here in the sacred place of our Nation,
surrounded by so many who fell fighting for our freedom. It is fitting,
too, that this cairn was chosen as the embodiment of our common concern,
not only because of the strong bonds that have grown up between the
people of Scotland and America out of this tragedy but because this
cairn was built stone by stone.
From the time of the Bible, men and women have piled stones to mark
a covenant between them as the patriarch Jacob did with Laban. So let us
take this cairn as the sign of our bond with the victims of Pan Am 103
to remember the life they brought into so many lives, to work to bring
justice down on those who committed the murders, to keep our own people
safe, and to rid the world of terrorism and never to forget until this
job is done.
We must all labor for the day, my fellow Americans and citizens of
the world, when, in the words of the Psalm, "we shall not be afraid for
the terror by night, nor for the arrow that flieth by day, nor for the
pestilence that walketh in darkness, nor for the destruction that
wasteth at noonday."
The days are now shortening, and December 21st approaches once
again. I hope, to those of you who are members of the families, that the
honor done your loved ones here today brings you some solace. And I pray
that when this anniversary day comes again you will have a measure of
peace. Your country men and women are with you in spirit and in
determination.
God bless you. God bless Scotland. And God bless the United States
of America.

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November 11,1995 Remarks at a Veterans Day Ceremony in Arlington, Virginia

But as the painful events of recent days have reminded us, the
forces of darkness and division have not been destroyed. Threats like
the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction; violence rooted in
ethnic, religious, and racial hatred; organized crime and drug
trafficking; and especially terrorism call upon us to respond. Just as
our veterans faced down the threats of a previous era, so now we must
confront these challenges of this time. Just as Congress and the
President join in bipartisan spirit over the last 50 years to protect
our Nation's security, so we must join today.
I am proud of the work our military is doing in the fight to keep
illegal drugs out of America and the fight to break the terrible drug
cartels of the world. I am proud of the work our law enforcement people
have done here at home and abroad to combat terrorism, from bringing
terrorists to justice from all across the world to actually stopping
terrorists plots in the United States before they succeed.
But as we saw in the World Trade Center and at Oklahoma City and as
we saw so recently in the tragic, tragic murder of Israel's great leader
and military hero, Prime Minister Rabin, there is more to be done.
Giving our officials the tools they need to defeat terrorism is now a
part of our national security mission, just as maintaining a strong
national defense is. This matter must be beyond party. All of us must
rise to the challenge to meet it.

November 13, 1995 Statement on the Terrorist Attack in Riyadh, Saudi


Arabia

This morning's attack in Riyadh against an American facility is an


outrage. Our condolences and prayers go out to the victims and their
families. We appreciate the speed and professionalism with which Saudi

101
authorities have responded to this emergency and will work closely with
them in identifying those responsible for this cowardly act and bringing
them to justice.

November 13, 1995 Remarks to the Democratic Leadership Council

"... That responsibility extends to the other threats in the world today
that are related to racial and ethnic and religious divisions,
especially to terrorism. Just this morning, the terrorist attacks
against American citizens in Saudi Arabia provided a brutal reminder
that our people are not immune, not immune here at home as we learned at
the World Trade Center and Oklahoma City and not immune abroad.
Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their loved ones
at this time of their loss. We owe it to them and to all of our citizens
to increase our efforts to deter terrorism, to make sure that those
responsible for this hideous act are brought to justice, to intensify
and pressure the isolation of countries that support terrorism. And we
must spare no effort to make sure our own law enforcement officials have
what they need to protect our citizens. That"s why, even before Oklahoma
City, I sent legislation to Capitol Hill asking for additional resources
to deal with the threat of terrorism. The Senate passed the bill
quickly, but the bill has stalled for months and months in the House. I
ask again for the House of Representatives to pass the antiterrorism
legislation.

November 17,1995 Interview With NHK Television of Japan

"... We also know we're going to have to deal with problems of


proliferation of weapons of destruction, of terrorism, of organized
crime. Both Japan and the United States have been victimized by

102
terrorism recently. So there are still very compelling reasons for us to
maintain our security partnership. We are reviewing that. We want to
clarify that in the form of a declaration.

My vision includes the ability of nation-states to open up their


systems enough to have a global trading system but to still be strong
enough to stamp out the organized forces of destruction, to stamp out
those who would use terrorism and organized crime and drug trafficking
to kill innocent people. That really is going to be our great challenge,
to take advantage of all these forces that are pulling the world
together-essentially, economics and culture pulling the world
together-and to stamp out these forces that are threatening to tear us
apart, the forces of racial and religious and ethnic hatred-what we're
trying to deal with now in Bosnia, hoping to bring peace there-and the
forces of terrorism, organized crime, and drug trafficking. Those things
are the great security challenges of the 21st century, along with the
proliferation of weapons. Those people that want to proliferate
weapons-we've got to do something about it. When Japan went into
Cambodia to try to help make the peace-there is something like 10
million landmines there. We have to do something about that.
But if we can deal with our differences, our cultural, racial,
ethnic, religious differences, and deal with the organized criminal and
the terrorists, then I think the 21st century will be the greatest time
in all of human history.

November 27, 1995 Address to the Nation on Implementation of the Peace


Agreement in Bosnia-Herzegovina

"... As the cold war gives way to the global village, our leadership is
needed more than ever because problems that start beyond our borders can

103
quickly become problems within them. We're all vulnerable to the
organized forces of intolerance and destruction; terrorism; ethnic,
religious, and regional rivalries; the spread of organized crime and
weapons of mass destruction and drug trafficking. Just as surely as
fascism and communism, these forces also threaten freedom and democracy,
peace and prosperity. And they, too, demand American leadership.
But nowhere has the argument for our leadership been more clearly
justified than in the struggle to stop or prevent war and civil
violence. From Iraq to Haiti, from South Africa to Korea, from the
Middle East to Northern Ireland, we have stood up for peace and freedom
because it's in our interest to do so and because it is the right thing
to do.

November 29, 1995 Remarks to the Parliament of the United Kingdom


in London

"... In the years since, we have also stood together, fighting together
for victory in the Persian Gulf, standing together against terrorism,
working together to remove the nuclear cloud from our children's bright
future, and together preparing the way for peace in Bosnia, where your
peacekeepers have performed heroically and saved the lives of so many
innocent people. I thank the British nation for its strength and its
sacrifice through all these struggles. And I am proud to stand here on
behalf of the American people to salute you.

Though the cold war is over, the forces of destruction challenge us


still. Today they are armed with a full array of threats, not just the
single weapon of frontal war. We see them at work in the spread of
weapons of mass destruction, from nuclear smuggling in Europe to a vial
of sarin gas being broken open in the Tokyo subway to the bombing of the

104
World Trade Center in New York. We see it in the growth of ethnic
hatred, extreme nationalism, and religious fanaticism, which most
recently took the life of one of the greatest champions of peace in the
entire world, the Prime Minister of Israel. We see it in the terrorism
that just in recent months has murdered innocent people from Islamabad
to Paris, from Riyadh to Oklahoma City. And we see it in the
international organized crime and drug trade that poisons our children
and our communities.
In their variety these forces of disintegration are waging guerrilla
wars against humanity. Like communism and fascism, they spread darkness
over tight, barbarism over civilization. And like communism and fascism,
they will be defeated only because free nations join against them in
common cause.
We will prevail again if, and only if, our people support the
mission. We are, after all, democracies. And they are the ultimate
bosses of our fate. I believe the people will support this. I believe
free people, given the information, will make the decisions that will
make it possible for their leaders to stand against the new threat to
security and freedom, to peace and prosperity.

December 19, 1995 Remarks on Vetoing the Departments of Commerce,


Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies
Appropriations Act, 1996, and an
Exchange With Reporters

"... There is one last thing I'd like to say. Eight months ago today,
terror visited our children in Oklahoma City. The memory of that awful
tragedy will be with us forever. Just yesterday, law enforcement
officers found a bomb outside a Federal office building in Reno, Nevada.
In the weeks after Oklahoma City, I sent to the Congress a bill to give
law enforcement the tools they need to crack down on terrorism and to
protect our families-terrorism arising from within the United States,

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terrorism coming from beyond our borders.
The Senate passed the bill last June with sweeping bipartisan
support. But a few people with extreme views have prevented the House of
Representatives from even considering the bill. They have held it up
long enough. Here in this time of peace for our country, I ask all
Americans to remember the victims of Oklahoma City, and I ask the
Congress to give law enforcement the tools they need to be truly peace
officers.
When they send me a bill that protects our families by keeping our
promise to put 100,000 police officers on the street, they should also
protect our families by keeping their promise to send us a strong
antiterrorism bill.
Thank you.

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1996

January 23, 1996 Address Before a Joint Session of the Congress on the State of the
Union

"... All over the world, even after the cold war, people still look to us
and trust us to help them seek the blessings of peace and freedom ...
The threats we face today as Americans respect no nation's borders.
Think of them: terrorism, the spread of weapons of mass destruction,
organized crime, drug trafficking, ethnic and religious hatred,
aggression by rogue states, environmental degradation. If we fail to
address these threats today, we will suffer the consequences in all our
tomorrows

As we remember what happened in the Japanese subway, we can outlaw


poison gas forever if the Senate ratifies the Chemical Weapons
Convention this year. We can intensify the fight against terrorists and
organized criminals at home and abroad if Congress passes the
antiterrorism legislation I proposed after the Oklahoma City bombing,
now. We can help more people move from hatred to hope all across the
world in our own interest if Congress gives us the means to remain the
world's leader for peace.

February 17, 1996 Remarks to the Community in Rochester

"... And I am proud of what the United States has done to stand up
against terrorism, to limit the spread of dangerous weapons, to work for
a ban on all nuclear testing, to stand up for peace in the Middle East
and in Haiti and in Northern Ireland and in Bosnia today, where our

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brave soldiers are fighting for peace. I am proud of them.

Look at the rest of the world. Everybody ought to know that peace is
better than war, that economic competition is better than terrorism. But
here we are on the brink of a new peace in the Middle East and my
friend, the Prime Minister, is murdered. Here we are on the brink of a
new peace in Ireland and, foolishly, the peace is broken by a bomb. Here
we are on the brink of making our people safer than ever before, but we
know that none of us are free from terrorism generated at home and
abroad.

We have to do the right thing, and the right thing makes us more secure. We can be hit
by terrorists from anywhere. It is the right thing to stand up against terrorism
everywhere. We have to stand for the things we believe in.

March 5,1996 Remarks to the National Association of Counties

"... Today I'm announcing a series of steps to support the fight against
future terrorist attacks, to bring killers to justice, and to rally
support for peace in the Middle East. These steps include immediate
emergency transfer to Israel of highly sophisticated detection
equipment; the dispatch of American specialists to work with their
Israeli counterparts on strengthening antiterrorism measures; the
development of a comprehensive package of training, technical
assistance, and equipment to improve antiterrorism cooperation among
Israel, the Palestinians, and other governments in the region; and
contact with foreign governments to ask for their help in the fight for
peace and against terrorism. The United States has always stood with the

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people of Israel through good times and bad, and we stand with them
today.
Let me say that in so many ways your work is the polar opposite of
the extremism which threatens to tear apart the fabric of so many
societies in the world today. When you walk out of your office, the
great challenges of our time confront you with human faces. You have no
choice but to reach out to your fellow citizens and to try to work
together to meet those challenges. As the great former mayor of New York
City, Fiorello La Guardia, once said, there is, after all, no Republican
or Democratic way to clean the streets. You have shown what can be
accomplished if people put aside their differences and work together.
And I hope while you're here you'll remind every elected official in
Washington that we, too, can do our job here if we do it together.
I came into this community and into my job with a very
straightforward vision. I wanted to make sure that our country would go
into the 21st century with the American dream alive and well for every
single American willing to work for it. I wanted our country to remain
the strongest force for peace and freedom, for security and prosperity
in the post-cold-war world. And above all, I wanted to see this country
come together around our basic values and our mutual respect for one
another.

March 5, 1996 Remarks at a Memorial Service for Victims of Terrorism

"... to my fellow Americans and all the people of Israel: The American people
join in this time of grieving and loss. We mourn Israel's loss-we mourn
Israel's terrible loss, and we share your outrage. We stand with you in
your determination to bring this terror to an end and to bring to
justice those responsible for the senseless violence that has afflicted
the land of Israel and taken the lives of innocent people.
In moments such as these our anguish challenges our spirit.
Daughters and sons, husbands and wives, brothers and sisters, mothers

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and fathers, friends murdered—murdered solely for the blood running
through their veins, solely because of where they live, solely because
they wish to live in peace and harmony.
Our faith may be shaken, but at times like this it is all the more
important to persevere. These fanatical acts were not aimed simply at
killing innocent people, they were clearly aimed at killing the promise
of peace. Those responsible thrive on division and conflict. It is
almost as if they cannot exist without someone to hate, someone to kill.
They know a new day has been dawning in the Middle East. They know
the vast majority of Israelis and Palestinians want a new day of peace.
With every new step taken along the way, the harshest enemies of peace
have grown more and more desperate. We must not allow them to prevail.
The best way to defeat them is to first restore security and then
bolster the peace they fear; that will take away their very reason for
being.
We will counter the threat of terror with unshakable resolve. As I
have pledged to Prime Minister Peres, the United States is working with
Israel to stop the killing, to bring the criminals to justice, to step
up the struggle for peace. But just as important as the strength of our
policies is the strength we must carry in our hearts.
I remember the story of Daniel. Because his faith never wavered,
even in the face of those who betrayed him and had him cast into the den
of lions, God delivered Daniel. Have faith, and I believe God will
deliver Israel from those powerful vipers who have the ability to turn
young men into mad suicidal mass murderers, those awful people who would
slaughter young children to defeat those who only want those children to
grow up in peace, and who on this very night have succeeded in
terrifying every young child in Israel who goes to bed tonight worrying
about whether he or she will be the next to have their life cut short.

Once again under terrible burdens, the people of Israel must choose

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the fight against terrorism, to restore their security, to stand for
peace. Once again as ever, the United States stands with you, shoulder
to shoulder, heart to heart.
Ha-zak, ha-zak, vuh-neet ha-zake. May God bless the victims and
cherish their souls. And may God bless Israel with the faith and courage
of Daniel.

March 13, 1996 Remarks at the Opening of the Summit of the Peacemakers in
Sharm al-Sheikh, Egypt

"... From all around the world we have come to the Sinai to deliver one
simple, unified message: Peace will prevail. This summit is
unprecedented in the history of the Middle East. It would have been
inconceivable just a few short years ago. It stands as proof and promise
that this region has changed for good. Leaders from Israel and the Arab
world, from Europe, from Asia, from North America, 29 of us, shoulder-
to-shoulder, joined in support of peace. We have gathered before to
celebrate new milestones in our journey; today we join in common defense
against those who would turn us back. We are here because we know what
is at stake.
In the 18 years since Egypt and Israel made a miracle at Camp David,
Israelis and Arabs have changed the course of history in their lands.
Step by step, courageously they have broken with the past, laying down
the arms of war and opening their arms to one another. But with every
milestone passed along the road of peace and progress, the enemies of
peace have grown more desperate and more depraved. They know they cannot
compete in the marketplace of ideas; they know they have nothing to
offer but hardship and despair. And so they resort to murderous attacks
that are an affront to the civilized world and to the moral precepts
that lie at the core of the three faiths represented here, as President
Mubarak has so eloquently stated.
In the busy streets of Jerusalem, Ashkelon, and Tel Aviv, suicide

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bombers launched a wave of terror to kill as many Israelis as possible:
ordinary men and women riding the bus to work, families shopping for the
holidays, innocent children in their Purim costumes, murdered for the
blood in their veins. Our hearts go out to the people of Israel and to
all the victims of these atrocities, which include also Palestinians and
Americans. Many of the nations here today have experienced the nightmare
of terror. Death does not discriminate among the terrorists' victims.
Over the last 2 weeks, as I have said, losses were felt not only in Israeli but also in
Palestinian, American, and Moroccan homes.
The hard-won achievements of the Palestinian people are under direct
assault. The merchants of terror would sell out their future and trade
their dreams for despair. And Arab mothers and fathers who seek a better
life for their children understand the enemies of peace have targeted
them as well.
Let no one underestimate the significance of our gathering here
today. Today the wall of division we face is not really between Arab and
Israeli. It is instead between those who reach for a better tomorrow and
those who rail against it, between those who traffic in hate and terror
and those who work for peace.
To the forces of hatred and violence I say, and let us all say, you
kill yourselves and others in the aim of killing peace. Yet today, as
you see, peace survives. And peace will grow stronger. You will not
succeed. Your day has passed. You have plowed the fields of hatred, but
here we are coming to reap unity and new strength to defeat you and to
keep the promise and hope of peace alive.
We who have gathered in Egypt today are committed to the search for
peace. Our very presence here underscores the depth of our dedication.
But words and symbols are not enough. The world looks to us now for
action, and we must direct our collective resolve in three specific
areas.
First, we must be clear in our condemnation of those who resort to
terror. Violence has no place in the future we all seek for the Middle
East.

112
Second, we must reinforce our common search for a comprehensive
peace. We must press forward until the circle of peace is closed. And we
must work to bring the benefits of peace to the daily lives of the
people here, for if people lose their hope in peace, the terrorists will
have succeeded. This would be the cruelest victory of all, and we must
not let it happen.
Third, we must actively counter the terrorists with all the means at
our command, combining our efforts tangibly and joining our strength to
defeat their evil aims. Chairman Arafat and the Palestinian Authority
are responding to that challenge. Each of us here must do our part to
help them succeed in their mission. We know we cannot guarantee 100
percent success, but all of us must demand of each other and of
ourselves 100 percent effort. The danger we face is urgent, the
challenge is clear, but the solidarity of the peacemakers will conquer
the forces of division if we will resolve to keep that solidarity.
We stand today as one not far from the mount where God gave the word
to Moses, the law of humanity, tolerance, and faith that guides our way
today. We are the heirs of that moral legacy whether we be Muslim or Jew
or Christian. From many lands and many different traditions we come,
today all speaking the language of peace.
In the Bible we are told that when they were grown, Isaac, the
patriarch of the Jews, and Ishmael, the patriarch of the Arabs, met but
once. They came together at the death of Abraham, the father they
shared, the father of both peoples. Today the descendants of Isaac and
Ishmael have joined together in a spirit of rebirth to secure the shared
promise of a life of peace for all the peoples of this region. Those of
us who come here today to stand with them must not allow the forces of
the past to deny them the future they seek, that we all seek.
Let our charge go forth from the Sinai today: We will win the battle
for peace.
Thank you.

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March 13, 1996 The President's News Conference With President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt in Sharm al-Sheikh

"... The Summit of Peacemakers has just concluded. This meeting took
place at a time when the peace process confronts serious threats. The
summit had three fundamental objectives: to enhance the peace process,
to promote security, and to combat terror.
Accordingly, the participants here today expressed their full
support for the Middle East peace process and their determination that
this process continue in order to accomplish a just, lasting, and
comprehensive peace in the region; affirmed their determination to
promote security and stability and to prevent the enemies of peace from
achieving their ultimate objective of destroying the real opportunity
for peace in the Middle East; and reemphasized their strong condemnation
of all acts of terror in all its abhorrent forms, whatever its
motivation and whoever its perpetrator, including recent attacks in
Israel, considering them alien to the moral and spiritual values shared
by all peoples of the region; and reaffirmed their intention to stand
staunchly against all such acts and to urge all governments to join them
in this condemnation and opposition.
To that end we decided to support the Israeli-Palestinian
agreements, the continuation of the negotiating process, and to
politically and economically reinforce it; to enhance the security
situation for both with special attention to the current and pressing
economic needs of the Palestinians; to support the continuation of the
negotiating process in order to achieve a comprehensive settlement; to
work together to promote security and stability in the region by
developing effective and practical means of cooperation and further
assistance; to promote coordination of efforts to stop acts of terror on
bilateral, regional, and international levels, ensuring instigators of
such acts are brought to justice; supporting efforts by all parties to
prevent their territories from being used for terrorist purposes and

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preventing terrorist organizations from engaging in recruitment,
supplying arms, or fundraising; to exert maximum efforts to identify and
determine the sources of financing for these groups and to cooperate in
cutting them off; and by providing training, equipment, and other forms
of support to those taking steps against groups using violence and
terror to undermine peace, security, or stability.

Question: President Clinton, Prime Minister Peres and John Major both
talked of Iran as a source of terrorism. He also mentioned Libya. Why
did this conference not single out any of the nations that you accuse of
sponsoring terrorism, point fingers, and impose or try to impose any
kind of sanctions on these nations?

President Clinton. Well, I think you know my statements on that


issue have been quite clear and forthright, and the United States has
taken very strong actions there. Let me answer you in this way: The
nations here in what they agreed to do--and if you go back to my
statement, this is a remarkable statement that every person here agreed
that we would together take specific steps, including dealing with
funding sources. I believe that's a pretty explicit commitment on our
part to do what we can within our means to reduce terrorism in the area.
And I believe that we shouldn't diminish what we did do by focusing on
what was not done or said. What was done and said is far more than has
ever been done and said by people working together in this region.

March 13, 1996 The President's News Conference With President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt in Sharm al-Sheikh

".. That does not mean-and in each of these countries, the facts may be
somewhat different. So I don't think we're speaking in euphemisms when
we talk about the terror here being tied up with the question of getting

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peace in the Middle East. But Islamic-to equate Islam with terror I
think is a big mistake. I mean, the Japanese dealt with it in the Tokyo
subway with the sarin gas. We dealt with it at Oklahoma City. People all
over the world are coming to grips with it. The British are having their
buildings blown up again.
So I think you have to look at this in every country, in every place
it rears its head, and see how it can be dealt with. The problem here is
that the terror is associated with people who do not want a peaceful
resolution in the Middle East. If we had a peaceful resolution in the
Middle East and if the Palestinian Authority had time to develop as an
ordinary government, they would have more and more and more capacity to
deal with the terrorism on their own. And that's what we're talking
about.

March 14, 1996 The President's News Conference With Prime Minister Shimon Peres
of Israel in Jerusalem

"... First, I would like to express my


appreciation to the Prime Minister and his Cabinet for the meeting that
we had this morning just before coming over here to discuss the
situation with regard to terrorism and the recent bombings. We have
decided that the United States and Israel will immediately begin
negotiations to conclude a bilateral agreement on combating terrorism. I
told the Prime Minister that the United States will commit more than
$100 million to this effort.
I am taking this step because I am determined that we must have
every tool at our disposal to fight against extremist violence. Last
night I sent to the Congress an urgent request for the first installment
of this counterterrorism effort. I expect Congress to act quickly on
this important measure.
The agreement will strengthen our attack on terror in three
important areas. First, the United States will immediately begin to

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provide Israel with additional equipment and training. Second, our
nations will join together to develop new antiterror methods and
technologies. Third, we will work to enhance communications and
coordination between our nations, as well as other governments who have
joined with us in the war against terror.
In addition to what we propose to do under this agreement, the
United States will also increase its intelligence sharing and
coordination. At my direction, our Secretary of State, Warren
Christopher, and the Director of Central Intelligence, John Deutch, will
remain in Israel to speed the progress of this agreement. We must do
everything we can to track down those responsible for the recent
violence, and we must work to prevent them from shedding more innocent
blood.

As a result of the meeting in Sharm al-Sheikh yesterday, I have seen for the
first time a broad-based commitment to making sure the noble people of
Israel and the peace-loving peoples throughout this region may be able
to live and work together against terrorism and for a peaceful future.
Thank you.

Question: Mr. President, I'd like to ask you about Congress' handling of
your antiterrorist legislation. Yesterday the House voted to delete a
provision to ban foreign fundraising in the United States. Do you think
this bill is on the right track?

President Clinton: Excuse me, would you-they voted to delete what?

Question: Foreign fundraising in the United States. Do you think this


weakens the bill? Is it on the right track? How do you think they're
handling it?

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President Clinton:. Well, of course I think it should have passed months
ago, and I don't know why it wasn't. We have a lot of resources to
combat terrorism now; we would like some more. The bill had been
transformed and things have been added to it that weren't necessarily
urgent, but I'm very concerned that because of the hearings we had
earlier in the year about some of the developments in the United States,
I'm afraid there's a little too much domestic political considerations
maybe in the debate of the antiterrorism bill and not enough focus on
the global aspects of terrorism and how we need these tools to combat
terrorists from abroad and what terrorists from abroad might do within
the United States. That's the reason I put forward the legislation, and
I would hope that Congress would focus on that and keep those two
elements in mind in moving through this bill and passing a good one.

It is not easy for democratic societies to defeat organized forces


of destruction. The end of the cold war means that there will in all
probability, and we hope, be less conflict among nation-states. There
will be more conflict in the future by people who organize themselves
for illegitimate means through terrorism and who try to access the
dangerous weapons—traditional, biological, and chemical weapons-who
try to use the forces of organized crime and the money they can get from
drug trafficking to build a network of destruction, if you will, that
can cross the boundaries of nation-states. I believe this is a problem-
the Prime Minister alluded to this earlier-this is today Israel's
problem, it's the Middle Eastern problem, but it will be the principal
security problem of the future, and I think we had better get after it.
And that's what we're trying to do.

I wish I had it in my power to reach into the hearts of those young


men who have bought some apocalyptic version of Islam and politics that
together causes them to strap their bodies with bombs and blow

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themselves to smithereens and kill innocent children. I wish I could do
that. I don't pretend to be able to do that. But that's not the
question. The question is, can we improve the capacity of Israel and of
the Palestinian Authority to prevent these things from occurring? The
answer to that question is yes.

Second question, can we improve our capacity to break up the


networks of money and materiel that make these things possible? The
answer to that is yes. Can we create a risk-free world here in Israel?
No. Can we reduce the risks and do much better? Yes. That is the way we
should look at this and that is the focus we should take. You know, I
couldn't do that in the United States. Is it less likely that someone
could do what happened in Oklahoma City again in the United States? I
think it is because of steps we have taken. Is it absolutely certain
that nothing like that will ever happen again? No.
As long as you have free societies where people have some ability to
move, some right of privacy, some ability to transfer funds, and some
ability to get access to materials that can be made into bombs, you
cannot have a totally risk-free world. What we are trying to do is to
reduce the risks, to reduce the likelihood of this, to prevent more of
these things from happening, to catch more of the wrongdoers. That's
what we're trying to do. We can absolutely do that, and that should be
the focus.

March 14, 1996 Remarks and a Question-and-Answer Session With Students in Tel
Aviv

"... America knows also the wounds of terror because of experience on our
own soil, in the tragedies of Oklahoma City and the World Trade Center
in New York. One of terrorists' greatest consequences is the awful
persistence of fear, fear that the bus is not safe, that a shopping
center might be a target, that there is no haven from danger, that

119
friends or family will be taken in an instant, that the fear itself will
never end. But fear must be conquered, security must be restored, and
peace must be pursued.
Those who still pursue the terror here in the face of unbelievable
opportunities for learning, for prosperity, for growth, for living in
harmony, for enriching their lives by living with people who are other
than they are, they are in the grip of that ancient fear that life can
only be lived if you're looking down on someone else, if you're hating
someone else, if you're grateful just for the fact that you're not like
someone else. It is the great challenge of your generation to overcome
those fears in perhaps the hardest place in the world to do it. For you
can live out your dreams only if you can convince others to lay down
their fear and define themselves in terms of what they can become, not
who they can hate.

Today Prime Minister Peres and I, along with our top security
advisers, set a course to deepen our own cooperation and intensify our
war on terror. We agreed to increase intelligence sharing, to develop
new methods to combat terror, to enhance coordination between our
nations and others who have agreed to join us to fight against terror. I
committed $100 million to this effort, and last night I sent a message
to the Congress asking them to take urgent action to fulfill our first
installment in this endeavor.
America stands with you in the pursuit of peace and in the war on
terror. And we will do more.

this problem of terrorism and of fanaticism and of extremism is a problem


that the world faces. Remember it wasn't so long ago that a religious
fanatic walked into a Japanese subway and broke open a small vial of

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sarin gas and killed many people. It was only a year ago, or 2 years
ago, I guess now, that the tragedy in Oklahoma City occurred in America.

So for your lifetime, I do believe you'll have to fight these


organized forces of destruction. But I believe you will do it within a
framework in which the nations are at peace and are growing together
economically and you will be more secure. That's what I believe will
happen.

March 16, 1996 The President's Radio Address

Good morning. I have recently returned from an historic meeting in


the Middle East. Twenty-nine leaders from the region and around the
world came together in support of peace and against terrorism. Our
summit was called to confront an urgent threat. Recent terrorist
atrocities in Israel have taken scores of innocent lives, including
those of two young Americans. They have jeopardized the hopes of
Israelis and Palestinians who long for peace, and they menace the dreams
of all the mothers and fathers there who seek a better life for their
children.
But the merchants of terror will not succeed. By their acts of
violence they have only reinforced the determination of the peacemakers.
Whatever the effort, whatever the time it takes, we will prevail because
we must.
The violence in Israel is a terrible reminder of the challenges we
all face to protect the security of our Nation and our people. For while
we live in an age of great possibility, we face new perils as well. Open
societies and open markets are on the march. And the dawn of the
information age is creating exciting new opportunities to build a
brighter future. But as barriers fall, the freedom and openness that

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make our Nation strong can also make us vulnerable. The freedom and
openness that will bring Americans almost 3 million new jobs in the next
few years in telecommunications alone, spurred on by the
telecommunications bill I signed just a few weeks ago, also mean that
our democratic societies, which have to be open to new people and
products and information, are also more vulnerable because they're open
to threats that all too easily can cross national borders.
Terrorism is a part of the growing web of threats that include the
spread of weapons of mass destruction, drug trafficking, and organized
crime. I have made our fight against terrorism a national security
priority. And in order to defeat these forces of destruction, we need
every tool at our disposal. The United States maintains strong sanctions
on states that sponsor terrorism. We have stepped up cooperation with
other nations to root out terrorists before they act and to capture them
when they do. We have increased funding, manpower, and training for our
law enforcement agencies to combat terrorism. And our efforts are
yielding results. We made swift arrests after the attacks on the World
Trade Center and Oklahoma City. Today those responsible for the World
Trade Center bombing are behind bars. In the last 3 years the United
States has arrested more terrorists than at any time in our history,
plucking them from hiding all around the world and bringing them to
justice for their crimes. This progress is dramatic, but we must do
more.
Yet on the same day I was in the Middle East rallying the world
community to fight terrorism, some in Congress, led by Republicans, were
taking apart piece by piece the tough legislation designed to beat back
that very threat. More than a year ago I sent a bill to Congress that
would strengthen our ability to investigate, prosecute, and punish
terrorist activity. After the Oklahoma City bombing I made that
legislation even stronger. My efforts were guided by three firm goals:
first, to protect American lives without infringing on American rights;
second, to give law enforcement officials the tools they need to do the
job; and third, to make sure that terrorists are barred from our

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country.
The congressional leaders promised to send me that bill by last
Memorial Day, 6 weeks after the Oklahoma City tragedy. The Senate passed
counterterrorism legislation last June. But now, less than 6 weeks
before the anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing, the House has
finally acted to gut the bill. The House took the teeth out of our
efforts to fight terrorism. Unbelievably, the House voted to give law
enforcement officials fewer tools to fight terrorism than they have to
fight far less horrible crimes here at home.
First, the bill had a provision to chemically mark the explosive
materials terrorists use to build their deadly bombs. If we know where
explosives come from, we have a better chance of figuring out who used
them. The House voted to strip this law enforcement tool because for
some reason the Washington gun lobby opposed it. The House and the
Washington gun lobby are against giving law enforcement the ability to
trace explosives. I know we should be able to keep up with materials terrorists
use to build bombs.
The House also voted to let terrorists like Hamas continue to raise
money in America by stripping the Justice Department's authority to
designate organizations as terrorists and thereby stop them from raising
funds in the United States. The House voted against allowing us to
deport foreigners who support terrorist activities more quickly, and it
voted to cripple our ability to use high-tech surveillance to keep up
with stealthy and fast-moving terrorists.
At the same time the bill went easy on terrorists, it got tough on
law enforcement officials. The House stripped a provision that would
have helped protect police officers from cop-killer bullets. And it
ordered a commission to study not the terrorists but the Federal law
enforcement officials who put their lives on the line to fight
terrorism. Even the Republican chairman of the Judiciary Committee,
Henry Hyde, couldn't believe what his colleagues did, saying the House
eviscerated the terrorism bill. I urge the Senate to stand firm and turn
this bill back into the strong antiterrorism legislation I want to sign

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and America needs.
Our Nation has felt the lash of terrorism. We know its terrible
costs, and we know that only America can lead the world's fight against
it. We can't let the gun lobby turn America into a safehouse for
terrorists. Congress should get back on track and send me tough
legislation that cracks down on terrorism. It should listen to the cries
of the victims and the hopes of our children, not the back-alley
whispers of the gun lobby.
Thanks for listening.

March 17, 1996 Remarks to the United Jewish Appeal Young Leadership Conference

"... Let me say that the 2 days and 9 hours I spent going from here to
Sharm al-Sheikh to Tel Aviv and Jerusalem and back to Tel Aviv again and
then home were a remarkable experience for me. I am grateful that the
United States is a friend of Israel and a friend of the cause of peace.
I am grateful that the United States is an implacable opponent of
terrorism. And I am grateful that at this moment I was able to go on
behalf of all the American people to stand with the people of Israel in
their time of pain and sorrow and challenge to express the outrage of
our people at the latest campaign of terror and to show our solidarity.
All of you know this, but it bears repeating that the terrorist
attacks claimed not only Israeli lives but also those of Palestinians—
and some of the most gripping tales I heard when I was there came from
their family members, who also long for peace-and two young Americans,
Sarah Duker and Matthew Eisenfeld.
Now, it is important, quite apart from the peace process, that we
once again say to the world, we know no country is safe from terror. We
have seen it in the World Trade Center and in Oklahoma City in the
United States. We know our friends in Japan have suffered it in the
terrible attack of sarin gas in the Tokyo subway. But we know that in
the Middle East it has too often been employed as an instrument of

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politics. And it is wrong. We stand against it now. We redouble our
efforts against it, and we will be against it forever.
The symbol of our solidarity on this trip was perhaps best conveyed
by the stone from the South Lawn of the White House that I was
privileged to place on the grave of my friend Prime Minister Rabin,
along with all of his family members. That is the place where the first
accord with the Palestinians was signed. It represents our hope for
progress, our belief in the chances of peace, and our unwavering
solidarity.
As you know, we have resolved to strengthen our cooperation with all
those who will stand against terror in the Middle East. We are
committing more than $100 million to the task. We are increasing our
intelligence sharings, and we are developing new methods to combat
violence there. We are convinced that ultimately fear will overcome the
adversity of terror, because overcoming that kind of adversity is the
genius of the Jewish people and the history of the State of Israel. No
nation on Earth has experienced more often the painful truth that the
path of triumph often passes through tragedy. No people knows better
that we must deny victory to oppressors. The Jewish people have overcome
every one of their would-be destroyers, denying them their goal, and in
so doing reaffirming that what is good in human nature can prevail.

Let me remind my fellow Americans that we have challenges here at


home and that if we want to truly be effective in the transnational
fight against terrorism, we must have the tools to deal with terrorism
here at home. Well over a year ago I sent to Congress a bill to improve
our ability to investigate, to prosecute, to punish terrorist activity.
After our own tragedy in Oklahoma City I made that legislation even
stronger and challenged the Congress to pass it.
Last June the Senate passed the counterterrorism legislation. Until
last week, the House of Representatives, letting more than a half-year

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go by, had not acted. Then last week when it did act, unbelievably it
acted to destroy the bill, to gut it, indeed to mock it. The House
voted, for example, to delete a provision of the bill that would allow
us to tag explosive materials so that if a bomb is exploded somewhere in
America, it will be marked and we can trace it back to its source. Now,
if you have your car stolen in Washington, DC, tonight and somebody
drives it to West Virginia--! hope it doesn't happen-[laughter]-but
think about it, and you call the police and you tell them your name and
the serial-and the license plate of your car and the car has any serial
numbers on it, and it's found tomorrow morning in a parking lot of a
grocery store in West Virginia, under the national computer network
system we have, within 30 seconds it can be identified as your car. And
you can be told that it's your car.
We have serial numbers on guns that are sold in America, unless
they're filed off. Now why in the world the Washington gun lobby is
opposed to our tagging explosives which could be used to blow apart the
bodies of innocent civilians is beyond me. If people want to use the
explosives for appropriate construction work, they can still do it.
Their civil liberties are not going to be impaired. But as soon as the
objection was raised, the House says, thank you very much, we'll take it
right out.
We had a provision in that bill that would allow us to deport more
quickly people who come into this country and are obviously involved in
raising funds for terrorist organizations. They took that out. We had
other provisions that would enable us to move more aggressively against
organizations that clearly engage in terrorism. They took those out.
And they imposed a commission not to study terrorism within our
borders or beyond our borders but to study the Federal law enforcement
officials whose primary job it is to combat this kind of terrorist
activities. That is the wrong response, and it sends a terrible signal
to people throughout the world who believe that if they can just get the
right kind of extremist opposition to standing up to terrorism in
America, it will weaken our resolve. They are wrong about that, and we

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should pass a good antiterrorism bill immediately.

April 5, 1996 Remarks at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond,


Oklahoma

"... And as horrible and personal as the bombing of the Federal building
was to you, I want you to try to step back a minute and put it in a larger context. It was,
first and foremost, an act of terror. What is terror? Terror is when
someone, allegedly for some philosophical or political reason, believes
they have the right to take innocent lives, not people who are fighting
them in war, not people who are wearing uniforms, not people who are
staring at them across a battle line but just to take an action that
will take the lives of people who just happen to be in the wrong place
at the wrong time.
And we are seeing that all over the world, and you see it in two
ways. First, you see homegrown terror, people in your own country that
are so profoundly alienated they think they have a right to do this.
You've been reading about the Unabomber in recent days. That's an
example of that. You remember when the religious fanatics in Japan broke
open poison gas in the Japanese subway and killed a lot of people and a
few days later could have killed hundreds more, but miraculously, the
second attempt was thwarted. That's an example of that.
And then you have imported terrorism, where people come in from
other countries and they try to wreck your life to pursue their
political ambitions. An example of that is the World Trade Center
bombing. And it's really tough when they're coming from right next door,
which is what is tearing the heart out of the people in the Middle East
now. And you remember how recently we saw the people there-innocent—
not only innocent Israelis, innocent Palestinians, innocent Moroccans,
little children just blown away because some crackpot believes that it
is a legitimate way to pursue your political philosophy to kill innocent
civilians.

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Now what I want to tell you today is-and I want you to think about
this, especially theyoung people-the world you're living in and the world we're moving
toward is going to offer you more opportunities to succeed, if you have
a good education, than any generation of Americans has ever known. But
the same forces that offer you those opportunities to succeed offer
people opportunities to commit terrorist acts. And therefore, we must be
more vigilant, more active, more determined than ever before.

We've done a lot to try to fight terrorism. We've done a lot to try
to fight drug trafficking. We've done a lot to try to fight the money
laundering that goes along with all this, to try to help other countries
stand up to organized crime, because nobody is immune from this.

The lessons we have to take out of what happened to us at the World


Trade Center, what happened to us in Oklahoma City, what we were able to
avoid when we stopped terrorist attacks in the last 2 years on our own
soil and against our airplanes as they were flying over the oceans,
those are the things we have to leam.
Now, what I want to say to you is that, first, you've got to realize
all these things work together. On the 19th of this month, when you all
are observing the one-year anniversary, the reason I won't be here is I
have to go to Russia to a nuclear summit. And part of it is about
continuing to reduce nuclear weapons. But part of it is making sure that
every place in the world that has the residue of the nuclear age, this
nuclear material, make sure it is secure and safe and cannot be stolen,
because we don't want our homegrown terrorists or our foreign terrorists
to get their hands on nuclear material that, with just the size of a
wafer, you could make a bomb 10 times more powerful than the one that

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destroyed your Federal building in Oklahoma City. So I have to go there.
The United States has to be a part of that. And that's an important
thing, but we also have to recognize that there are things that we have
to do here at home.
Last year I asked people in the other parts of the world to stand
with the United States because we took a tough stand against the countries that support
terrorism, against Iran and Iraq and Sudan and Libya. And I get
frustrated when they don't help. But when those bombs blew up in Israel,
it sobered a lot of countries up, and in 3 days the President of Egypt
and I were able to persuade 29 countries to send high-level leaders,
including heads of state, to Egypt to meet to stand up against
terrorism. We had Arab countries condemning terrorism in Israel for the
first time.
So we've got-we're getting in a position now where the people are
willing to say we can't let terrorism pay. We can't let terrorism pay.
We've got to make sure that terrorists pay for what they're doing. We
have to make sure that's true here and around the world.
When I was in Israel-and I suppose they have about as much
experience with terrorism as anybody-l talked to leaders of both
political parties. And they hardly agree on anything over there; they
fight just like we do. [Laughter] But you know what? They were both
agreed on one thing. They said, "You have got to continue to take the
lead in the fight against terrorism, and you need to pass that
legislation that you're trying to pass to crack down on the forces of
terrorism in the United States and enable us to stand against them when
they invade our country."
It's been almost a year since I was pledged that terrorism bill, and
it's still not in the shape it needs to be. But let me just tell you
three things that I think ought to be in it, and there's a big debate
about it.
We know what kind of bomb blew up the Federal building. We propose
that we be able to have markers that go into explosives when people buy
them. Contractors don't have a thing in the world to fear. People need

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to buy explosives; you can't do a lot of work without them. But if
explosives are used to kill innocent civilians, we ought to be able to
find out where they came from and who bought them. That's what I
believe, and I hope you do, too.
We ought to have explicit authority that permits the Attorney
General of the United States to stop terrorist groups like Hamas from
raising money in America. And if we catch people doing it, we ought to
be able to throw them out of the country immediately-immediately, not
after some long, drawn-out process.
We ought to have the best technology available to our law
enforcement officials to keep up with these terrorists that move around
in a hurry, and they're very sophisticated and very hard to catch. And
we can do that without violating the civil liberties of the American
people, without undermining the constitutional rights of criminal
defendants. But I'm telling you, folks, these people are smart. They
understand computers. They understand information. They understand how
to hide. They understand how to doctor bank records. They understand how
to launder money.
And when it all comes down to it, just think of what would happen if
Oklahoma City had happened five or six or seven times within a month or
two. Think what it would have done to the American people. Think what
would have happened if 3,000 people had been killed at Oklahoma City and
every American had felt like those people were within 50 miles of them.
That's what happened in Israel just a few weeks ago. It can paralyze a
country. It can take its heart out. It can take its confidence away. It
can make young people believe they have no future.
Now, I am very optimistic about America's future, and I am proud of
the work that our law enforcement officials have done in catching these
people. And I am proud of the fact that we have caught and deported more
terrorists in the last 3 years than at any time in our history put
together. I am proud of that.
I am not saying these things to frighten any Americans. I am just
telling you I have been around the world representing you; I've talked

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to people all over the world. I do not believe—if we can do our job and
if we had just a little bit of luck-l do not believe that you will have
to worry about a nuclear weapon wiping out a whole American community or
killing lots of Americans in the way that our parents worried about us
when I was growing up. But I do not believe you can fulfill your dreams
and be totally free until we have taken the strongest possible stand
against terrorism, organized crime, drug running, and weapon sales. And
they are all related.
So I ask you, I ask you because you will have more weight than most
people-this State has suffered, this State has felt it, this State
understands the human dimension of people killing innocent people for
perverted, allegedly political reasons-to say in simple, clear terms,
this is not a political issue; this is not a partisan issue; this is not
an ideological issue. This is a matter of America getting ready for the future and
guaranteeing our young people the opportunities that they deserve to live out their God-
given dreams and destiny.
Thank you, and God bless you all.

April 13, 1996 The President's Radio Address

"... more than a year ago, I sent to Congress legislation that would strengthen
our ability to investigate, prosecute, and punish terrorist activity. After Oklahoma
City, I made it even stronger. My efforts were guided by three firm
goals: first, to protect American lives without infringing on American
rights; second, to give the FBI and other law enforcement officials the
tools they have asked for to do the job; and third, to make sure
terrorists are barred from this country.
In the wake of Oklahoma City, Congress promised to send me the bill
6 weeks after the tragic bombing. And yet, unbelievably, almost an
entire year has passed, and Congress still has not managed to send me
strong antiterrorism legislation. There is simply no excuse for this
foot-dragging. This bill should have been law a long time ago.

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So I urge Congress: Make it happen. Pass antiterrorism legislation
now. In the name of the children and all the people of Oklahoma City, I
say to Congress, do not let another day go by in which America does not
have the tools it needs to fight terrorism. It's essential that Congress
send me the right antiterrorism legislation, legislation that finally
will give law enforcement the upper hand.
When I met with leaders of the congressional majority shortly after
the bombing, they assured me that Congress would give the American
people strong antiterrorism legislation. They haven't. While the Senate
passed a solid bill, the House absolutely gutted it. Under pressure from
the Washington gun lobby, House Republicans took that bill apart piece
by piece. Well, now it's time they put it back together. America cannot
afford to settle for a fake antiterrorism bill. We need the real thing.
And on my watch, I'm determined to get it.
This is what real antiterrorism should have: First, we need explicit
authority to prevent terrorist groups like Hamas from raising money in
the United States for their dirty deeds. Second, we need authority to
deport quickly foreigners who abuse our hospitality by supporting
terrorist activities away from or within our shores. Second, we need to
give law enforcement officials the ability to use high-tech surveillance
and other investigative tools to keep up with stealthy, fast-moving
terrorists.
And we need a provision to mark chemically the explosive materials
terrorists use to build their deadly bombs. If we know where the
explosives come from, we have an edge in tracking down the criminals who
use them. These taggants work. In fact, when they were being tested just
a few years ago, they helped us to catch a man who had killed someone
with a car bomb. Law enforcement officials believe that of the more than
13,000 bombing crimes in the last 5 years, as many as 30 percent could
have been solved faster with taggants.
Yet the Republicans in Congress continue to oppose this commonsense
initiative. Why? Because the Washington gun lobby told them to. One
Republican Congressman had another reason, an unbelievable one. He

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actually told his own committee chairman, "I trust Hamas more than my
own Government." Well, I don't. And I don't think most Americans or
most Members of Congress in either party do.
I urge Congress to change course. Put the national interest before
the special interests. Give law enforcement the ability to trace these
explosives-using bombs that kill Americans.
We know acts of terror are no match for the human spirit. In the
last year, the people of Oklahoma City have proved this. We know we can
heal from terrorism. But now we must do even more to stop it before it
happens. A strong antiterrorism bill will help us to do just that. And
that's why it must be the law of the land.
Thanks for listening.

April 20, 1996 The President's Radio Address

"... Just as we work with our friends and allies to protect the security
of our people, we also must do our part at home, making sure that we're
as well-prepared as possible to do what needs to be done to combat the
forces of destruction, whether they are homegrown or whether they come
from beyond our borders. This is especially true of our efforts against
terrorism. That's why I'm very pleased that Congress has agreed to give
the American law enforcement people important new tools to fight
terrorism.
Yesterday was the first anniversary of the bombing in Oklahoma City.
We owe it to the fine Americans who were killed there, those who were
wounded, and their families to do all we can to fight terrorism. Last
year I sent Congress a bill to strengthen law enforcement's ability to
protect Americans from terrorism. Right after the Oklahoma City bombing
I strengthened the proposals, and congressional leaders promised swift
passage of the legislation. This past Thursday, Congress passed the
antiterrorism bill at last. Now, my fellow Americans, there will be no
more delay. I will sign this bill into law early next week, and by

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Wednesday, law enforcement will have new tools to crack down, track
down, and shut down terrorists.
Even though I'm pleased with what Congress, both Republicans and
Democrats together, did, I am disappointed that some of my proposals
were left out of the bill. I believe we should help police keep
suspected terrorists under surveillance. I believe we should give law
enforcement more time to investigate and prosecute terrorists who use
machineguns, sawed-off shotguns, and explosive devices. These and other
important antiterrorism measures were left on the cutting-room floor.
But this bill still makes important progress. It will make it easier
for police to trace bombs to criminals who made them by requiring
chemical taggants in some explosive materials. It will make it much
harder for terrorists to raise the money they need to fund their crimes.
It may not go as far as I would like, but it does strike a real blow
against terrorism, and I will be happy to sign it.
From Egypt to England, from the Tokyo subway to the World Trade
Center, from the heart of Jerusalem to America's heartland, terrorism
ignores borders and strikes without discrimination. As we recognize
crime victims everywhere this National Crime Victims' Rights Week, we
must vow never to relent against these forces of destruction.
By working with other nations, we can put terrorists on the
defensive and make the world a safer place. And by working together at
home, we will keep America strong and secure as we move into the new
century.
Thanks for listening.

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April 24, 1996 Remarks on Signing the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty
Act of 1996

"... This is a good day because our police officers are now going to be
better prepared to stop terrorists, our prosecutors better prepared to
punish them, our people being better protected from their designs. This
legislation is more important today because of the very forces which
have unlocked so much potential for progress: the new technologies, the
instant communications, the open borders. These things have done so much
good. But they have also made it easier for the organized forces of
hatred and division to endanger the lives of innocent people. We have
seen terrorism take its horrible toll all around the world, from Tokyo
to London to Jerusalem and, of course, in our own country.
When a terrorist car bomb took the lives of 241 American Marines in
Beirut, we felt the shock waves here at home. When savage killers took
the life of Leon Klinghoffer, countless Americans wept for him and for
his family. When Pan Am 103 went down over Lockerbie, Scotland, killing
270 people including 189 Americans, we saw again that there are no
borders or bounds on the forces of hatred. When the bomb exploded at the
World Trade Center, as Mary Jo said, by the grace of God killing only 6
but injuring over 1,000 people, we knew again that we had no place to
hide. And of course, 5 days ago we marked the first anniversary of
the most terrible terrorist attack upon these shores in our history,
reminding us that even the very young and the most innocent are not
immune.
We also have to remember as we remember those who were lost that, as
painful as that loss is, their deaths and their destructions are not the
terrorists' only goals, for each and every act of terrorism is also a
means to another end, the unbelievable idea that it is all right to kill
an innocent person to achieve a political goal, to stop us from living
our lives in the light of liberty, to force us to cower in the dark grip
of fear, to terrify us as targets into submission.
So let us honor those who lost their lives by resolving to hold fast

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against the forces of violence and division, by never allowing them to
shake our resolve or break our spirit, to frighten us into sacrificing
our sacred freedoms or surrendering a drop of precious American liberty.
Rather we must guard against them, speak against them, and fight against
them.
Fighting terrorism is and will for a long time to come be one of the
top security priorities of the United States. On our own and with our
allies, we have implemented strong sanctions against states that harbor
terrorists and encourage them. We have intensified partnerships with
other countries to stand together against terrorists around the world.
We have increased our investment, our personnel, and our training for
law enforcement efforts here at home.
I sent Congress antiterrorism legislation over a year ago, and after
the Oklahoma City bombing I asked for additional measures. I applaud the
great majority of Congress who stood up for the safety of the American
people, worked through the policy debates, and made sure that in the end
politics faltered and common sense prevailed. Democrats and Republicans,
Republicans and Democrats, people who love their country as patriots
came together, worked together, and got the job done.
The antiterrorism bill is grounded in common sense and steeled with
force. Because of this bill, law enforcement will be better prepared
than ever to stop terrorists before they strike and to bring them to
justice when they do. From now on we can quickly expel foreigners who
dare to come to America and support terrorist activities. From now on
American prosecutors can wield new tools and expanded penalties against
those who terrorize Americans at home or abroad. From now on we can stop
terrorists from raising money in the United States to pay for their
horrible crimes. From now on criminals sentenced to death for their
vicious crimes will no longer be able to use endless appeals to delay
their sentences, and families of victims will no longer have to endure
years of anguish and suffering.
We have new laws and better controls against chemical and biological
weapons. We have agreed to put chemical markers in plastic explosives

136
that will help us to detect explosives like those used to bring down Pan
Am 103. We will be able to require chemical taggants in some other
explosive materials as well. They will make it easier for police to
trace bombs to the criminals who made them and bring those criminals to
justice.
This legislation is a strong step forward for our security, but we
mustn't stop there. I am directing the Secretary of the Treasury to
complete the study of taggants required by Congress and propose
appropriate regulations as quickly as possible. We must also address the
problem of black and smokeless powders, routinely used to make illegal
smokeless devices like pipe bombs. I'm directing Secretary Rubin to
consult with industry representatives and the law enforcement community
to report back with appropriate recommendations.
Finally, I believe we have to take additional steps. I believe we
must do more to help police keep terrorists who are-suspected
terrorists under surveillance. I believe we should give law enforcement
more time to investigate and prosecute terrorists who use machine guns,
sawed-off shotguns, and explosive devices. I agree with police officers
that instead of creating a commission to study them, in the end we must
ban cop-killer bullets.
Nonetheless, make no mistake about it: This bill strikes a mighty
blow against terrorism, and it is fitting that this bill becomes law
during National Crime Victims' Rights Week, because it stands up for
victims in so many important ways. There are a lot of victims' advocates
and victims here, and I thank them for their presence today. This bill
recognizes that victims have a compelling interest in the trials of
those accused of committing crimes against them and requires closed-
circuit television coverage when Federal trials are moved far away, a
provision we owe to the vigilance of the Members of Congress from Oklahoma.
And we thank you for it.
I'd like to close with a word to all of the family members of
Americans slain by terrorists and to the survivors of terrorism, to the
children who lost their parents in Pan Am 103 and parents who lost their

137
children in Israel, to all of you from Oklahoma City, to Andrew Kerr on
my staff of the National Security Council whose father was murdered in
Beirut, to each and every one of you with us today and those who are
watching all across this great land of ours. Your endurance and your
courage is a lesson to us all. Your vigilance has sharpened our
vigilance.
And so I sign my name to this bill, in your names. We renew our
fight against those who seek to terrorize us, in your names. We send a
loud, clear message today all over the world, in your names: America
will never surrender to terror. America will never tolerate terrorism.
America will never abide terrorists. Wherever they come from, wherever
they go, we will go after them. We will not rest until we have brought
them all to justice and secured a future for our people, safe from the
harm they would do—in your names.
Thank you. God bless you, and God bless America.

April 28, 1996 Remarks to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee
Policy Conference

"... Even during the suicide bombings there was dramatic proof that peace
is taking root. Remember, as Prime Minister Peres said, at the Summit of
the Peacemakers in Sharm al-Sheikh we had 29 leaders from around the
globe and 13 from the Arab world voting and committing themselves for
the first time not only to condemn but to work against terrorism in
Israel. It was an historic moment. And we are following up on it.
I say again-l want to hammer this home, not only to you who know
but to people beyond this room: This progress for peace is the reason
the enemies of peace are lashing out. We must restore peace. We must
restore security. But we must not be diverted from our ultimate goal,
else we will hand them the victory that they have sought all along.

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We are also working, as the Prime Minister has said, more closely
than ever to defeat terrorism. This week we will complete the agreement
to combat extremist violence that we began work on during my visit to
Israel last month. Almost as soon as we received word of the bombings,
we began sending new equipment to detect explosives. Now we are
committing more than $100 million to this program for equipment and
training, for development of new technologies and improved
communications and coordination. And I am very pleased that in the
budget I signed just 2 days ago, the first $50 million was included in
our common antiterrorist efforts.

We all know that Israel should have every tool at its disposal in
the fight against terror. And we all know that the organized forces of
hatred and terror threaten people not only in the Middle East but here
at home and around the world. We saw that in Oklahoma City, at the World
Trade Center, in the attacks we have thwarted, in the subways of Tokyo,
in the skies over Scotland. We see it all around the world. Fighting
terrorism will remain one of our top law enforcement priorities for many
years to come. And in order to be successful, we have to have the tools
we need here, and we have to work together.

I want to thank the Congress and Members in both parties for passing
the antiterrorism bill I signed into law just last week. I want to thank
many of you in this audience in both parties who worked hard and lobbied
hard for that legislation. It will help us to stop terrorists before
they strike and to bring them to justice when they do. Now we can more
quickly expel foreigners who come here and support terrorist activities.
Our prosecutors can wield new tools and expanded penalties against those
who terrorize Americans at home or abroad. And we can stop terrorists
from raising money in the United States to pay for their crimes anywhere
around the world.

139
Again, I say AIPAC has long been a powerful voice in favor of this
legislation. We may not be able to always stop those who are gripped by
hatred, but at least now because of your support, we will make a real
difference in the fight against terror. And I pledge to you that in
America, in Israel, and around the world we will not rest from these
efforts until, in the words of the Psalm, "We shall not be afraid of
the terror by night, nor for the arrow that flies by day."

April 30, 1996 Remarks on Signing the Israel-United States Counterterrorism


Cooperation Accord and an Exchange With Reporters

"... This agreement does just that by deepening the cooperation between
our two countries in the fight against terrorism. Prime Minister Peres
and I worked on it during my visit to Israel last month, in the wake of
a terrible string of suicide bombings. Now we have agreed upon areas for
greater cooperation, on information sharing, on research and
development, on training and technical assistance, on investigation, prosecution,
and extradition. In each one we will look at very practical ways in which we
can work together better.
I am pleased to sign this accord. And I am also pleased that the
budget I signed just last week included the $50 million I requested
earlier this year for our joint antiterrorism efforts in this year,
including today's accords. I thank the Congress for their prompt action
here and for the bipartisan support it received.

May 22, 1996 Remarks at the United States Coast Guard Academy
Commencement in New London, Connecticut

"... The right way to defend America includes eliminating weapons of mass
destruction, stopping their spread, and building a smart missile defense
system. It also includes continuing the fight against the increasingly

140
interconnected forces of destruction like terrorism, organized crime,
and drug trafficking.
Believe me, no one is immune to their danger, and you will see them
more in your career, not the people of Tokyo where the sarin gas attack
in the subway injured thousands of commuters, the people of Latin
America or Southeast Asia where drug traffickers wielding imported
weapons have murdered hundreds of innocent people, not the people of
Israel where hatemongers have blown up buses full of children, nor the
people of the former Soviet Union and Central Europe where organized
criminals are undermining new democracies, and of course, not the people
of our United States, where homegrown terrorists blew up the Murrah
Federal Building in the heart of America and foreign terrorists tried to
topple the World Trade Center, where drug traffickers poison our
children and bring untold violence to our streets.

We have to keep the heat on states that sponsor terrorism or violate international
law with tough sanctions like the one the international community has imposed on
Iraq since the Gulf war.

... we will enter the 21st century with a military whose


fighting edge is sharper than ever; with a peaceful, undivided Europe
and a stable, prosperous Asia; with fewer nuclear weapons in the world's
arsenals and tough new agreements to control chemical and biological
weapons; with terrorists, organized criminals, and drug traffickers on
the run, not on the rampage; with more barriers to American products
coming down; with more people than ever living with the blessings of
peace and democracy.
For 50 years now, our country has been the world's leading force for
freedom and progress around the world, and it has brought us real
security and prosperity here at home. If we continue to lead, if we
continue to meet the peril and seize the promise of this new era, that

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proud history will also be your future and the future of your children.
Good luck, and God bless you and God bless America.

June 26, 1996 Remarks on the Terrorist Attack in Saudi Arabia and an Exchange
With Reporters

"... I want to say a few words about yesterday's outrageous attack on Americans in
Saudi Arabia. First, I ask every American to take a moment today to say a prayer for the
victims and their families and to rededicate ourselves to the fight against terrorism.

Let me now tell you what we know, what we do not know, and what we
are doing about the attack. Here's what we know about what happened:
Saudi police were immediately suspicious of a truck which was parked
outside the security perimeter of our base. They alerted an American
patrol and began to warn the occupants of nearby buildings. As our
patrol approached the truck, two of its occupants fled, and shortly
thereafter, the bomb exploded. No person or group has claimed
responsibility for the attack yet, and we do not know who is responsible
yet.
As of this moment, 19 are confirmed dead, all Americans. Eighty
people have been seriously wounded, including some non-Americans, and
more than 200 people were treated for minor injuries. Secretary of State
Christopher will fly to Saudi Arabia today. Last night, I directed an
FBI team of 40 experts, investigators and forensic experts, to go there
to work with the Saudi Arabian authorities. We deeply appreciate the
cooperation of the Saudi Government.

Now as I head to Lyons, my first order of business will be to focus


the strength and the energy of the G-7 on the continuing fight against
terrorism. Let me be very clear: We will not rest in our efforts to find
who is responsible for this outrage, to pursue them, and to punish them. Anyone who
attacks one American attacks every American, and we protect and defend

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our own.
This attack underscores the struggle of all those who share
tolerance and freedom and security. Our struggle at the end of the cold
war is to deal with these new perils: the rogue states like Iran and
Iraq; the smugglers who would poison our children with drugs; those who
deal in sophisticated weapons or weapons of mass destruction, chemical,
biological and nuclear; terrorists who strike not just in Saudi Arabia
but in the subways of Tokyo, in the streets of London, in the Holy Land,
and in America's heartland-usually people in the paralyzing grip of
religious, ethnic, and racial hatred.
To meet these threats, last year the G-7 in Halifax and then, at the
United Nations General Assembly, the United States launched initiatives
to fight international organized crime, drug trafficking, nuclear
smuggling, and terrorism. Now at Lyons, we expect to expand that work,
and we expect to see very practical results, including a package of 40
specific recommendations to combat terrorism. Defeating these organized
forces of destruction is one of the most important challenges our
country faces at the end of this century and the beginning of the next.
The G-7 is primarily an economic group. We've worked hard to advance
our economic security, and compared to 4 years ago, we're much better
off. We know we still have a long way to go. But I will say to my
partners there what I say to my fellow Americans today: We cannot have
economic security in a global economy unless we can stand against these
forces of terrorism. The United States will lead the way, and we expect
our allies to walk with us hand-in-hand. We cannot tolerate this kind of
conduct.

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June 27,1996 Remarks With President Jacques Chirac of France on the G-7
Response to Terrorism and an Exchange With Reporters in Lyons

"... I want to thank President Chirac and my other G-7


colleagues for their very powerful statements and their expression of
sympathy to the victims and their families.
We have once again stood united against terrorism. We understand
that an attack on one of us is an attack on all of us and that none of
us is invulnerable. Attacks of terror can occur anywhere, whether in a
Paris metro station or in Manchester or the subway in Tokyo or the World
Trade Center or the Oklahoma City Federal Building. This latest act of
outrage reminds us of one of the great burdens of the modem world.
As we become more open, as our borders become freer to cross, as we
can move information and money and people and material across national
boundaries more quickly, we all become more vulnerable to terrorists, to
the organized forces of destruction, to those who live to kill for
ethnic or racial or religious reasons, especially. And I want to
emphasize that I am convinced that the G-7 leaders are every bit as
determined as I am to take stronger action.
In the next day or two we will be discussing, as I said earlier, 40
specific actions we can take to try to protect our borders, to try to
stop the illegal weapons trade, to try to stop the money laundering and
illegal currency transactions, to try to protect the witnesses and
others who support our efforts to crack terrorists and their operations.
And then President Chirac, in suggesting this ministerial, has given us
the chance to try to come up with even more specific steps that will
involve, we hope, even more people rallying to our cause.
This is a very sad day for the United States. I have been very moved
by the deep and genuine expressions of condolence by the President of
France and the other leaders here. But I have been even more moved by
the determination that they have shared with me in common to take
stronger stands against terrorism, to prevail and not to give in. That

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is the message we want to go out to the world tonight.
Thank you.

... among the things we are looking at, for our


next statement on this and for the ministerial meeting, is the question
of whether we can do more to help each other protect our people against
larger and more powerful explosives, and perhaps even more important,
whether we can do more to detect them.
If you will recall, when we had the terrible bomb explosions in
Israel several weeks before the election, one of the things that I did
was to send to the people of Israel the latest detection equipment that
we had to try to aid them in finding people who had explosives on their
persons or in their cars. And we believe that made a contribution to
their endeavors.
So one of the things that we are going to do is to try to figure out
how much more we can do in the area of prevention and how much more we
can do in the area of detection of explosives, which are becoming the
weapon of choice for terrorists all around the world.

June 27, 1996 Exchange With Reporters Prior to Discussions With Prime Minister
John Major of the United Kingdom in Lyons, France

"... we have already agreed on a number of things that we will do together to deal with
the problems of international crime that specifically bear on terrorism. And
we may come up now with some other things that we can do together.
But I think all of us understand that terrorism is a problem from
which no one can hide and on which we must all cooperate. We have had
terrorism in the United Kingdom, we have had terrorism in the United
States, had this awful attack in Dhahran, had the problem in the Tokyo
subway. This is the security challenge of the 21st century, I'm afraid,
and we have to get after it.

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June 29, 1996 The President's News Conference in Lyons

"... Ladies and gentlemen, this summit made real progress in the three
areas that we came here to address: the fight against terrorism and
crime, strengthening the peace in Bosnia, and advancing our common
agenda for economic growth.
I thank the leaders for sharing our outrage at the cowardly attack
in Saudi Arabia and for agreeing to intensify the fight against
terrorism. We resolved to take a range of concrete steps that will
extend the efforts we are making at home. These steps will help us to
achieve four key objectives. First, terrorists and criminals must have
nowhere to hide. For example, we must cooperate to speed up extradition
and prosecution of those who practice terror and then leave the country
in which they commit their acts. Second, we must dry up the resources
terrorists use to fund their violence. Third, we must do a better job of
defending our national borders to keep the terrorists, the criminals,
and the illegal weapons out. And finally, we must stop terrorists from
misusing the high-tech communications that we all rely on for commerce
and cooperation.

But let me be clear: Just as no enemy could drive us from the field
in World War II and the cold war, we will not be driven from the
frontiers of our fight against terrorism today.

let me remind you that... the people who did the World Trade Center bombing were
arrested and tried. There was an intense effort after Oklahoma City to
apprehend the suspect, and there's now going to be a criminal justice
process working its course there. We have extradited suspected
terrorists in the United States from all over the world. And I can tell

146
you, perhaps even more importantly, we have succeeded in preventing
planned terrorist incidents. And I have learned from working in the
Middle East so intensely the last 3 years that in spite of all the
horrible things we read about there, there are still more incidents that
are planned that are prevented and averted than there are which are
carried out.
So I don't expect our words to have any impact on these people. But
if our words are put into action, just as we did in the United States,
for example, in passing the antiterrorism legislation, we will acquire
greater capacity to prevent these incidents, and to catch and punish
people severely when they do, and to tie them to their sponsors, if they
have sponsors beyond their own little cells. And those are the three
things that I want to do. So I don't expect them to be moved by my
words. But they need to know that I'm going to do my best to put our
words into action.

I think it's fair to say that-if you remember, these things have sort of gone in
waves, you know. We had this huge wave of terrorism in the eighties; it
primarily involved something other than bombs, although we had that
awful incident in Lebanon. And we just learn as we go along. And I'm
sure that there will be times in the future when murderous forces
outsmart those of us that are trying to stop them. But I believe we will
learn something from this, and I believe we will be able to continue our
mission.

June 29, 1996 The President's Radio Address

"... I'm speaking to you today from Lyons, France, where


the leaders of the world's industrialized democracies have gathered for
our annual summit. We're meeting at a time of peace and prosperity but

147
in the shadow of terrorism. The cowardly, brutal attack on American
military personnel in Saudi Arabia is on everyone's mind. This weekend,
all Americans will join me in mourning the 19 Americans who lost their lives, in
sending prayers to their loved ones. I've made it clear that I'll do
everything in my power to discover who's responsible, to pursue them,
and to punish them.
I am pleased that our summit partners here agreed with me to direct
our agenda to the work we can do together to fight terrorism and
international crime. This is especially important now. While the
international perils of the 20th century, fascism and communism, have
been defeated, new dangers are rising up to take their place as we enter
the 21st. New technologies and the rapid movement of information, money,
and people across borders bring us closer together and enrich our lives.
But they also make us all more vulnerable to rogue states, crime, drugs,
and terrorism.
Unlike the previous great struggles of this century, we must
confront these threats along a moving front, from the Tokyo subway to
the streets of London, from a bus in Paris to the World Trade Center in
New York and the heartland in Oklahoma City and, of course, in Saudi
Arabia. But just as no enemy could drive us from the fight to meet our
challenges and protect our values during World War II and the cold war,
we will not be driven from the frontiers of our fight against terrorism
today. Working with our partners around the world, we will take on the
forces of terror.
As a result of United States leadership, here in Lyons we have
adopted specific recommendations to combat crime and terrorism,
practical steps that all governments can take and should take. They fall
into four key areas.
First, we need to make sure that criminals and terrorists have
nowhere to hide. So we will strengthen our efforts to prosecute and
extradite major criminals and terrorists, to share information, and to
develop joint witness protection programs.
Second, we must deny criminals and terrorists the resources they

148
need to do violence to our citizens. So we will work to seize their
assets, to gather more information on their financial transactions, and
to shut down money laundering.
Third, we have to strengthen the defense of our national borders so
that criminals and terrorists cannot violate them. So we will crack down
on weapons trafficking, alien smuggling. We'll do a better job in
safeguarding travel documents from fraud and abuse. And we will track
forged or stolen documents together.
Finally, we must stop criminals and terrorists from misusing the
high-tech communications we all rely on for commerce and cooperation, so
we will take the fight to those who would abuse government and financial
institutional data bases.
There's more we can do together, so we directed our senior officials
to come together as soon as possible to discuss additional steps to
intensify the worldwide fight against terrorism.
All these steps against terrorism, international crime, drug
trafficking, and the spread of weapons of mass destruction are part of a
campaign America has been leading for 3 years now. Without our
leadership, the job will not get done. The good news is, the United
States at this G-7 summit is in the best position we've been in for
years to protect the physical security of our people, in part because of
our strong leadership toward a more stable and prosperous economic
future for ourselves and our allies.

June 30, 1996 Remarks at the Memorial Service at Patrick Air Force Base, Florida,
for
American Servicemen Killed in Saudi Arabia

"... Today, in this place, we honor seven sons of America who sacrificed
their lives in the service of our Nation. To their loved ones and their
friends and their families and to their family here at Patrick, I know I
bring the thoughts and the prayers of all Americans with me. As one we

149
mourn your loss, we share your grief, we thank God for the lives of your
loved ones.
Five of our fallen sons come from this base. They were pilots and
navigators, communicators and engineers. Each was a part of the 71st
Rescue Squadron, whose motto hangs especially heavy on our hearts today,
"So that others may live." Two others came from further away, but
they, too, are now back home in this land that they loved and that they
gave everything to defend.

Your loved ones were taken before their time, felled by the hands of
hatred in an act whose savagery is matched only by its cowardice. We
will not rest until our efforts to capture, prosecute, and punish those
who did this evil deed are successful.

But today let us just for a moment put aside our anger to remember
those who were lost, to find strength in the service they gave, to thank
God for the lives that they did live, and to resolve to continue the
struggle for freedom and decency to which they were so devoted.
We are blessed to live in a prosperous land at a time of peace. But
we see here again today, in heartbreaking reality, that this time is not
free of peril. While the modern world opens many new opportunities to
us, it also opens us to the forces of intolerance and destruction and
especially to the forces of terrorism that are so often rooted in ethnic
and religious hatred. We know now painfully that terrorists can strike
anywhere, from a subway in Tokyo to the streets of London, from the
sacred ground of the Holy Land to the World Trade Center in New York and
Oklahoma City and now in Saudi Arabia.
My fellow Americans, during the long struggles of World War II and
the cold war, our Nation stood fast for freedom. In our time, terrorism
is the enemy of peace and freedom. America must not and America will not

150
be driven from the fight against terrorism. In this effort, every American must stand with
the men and women of our armed services. Every American must stand against violence
and hatred and stand for dignity and tolerance, at home as well as abroad. We must
honor the memory of those we have lost by upholding the ideals for which
they lived and the mission for which they gave their lives.

July 9, 1996 The President's News Conference With Prime Minister


Binyamin Netanyahu of Israel

"... We spoke at length about the threat posed to our mutual interests by
terrorism. After the brutal attack on Dhahran, Americans understand
better than ever that, as the Prime Minister himself has written, free
societies must mobilize their resources, their ingenuity, and their will
to wipe out this evil from our midst. I am pleased, therefore, to
announce that we have agreed that the first meeting of the U.S.-lsrael
counterterrorism group created this past spring will take place this
month. Our cooperation will be a key element in the global effort to
defeat terrorism, an effort America has led at Sharm al-Sheikh and the
G-7 conference.
We're also stepping up our joint efforts against the threat posed to
Israel by missile proliferation. The United States has agreed to provide
shared early warning information in Israel beginning before the end of
next year-this year, excuse me.

July 27, 1996 The President's Radio Address and an Exchange With Reporters

"... The bombing at Centennial Olympic Park this morning was an evil act of terror. It
was aimed at the innocent people who were participating in the Olympic games and in
the spirit of the Olympics, an act of cowardice that stands in sharp contrast to the
courage of the Olympic athletes.
On behalf of all Americans, let me extend my condolences to the

151
families of those who lost their lives and our prayers to those who were
injured. I want to thank the brave security personnel who were on the
scene. They saw the package; they alerted the bomb squad; they cleared
the crowd. They prevented a much greater loss of life.

I want to make clear our common determination. We will spare no


effort to find out who was responsible for this murderous act. We will
track them down. We will bring them to justice. We will see that they
are punished. In the meanwhile, we are all agreed the games will go on.
We will take every necessary step to protect the athletes and those who
are attending the games.

Let me say finally that an act of vicious terror like this is


clearly directed at the spirit of our own democracy. It seeks to rip
also at the spirit of the Olympics. We are doing everything in our power
to prevent these attacks. There's been an enormous effort made to
establish security at the sites of all the events. At the park itself,
the investigation will continue today and then there will be additional
security measures taken there.
But we must not let these attacks stop us from going forward. We
cannot let terror win; that is not the American way. The Olympics will
continue. The games will go on. The Olympic spirit will prevail. We must
be firm in this; we cannot be intimidated by acts of terror.

... I support the death penalty for terrorism that leads to murder; I always have. And we-
if you look at what we did in the crime bill, you know that. I believe that people who
deliberately kill each other-kill other people, excuse me~particulariy under
circumstances demonstrating this kind of cowardice and designed to
intimidate and cower large numbers of others, deserve capital

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punishment. I certainly do.

July 28, 1996 Remarks to the Disabled American Veterans Convention in New
Orleans, Louisiana

"... Ladies and gentlemen, as veterans who have given so much to defend
our country, you know what it is personally to face an enemy. Today, we
have an enemy it is difficult to face because the enemy is so often
hidden, killing at random, surfacing only to perform cowardly acts.
Their aim is to demoralize us as a people and to spread fear into
everyday life. We must not let them do that. As Americans, we can and
must join together to defeat terrorism wherever it strikes and whoever
practices it.
We all are outraged by what happened in the Centennial Olympic Park
in Atlanta. And we all admire the athletes, the thousands of volunteers,
the tens of thousands of fans who made a strong statement to the world
yesterday when they showed up and carried on the Olympics, saying that
they would not be intimidated by terrorism and that no terrorist could
kill the Olympic spirit.
What we saw yesterday was a symbol of an emerging consensus among
all responsible nations and freedom-loving people everywhere that we
have to work closely together to stop the spread of terrorism. We know,
from the Tokyo subway to the streets of Tel Aviv to the Khobar Towers in
Saudi Arabia, where we lost 19 of our fine Air Force personnel, that
terrorism is a problem that knows no boundaries. We have learned here so
painfully in America, from the World Trade Center to Oklahoma City, that
attacks from terrorists can be homegrown or can be generated in other
lands. We know that nations are beginning to understand that there is no
place that is safe when any place is vulnerable to terrorists.
Not very long ago after the upsurge of terrorist attacks in Israel,
we had a remarkable meeting of 29 nations at Sharm al-Sheikh in Egypt,
where for the first time 13 Arab States condemned terrorism in Israel.

153
It was the beginning of wisdom, because, as the Saudis have seen, there
is no nation which can hide from terrorism unless we all recognize that
the rules of civilized people do not permit it to be practiced.
The recent meeting of the G-7 nations in France produced a
significant increase in international measures to cooperate against
terrorism. And this week, following up on that, we will have a very
important conference in Paris, France, involving those nations with
high-level representatives to deal with the questions that terrorism
presents us.
Terrorists are often supported by states. And states that sponsor or
permit terrorism, including Iraq, Iran, Libya, and Sudan, and any
others, must face strong sanctions. We all have to say we cannot live
with this; it is wrong. People must seek to resolve their differences by
ways other than killing innocent civilians.
This year I signed into law an antiterrorism act which made
terrorism a Federal offense, expanded the role of the FBI in solving
these crimes, and imposed the death penalty for terrorism. As strong as
the bill was, it did not give our law enforcement officials some of the
powerful tools I had recommended because they wanted and needed them,
including increased wiretap authority for terrorists who are moving from
place to place-where they are flexible, so must we be-and chemical
markers, often called taggants, for the most common explosives, black
and smokeless powder, so that we can track down those who make bombs
that kill innocent people.
This morning I was very encouraged to hear the Speaker of the House,
Mr. Gingrich, express a willingness to consider these tougher measures.
I have asked the Speaker, majority leader Senator Trent Lott, the
leaders of the Democratic minority, Senator Daschle and Mr. Gephardt,
and the FBI Director, Louis Freeh, to come to the White House tomorrow
to help to agree on a package that will provide these additional
protections against terrorism and any other measures we need to take to
increase the protection of the American people.
We will continue to do whatever is necessary to give law enforcement

154
the tools they need to find terrorists before they strike and to bring
them swiftly to justice when they do. This week I announced new measures
aimed at increasing airport security, increasing baggage searches and
screening, to tighten passenger checks, to plan the deployment of the
latest X-ray technologies. I said then and I will say again, I am well
aware that these new security measures will increase inconvenience and
may even carry a modest increased cost to the air-traveling public. But
this inconvenience is a small price to pay for better peace of mind when
our loved ones board a plane. These measures went into effect
immediately.
And so, my fellow Americans, we have opened up three fronts against
terrorism. We're increasing international efforts to ensure that terrorists will have no
place to plan or hide their operations. We're making use of expanded
antiterrorism powers at home, including the death penalty. And we are
tightening airport security. We will continue to expand our efforts on
all three fronts against terrorism.
I want to remind you that we have had some results. We have seen a
record number of terrorists captured and convicted. We have thwarted a
number of planned terrorist attacks, including a serious one against the
United Nations and one against the United States airlines flying out of
the West Coast over the Pacific. We are keeping the heat on terrorist
organizations and those who would support them.
But I would remind you that every death is one death too many. And
we have seen now over many, many years, from the struggles of our
allies, as well as from those we have faced recently, that this is a
long, hard fight. But if we work together, this is a challenge we can
and will meet. It may well be the most significant security challenge of
the 21st century to the people of the United States and to civilized
people everywhere. And the veterans of the United States, I know, will
support our country being as strong and tough and smart and steadfast as
it takes to get the job done.

155
July 29, 1996 Remarks on Terrorism and an Exchange With Reporters

"... I think when the bomb went off in the Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta, that
park literally became our national common ground, a symbol of our common
determination to stand against terrorism, domestic or foreign, and to do everything we
can to combat it.
We have followed a three-part strategy consistently. First of all,
we have worked with our friends around the world to try to increase
international cooperation against terrorists and to isolate the states
that support terrorism. Just today in Paris, the G-7 conference on
terrorism is opening, and I believe after this meeting the Attorney
General is going to Paris to represent the United States there.
We have intensified our antiterrorism efforts here at home. And I
want to again thank the congressional leadership and the Members of
Congress from both parties that strongly supported the antiterrorism
bill and other efforts that we have made to strengthen our hand here at
home. And we've had some results, preventing terrorism actions, catching
people who commit terrorist acts. We intend to do more.
The third thing we have done is to increase airport security. And we
will be looking at what else we can do through the commission that I've
asked the Vice President to head to intensify airport security in the
weeks and months ahead.
Again, let me say, if you look around this room-the Speaker,
Senator Lott, Senator Daschle, Mr. Gephardt, Senators Hatch and Biden,
Congressman Hyde and Congressman Conyers, the Secretary of State, the
Attorney General, the representatives of our law enforcement and
intelligence agencies-you can see that when we are attacked, whether
it's from within or without, we come together. And that's what we're
doing here.
I hope we'll be able to discuss some specific things that we might
be able to do to strengthen our hand against terrorism, some things that
we proposed before, maybe some other new ideas people have, including some very
specific and limited use of wiretaps, perhaps discussion of the taggants issue again and

156
some other issues that will come before us. The main thing is we need to get the very
best ideas we can, and we need to move as quickly as we can to do everything
we can to try to strengthen this country's hand against terrorism.
And the Speaker made a point the other day which I think is very
important, which is that the people who do this thing are always trying
to stay ahead of the curve. Whatever we do, they'll try to find some
other way to get around it. That means that this has got to be a long,
disciplined, concerted, united effort by the United States. And I think
we ought to take every tool we can and take every possible advantage we
can because this is not going to be easy. But we have shown that we can
get results when we work together and do the right thing and the smart
thing.
So I'm glad that the leaders are here. I'm looking forward to the
conversation. And I'd like to give the Speaker a chance to say a word
and Senator Lott and perhaps the minority leaders.

July 30, 1996 The President's News Conference With President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt

"... We also spoke at length about terrorism, a threat that both our
nations know all too well. As the host of the unprecedented Summit of
the Peacemakers at Sharm al-Sheikh, President Mubarak helped show the
world the deep desire for peace and security that prevails throughout
the Middle East.
We know, too, that we have to fight terrorism on three fronts:
first, through closer cooperation with our friends and allies abroad;
second, here at home, by giving law enforcement the tools they need, the
most powerful counterterrorism tools available; and third, in our
airports and on our airplanes, by increasing security. This will be a
long, hard struggle. But when we work together against terrorism,
abroad, at home, and in all the places that link us, we can obtain
results.

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At last month's G-7 summit in Lyon, I proposed a series of concrete
measures to intensify our fight against terror and ask our allies to do
more. Today in Pan's, Attorney General Reno and other top officials from
the G-7 nations and Russia followed through on our call for action.
These 8 nations announced 25 specific areas of intensified cooperation,
including working together to better protect mass transportation through
strict international standards for airport bomb detection, screening,
and security; cooperation on vehicle and explosive identifications; and
standardization of passenger and cargo manifests.
We will adopt laws controlling the manufacture and export of
explosives and firearms to keep them from falling into terrorists'
hands. We will work to outlaw personal possession of biological weapons
and to make all terrorist bombings an international crime. We will
collaborate in stopping terrorists from using coded computer
communications to conceal their plans.
We also pledged to our allies the help that America is uniquely in a
position to give. The FBI will explore the creation of a forensic
science database, an international clearinghouse for evidence on
terrorist crimes. We will share with others our research on explosive
taggants, the chemical markers that help us track down bombmakers, as
well as taggant regulations our Nation is now developing.
I want to do everything we can. And I am determined to do everything
we can to also give American law enforcement the tools they need to
fight terrorism. Today, Chief of Staff Panetta is following up on the
meeting I held yesterday with our congressional leadership to discuss
how we can immediately strengthen our own antiterrorism laws, including
the use of taggants, wiretaps, and other means. They had a productive
session this morning. They will be meeting again this evening.

... there are some differences between ourselves and our allies in the G-7, for example,
and other places about the extent to which we should impose economic
sanctions to isolate countries we know are supporting terrorism. I'll
come back to that.

158
But let's look at what we do agree on. We have agreed today in Paris
on a sweeping set of common measures to prevent terrorist activity from
occurring in the first place and to catch terrorists when they do
successfully carry out their schemes.
Now, this is the most important thing you can do. In the United
States, since I have been here, we have dramatically intensified our
efforts. We have succeeded in thwarting schemes designed to bomb the
United Nations, bomb the Lincoln Tunnel, go after airplanes leaving from
the west coast, the Arizona operation which was uncovered just a few
weeks ago. And then, of course, we had the World Trade Center tragedy,
but there were people arrested and tried and convicted. And we have a
trial going on involving Oklahoma City now.
So there are things that can be done here. Just because we have a
disagreement in some areas doesn't mean we don't have wide areas of
agreement. I believe sooner or later other countries will come to our
understanding that you simply cannot continue to do ordinary business
with people who believe that they have a right to practice commerce with
you in the daytime and fund terrorists to kill your innocent civilians
at night. I believe in the end that these countries will come around to
our position. But in the meanwhile, I think we ought to cooperate with
them where we can, because no civilized nation of any culture or
religion or region wishes to see its people exposed to terrorism.

August 1,1996 Remarks on the Economy and an Exchange With Reporters

Question: Mr. President, on the subject of terrorism, some critics are


saying that the measures that you're working on now with lawmakers
really aren't going to make that much of a difference. And I know
Republicans have been critical of the administration for not spending
all the funds that it had earmarked for terrorism.

President Clinton: Well, all I can tell you is, what we're doing here is

159
what our law enforcement agencies have asked us to do. And I would
remind you that our law enforcement agencies succeeded in cracking the
World Trade Center case, that there is a trial going on in the Oklahoma
City case, that they thwarted what was apparently and allegedly a big
operation in Arizona recently. And we know they have prevented other
incidents from occurring. So all I'm trying to do is to work with the
law enforcement agencies of our country and the people that we have
brought together to work on this antiterrorism initiative. And we
followed their recommendations, and we're doing our best to get the job
done.

August 2, 1996 Remarks Prior to a Meeting With Democratic Congressional Leaders


and an Exchange With Reporters

"... I must say I'm deeply disappointed that the antiterrorism package
which had been agreed to by our caucus and our leadership and the
leadership of the Republican Party apparently is not going to pass
because the same folks who opposed the crime bill in '94 and the Brady
bill are not going to permit it to pass in the House. And I am
disappointed about that. I'm disappointed that we can't pass anything on
the taggants yet, the explosives, because that's a big problem in
domestic terrorist incidents. But I think we have to keep working on it
because this problem will not go away.

I have done my best not to make this a partisan issue, this


terrorism issue. This is a national security issue. Just as much as
devising a defense in the cold war was a national security issue, that
we tried to develop a bipartisan position on, dealing with terrorism,
dealing with the proliferation of weapons, dealing with the consequences

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for freedom-loving people everywhere of all the racial and ethnic and
religious and tribal and political hatred in the world today, these are
the national security issues of the 21st century. And so I can tell you
that I think it is legitimate for those of us who believe more should be
done to continue to press for more to be done.
But I am going to do my best to try to fashion a bipartisan majority
in America for this. This is national security. We've always in the past
been able to hammer out a bipartisan posture on national security, and I
hope we can. I know the leadership of the Republican Party must be
disappointed that they could not deliver the Members here and that their
caucus is, I believe, out of step with what the American people want.
But I hope we can make this a bipartisan issue because it's a security
issue.

keep in mind we've been doing quite a lot. We just had a meeting in-let me back up and
say-let me remind you of what our strategy is. The first strategy is to get the other
nations of the
world to take as hard a line on terrorism as we have already taken-and is manifest in
this Congress which did pass in a bipartisan way a tougher sanctions bill, for example,
against Iran and Libya-and to get other countries to work with us. And we agree on 25
separate things that
we would do together with the G-7 countries in that regard. And last year-or earlier this
year, several months ago at the United Nations-the last time I spoke to the United
Nations, I asked them to adopt an international compact against terrorism. So we're
moving on that.
The second thing we're trying to do is to increase our capacity to
deal with terrorist activities here at home. And we have increased our
capacity in the last 3 years. And this Congress did pass in a bipartisan
way an antiterrorism bill which helped us to do more. The third thing we
have to do, because they're targeted, is to dramatically increase
airport security. Now, in addition to that, we're taking further

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measures to increase the security of our troops overseas, as you know,
and General Downing is going to make a report to me sometime in the next
couple of weeks about that. And we have had success in thwarting several
planned terrorist activities in the United States against America. So
there are things that we can do.

August 2, 1996 Remarks Announcing Measures To Improve Working Conditions in


the Apparel Industry and an Exchange With Reporters

Question: Mr. President, what can you tell us about these reports of
terrorist training camps in Iran, and what, if anything, do you plan to
do about it?

President Clinton: Well, first of all, there are terrorist training


camps in more than one country in the world, and we are aware of many of
them in many countries. The question here is whether—who was
responsible for the killing of the America servicemen in Saudi Arabia?
And keep in mind, we cannot confirm-l was asked a question by a young
man this morning-we cannot confirm yet what the cause of the TWA crash
was, and until we can we shouldn't speculate. But we know that our
servicemen in Saudi Arabia were killed by a terrorist attack. Who was
responsible for that? Who supported them in that? And was any nation
involved in that? These are the questions we have to ask and answer. The
speculation or even the existence of actual terrorist training camps do
not answer those specific questions.
And so until I'm in a position to tell the American people the
answer to those questions, I think I should tell you what I have said
all along. Our country has taken a tough line against terrorism. We want
our allies to help us. We want to have the tools we need here at home to
prevent as many attacks as possible and to punish people who carry them
out. We want to make airline safety as safe as we possibly can. And
that's what we're working on. And then when we find people who have done

162
things that are wrong, we will do our best to bring them to justice, as
you have seen in the successful trials and convictions in the World
Trade Center bombing and the trial going on involving the Oklahoma City
bombing.

It is true that some of the people who have the knowledge necessary
to cause problems for us domestically, in instances of domestic
terrorism, have been in the military. But I don't know that we can
compellingly say that there's any higher percentage of people who are
mentally unbalanced who have been in the military than in any other
group. And I don't know that there's any sort of screening process that
the military could adopt that would protect against that. That is
something that—I think that's one of the ongoing questions they're
always asking themselves whenever we have an incident not just involving
a bomb, but if there's something else that a soldier does or a veteran
does that may seem tied to his or her military service, they look at
that. But I don't know that there's an easy answer to that.

August 5, 1996 Remarks on Signing the Iran and Libya Sanctions Act of 1996 and an
Exchange With Reporters

"... We come together around the common commitment to strengthen our


fight against terrorism. Terrorism has many faces, to be sure, but Iran
and Libya are two of the most dangerous supporters of terrorism in the
world. The Iran and Libya sanctions bill I sign today will help to deny
those countries the money they need to finance international terrorism.
It will limit the flow of resources necessary to obtain weapons of mass
destruction. It will heighten pressure on Libya to extradite the
suspects in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103.
From the skies over Lockerbie to Khobar Towers, from the World

163
Trade Center to Centennial Park, America has felt the pain of terrorism
abroad and at home. From the Tokyo subway to the streets of Tel Aviv, we
know that no nation is immune. We have not yet solved all these
tragedies. We will not rest until we do so. But one thing is clear: To
succeed in this battle we need to wage it together, as one America
leading the community of civilized nations.
Our Nation is fighting terron'sm on three fronts: first, abroad,
through closer cooperation with our allies; second, at home, by giving
our law enforcement officials the most powerful counterterrorism tools
available; and, third, by improving security in our airports and on our
airplanes. Last week in Paris, with America's leadership, the G-7
nations and Russia agreed on a sweeping set of measures to prevent
terrorists from acting and to catch them when they do. We have seen that
when we pool our strength we can obtain results. We will continue to
press our allies to join with us in increasing the pressure on Iran and
Libya to stop their support of terrorists. We already have acted
ourselves, through our own sanctions, and with this legislation we are
asking our allies to join with us more effectively.
With this legislation we strike hard where it counts, against those
who target innocent lives and our very way of life. It shows we are
fully prepared to act to restrict the funds to Iran and Libya that fuel
terrorist attacks. America will not rest, and I resolve to hunt down,
prosecute, and punish terrorists and to put pressure on states that
support them. The survivors of terrorism, the families of its victims
who surround me, and all the American people deserve nothing less.

[At this point, the President signed the legislation.]

The President. Thank you all very much.

Extraterritorial Impact of Sanctions

Question: Mr. President, France says the Europeans will retaliate if this

164
measure is implemented.

President Clinton: Well, of course that's their decision to make. But


every advanced country is going to have to make up its mind whether it
can do business with people by day who turn around and fuel attacks on
their innocent civilians by night. That's a decision that every
country's going to have to make.
I will say this: I am encouraged that we are doing more with our
allies than before to fight terrorism and that there is broader
agreement than there has been before on specific measures. But in
extreme cases where we disagree and where it is obvious that basically
turning away from the implications of state support of terrorism has not
worked, the United States has to act. And I can only hope that some day
soon, all countries will come to realize that you simply can't do
business with people by day who are killing your people by night.

August 5, 1996 Remarks on International Security Issues at George Washington


University

"... I want to thank the family members of the victims of Pan Am Flight 103 who are here
with me today, as well as two of those who were held hostage in Iran back in 1980 who
are here
today-and 79. Thank you for coming.

In the world of the 21st century, the Olympic way will become
possible in the lives of more people than ever before. More people than
ever before will have the chance to live their dreams. The explosion of
knowledge, communication, travel, and trade will bring us all closer
together in the global village. But as we saw in that terrible moment of
terror in Centennial Park, this new openness also makes us more

165
vulnerable to the forces of destruction that know no national
boundaries. The pipe bomb reminded us, as did the murder of 19 fine
American servicemen in Saudi Arabia and the still unresolved crash of
TWA 800, that if we want the benefits of this new world we must defeat
the forces who would destroy it by killing the innocent to strike fear
and bum hatred into the hearts of the rest of us. This is a lesson and a responsibility
every American must accept. As the mayor of Montoursville, a town of just 5,000 people
in Pennsylvania that lost 21 of its brightest hopes for the future on
TWA Flight 800, said, no matter how secluded and how innocent we are,
once we leave our community we're subject to the troubles of the outside
world.
America faces three great challenges as we enter the 21st century:
keeping the American dream alive for all who are willing to work for it;
bringing our own country together, not dividing it; and making sure
America remains the strongest force in the world for peace and freedom,
security and prosperity. I come to this place of learning and reason, a
place so focused on the future, to explain why we cannot meet our own
challenges of opportunity and responsibility and community unless we
also maintain our indispensable role of leadership for peace and freedom
in the world.
The worldwide changes in how people work, live, and relate to each
other are the fastest and perhaps the most profound in history. Most of
these changes are good: The cold war is over; our country is at peace;
our economy is strong; democracy and free markets are taking root on
every continent. The blocs, the barriers, the borders that defined the
world for our parents and grandparents are giving way, with the help of
a new generation of extraordinary technology. Every day millions of
people use laptops, modems, CD-ROM's, and satellites to send ideas and
products and money all across the planet in seconds. The opportunities
to build a safer world and a more prosperous future are enormous.
But for all the promise of our time, we are not free from peril.
Fascism and communism may be dead or discredited, but the forces of
destruction live on. We see them in the sudden explosions of ethnic,

166
racial, religious, and tribal hatred. We see them in the reckless acts
of rogue states. We see them especially in the dangerous webs of new
threats of terrorism, international crime and drug trafficking, and the
continuing threat that weapons of mass destruction might spread across
the globe. These forces of destruction find opportunity in the very
openness, freedom, and progress we cherish.
We must recognize that modern technologies by themselves will not
make for us a new world of peace and freedom. Technology can be used for
good or evil. American leadership is necessary to assure that the
consequences are good. That is why we have worked so hard to seize the
opportunities created by change and to move swiftly and strongly against
the new threats that change has produced. To seize the opportunities, we
are strengthening our alliances, dramatically reducing the danger of
weapons of mass destruction, leading the march for peace and democracy
throughout the world, and creating much greater prosperity at home by
opening markets to American products abroad.
Our alliances are the bedrock of American leadership. As we saw in
the Gulf war, in Haiti, and now in Bosnia, many other nations who share
our goals will also share our burdens. In Europe, we have supported the
forces of democracy and reform in the former Soviet Union, the removal
of Russian troops from the Baltics, and led the way to opening NATO's
doors to Europe's new democracies through the Partnership For Peace, as
Europe, the main battleground for the bloodiest century in history, is
finally coming together peacefully. In Asia, we have revitalized our
security alliance with Japan, joined with South Korea to promote lasting
peace on the Korean Peninsula, and worked steadily to encourage the
emergence of a strong, stable, open China.
The end of the cold war has also allowed us to lift the dark cloud
of nuclear fear that had hung over our heads for 50 years. Today not a
single Russian missile is pointed at our citizens or cities. We are
cutting Russian and American arsenals by two-thirds from their cold war
height. We helped Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakstan to give up their
nuclear weapons which were left on their land when the Soviet Union

167
dissolved. We are working with Japan and Korea, and we have persuaded
North Korea to freeze the dangerous nuclear program it had been
developing for over a decade.
We have advanced the struggle for peace and freedom. When people
live free and at peace, we are more secure because they are less likely
to resort to violence or to abuse human rights, and more likely to be
better trading partners and partners in our common struggle against
terrorism, international crime and drug trafficking, environmental
degradation.

The fact is America remains the indispensable nation. There are


times when America and only America can make a difference between war
and peace, between freedom and repression, between hope and fear. Of
course, we can't take on all the world's burden. We cannot become its
policemen. But where our interests and values demand it and where we can
make a difference, America must act and lead.
Nowhere is that responsibility more clear or more urgent than in the
struggle against terrorism. No one is immune, whether you're riding a
subway in Tokyo or a bus in Tel Aviv, whether you're window shopping in
London or walking the streets in Moscow, whether you're doing your duty
in Saudi Arabia or going to work in Oklahoma City. Terrorism has become
an equal opportunity destroyer, with no respect for borders.
Whether we like it or not, in ways both good and bad we are living
in an interdependent world. That's why we must break down the walls in
our mind between foreign and domestic policy. And I might say, Mr.
President, on this 175th anniversary, that is one of the intellectual
objectives that I hope our great universities will commit themselves to.
The reality is our personal, community, and national prosperity
depend upon our policies on economics in trade at home and abroad. Our
personal, community, and national well-being depends upon our policies
on the environment at home and abroad. Most dramatically, our personal,

168
community, and national security depend upon our policies on terrorism
at home and abroad. We cannot advance the common good at home without
also advancing the common good around the world. We cannot reduce the
threats to our people without reducing threats to the world beyond our
borders. That's why the fight against terrorism must be both a national
priority and a national security priority.
We have pursued a concerted national and international strategy
against terrorism on three fronts: First, beyond our borders, by working
more closely than ever with our friends and allies; second, here at
home, by giving law enforcement the most powerful counterterrorism tools
available; and third, in our airports and airplanes by increasing
aviation security.
This will be a long, hard struggle. There will be setbacks along the
way. But just as no enemy could drive us from the fight to meet our
challenges and protect our values in World War II and the cold war, we
will not be driven from the tough fight against terrorism today.
Terrorism is the enemy of our generation, and we must prevail.
First, on the international front, stopping the spread of terrorism
clearly requires common action. The United States has a special
responsibility to lead in this effort. Over the past 4 years, our
intelligence services have been sharing more information than ever with
other nations. We've opened up a law enforcement academy in Budapest
which is training people from 23 nations, an FBI office in Moscow, and
just last Friday, Congress gave us the funding for FBI offices in Cairo,
Islamabad, Tel Aviv, and Beijing.
We've requested more money for intelligence in 1997. This focus is
making a difference. As the Senate intelligence committee concluded in its 1996 report
on the intelligence authorization bill, the work of U.S. intelligence agencies
against terrorism has been an example of effective coordination and
information sharing.
I've also worked to rally other nations to the fight against
terrorism: last year at the U.N. General Assembly; this spring at the
historic Summit of Peacemakers at Sharm al-Sheikh, where 29 nations,

169
including 13 Arab nations, for the first time condemned terrorism in
Israel and anywhere else it occurs in the Middle East and throughout the
world; at the G-7 summit in Lyons and the recently held follow-on
conference we called for in Paris, where we were represented ably by the
Attorney General.
Now, the point of all these efforts with other countries is not to
talk but to act. More countries are acting with us. More countries are
taking the "no sanctuary" pledge and living up to their extradition
laws so that terrorists have no place to run or hide. More countries are
helping us to shut down the gray markets that outfit terrorists with
weapons and false documents.
Last week in Paris, the G-7 nations and Russia agreed to pursue a
sweeping set of measures to prevent terrorists from acting and to catch
them if they do. And we set timetables with specific dates by which
progress must be made. We're also working with Saudi Arabia to improve
the security of our forces stationed there, so that we can continue to
deter aggression by rogue states and stand against terrorism in the
Middle East.
After Khobar Towers, I immediately ordered investigations by the FBI
and a commission headed by General Wayne Downing, which is to report to
me later this month. While it's too early to reach conclusions, these
investigations are moving aggressively in cooperation with our host. And
we are working with the Saudi Government to move almost all our troops
to other bases to better protect them from terrorist attacks.
Even though we're working more closely with our allies than ever and
there is more agreement on what needs to be done than ever, we do not
always agree. Where we don't agree, the United States cannot and will
not refuse to do what we believe is right. That's why we have maintained
or strengthened sanctions against states that sponsor terrorism: Iran,
Iraq, Libya, and Sudan. You cannot do business with countries that
practice commerce with you by day while funding or protecting the
terrorists who kill you and your innocent civilians by night. That is
wrong. I hope and expect that before long our allies will come around to

170
accepting this fundamental truth.
This morning I signed into law the Iran-Libya sanctions act. It
builds on what we've already done to isolate those regimes by imposing
tough penalties on foreign companies that go forward with new
investments in key sectors. The act will help to deny them the money
they need to finance international terrorism or to acquire weapons of
mass destruction. It will increase the pressure on Libya to extradite
the suspects in the bombing of Pan Am 103.
With us today, as I said before, are some of those families and the
loved ones of other victims of terrorism sponsored by Iran and Libya.
Let me repeat the pledge I made to them earlier. We will not rest in our
efforts to track down, prosecute, and punish terrorists and to keep the
heat on those who support them. And we must not rest in that effort.
The second part of our strategy is to give American law enforcement
officials the most powerful tools available to fight terrorism without
undermining our civil liberties. In the wake of Oklahoma City, I
strengthened the terrorism bill I had previously sent to Congress but
which had not then been passed. Despite the vow of Congress to act
quickly, it took a year before that bill came to my desk to be signed.
The bill had some very good points. It made terrorism a Federal
offense, expanded the role of the FBI, imposed the death penalty for
terrorism. As strong as it was, however, it did not give our law
enforcement officials other tools they needed and that they had asked
for, including increased wiretap authority for terrorists to parallel
that which we have for people involved in organized crime now, and
chemical markers for the most common explosives so that we can more
easily track down bombmakers.
After the bombing in Atlanta, Congress said it would reconsider
these and other measures. I immediately called the congressional
leadership to the White House and urged them to put together a package
and vote it into law before they left for the August recess last Friday.
I am disappointed, and more importantly, the America people are
disappointed that that job was not done. These additional measures would

171
save lives. They would make us all more secure. When the Congress
returns from the August recess, we will take them up again, and we must get the job
done.
There is more I will ask Congress to do. Next month I will submit to
Congress the "International Crime Control Act" that our Justice,
State, and Treasury Departments drafted at my request, because more and
more, terrorism, international organized crime, and drug trafficking are
going hand in hand. This bill expands our fight against money
laundering, so criminals and terrorists will have a tougher time
financing their activities. It strengthens our extradition powers and
border controls to keep more criminals and terrorists out of America. It
increases the ability of American law enforcement to prosecute those who
commit violent crimes against Americans abroad. Congress should pass it.
And once again, I urge the Senate to ratify the Chemical Weapons
Convention, so that we can eliminate chemical weapons stockpiles and
give our law enforcement new powers to investigate and prosecute people
planning attacks with such weapons. We have seen the terrible,
destructive impact of sarin gas in the Tokyo subway. Within a month of
that attack, Japan's Diet ratified the Chemical Weapons Convention, but
we still have not done so. If the Chemical Weapons Convention were in
force today, it would be much more difficult for terrorists to acquire
chemical weapons. They are not waiting, and we shouldn't either.
Finally, the third front of our struggle against terrorism is the
airports and airplanes that bring us all closer together. Air travel
remains the safest form of transportation. And our airlines have the
best safety record and security record in the business. But that's a
small consolation when a single attack can take so many lives.
Last year we began field testing new high-tech explosive detection
machines in Atlanta and San Francisco. We significantly increased
security at our airports, and the FAA created a new Government and
industry panel to review airline security.
After the TWA crash, I ordered new measures to increase the security
of air travel. As any of you who have flown in recent days will have

172
noticed, we're doing more hand searches and machine screening of
luggage. We're requiring preflight inspections for every plane flying to
or from the United States-every plane, every cabin, every cargo hold,
every time. The Vice President is leading a commission on aviation
security that is to report back to me within 45 days with an action plan
to deploy machines that can detect the most sophisticated explosives and
other needed changes.
Now, I know all this has led to some extra inconvenience for air
travelers, and it may lead eventually to a modest increase in the cost
of air travel. But the increased safety and peace of mind will be worth
it.
So, greater international cooperation, stronger American law
enforcement, safer air travel, these are the fronts of our concerted
strategy against terrorism. Much of this work by law enforcement,
intelligence, and military professionals goes unheralded, but we are
getting results. For example, we prevented attacks on the United Nations
and the Holland Tunnel in New York. We thwarted an attempt to bomb
American passenger planes from the skies over the Pacific. We convicted
those responsible for the World Trade Center bombing and arrested
suspects in the Oklahoma City and Unabomber cases. We've tracked down
terrorists around the world and extradited more terrorists in 4 years
than in the previous 12.
But I want to make it clear to the American people that while we can
defeat terrorists, it will be a long time before we defeat terrorism.
America will remain a target because we are uniquely present in the
world, because we act to advance peace and democracy, because we have
taken a tougher stand against terrorism, and because we are the most
open society on Earth. But to change any of that, to pull our troops
back from the world's trouble spots, to turn our backs on those taking
risks for peace, to weaken our opposition against terrorism, to curtail
the freedom that is our birthright would be to give terrorism a victory
it must not and will not have.
In this fight, as in so many other challenges around the world,

173
American leadership is indispensable. In assuming our leadership in the
struggle against terrorism we must be neither reluctant nor arrogant but
realistic, determined, and confident. And we must understand that in
this battle we must deploy more than police and military resources.
Every one of you counts; every American counts.
Our greatest strength is our confidence. And that is the target of
the terrorists. Make no mistake about it: The bombs that kill and maim
innocent people are not really aimed at them but at the spirit of our
whole country and the spirit of freedom. Therefore, the struggle against
terrorism involves more than the new security measures I have ordered
and the others I am seeking. Ultimately, it requires the confident will
of the American people to retain our convictions for freedom and peace
and to remain the indispensable force in creating a better world at the
dawn of a new century.
Everywhere I travel on behalf of our country I encounter people who
look up to us because of what we stand for and what we're willing to
stand against. I have said this before, but when Hillary and I visited
the Olympic Village, I was so moved by the athletes who came up to me
and talked about what America had meant to their country: a young
Croatian athlete who thanked me for our efforts there, not long after
Secretary Brown's plane crashed and Secretary Kantor had finished the
mission; an Irish athlete who thanked me for our efforts to bring peace
in Northern Ireland; a Palestinian athlete who said that he came from a
very old people, but they never had an Olympic team until they made
peace with Israel, and that many people wanted to keep that peace.
This responsibility is great, and I know it weighs heavily on many
Americans. But we should embrace this responsibility because at this
point in time no one else can do what we can do to advance peace and
freedom and democracy and because it is necessary at this point in time
for our own peace and freedom and prosperity.
As we remember the centennial Olympics, the weeks of courage and
triumph, the wonder of the world's youth bound together by the rules of
the game in genuine mutual respect, let us resolve to work for a world

174
that looks more like that in the 21st century, to stand strong against
the moments of terror that would destroy our spirit, to stand for the
values that have brought us so many blessings, values that have made us
at this pivotal moment the indispensable nation.
Thank you very much.

August 10, 1996 The President's Radio Address

"... As heroic as the feats of the athletes in this Olympics was the way
all those involved in the Atlanta games pressed on in the face of
adversity. Just 2 weeks ago today a pipe bomb exploded in Centennial
Olympic Park. It was a terrorist act aimed not only at the innocent
people there but the very spirit of the Olympics. This was brutal
evidence that no nation is immune from terrorism and an urgent reminder
that we must do everything we can to fight the terrorists.
The world we live in is more open than ever. People have more
opportunities than ever because people and technology and information
travel quickly across national borders. But these things that make us
all closer and give us more chances also make us more vulnerable to the
forces of organized destruction, to the drug traffickers, the organized
criminals, the people who sell weapons of mass destruction, and of
course, especially to the terrorists.
What happened in the Olympic Centennial Park, that wonderful public
space open to all people who visited Atlanta, is symbolic of the world's
problem with terrorism. Now, that's why terrorism must be a central
national security priority for the United States. Our efforts must and
will be unrelenting, coordinated, and strong.
We are pursuing a three-part strategy against terrorism.
First, we're rallying the world community to stand with us against
terrorism. From the Summit of the Peacemakers in Sharm al-Sheikh,
Egypt, where 13 Arab nations for the very first time condemned terror in
Israel and throughout the Middle East to the antiterror agreements we

175
reached with our G-7 partners in Russia last month to take specific
common actions to fight terrorism, we are moving forward together. Our
intelligence services have been sharing more information with other
nations than ever to stop terrorists before they act, capture them if
they do, and see that they're brought to justice. We've imposed stiff
sanctions with our allies against states that support terrorists. When
necessary, we're acting on our own. A law I signed this week will help
to deny Iran and Libya the money they use to finance international
terrorism.
Second, our antiterrorism strategy relies on tough enforcement and
stern punishment here at home. We made terrorism a Federal offense,
expanded the role of the FBI, imposed the death penalty. We've hired
more law enforcement personnel, added resources, improved training. And
I'm proposing a new law that will help to keep terrorists off our soil,
fight money laundering, and punish violent crimes committed against
Americans abroad.
Third, we're tightening security on our airplanes and at our
Nation's airports. From now on, we'll hand-search more luggage and
screen more bags and require preflight inspections for any plane flying
to or from the United States. I've asked Vice President Gore to head an
effort to deploy new high-technology inspection machines at our airports
and to review all our security operations.
We'll continue to press forward on all three of these fronts. But we
cannot cast aside any tools in this fight for the security of our
country and the safety of our people. That is exactly what the
Republican majority in Congress did by stripping from the antiterrorism
legislation key provisions that law enforcement needs to help them find
out, track down, and shut down terrorists.
Law enforcement has asked for wiretap authority to enable them to
follow terrorists as they move from phone to phone. This is the only way
to track stealthy terrorists as they plot their crimes. This authority
has already been granted to our law enforcement officials when they're
dealing with organized criminals. Surely it is even more urgent to give

176
them this authority when it comes to terrorists. But Congress said no.
And law enforcement has also asked that explosives used to make a
bomb be marked with a taggant, a trace chemical or a microscopic plastic
chip scattered throughout the explosives. This way sophisticated
machines can find bombs before they explode, and when they do explode
police scientists can trace a bomb back to the people who actually sold
the explosive materials that led to the bomb.
Now, tagging works. In Switzerland over the past decade it's helped
to identify who made bombs and explosives in over 500 cases. When it was
being tested in our country several years ago, it helped police to find
a murderer in Maryland.
In the last 2 weeks since the Olympic bombing, our law enforcement
officers have been working around the clock, but they have been denied a
scientific tool that might help to solve investigations like this one.
Our antiterrorism bill would have given us the ability to require
tagging gunpowder often used in making pipe bombs. The Republicans in
Congress could give law enforcement this antiterrorism tool, but once
again they're listening to the gun lobby over law enforcement. It may be
good politics, but it's not good for the American people. This is a
reasonable proposal from our law enforcement community. It doesn't have
anything to do with limiting people's ability to own or use guns in a
lawful manner. The same people who opposed the Brady bill and the
assault weapons ban are opposing this provision. I'd just like to remind
them that no hunter or sportsman has lost a weapon or the right to use a
weapon in a lawful manner as a result of the Brady bill or the assault
weapons ban, but we're getting rid of 19 deadly assault weapons, and
60,000 felons, fugitives, and stalkers have not gotten handguns because
of the Brady bill.
We should have a good taggants provision in our antiterrorism
legislation. So let's put aside interest group politics and honor the
victims of terrorism, protect our people, and support our law
enforcement officials by giving them the tools they plainly need.
This fight against terrorism will be long and hard. There will be

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setbacks along the way. But let's remember, we can win. Already we have
prevented planned terrorist attacks on the Holland Tunnel in New York,
on the United Nations building, on our airplanes flying out of our west
coast airports. Already we have succeeded in extraditing terrorists back to America and
convicting terrorists and arresting others who are suspected of terrorism. We can
whip this problem.
Just as no enemy could drive us from the fight to meet our
challenges and protect our values in World War II and the cold war, we
cannot be driven from the fight against today's enemy, terrorism. We
know that if we all work together, America will prevail.
Thanks for listening.

August 29, 1996 Remarks Accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Democratic
National
Convention in Chicago

"... My fellow Americans, I want to build a bridge to the 21st century


that makes sure we are still the nation with the world's strongest
defense, that our foreign policy still advances the values of our
American community in the community of nations. Our bridge to the future
must include bridges to other nations, because we remain the world's
indispensable nation to advance prosperity, peace, and freedom and to
keep our own children safe from the dangers of terror and weapons of
mass destruction.

We are fighting terrorism on all fronts with a three-pronged


strategy. First, we are working to rally a world coalition with zero
tolerance for terrorism. Just this month, I signed a law imposing harsh
sanctions on foreign companies that invest in key sectors of the Iranian
and Libyan economies. As long as Iran trains, supports, and protects

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terrorists, as long as Libya refuses to give up the people who blew up
Pan Am 103, they will pay a price from the United States.
Second, we must give law enforcement the tools they need to take the
fight to terrorists. We need new laws to crack down on money laundering
and to prosecute and punish those who commit violent acts against
American citizens abroad, to add chemical markers or taggants to
gunpowder used in bombs so we can crack the bombmakers, to extend the
same power police now have against organized crime to save lives by
tapping all the phones that terrorists use. Terrorists are as big a
threat to our future, perhaps bigger, than organized crime. Why should
we have two different standards for a common threat to the safety of
America and our children? We need, in short, the laws that Congress
refused to pass. And I ask them again, please, as an American, not a
partisan matter, pass these laws now.
Third, we will improve airport and air travel security. I have asked
the Vice President to establish a commission and report back to me on
ways to do this. But now we will install the most sophisticated bomb-
detection equipment in all our major airports. We will search every
airplane flying to or from America from another nation, every flight,
every cargo hold, every cabin, every time.
My fellow Democrats and my fellow Americans, I know that in most
election seasons foreign policy is not a matter of great interest in the
debates in the barbershops and the cafes of America, on the plant floors
and at the bowling alleys. But there are times, there are times when
only America can make the difference between war and peace, between
freedom and repression, between life and death. We cannot save all the
world's children, but we can save many of them. We cannot become the
world's policeman, but where our values and our interests are at stake
and where we can make a difference, we must act and we must lead. That
is our job, and we are better, stronger, and safer because we are doing
it.

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September 3, 1996 Remarks to the National Guard Association of the
United States

" . . . But the more open our society, the more vulnerable we are to the
organized forces of destruction. And that is why I have said repeatedly,
finding a way to deal with terrorism, terrorism from which no one is
immune-as you saw it from the attack in the subway in Tokyo, you've
seen it in Great Britain, you've seen it on the continent of Europe,
you've seen it in Atlanta, you've seen it in Oklahoma City, you saw it
at the World Trade Center, and you hear about it and it sends chills up
and down your spine when you discover the things that were planned that have been
avoided by the diligence of our law enforcement officials. We have got to continue
to work on this. We have got to continue to combat terrorists wherever
they are. And I believe that we must continue to try to convince others
to do the same thing.
We have followed a three-prong strategy:
First, to rally our friends and allies around the world against
terror. We did that at the G-7 meeting in France last summer and at the
Summit of the Peacemakers at Sharm al-Sheikh in Egypt, where, for the
first time, Arab states, a large number of them, condemned terrorism in
Israel or wherever it occurred in the Middle East. We are increasing the
isolation of those who sponsor terrorism by maintaining and
strengthening our sanctions against Iran, Iraq, Libya, and Sudan.
Second, here at home, we're working hard to give law enforcement the
tools they need to combat modern terrorism, through the antiterrorism
bill that we pushed through Congress after Oklahoma City, and with new
legislation to help us stop money laundering and tighten our borders
against terrorists.
Third, we're working very hard to increase our security at airports
and on airplanes, doing more hand searches and machine screening of
luggage, requiring preflight inspection for every plane flying to or
from the United States, examining all standard aviation security
practices so that we can make further changes to increase security.

180
I might say since most of you probably flew into Washington to
attend this meeting, you may have noticed some delay in air travel. I
hope you didn't but if you did, it's worth that to make all Americans
safer when they board airplanes and others when they come to our
country.
This will be a long, hard struggle. It will require discipline,
concentration, flexibility, the ability to learn and continuously
change. But the most important thing it will require is the same level
of will that the American people and the American Armed Forces brought
to bear in all of our armed conflicts and through the long twilight
struggle of the cold war. We have to understand that this may well be
the 21st century's curse. And we know that as long as human nature is
what it is, there will be some amount of misconduct in this old world,
some amount of wrongdoing and some amount of downright evil. And as long
as that's around, the United States will be a target, and the United
States must take the lead in stamping it out and standing against it.
Let me say in closing, I have seen enormous numbers of Americans
face to face in the last 10 days because of the events that you know
well. I expect I've looked into the faces of right around a half a
million people, riding on the train and on the bus, going to the big
meetings and passing through the small towns early in the morning and
late at night.

September 7, 1996 The President's Radio Address

"... I ask the leaders of both parties in Congress to pull together and
pass this treaty. It will make life tougher for rogue states like Iraq.
Those few nations that refuse to sign will find themselves increasingly
isolated. Tough new trade controls will prohibit anyone from selling
them ingredients for chemical weapons, making it more difficult for them
to build the weapons.
The treaty will increase the safety of our citizens at home as well

181
as our troops in the field. The destruction of current stockpiles,
including at least 40,000 tons of poison gas in Russia alone, will put
the largest potential sources of chemical weapons out of the reach of
terrorists. And the trade controls will deny terrorists easy access to
the ingredients they seek.
Of course, these controls can never be perfect. But the convention
will give us new and vital tools for preventing a terrorist attack
involving chemical weapons. By tying the United States into a global
verification network and strengthening our intelligence sharing with the
international community, this treaty can be an early warning that is
essential for combating terrorism.
Congressional action on the Chemical Weapons Convention will also
strengthen the hand of our law enforcement officials while protecting
our civil liberties. Right now we have a limited ability to investigate
people suspected of planning a chemical attack. Today, for example,
there is no Federal law on the books prohibiting someone from actually
cooking up poison gas. The legislation that is needed to put the treaty
into place would change that and give us the most powerful tools available to investigate
the development, production, transfer, or acquisition of chemical weapons, as well as
their actual use.
We in America have been very fortunate in never experiencing a
terrorist attack with chemical weapons. Japan, the only country that has
suffered such an attack, saw the value of the Chemical Weapons
Convention instantly. Within one month of the sarin gas attack in Tokyo,
Japan completed ratification of the convention.
Let's not wait. For the safety of our troops, and to fight terror
here and around the globe, the Senate should ratify the Chemical Weapons
Convention now.
Thanks for listening.

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September 12, 1996 Statement on Counterterrorism Initiatives

"... I have sent to the Congress $1.097 billion in proposals to


strengthen our antiterrorism, counterterrorism, and security efforts in
this country and abroad.
These proposals include fiscal 1996 supplemental appropriations for
the Department of Defense as well as fiscal 1997 budget amendments to my
appropriations requests now pending before the Congress.

On July 29,1 met with the bipartisan leadership of the Congress to


discuss an appropriate Federal response to the threat of terrorism,
adding to the strong antiterrorism initiatives my administration had
already taken. This package of budget proposals is the product of an
interagency review that I ordered, subsequent to that meeting, in the
wake of recent acts of domestic and international terrorism. It is a
comprehensive, balanced program to address this urgent requirement, and
I urge the Congress to act expeditiously on it.
Over the past year, the danger to U.S. forces and installations from
international terrorism has grown. At my direction, the Department of
Defense and the intelligence community identified measures to enhance
programs to deter and thwart terrorism. My requests for 1996
supplemental appropriations will fund the most urgent of them. These
requests total $353 million for various antiterrorism activities to
increase physical security at overseas installations and to improve
intelligence capabilities to detect and combat terrorist activity.
We have already begun to address the problems resulting from
heightened terrorist activity. Last month, I approved the relocation of
U.S. forces in the Persian Gulf region to lower threat areas. Though the
Saudi Arabian government agreed to cover some costs to support this
relocation, our forces have had to redirect funds from ongoing
operations. Thus, to limit the adverse effects to the Department of
Defense operations and provide sufficient funds for these critical
antiterrorism measures, I urge the Congress to act upon these

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supplemental requests as soon as possible.
The rest of the $1.097 billion in proposals is comprised of $728
million in 1997 budget amendments for my antiterrorism,
counterterrorism, and security proposals as well as requests for
contingent emergency funding.
It includes $207 million for the Department of Justice, $154 million
of which would go to the FBI for additional positions and antiterrorism
support; $201 million for the Department of Transportation, $198 million
of which would go to the Federal Aviation Administration to purchase
explosives detection devices and perform passenger profiling and
screening; and $147 million for the Department of the Treasury, $66
million of which would go to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms
to enhance its ability to respond to terrorist threats and investigate
crimes involving explosives, and $60 million of which would go to the
U.S. Customs Service to increase its capacity to screen passengers and
detect dangerous materials.
This package of proposals reflects my comprehensive strategy to
fight terrorism on three fronts: (1) beyond our borders, to work more
closely with our friends and allies; (2) at home, giving law enforcement
the most powerful counterterrorism tools available; and, (3) in our
airports, by increasing aviation security.
Congressional spending levels for defense contain substantial
increases over my budget request-in particular, for certain procurement
and research and development projects that are not contained in the
Department of Defense's long-term planning requirements. I believe that
we can provide for our military readiness, antiterrorism activities, and
for other important national needs in the context of an agreement with
the Congress on FY 1997 spending levels.
I strongly urge the Congress to enact this package as quickly as
possible.

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September 24, 1996 Remarks to the 51st Session of the United Nations General
Assembly in New York City

"... we find ourselves at a turning point in history, when the blocs


and barriers that long defined the world are giving way to an age of
remarkable possibility, a time when more of our children and more
nations will be able to live out their dreams than ever before. But this
is also an age of new threats: threats from terrorists, from rogue
states that support them; threats from ethnic, religious, racial, and
tribal hatreds; threats from international criminals and drug
traffickers, all of whom will be more dangerous if they gain access to
weapons of mass destruction.
The challenge before us plainly is twofold: to seize the
opportunities for more people to enjoy peace and freedom, security and
prosperity, and to move strongly and swiftly against the dangers that
change has produced. This week in this place, we take a giant step
forward. By overwhelming global consensus, we will make a solemn commitment to
end all nuclear tests for all time.

The United States has six priority goals to further lift the threat
of nuclear weapons destruction and the threat of weapons of mass
destruction and to limit their dangerous spread:
First, we must protect our people from chemical attack and make it
harder for rogue states and terrorists to brandish poison gas by
bringing the Chemical Weapons Convention into force as soon as possible.
I thank the nations here that have ratified the Chemical Weapons
Convention. I deeply regret that the United States Senate has not yet
voted on the convention, but I want to assure you and people throughout
the world that I will not let this treaty die and we will join the ranks
of nations determined to prevent the spread of chemical weapons.
Second, we must reduce the risk that an outlaw state or organization

185
could build a nuclear device by negotiating a treaty to freeze the
production of fissile materials for use in nuclear weapons. The
Conference on Disarmament should take up this challenge immediately. The
United States, Russia, France, and the United Kingdom already have
halted production of fissile materials for weapons. I urge other nations
to end the unsafeguarded production of these materials pending
completion of the treaty.
Third, we must continue to reduce our nuclear arsenals. When Russia
ratifies START II, President Yeltsin and I are all ready to discuss the
possibilities of further cuts as well as limiting and monitoring nuclear
warheads and materials. This will help make deep reductions
irreversible.
Fourth, we must reinforce our efforts against the spread of nuclear
weapons by strengthening the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. We should
give the International Atomic Energy Agency a stronger role and sharper
tools for conducting worldwide inspections. Our law enforcement and customs
officials should cooperate more in the fight against nuclear smuggling.
And I urge all nations that have not signed the NPT to do so without
delay.

We also believe that all of us, the nations of the world working
together, must do more to fight terrorism. Last year I asked the nations
assembled here to commit to a goal of zero tolerance for aggression,
terrorism, and lawless behavior. Frankly, we have not done that yet.
Real zero tolerance means giving no aid and no quarter to terrorists who
slaughter the innocent and drug traffickers who poison our children and
to do everything we can to prevent weapons of mass destruction from
falling into the wrong hands.
Real zero tolerance requires us to isolate states that refuse to
play by the rules we have all accepted for civilized behavior. As long
as Iraq threatens its neighbors and people, as long as Iran supports and

186
protects terrorists, as long as Libya refuses to give up the people who
blew up Pan Am 103, they should not become full members of the family of
nations.
The United States is pursuing a three-part strategy against
terrorists: abroad, by working more closely than ever with like-minded
nations; at home, by giving our law enforcement the toughest
counterterrorist tools available; and by doing all we can to make our
airports and the airplanes that link us all together even safer.
I have requested more than $1 billion from our Congress to meet
these commitments, and we are implementing the Vice President's aviation
security plan to make those traveling to, from, and within the United
States more secure.
There are other steps we must take together. Last year, I urged that
together we crack down on money laundering and front companies; shut
down gray markets for guns, explosives, and false documents; open more
law enforcement centers around the world; strengthen safeguards on
lethal materials. In each of these areas, we have made progress, through
the U.N., at the Summit of Peacemakers in Sharm al-Sheikh, at the Paris
terrorism conference, and individually.
Now we should adopt the declaration on crime and public security I
proposed last year. It includes a no-sanctuary pledge, so that we can
say with one voice to the terrorists, criminals, and drug traffickers:
You have no place to run, no place to hide.
I call on every member to ratify 11 international conventions that
would help prevent and punish terrorism and to criminalize the use of
explosives in terrorist attacks. To every nation whose children fall
prey to drugs and every nation that makes those drugs, we must do more
to reduce demand and to take illegal drugs off the market and off the
streets.

Our duty to fight all these forces of destruction is directly linked

187
to our efforts to reduce the threat of weapons of mass destruction. We
all know we are not immune from this. We saw it when our friends in
Japan were subject to the murderous power of a small vial of sarin gas
unleashed in a Tokyo subway. We know a small lump of plutonium is enough
to build a nuclear bomb. We know that more dangerous people have access
to materials of mass destruction because of the rapid movement and open
borders of this age. The quest to eliminate these problems from the
world's arsenals and to stop them from spreading has taken on a new and
powerful urgency for all of us.
So let us strengthen our determination to fight the rogue states,
the terrorists, the criminals who menace our safety, our way of life,
and the potential of our children in the 21st century. Let us recommit
ourselves to prevent them from acquiring weapons of mass destruction.
Let us work harder than ever to lift the nuclear backdrop that has darkened the world's
stage for too long now.
Let us make these solemn tasks our common obligation, our common
commitment. If we do, then together we will enter the 21st century
marching toward a better, safer world, the very better, safer world the
United Nations has sought to build for 51 years.
Thank you very much.

September 30, 1996 Statement on Signing the Omnibus Consolidated


Appropriations Act, 1997

"... For counterterrorism, the bill funds my request for over $1.1
billion to fight terrorism and to improve aviation security and safety.
It enables the Justice and Treasury Departments to better investigate
and prosecute terrorist acts, and it provides funds to implement the
recommendations of Vice President Gore's Commission on Aviation Safety and
Security and the Federal Aviation Administration's recent 90-day safety
review. These funds will enable us to hire 300 more aviation security
personnel, deploy new explosive detection teams, and buy high-technology

188
bomb detection equipment to screen luggage. The bill also gives my
Administration the authority to study the use of taggants in black and
smokeless powder; taggant technology holds the promise of allowing the
detection and identification of explosives material.
I hereby designate as an emergency requirement, as the Congress has
already done, the $122.6 million in fiscal 1996 funds and the $230.68
million in fiscal 1997 funds for the Defense Department for
antiterrorism, counterterrorism, and security enhancement programs in
this Act, pursuant to section 251 (b)(2)(D)(l) of the Balanced Budget and
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended.
This bill also funds the Nation's defense program for another year;
it fully funds my defense antiterrorism and counter-narcotics efforts as
well as the Cooperative Threat Reduction program, and at my insistence
it provides a substantial amount of the funding for my dual-use
technology program. But it also provides about $9 billion more than I
proposed for defense, including a substantial amount for weapons that
are not even in the Defense Department's future plans and were not
requested by the service chiefs. This bill is part of a plan by the
majority in the Congress that adds funds for investments now and reduces
them in the future. I continue to believe that my long-range plan is
more rational. It provides sufficient funds now while increasing them at
the turn of the century when new technologies will become available.

October 9, 1996 Remarks on Signing the Federal Aviation Reauthorization Act of 1996

"... Today I am pleased to sign the Federal Aviation Administration's


authorization bill that will address the concerns Doug Smith expressed
so movingly. It will improve the security of air travel. It will carry
forward our fight against terrorism.

189
The bill I sign today will increase the safety of our Nation and our
families by giving us more of the tools we need to fight terrorism. We
have pursued a concerted strategy against terrorism on three fronts:
First, working more closely than ever with our allies to build a
coalition with zero tolerance for terrorism; second, by giving our own
law enforcement officials the most powerful counterterrorism tools
available; and third, by increasing security in our airports and on our
airplanes. This bill is an outstanding example of how we can advance
that strategy when we work together, Government and private citizens,
the executive branch and Congress, Republicans and Democrats.
After the TWA 800 disaster, I asked Vice President Gore and a
commission of experts to examine all our aviation security practices and
recommend improvements that would protect against terrorists or criminal
attacks. On September 9th, 45 days after they began their work, the Vice
President and his commission delivered their action plan. Today, exactly
one month later, almost all of its recommendations will become the law
of the land. I want to say a special word of thanks to the Vice
President, who very much wanted to be here today and could not for
obvious reasons, for the extraordinary work he has done on this and so
many other issues.
Because of this legislation and the budget bill I signed last week,
we will install hundreds of state-of-the-art bomb detection scanners in
our major airports to examine both checked and carry-on luggage. It will
pay for a dramatic increase in FBI agents assigned to the Bureau's
counterterrorism efforts. Now background and FBI fingerprint checks will
become routine for airport and airline employees with access to security
areas. And the Federal Aviation Administration will continue the bag
match program for domestic flights at selected airports that were begun
by my Executive order last month. We will increase inspection of mail
and other international air cargo and expand the use of bomb-sniffing
dogs. Because of these improvements, Americans will not only feel safer,
they will be safer. America has the will and we are finding the ways to
increase security against the terrorist threat on all fronts. We cannot

190
make the world risk free, but we can reduce the risks we face.
Beyond our efforts to improve aviation security, our new
counter-terrorism measures will also strengthen America's intelligence
capabilities worldwide so that we can stop terrorists before they
strike. We're improving security at both military and diplomatic
facilities so that those who serve our Nation abroad are better
protected. We are strengthening security at public sites here at home.
And we are continually stepping up our law enforcement efforts with more
agents and more prosecutors, after sending the message to terrorists
that they will pay the full price for their deeds.
With these steps we are helping to make Americans safer. This
legislation is proof that if we work together and put the interests of real people first, we
can meet the challenges of this era.

October 18, 1996 Message on the Observance of the Anniversary of the Terrorist
Attack in Beirut, Lebanon

"... Thirteen years ago, as dawn was breaking in Beirut, Lebanon, a


suicide-bomber drove a truck filled with explosives into a compound that
housed American Marines. More than 240 Americans were killed by this
single act of hatred. Almost simultaneously, a similar assault claimed
the lives of dozens of French soldiers.
Now, in this place of repose and respect, representatives from over
thirty nations join to honor these victims and all the others around the
world who have lost their lives at the hands of terrorists. We remember
the passengers of Pan Am Flight 103, whose journey ended in the skies
over Lockerbie, Scotland. We remember the victims of the World Trade
Center bombing, and the 168 innocent people-among them helpless
children-who were murdered in Oklahoma City. We remember those
Americans in Riyadh and Dhahran, Saudia Arabia, who gave their lives in
service to our nation. And we remember those murdered on the streets of
Tel Aviv, or poisoned in the Tokyo subway, or killed by a car bomb on

191
Canary Wharf in London, or assaulted on an Army base near Belfast, and
so many others who have suffered the pain and outrage of a terrorist
attack.
This remembrance ceremony is a fitting tribute to the victims of
terrorism worldwide, and I want to thank Carmella LaSpada and the "No
Greater Love" organization for their steadfast commitment to honor and
remember those victims, as well as the brave men and women who have died
in service to America. For all the positive advances of our time, the
threat of terrorism looms larger in a world grown ever closer. That is
why we must work together with other nations more than ever to prevent
terrorists from acting and to capture them if they do. And we are doing
just that.
But just as important as the strength of our policies is the
strength of our spirit. To the family members gathered at Arlington
National Cemetery, I know that no words can comfort you for the loss of
your loved ones. The passage of time will never erode the place they
hold in your hearts. But let us move beyond our sorrow and anger to find
joy in the memories of those we honor here. Let us give thanks for the
lives they lived, find inspiration in all they achieved, and together
strive to realize the shining dreams they left behind. Let us unite the
community of civilized nations to stand up for freedom and stand against
the scourge of terrorist violence.

October 22, 1996 Remarks to the Community in Detroit

"... Our security as individuals, communities, and a nation depends upon our
policies to fight terrorism, crime, and drugs at home and abroad. We
reduce the threats to people here in America by reducing the threats
beyond our borders. We advance our interests at home by advancing the
common good around the world.

192
That escapism is not available to us because at the end of the cold
war, America truly is the world's indispensable nation. There are times
when only America can make the difference between war and peace, between
freedom and repression, between hope and fear. We cannot and should not
try to be the world's policeman. But where our interests and values are
clearly at stake, and where we can make a difference, we must act and
lead.
We must lead in two ways: first, by meeting the immediate challenges
to our interests from rogue regimes, from sudden explosions of ethnic,
racial, and religious and tribal hatreds, from short-term crises; and
second, by making long-term investments in security, prosperity, peace,
and freedom that can prevent these problems from arising in the first
place and that will help all of us to fully seize the opportunities of the 21st century.
We have approached the immediate challenges with strength and
flexibility, working with others when we can, alone when we must, using
diplomacy where possible and force where necessary.

That's why we have worked patiently and pragmatically to reduce the


threat of weapons of mass destruction, to take on the challenge of
terrorism, to build an open trading system for the 21st century, to help
secure the gains that peace and freedom are making around the world. We
are making the future more secure by lifting the danger of weapons of
mass destruction.

There is, to be sure, more hard work ahead of us. We must secure the
ratification in the United States Senate of the Chemical Weapons
Convention, to make it more difficult for rogue states and terrorists to
acquire poison gas. We must strengthen the Biological Weapons Convention

193
to help prevent the use of disease as a weapon of war. And we must
succeed in negotiating a worldwide ban on antipersonnel landmines, which
murder and maim more than 25,000 people a year.
As we keep our focus on these goals, we must also keep the heat on
terrorists who would darken the dawn of the new century. Piece by
piece, we have put in place a strategy to fight terrorism on three
fronts: toughening our laws at home, tightening security in our airports
and airplanes, and pressing our allies to adopt with us a strict policy
of zero—zero-tolerance for terrorism.
In the congressional session just concluded, two important pieces of
legislation were passed to help give us the tools to fight terrorists at
home. And almost all the Vice President's recommendations for increased
security at our airports and on our airplanes were adopted in a billion-
dollar bill designed to help us move immediately and aggressively to
improve airport and airline security. I am encouraged by that.
When I met last summer with the leaders of the G-7 nations in
France, they agreed to work with us to try to get a zero tolerance for
terrorism policy around the world. While we can defeat terrorists-and
we have been successful in thwarting attempted terrorist attacks in the
United States, attempted attacks on our planes flying out of the West
Coast; recently there was a conviction in a United States court of a
person we extradited back to the United States who was charged and then
convicted of conspiring to blow up a number of airplanes flying out of
our West Coast over the Pacific-it will be a long time before we defeat
terrorism. But we have to remain determined and strong. If we do, we
know we can prevail.
It took a while for the cold war to be resolved in a way that was
favorable to humanity and freedom, but we stayed the course, and we must
stay the course against this. And our allies must help us. We simply
cannot be doing business by day with people who are supporting
terrorists who will kill us by night. That is wrong, and we must work to
develop a common policy on that.

194
when people live free and they're at peace, they're much less likely to make war or
abuse the rights of their own citizens, much more likely to be good trading partners and
partners in
the struggle against terrorism, international crime, and drug trafficking, working with us to
prevent global environmental decay. From the Middle East to Northern Ireland, from
Cuba to Burma, from Burundi to South Africa, those taking risks for peace and freedom
know that the
United States will stand at their side.

December 21,1996 Statement on the Anniversary of the Bombing of Pan


American Flight 103

"... On this day 8 years ago, Pan American Flight 103 was savagely torn
from the skies over Lockerbie, Scotland. We have not forgotten the 270
victims who perished in that cowardly act of terrorism. And we have not forgotten their
families. On behalf of the American people, we remember your loss today. We draw
strength from your
dignity and your courage. You are not alone in your determination to see
that the perpetrators of this evil deed are brought to justice. Your
country stands with you and shares your continuing grief.
The sponsors of terrorism hope that with the passing of time the
world will forget their crimes. We will not forget. Time has not
diminished our outrage, and it never will. We are determined to see that
those who committed these murders are brought to justice. That is why we
continue to demand the extradition of the two Libyans who have been
indicted for this vicious offense to stand trial in the U.S. or U.K. It
is also why we have pushed for and secured tough international sanctions
against Libya that we strengthened further with legislation in 1996. We
will not rest until this case is closed and justice is done.

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1997

January 20, 1997 Inaugural Address

"... My fellow citizens, at this last Presidential Inauguration of the


20th century, let us lift our eyes toward the challenges that await us
in the next century. It is our great good fortune that time and chance
have put us not only at the edge of a new century, in a new millennium,
but on the edge of a bright new prospect in human affairs, a moment that
will define our course and our character for decades to comes. We must
keep our old democracy forever young. Guided by the ancient vision of a
promised land, let us set our sights upon a land of new promise ...
The divide of race has been America's constant curse. And each new
wave of immigrants gives new targets to old prejudices. Prejudice and
contempt cloaked in the pretense of religious or political conviction
are no different. These forces have nearly destroyed our Nation in the
past. They plague us still. They fuel the fanaticism of terror. And they
torment the lives of millions in fractured nations all around the world.
These obsessions cripple both those who hate and of course those who
are hated, robbing both of what they might become. We cannot, we will
not, succumb to the dark impulses that lurk in the far regions of the
soul everywhere. We shall overcome them. And we shall replace them
with the generous spirit of a people who feel at home with one another.
Our rich texture of racial, religious, and political diversity will be a
godsend in the 21st century. Great rewards will come to those who can
live together, learn together, work together, forge new ties that bind
together.

We will stand mighty for peace and freedom and maintain a strong
defense against terror and destruction. Our children will sleep free
from the threat of nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons. Ports and
airports, farms and factories will thrive with trade and innovation and

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ideas. And the world's greatest democracy will lead a whole world of
democracies.

January 23, 1997 Remarks at the Swearing-in of Madeleine K. Albright as Secretary of


State and an Exchange With Reporters

"... Now as our Secretary of State, she will help lead the effort to build a world where
America
makes the most of its partnerships with friends and allies around the world, where
America leads the fight for a world that is safer from weapons of terror and mass
destruction, where America leads the fight for a world that is safer from organized crime,
drug trafficking, and all terrorist activity, and where expanded trade brings growth and
opportunity, where peace and freedom know no frontiers.

January 28, 1997 The President's News Conference

"... We have worked very hard, as you know, since the Khobar incident, to enhance the
security of our Armed Forces personnel in Saudi Arabia. In that
endeavor, we have received the cooperation of the Saudi Government. We
have relocated a large number of people. We have done a lot of work.
We've invested a lot of money; so have they. And we believe that there
is no such thing as a risk-free world, but we believe that our Armed
Forces are more secure today. And we feel good about that.
On the investigation, clearly, for our point of view, in our
Government, the FBI is in charge of that. They have sought the answers
to some more questions. The Saudi Government has assured us from the
very highest levels that they would get answers for those questions, and
so I expect that to happen. And that's all I can tell you at this time.
The process is ongoing. The investigation is ongoing. The relationship
is ongoing."

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February 4, 1997 Address Before a Joint Session of the Congress on the State of the
Union

"... We are acting to prevent nuclear materials from falling into the wrong hands
and to rid the world of landmines. We are working with other nations with renewed
intensity to fight drug traffickers and to stop terrorists before they act and hold them fully
accountable if they do.
Now we must rise to a new test of leadership, ratifying the Chemical
Weapons Convention. Make no mistake about it. It will make our troops
safer from chemical attack. It will help us to fight terrorism. We have
no more important obligations, especially in the wake of what we now
know about the Gulf war.

In the end, more than anything else, our world leadership grows out
of the power of our example here at home, out of our ability to remain
strong as one America. All over the world, people are being torn asunder
by racial, ethnic, and religious conflicts that fuel fanaticism and
terror. We are the world's most diverse democracy, and the world looks
to us to show that it is possible to live and advance together across
those kinds of differences.

February 12, 1997 Remarks on Receiving the Final Report of the White House
Commission on Aviation Safety and Security and an Exchange With Reporters

"... aviation security is one of the major fronts of our three-


part counter-terrorism strategy. On September 9th, I accepted the
Commission's 20 initial policy recommendations on security. We acted
quickly to implement these recommendations. We have begun installing 54
bomb detection machines in America's airports. We are training and

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deploying over 100 bomb-sniffing dog teams. The FAA is hiring 300 new
special agents to test airport security. And the FBI is adding 644
agents and 620 support personnel in 1997 to counterterrorism efforts.
We are taking action to make our people more secure. But we cannot
afford to rest. The balanced budget I submitted to Congress last week
contains $100 million for future aviation security improvements, as the
Commission recommends. I urge the Congress to provide this critical
funding. This unprecedented Federal commitment reflects our resolve to
do everything we can to protect our people and to prevent terrorism.

February 13, 1997 The President's News Conference With Prime Minister
Binyamin Netanyahu of Israel

"... Prime Minister Netanyahu and I reviewed our shared efforts to combat
terror, including the 2-year, $100 million program I announced last
year. Those funds have allowed Israel to invest in research and
development for new technologies, to procure state-of-the-art security
equipment, to streamline the passage of goods and people from the West
Bank and Gaza. That way Israel has more security, and Palestinians have
more economic opportunity.

we are obviously concerned about Iran from many perspectives, not only from the build-
up of its conventional military forces but also from the continued determination
of the government to support terrorists in the region and beyond. And we are doing what
we can to stem the tide of terrorism. And I will say again, we will do what we can to
make sure that no development in any other country that is beyond our control or
influence will be permitted to erode Israel's qualitative security edge. That is our
responsibility, and we'll do our best to fulfill it.

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we spend quite a lot of time trying to do something about terrorists everywhere. We
invest a lot of our resources and our efforts in working with our friends in Israel and
throughout the world trying to prevent terrorists from conducting
successful operations and trying to track them down and punish them and
extradite them and do what needs to be done when they do.
So I think our--l think the United States has a clearer, more
unambiguous position on terrorism, whether it affects our people
directly or not, than virtually any other large industrial country in
the world. And I will continue to do that.
However, it has been obvious for some time to the overwhelming
majority of people in Israel-which is why the Prime Minister has done
what he's done and why his predecessors did what they did-that in the
long run, there had to be a comprehensive peace in the region to end all
the violence. And I applaud him for doing that.
When we seek to make peace, we obviously are dealing with people
with whom we have been angry, angry enough to take up arms, people with
whom we have not had a relationship of trust. And that is what makes
every step along the way so difficult. But I think to renounce the
possibility of peace is not the right course. To stand up to terrorism
in every way we can is the right course.

March 20, 1997 Statement on the Anniversary of the Sarin Gas Attack in Tokyo,
Japan

Two years ago terrorists launched a cowardly chemical attack in


Tokyo's subways that took 12 lives and injured thousands more. Today we
join with the people of Japan in remembering their pain and loss.
This tragic anniversary also reminds us that we must do everything
possible to protect Americans from the threat of a similar terrorist
outrage. That includes ratifying the Chemical Weapons Convention, a step
that Japan's Diet took within a month of the attack in Tokyo. And just

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this week, the treaty was submitted to Russia's Duma for ratification.
We still have not ratified. It would be harmful to our national
interests if the United States, which led the way in developing this
treaty, was on the outside, not the inside, when it comes into operation
on April 29.
The Chemical Weapons Convention will help to thwart chemical
terrorists in several important ways. It will eliminate their largest
potential source of chemical weapons by mandating the destruction of
existing chemical weapon stockpiles. It will make it more difficult for
terrorists to gain access to chemicals that can be used to make chemical
weapons. It will tie the United States into a global intelligence and
information network that can help provide early warning of terrorist
plans for a chemical attack. It will give our law enforcement new
authority at home to investigate and prosecute anyone seeking to acquire
chemical weapons or to use them against innocent civilians.
Just as no law prevents every crime, no treaty is foolproof. But the
Chemical Weapons Convention will help make our citizens more secure. It
will also help protect our soldiers by requiring member nations to
destroy their chemical weapons, a step that we are already taking under
U.S. law.
These overwhelming benefits explain why America's military leaders
and Presidents of both parties have strongly supported the ratification
of this treaty. As we remember the terrible toll that sarin gas took in
Tokyo 2 years ago, I urge the Senate to help protect our citizens and
soldiers and strengthen our fight against terror by ratifying the
Chemical Weapons Convention now.

May 31, 1997 Commencement Address at the United States Military Academy in
West Point, New York

"... This vision for a new Europe is central to our larger security
strategy, which you will be called upon to implement and enforce. But

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our agenda must go beyond it because, with all of our power and wealth,
we are living in a world in which increasingly our influence depends
upon our recognizing that our future is interdependent with other
nations and we must work with them all across the globe, because we see
the threats we face tomorrow will cross national boundaries. They are
amplified by modern technology, communication, and travel. They must be
faced by like-minded nations working together, whether we're talking
about terrorism, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, drug
trafficking, or environmental degradation. Therefore, we must pursue
five other objectives.

we are building coalitions across the world to confront


these new security threats that know no borders: weapons proliferation,
terrorism, drug trafficking, environmental degradation.

We have to lead in constructing global arrangements that provide us the


tools to deal with these common threats: the Chemical Weapons
Convention, the Non-Proliferation Treaty, the Comprehensive Test Ban
Treaty, and our efforts to further reduce nuclear weapons with Russia.
Now our great task is also to build these kinds of arrangements fighting
terrorism, drug traffickers, and organized crime. Three weeks from now
in Denver, I will use the summit of the eight leading nations to press
this agenda.

June 18, 1997 Statement on the Return of Mir Aimal Kansi to the United States

I want to express my deep appreciation to the FBI, CIA, and the


Departments of State, Justice, and Defense for their extraordinary work
in bringing Mir Aimal Kansi to the United States. Kansi is believed to
be responsible for the killing of two CIA employees and the wounding of

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three others in an attack on January 25,1993. The men and women who
participated in the effort to bring Kansi here showed great courage in
carrying out this mission.
The success in apprehending Kansi demonstrates that we are
determined to do what is necessary to track down terrorists and bring them to justice.
The
United States will not relent in the pursuit of those who use violence
against Americans to advance their goals-no matter how long it takes,
no matter where they hide.
Today our thoughts are also with the families of the victims.
Although nothing can restore their loss, we hope that the prospect of
justice in this case will bring them a measure of comfort.

June 21, 1997 The President's Radio Address

"... We'll also continue to advance our fight against new forces of
destruction that have no regard for borders. Last year, when we met in
Lyons, France, we agreed on a series of measures to combat terrorism and
organized crime. Since then we've actually implemented concrete steps,
from improving airline security to denying safe haven for criminals.
We've also made significant progress in bolstering the safety and
security of nuclear materials, something that simply wouldn't have been
possible without Russia as a partner. Together, the eight are working to
tighten the management of plutonium from dismantled nuclear warheads to
keep them from falling into the wrong hands. To better prevent and
investigate nuclear smuggling incidents, we set up a rapid response
network, stepped up law enforcement intelligence and customs
cooperation, and improved our nuclear forensics capabilities so that we
can identify the sources of smuggled nuclear materials. Soon, more than
20 additional countries in Europe and central Asia will be joining us in
these common endeavors.

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June 22,1997 Remarks at the Presentation of the Final Communique of the Summit
of the
Eight in Denver

"... Last year we adopted an ambitious agenda to fight crime and


terrorism. Since then we have taken concrete steps, from improving
airline security to denying safe haven for criminals. This year we'll
make special efforts to fight high-tech crimes such as those involving
computer and telecommunications technology.
We've also made important progress in promoting nuclear safety and
security, particularly in combating nuclear smuggling and in managing
the growing stockpiles of plutonium from dismantled nuclear warheads.

September 16, 1997 Remarks on the 50th Anniversary of the Central Intelligence
Agency in Langley, Virginia

"... Our first task is to focus our intelligence resources in the areas
most critical to our national security, the areas where, as Director
Tenet has said, we simply cannot afford to fail. Two years ago I set out
our top intelligence priorities in the Presidential Decision Directive:
First, supporting our troops and operations, whether turning back
aggression, helping secure peace, or providing humanitarian assistance;
second, providing political, economic, and military intelligence on
countries hostile to the United States so we can help to stop crises and
conflicts before they start; and third, protecting American citizens
from new transnational threats such as drug traffickers, terrorists,
organized criminals, and weapons of mass destruction.

You have also worked hard to build better teamwork within the

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intelligence community to make better use of limited resources, with
less duplication and more results. Today, your successes nearly are all
joint efforts, reflecting the talent and courage and expertise of men
and women across the board. The dramatic capture of Mir Aimal Kansi
proves the vast potential of your growing teamwork with the FBI. You
showed that America will not rest in tracking down terrorists who use
violence against our people, no matter how long it takes or where they
hide, and I thank you for that.

September 22, 1997 Remarks to the 52d Session of the United Nations General
Assembly in New York City

"... The forces of global integration are a great tide, inexorably


wearing away the established order of things. But we must decide what
will be left in its wake. People fear change when they feel its burdens
but not its benefits. They are susceptible to misguided protectionism,
to the poisoned appeals of extreme nationalism, and ethnic, racial, and
religious hatred. New global environmental challenges require us to find
ways to work together without damaging legitimate aspirations for
progress. We're all vulnerable to the reckless acts of rogue states and
to an unholy axis of terrorists, drug traffickers, and international
criminals. These 21st century predators feed on the very free flow of
information and ideas and people we cherish. They abuse the vast power
of technology to build black markets for weapons, to compromise law
enforcement with huge bribes of illicit cash, to launder money with the
keystroke of a computer. These forces are our enemies. We must face them
together because no one can defeat them alone.
To seize the opportunities and move against the threats of this new
global era, we need a new strategy of security. Over the past 5 years,
nations have begun to put that strategy in place through a new network
of institutions and arrangements with distinct missions but a common
purpose: to secure and strengthen the gains of democracy and free

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markets while turning back their enemies.
We see this strategy taking place on every continent: expanded
military alliances like NATO, its Partnership For Peace, its
partnerships with a democratic Russia and a democratic Ukraine; free-
trade arrangements like the WTO and the global information technology
agreement and the move toward free-trade areas by nations in the
Americas, the Asia-Pacific region, and elsewhere around the world;
strong arms control regimes like the Chemical Weapons Convention and the
Non-Proliferation Treaty; multinational coalitions with zero tolerance
for terrorism, corruption, crime, and drug trafficking; binding
international commitments to protect the environment and safeguard human
rights.

In the 21st century, our security will be challenged increasingly by


interconnected groups that traffic in terror, organized crime, and drug
smuggling. Already these international crime and drug syndicates drain
up to $750 billion a year from legitimate economies. That sum exceeds
the combined GNP of more than half the nations in this room. These
groups threaten to undermine confidence in fragile new democracies and
market economies that so many of you are working so hard to see endure.
Two years ago, I called upon all the members of this Assembly to
join in the fight against these forces. I applaud the U.N.'s recent
resolution calling on its members to join the major international
antiterrorism conventions, making clear the emerging international
consensus that terrorism is always a crime and never a justifiable
political act. As more countries sign on, terrorists will have fewer
places to run or hide.
I also applaud the steps that members are taking to implement the
declaration on crime and public security that the United States proposed
2 years ago, calling for increased cooperation to strengthen every
citizen's right to basic safety through cooperation on extradition and

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asset forfeiture, shutting down gray markets for guns and false
documents, attacking corruption, and bringing higher standards to law
enforcement in new democracies.
The spread of these global criminal syndicates also has made all the
more urgent our common quest to eliminate weapons of mass destruction.
We cannot allow them to fall or to remain in the wrong hands. Here, too,
the United Nations must lead, and it has, from UNSCOM in Iraq to the
International Atomic Energy Agency, now the most expansive global system
ever devised to police arms control agreements.

October 8, 1997 Statement on Action Against Terrorist Organizations

Last year I signed into law the Antiterrorism and Effective Death
Penalty Act. It authorizes the Secretary of State, in consultation with
the Secretary of the Treasury and the Attorney General, to designate an
organization that engages in terrorist activity a foreign terrorist
organization if it threatens the national security of the United States.
The law prevents any fundraising or other financial transactions by
these groups in the U.S. Heavy criminal penalties will also be levied
against individuals in the United States who provide material support or
resources to these terrorist organizations. Together, these provisions
will help deprive terrorist groups of the resources they need to finance
their acts of destruction.
Today Secretary Albright has designated 30 foreign organizations as
terrorist groups. Now we will work to uncover those who raise money for
them in America and encourage our friends and allies to do the same
within their own borders.
The Secretary's designations are part of our ongoing fight against
those who would undermine freedom and prosperity by violent acts. Just
as we must reward and encourage the builders of peace and democracy, we
must give no quarter to the enemies of these aspirations. Today's action

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sends a clear message: The path to change is through dialog and open
deliberation, not violence and hatred. The United States is committed to
fight against those who speak the language of terror.

November 14, 1997 Remarks to the Women's Leadership Forum in Las


Vegas, Nevada

"... What are the big security problems of the future? Terrorism, weapons
of mass destruction proliferation, organized crime, international drug
dealing, international environmental crises, the spread of new diseases
across national borders-none of these can be dealt with unless we're
willing to work as partners. We can lead, but we have to lead in a world
increasingly interdependent.

November 17, 1997 Statement on the Terrorist Attack in Luxor, Egypt

Earlier today, I called President Mubarak of Egypt to offer our


Nation's condolences to the families of those killed in the terrorist
assault at Luxor this morning. The United States deplores and condemns
this attack against innocent tourists. Once again, we are reminded of a
painful truth: Terrorism is a global threat. No nation is immune. That
is why all nations must redouble our commitment to fight this scourge
together.

November 18, 1997 Teleconference Remarks to the Council of Jewish


Federations

"... I would also like to thank you for your support of our
administration's effort to expand peace and stability in the Middle East
and around the world. We must never give in to the forces of destruction

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and terror. We must never give up on promoting peace. Our law
enforcement officials went halfway around the world to bring to justice
the man responsible for the cold-blooded murder of Americans outside the
CIA Headquarters. The World Trade Center bombers are going to jail for a
long, long time. Saddam Hussein cannot be allowed to expel international
weapons inspectors because we cannot accept another dictator with
weapons of mass destruction.

December 16, 1997 The President's News Conference

"... We have three issues that we think have to be discussed in the


context of any comprehensive discussion. The first relates to Iranian
support of terrorist activities, with which we strongly disagree. The
second relates to Iranian opposition to the peace process in the Middle
East, with which we disagree. And the third relates to policies
involving the development of weapons of mass destruction. I think we
have to be able to discuss those things in order to have
an honest dialog, just like we have an honest dialog with China now. We
don't have to agree on everything, but people have to be able to have an
honest discussion, even when they disagree.
And in terms of terrorism, I think the United States must maintain
an uncompromising stand there. We would not expect any Islamic State, in
effect, to say it had no opinions on issues involving what it would take
to have a just and lasting peace settlement in the Middle East. We would
never ask any country to give up its opinions on that. But we would ask
every country to give up the support, the training, the arming, the
financing of terrorism.
If you look at the world that we're living in and the one toward
which we are going, if you look at the torments that many Americans
underwent in the 1980's because of terrorist activities, our
uncompromising position on that I think is clearly the right one, and we
shouldn't abandon that, and we must not, and we won't. But do I hope

209
that there will be some conditions under which this dialog can resume?
certainly do.

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1998

January 27, 1998 Address Before a Joint Session of the Congress on the State of the
Union

"... We must exercise responsibility not just at home but around the
world. On the eve of a new century, we have the power and the duty to
build a new era of peace and security. But make no mistake about it;
today's possibilities are not tomorrow's guarantees. America must stand
against the poisoned appeals of extreme nationalism. We must combat an
unholy axis of new threats from terrorists, international criminals, and
drug traffickers. These 21st century predators feed on technology and
the free flow of information and ideas and people. And they will be all
the more lethal if weapons of mass destruction fall into their hands.
To meet these challenges, we are helping to write international
rules of the road for the 21st century, protecting those who join the
family of nations and isolating those who do not.

Together, we must confront the new hazards of chemical and biological weapons and
the outlaw states, terrorists, and organized criminals seeking to acquire them. Saddam
Hussein has spent the better part of this decade and much of
his nation's wealth not on providing for the Iraqi people but on
developing nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and the missiles to
deliver them. The United Nations weapons inspectors have done a truly
remarkable job finding and destroying more of Iraq's arsenal than was
destroyed during the entire Gulf war. Now Saddam Hussein wants to stop
them from completing their mission.

I know I speak for everyone in this chamber, Republicans and Democrats, when I say
to Saddam Hussein,"You cannot defy the will of the world," and when I say to him,
"You

211
have used weapons of mass destruction before. We are determined to deny
you the capacity to use them again."

Last year the Senate ratified the Chemical Weapons Convention to


protect our soldiers and citizens from poison gas. Now we must act to
prevent the use of disease as a weapon of war and terror. The Biological
Weapons Convention has been in effect for 23 years now. The rules are
good, but the enforcement is weak. We must strengthen it with a new
international inspection system to detect and deter cheating.

January 29, 1998 Remarks at the National Defense University

"... Even as we welcome this hopeful new moment, we all acknowledge,


especially those of you who are here studying it, that the world is far
from free of risk. Challenges persist, often in more complex guises,
from the spread of weapons of mass destruction to the menace of rogue
states to the persistence of religious, ethnic, and regional conflict.
The openness and freedom of movement that we so cherish about this
modern world actually make us more vulnerable to a host of threats,
terrorists, drug cartels, international criminals, that have no respect
for borders and can make very clever use of communications and
technology.

February 17, 1998 Remarks at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia

"... This is a time of tremendous promise for America. The superpower


confrontation has ended on every continent; democracy is securing for
more and more people the basic freedoms we Americans have come to take
for granted. Bit by bit, the information age is chipping away at the
barriers, economic, political, and social, that once kept people locked
in and freedom and prosperity locked out.

212
But for all our promise, all our opportunity, people in this room
know very well that this is not a time free from peril, especially as a
result of reckless acts of outlaw nations and an unholy axis of
terrorists, drug traffickers, and organized international criminals. We
have to defend our future from these predators of the 21st century. They
feed on the free flow of information and technology. They actually take
advantage of the freer movement of people, information, and ideas. And
they will be all the more lethal if we allow them to build arsenals of
nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and the missiles to deliver
them. We simply cannot allow that to happen.

March 11, 1998 Remarks Prior to Discussions With United Nations Secretary-General
Kofi Annan and an Exchange With Reporters

Again, let me say-l know I don't need to beat this dead horse, but
I think it's worth repeating one more time. I see this issue with Iraq
in the larger context of the threat I believe will be presented to the
world for the next few decades from biological and chemical and perhaps
even, God forbid, small-scale nuclear weapons-a different sort of
weapons of mass destruction threat than we have faced in the past. And
world leaders simply have to come to grips with the potential that is
out there for organized groups-not just nations but terrorist groups,
narcotraffickers, international criminals-to make and deploy such
weapons for their own purposes, so that this is very important on its
own merits. But it's also very important as the first of what I believe
will have to be a many, many year effort by all peace-loving people to
deal with this issue.

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May 12, 1998 Remarks on the International Crime Control Strategy

"... Up to $500 billion in criminal proceeds every single year, more than
the GNP of most nations, is laundered, disguised as legitimate revenue,
and much of it moves across our borders. International crime rings
intimidate weak governments and threaten democracy. They murder judges,
journalists, witnesses, and kidnappers and terrorists have attacked
Americans abroad and even at home with brutal acts like the World Trade
Center bombing.
Wrongdoing flows two ways. U.S. criminals also operate across
borders, victimizing people in other nations. All these activities
threaten our common safety and prosperity. To combat them, we must act
broadly, decisively, consistent with our constitutional values to leave
criminals no place to run, no place to hide.
The job of law enforcement officials behind me, from 12 different
agencies, is to protect the American people from crime. But the job of
our Congress, and my job, is to give these officers the tools they need
to do the job.
Therefore, today I announce for the first time a comprehensive
international crime control strategy for America. At its core is a
simple but compelling truth: International crime requires an
international response. America is prepared to act alone when it must,
but no nation can control crime by itself anymore. We must create a
global community of crimefighters, dedicated to protecting the innocent
and to bringing to justice the offenders.
This week, nations at the G-8 summit will announce significant new
joint anticrime activities. But let me tell you what I plan to do
already by taking better advantage of existing laws and asking Congress
for new legislation.
First, we will work with other nations to create a worldwide dragnet
capability to promptly arrest and extradite fugitives from justice. Our
bill asks for wider authority so America can extradite more suspected
criminals. We'll also press for international cooperations so criminals

214
will forfeit their ill-gotten gains.
Second, because none of us is safe if criminals find safe havens
abroad, we'll work to ensure other nations are also ready to fight
international crime-with global standards and goals, training and
technical aid, and programs to modernize criminal laws elsewhere.
Third, we will work with our allies to share information on growing
crime syndicates, to better derail their schemes. And we will work with
industries to protect against computer crime.
Fourth, we will put more law enforcement personnel abroad, to aid
our Embassies in identifying criminals before they attack Americans. And
I'm seeking new authority to prosecute more violent offenses against
Americans overseas.
Fifth, we will strengthen border security, with 1,000 new Border
Patrol Agents, new technologies, and stiffer penalties, to put more
smuggling rings out of business. I also want tough new sentences for
port runners and for smugglers who refuse to stop for our Coast Guard.
Sixth, I will ask Congress to enact strict provisions to bar drug
and arms traffickers and fugitives from justice from entering our
country and to expel them if they do come here.
Finally, I will seek new authority to fight money laundering and
freeze the U.S. assets of people arrested abroad. And we'll improve
enforcement of existing laws against counterfeiting and industrial
espionage.
To focus our efforts, we will complete within 6 months a
comprehensive analysis of the threat Americans face from international
crime. I've asked Vice President Gore to organize a global meeting to set a common
agenda for fighting corruption and strengthening the rule of law. Some of the criminals
have
sophisticated tools, so ours must be also. They can form temporary
cross-border alliances, based on greed and self-interest, so we must
strengthen the community of nations based on a community of values.

They care about no one but themselves, while we care so deeply about

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our children and their future. It is our most profound strength, the
strength that will allow us to prevail. For we cannot, we must not, we
will not accept a world in which American children and children abroad
grow up paralyzed by crime, fear, and violence.
Together, America and our allies can attack this scourge and build a
secure and prosperous future for all our people. Again, let me say to
all of you, especially to the law enforcement officers here, I thank you
very, very much. Thank you.

May 22, 1998 Commencement Address at the United States Naval Academy in
Annapolis, Maryland

"... our security is challenged increasingly by nontraditional


threats, from adversaries both old and new, not only hostile regimes but
also terrorists and international criminals, who cannot defeat us in
traditional theaters of battle but search instead for new ways to
attack, by exploiting new technologies and the world's increasing
openness.
As we approach the 21st century, our foes have extended the fields
of battle, from physical space to cyberspace; from the world's vast
bodies of water to the complex workings of our own human bodies. Rather
than invading our beaches or launching bombers, these adversaries may
attempt cyberattacks against our critical military systems and our
economic base. Or they may deploy compact and relatively cheap weapons
of mass destruction, not just nuclear but also chemical or biological,
to use disease as a weapon of war. Sometimes the terrorists and
criminals act alone. But increasingly, they are interconnected and
sometimes supported by hostile countries.
If our children are to grow up safe and free, we must approach these
new 21st century threats with the same rigor and determination we
applied to the toughest security challenges of this century. We are
taking strong steps against these threats today. We've improved

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antiterrorism cooperation with other countries; tightened security for
our troops, our diplomats, our air travelers; strengthened sanctions on
nations that support terrorists; given our law enforcement agencies new
tools. We broke up terrorist rings before they could attack New York's
Holland Tunnel, the United Nations, and our airlines. We have captured
and brought to justice many of the offenders.
But we must do more. Last week, I announced America's first
comprehensive strategy to control international crime and bring
criminals, terrorists, and money launderers to justice. Today I come
before you to announce three new initiatives: the first broadly directed
at combating terrorism; the other two addressing two
potential threats from terrorists and hostile nations, attacks on our
computer networks and other critical systems upon which our society
depends and attacks using biological weapons. On all of these efforts,
we will need the help of the Navy and the Marines. Your service will be
critical in combating these new challenges.
To make these three initiatives work, we must have the concerted
efforts of a whole range of Federal agencies, from the Armed Forces to
law enforcement to intelligence to public health. I am appointing a
National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and
Counterterrorism, to bring the full force of all our resources to bear
swiftly and effectively.
First, we will use our new integrated approach to intensify the
fight against all forms of terrorism: to capture terrorists, no matter
where they hide; to work with other nations to eliminate terrorist
sanctuaries overseas; to respond rapidly and effectively to protect
Americans from terrorism at home and abroad.
Second, we will launch a comprehensive plan to detect, deter, and
defend against attacks on our critical infrastructures, our power
systems, water supplies, police, fire, and medical services, air traffic
control, financial services, telephone systems, and computer networks.
Just 15 years ago, these infrastructures-some within government,
some in the private sector-were separate and distinct. Now, they are

217
linked together over vast computer-electronic networks, greatly
increasing our productivity but also making us much more vulnerable to
disruption. Three days ago, we saw the enormous impact of a single
failed electronic link when a satellite malfunction disabled pagers,
ATM's, credit card systems, and TV and radio networks all around the
world. Beyond such accidents, intentional attacks against our critical
systems already are underway. Hackers break into government and business
computers. They can raid banks, run up credit card charges, extort money
by threats to unleash computer viruses.
If we fail to take strong action, then terrorists, criminals, and
hostile regimes could invade and paralyze these vital systems,
disrupting commerce, threatening health, weakening our capacity to
function in a crisis. In response to these concerns, I established a
commission chaired by retired General Tom Marsh, to assess the vulnerability of our
critical
infrastructures. They returned with a pointed conclusion: Our
vulnerability, particularly to cyberattacks, is real and growing. And
they made important recommendations, that we will now implement, to put
us ahead of the danger curve.

we will undertake a concerted effort to prevent the spread


and use of biological weapons and to protect our people in the event
these terrible weapons are ever unleashed by a rogue state, a terrorist
group, or an international criminal organization. Conventional military
force will continue to be crucial to curbing weapons of mass
destruction. In the confrontation against Iraq, deployment of our Navy
and Marine forces has played a key role in helping to convince Saddam
Hussein to accept United Nations inspections
of his weapons facilities.
But we must pursue the fight against biological weapons on many
fronts. We must strengthen the international Biological Weapons

218
Convention with a strong system of inspections to detect and prevent
cheating. This is a major priority. It was part of my State of the Union
Address earlier this year, and we are working with other nations and our
industries to make it happen.

We will work to upgrade our public health systems for detection and
warning, to aid our preparedness against terrorism, and to help us cope
with infectious diseases that arise in nature. We will train and equip
local authorities throughout the Nation to deal with an emergency
involving weapons of mass destruction, creating stockpiles of medicines
and vaccines to protect our civilian population against the kind of
biological agents our adversaries are most likely to obtain or develop.
And we will pursue research and development to create the next
generation of vaccines, medicines, and diagnostic tools. The human
genome project will be very, very important in this regard. And again,
it will aid us also in fighting infectious diseases.
We must not cede the cutting edge of biotechnology to those who
would do us harm. Working with the Congress, America must maintain its
leadership in research and development. It is critical to our national
security.
In our efforts to battle terrorism and cyberattacks and biological
weapons, all of us must be extremely aggressive. But we must also be
careful to uphold privacy rights and other constitutional protections.
We do not ever undermine freedom in the name of freedom.

August 8, 1998 The President's Radio Address

"... I want to talk to you about the terrorist bombings


yesterday that took the lives of Americans and Africans at our Embassies
in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; to tell you what we're
doing and how we are combating the larger problem of terrorism that

219
targets Americans.
Most of you have seen the horrible pictures of destruction on
television. The bomb attack in Nairobi killed at least 11 Americans. In
Dar es Salaam, no Americans lost their lives, but at least one was
gravely wounded. In both places, many Africans were killed or wounded,
and devastating damage was done to our Embassies and surrounding
buildings.
To the families and friends of those who were killed, I know nothing
I can say will make sense of your loss. I hope you will take some
comfort in the knowledge that your loved ones gave their lives to the
highest calling, serving our country, protecting our freedom, and
seeking its blessings for others. May God bless their souls.
Late yesterday, emergency response teams, led by our Departments of
State and Defense, arrived in Africa. The teams include doctors to tend
to the injured, disaster relief experts to get our Embassies up and
running again, a military unit to protect our personnel, and
counter-terrorism specialists to determine what happened and who was
responsible.
Americans are targets of terrorism, in part, because we have unique
leadership responsibilities in the world, because we act to advance
peace and democracy, and because we stand united against terrorism. To
change any of that-to pull back our diplomats and troops from the
world's trouble spots, to turn our backs on those taking risks for
peace, to weaken our opposition to terrorism—that would give terrorism
a victory it must not and will not have.
Instead, we will continue to take the fight to terrorists. Over the
past several years, I have intensified our effort on all fronts in this
battle: apprehending terrorists wherever they are and bringing them to
justice; disrupting terrorist operations; deepening counterterrorism
cooperation with our allies and isolating nations that support
terrorism; protecting our computer networks; improving transportation
security; combating the threat of nuclear, chemical, and biological
weapons; giving law enforcement the best counterterrorism tools

220
available. This year I appointed a national coordinator to bring the
full force of our resources to bear swiftly and effectively.
The most powerful weapon in our counter-terrorism arsenal is our
determination to never give up. In recent years, we have captured major
terrorists in the far comers of the world and brought them to America
to answer for their crimes, sometimes years after they were committed.
They include the man who murdered two CIA employees outside its
headquarters. Four years later we apprehended him halfway around the
world, and a Virginia jury sentenced him to death. The mastermind of the
World Trade Center bombing, who fled far from America, 2 years later we
brought him back for trial in New York. And the terrorist responsible
for bombing a Pan Am jet bound for Hawaii from Japan in 1982, we pursued
him for 16 years. This June we caught him.
Some serious acts of terror remain unresolved, including the attack
on our military personnel at Khobar Towers in Saudi Arabia; the bombing
of Pan Am 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland; and now, these horrible bombings
in Africa. No matter how long it takes or where it takes us, we will
pursue terrorists until the cases are solved and justice is done.
The bombs that kill innocent Americans are aimed not only at them
but at the very spirit of our country and the spirit of freedom. For
terrorists are the enemies of everything we believe in and fight for:
peace and democracy, tolerance and security.
As long as we continue to believe in those values and continue to
fight for them, their enemies will not prevail. And our responsibility
is great, but the opportunities it brings are even greater. Let us never
fear to embrace them.
Thank you for listening.

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August 13, 1998 Remarks at a Memorial Service at Andrews Air Force Base,
Maryland, for the Victims of the Embassy Bombings in Kenya and Tanzania

"... No matter what it takes, we must find those responsible for these
evil acts and see that justice is done. There may be more hard road
ahead, for terrorists target America because we act and stand for peace
and democracy, because the spirit of our country is the very spirit of
freedom. It is the burden of our history and the bright hope of the
world's future.
We must honor the memory of those we mourn today by pressing the
cause of freedom and justice for which they lived. We must continue to
stand strong for freedom on every continent. America will not retreat
from the world and all its promise, nor shrink from our responsibility
to stand against terror and with the friends of freedom everywhere. We
owe it to those we honor today.
As it is written: "Their righteous deeds have not been forgotten.
Their glory will not be blotted out. Their bodies were buried in peace,
but their names shall live forever."

August 14, 1998 Videotaped Address to the People of Kenya and Tanzania

I am honored to address you, the people of Kenya and Tanzania. On


behalf of all the American people, I extend our deepest condolences to
the families and the friends of those Kenyans and Tanzanians who
perished in the tragic attacks in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam.
Some of them worked alongside Americans at our Embassies, making
vital contributions to our common efforts, and we are very grateful for
their service. Others were nearby, working hard, as they did every day.
All of these men and women were important to America, because we cherish
our friendship with your peoples. We have long admired the achievements
of your citizens and the beauty of your lands. All three of our nations
have lost beloved sons and daughters, and so many, many more were
injured. We pray, too, for their speedy recovery.

222
Let me express America's profound gratitude for your extraordinary
efforts, with Americans and others, to respond to this shared tragedy,
pulling people from the wreckage, aiding the wounded, searching for
evidence as to who committed these terrible acts.
Violent extremists try to use bullets and bombs to derail our united
efforts to bring peace to every part of this Earth. We grieve together,
but I am proud that our nations have also renewed our commitment to
stand together, to bring the offenders swiftly to justice, to combat
terrorism in all its forms and to create a more tolerant and more
peaceful world for our children.

August 15, 1998 The President's Radio Address

"... They had perished in Nairobi, cruelly and without warning, in an act of terror at
the American Embassy. It was not the sort of homecoming any of us would
have wished. But it was a tribute that befit their service to our
Nation.

As a nation, we have lost much. These families have lost even more.
Words cannot describe and tributes cannot begin to fill the cruel
vacancy left by evil acts of terror. But in the example of the proud and
grieving families I met on Thursday, we find an embodiment of American
resolve. They made it clear to me they did not want us to give in to
terror or to turn inward or retreat, for the world is full of promise,
and they do not want us to try to stop resolving the misunderstandings
that can deteriorate into the rot of hatred. Instead, they urged us to
stand strong, as ever, for freedom and democracy in all countries and
for all people.
And our administration will remain committed to the fight against
terror. Over the last few years, working with Congress, we have passed
tough new criminal penalties, tightened security at airports,
strengthened protection of our troops overseas. We have created an

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international coalition to help us combat terrorism and have apprehended
or helped to capture more than 40 terrorists abroad, including those
involved in attacks on Pan Am Flight 830 and the World Trade Center and
in the murder of two CIA employees in Virginia.

August 20, 1998 Remarks in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, on Military Action


Against Terrorist Sites in Afghanistan and Sudan

"... Today I ordered our Armed Forces to strike at


terrorist-related facilities in Afghanistan and Sudan because of the
threat they present to our national security.
I have said many times that terrorism is one of the greatest dangers
we face in this new global era. We saw its twisted mentality at work
last week in the Embassy bombings in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam, which
took the lives of innocent Americans and Africans and injured thousands
more. Today we have struck back.
The United States launched an attack this morning on one of the most
active terrorist bases in the world. It is located in Afghanistan and
operated by groups affiliated with Usama bin Ladin, a network not
sponsored by any state but as dangerous as any we face. We also struck a
chemical weapons-related facility in Sudan. Our target was the
terrorists' base of operation and infrastructure. Our objective was to
damage their capacity to strike at Americans and other innocent people.
I ordered this action for four reasons: first, because we have
convincing evidence these groups played the key role in the Embassy
bombings in Kenya and Tanzania; second, because these groups have
executed terrorist attacks against Americans in the past; third, because
we have compelling information that they were planning additional
terrorist attacks against our citizens and others with the inevitable
collateral casualties we saw so tragically in Africa; and fourth,
because they are seeking to acquire chemical weapons and other dangerous
weapons.
Terrorists must have no doubt that, in the face of their threats,

224
America will protect its citizens and will continue to lead the world's
fight for peace, freedom, and security.
Now I am returning to Washington to be briefed by my national
security team on the latest information. I will provide you with a more
detailed statement later this afternoon from the White House.
Thank you very much.

August 20, 1998 Address to the Nation on Military Action Against Terrorist Sites in
Afghanistan and Sudan

"... Good afternoon. Today I ordered our Armed Forces to strike at


terrorist-related facilities in Afghanistan and Sudan because of the
imminent threat they presented to our national security.
I want to speak with you about the objective of this action and why
it was necessary. Our target was terror; our mission was clear: to
strike at the network of radical groups affiliated with and funded by
Usama bin Ladin, perhaps the preeminent organizer and financier of
international terrorism in the world today.
The groups associated with him come from diverse places but share a
hatred for democracy, a fanatical glorification of violence, and a
horrible distortion of their religion to justify the murder of
innocents. They have made the United States their adversary precisely
because of what we stand for and what we stand against.
A few months ago, and again this week, bin Ladin publicly vowed to
wage a terrorist war against America, saying, and I quote, "We do not
differentiate between those dressed in military uniforms and civilians.
They're all targets."
Their mission is murder and their history is bloody. In recent
years, they killed American, Belgian, and Pakistani peacekeepers in
Somalia. They plotted to assassinate the President of Egypt and the
Pope. They planned to bomb six United States 747's over the Pacific.
They bombed the Egyptian Embassy in Pakistan. They gunned down German
tourists in Egypt.

225
The most recent terrorist events are fresh in our memory. Two weeks
ago, 12 Americans and nearly 300 Kenyans and Tanzanians lost their
lives, and another 5,000 were wounded, when our Embassies in Nairobi and
Dares Salaam were bombed. There is convincing information from our
intelligence community that the bin Ladin terrorist network was
responsible for these bombings. Based on this information, we have high
confidence that these bombings were planned, financed, and carried out
by the organization bin Ladin leads.
America has battled terrorism for many years. Where possible, we've
used law enforcement and diplomatic tools to wage the fight. The long
arm of American law has reached out around the world and brought to
trial those guilty of attacks in New York and Virginia and in the
Pacific. We have quietly disrupted terrorist groups and foiled their
plots. We have isolated countries that practice terrorism. We've worked
to build an international coalition against terror. But there have been
and will be times when law enforcement and diplomatic tools are simply
not enough, when our very national security is challenged, and when we
must take extraordinary steps to protect the safety of our citizens.
With compelling evidence that the bin Ladin network of terrorist
groups was planning to mount further attacks against Americans and other
freedom-loving people, I decided America must act. And so this morning,
based on the unanimous recommendation of my national security team, I
ordered our Armed Forces to take action to counter an immediate threat
from the bin Ladin network.
Earlier today the United States carried out simultaneous strikes
against terrorist facilities and infrastructure in Afghanistan. Our
forces targeted one of the most active terrorist bases in the world. It
contained key elements of the bin Ladin network's infrastructure and has
served as a training camp for literally thousands of terrorists from
around the globe. We have reason to believe that a gathering of key
terrorist leaders was to take place there today, thus underscoring the
urgency of our actions.
Our forces also attacked a factory in Sudan associated with the bin

226
Ladin network. The factory was involved in the production of materials
for chemical weapons.
The United States does not take this action lightly. Afghanistan and
Sudan have been warned for years to stop harboring and supporting these
terrorist groups. But countries that persistently host terrorists have
no right to be safe havens.
Let me express my gratitude to our intelligence and law enforcement
agencies for their hard, good work. And let me express my pride in our
Armed Forces who carried out this mission while making every possible
effort to minimize the loss of innocent life.
I want you to understand, I want the world to understand that our
actions today were not aimed against Islam, the faith of hundreds of
millions of good, peace-loving people all around the world, including
the United States. No religion condones the murder of innocent men,
women, and children. But our actions were aimed at fanatics and killers
who wrap murder in the cloak of righteousness and in so doing profane
the great religion in whose name they claim to act.
My fellow Americans, our battle against terrorism did not begin with
the bombing of our Embassies in Africa, nor will it end with today's
strike. It will require strength, courage, and endurance. We will not
yield to this threat; we will meet it, no matter how long it may take.
This will be a long, ongoing struggle between freedom and fanaticism,
between the rule of law and terrorism. We must be prepared to do all
that we can for as long as we must.
America is and will remain a target of terrorists precisely because
we are leaders; because we act to advance peace, democracy, and basic
human values; because we're the most open society on Earth; and because,
as we have shown yet again, we take an uncompromising stand against
terrorism.
But of this I am also sure: The risks from inaction, to America and
the world, would be far greater than action, for that would embolden our
enemies, leaving their ability and their willingness to strike us
intact. In this case, we knew before our attack that these groups

227
already had planned further actions against us and others.
I want to reiterate: The United States wants peace, not conflict. We
want to lift lives around the world, not take them. We have worked for
peace in Bosnia, in Northern Ireland, in Haiti, in the Middle East, and
elsewhere. But in this day, no campaign for peace can succeed without a
determination to fight terrorism.
Let our actions today send this message loud and clear: There are no
expendable American targets; there will be no sanctuary for terrorists;
we will defend our people, our interests, and our values; we will help
people of all faiths, in all parts of the world, who want to live free
of fear and violence. We will persist, and we will prevail.
Thank you. God bless you, and may God bless our country.

August 22, 1998 The President's Radio Address

"... I want to talk to you about our strike against


terrorism last Thursday. Two weeks ago, a savage attack was carried out
against our Embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. Almost 300 innocent people
were killed; thousands were injured. The bombs were aimed at us, but
they claimed anyone who happened to be near the Embassies that morning.
They killed both Africans and Americans indiscriminately, cruelty beyond
comprehension.
From the moment we learned of the bombings, our mission was clear:
Identify those responsible; bring them to justice; protect our citizens
from future attacks.
The information now in our possession is convincing. Behind these
attacks were the same hands that killed American and Pakistani
peacekeepers in Somalia, the same hands that targeted U.S. airlines, and
the same hands that plotted the assassinations of the Pope and President
Mubarak of Egypt. I'm referring to the bin Ladin network of radical
groups, probably the most dangerous non-state terrorist actor in the
world today.
We also had compelling evidence that the bin Ladin network was

228
poised to strike at us again, and soon. We know he has said all
Americans-not just those in uniform-all Americans are targets. And we
know he wants to acquire chemical weapons.
With that information and evidence, we simply could not stand idly
by. That is why I ordered our military strikes last Thursday. Our goals
were to disrupt bin Ladin's terrorist network and destroy elements of
its infrastructure in Afghanistan and Sudan. And our goal was to
destroy, in Sudan, the factory with which bin Ladin's network is
associated, which was producing an ingredient essential for nerve gas.
I am proud of the men and women of our Armed Forces who carried out
this mission and proud of the superb work of our intelligence and law
enforcement communities. I thank the congressional leadership for their
bipartisan support. And I'm grateful to America's friends around the
world who have expressed their solidarity. For this is not just
America's fight; it's a universal one, between those who want to build a
world of peace and partnership and prosperity and those who would tear
everything down through death and destruction; a fight that joins people
from Northern Ireland and Africa and the Middle East; a fight not
directed at any particular nation or any particular faith but at a
callous criminal organization whose policies of violence violate the
teachings of every religion.
In particular, it is very important that Americans understand that
the threat we face is not part of the Islamic faith. Hundreds of
millions of Muslims all over the world, including millions right here in
the United States, oppose terrorism and deplore the twisting of their
religious teachings into justification of inhumane, indeed ungodly acts.
Our efforts against terrorism cannot and will not end with this
strike. We should have realistic expectations about what a single action
can achieve, and we must be prepared for a long battle. But it's high
time that those who traffic in terror learn they, too, are vulnerable.
I'm determined to use all the tools at our disposal. That is why I
have just signed an Executive order directing the Treasury to block all
financial transactions between the bin Ladin terrorist group and

229
American persons and companies. We'll urge other governments to do the
same. We must not allow sanctuary for terrorism, not for terrorists or
for their money. It takes money, lots of it, to build the network bin
Ladin has. We'll do our best to see that he has less of it.
Finally, as we close ranks against international threats, we must
remember this: America will never give up the openness, the freedom, and
the tolerance that define us. For the ultimate target of these terrorist
attacks is our ideals, and they must be defended at any cost.
Thanks for listening.

August 27, 1998 Statement on the Arrest of Mohammad Rashid for the Terrorist Attack
on the United States Embassy in Kenya

"... Late last night, American law enforcement authorities brought to the
United States Mohammad Rashid, a suspect in the bombing attack on the
United States Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya. The suspect's involvement in
the bombing was established as the result of a joint investigation by
the Kenyan police and an FBI team. He is associated with Usama bin
Ladin, the preeminent organizer and financier of international terrorism whose
network we struck in Afghanistan and Sudan last week.
This arrest does not close this case. We will continue to pursue all
those who helped plan, finance, and cany out the attacks on our
Embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, which took the lives of 12 Americans
and hundreds of Africans.
Let me express my gratitude to our law enforcement and intelligence
agencies for a job very well done and to the Kenyan and Tanzanian
authorities for their hard work and close cooperation with the FBI.
This is an important step forward in our struggle against terrorism,
but there is a long road ahead. The enemies of peace and freedom
undoubtedly will strike again. Our resolve must be for the long run. We
have and we will continue to use all the tools at our disposal-law
enforcement, diplomacy, and when necessary, America's military might. No
matter what it takes, how long it takes, or where it takes us, we will

230
bring to justice those responsible for the murder and maiming of
American citizens. We will defend our interests, our people, and our
values.

August 31, 1998 Opening Remarks at a Roundtable Discussion on Education in


Herndon, Virginia

"... I've been very involved in, in the last several weeks, as all
of you know; trying to construct a world free of terrorism and more full
of peace and prosperity and security and freedom

Our securities are increasingly interconnected. I'm sure


all of you have followed the events in the aftermath of the tragic
bombing at our Embassies in Africa, and you know that there were far
more Africans killed than Americans, even though America was the target.
And you know that the person responsible did not belong to any
government but had an independent terrorist network capable of hitting
people and countries all around the world ... We don't want terrorists to get a hold of
weapons of mass destruction.

September 1, 1998 Remarks to Future Russian Leaders in Moscow

"... We are working to halt the spread of weapons of mass destruction. We


signed the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty with 147 other
countries. We're working to contain the arms race between India and
Pakistan, to strengthen controls on transfers of weapons technologies,
to combat terrorism everywhere.

231
If we stand together and if we do the right things, we can build
that kind of world. If the people of Russia stand for economic reform
that benefits all the people of this country, America will stand with
you. As the people of Russia work for education and scientific
discovery, as they stand against corruption and for honest government,
against the criminals and terrorists and for the safety of ordinary
citizens, against aggression and for peace, America will proudly stand
with you. It is the right thing to do, but it is also very much in the
interest of the American people to do so.

September 4, 1998 Exchange With Reporters Prior to Discussions With Prime


Minister Bertie Ahern of Ireland in Dublin

"... The problem with the bombings in our Embassies in Africa is that
they were carried out by an operation which does not belong to a nation
and does not have a claim or a grievance against the particular nation
that it wants to resolve so that it can be part of a normal civic life.
It is an organization without that kind of political agenda. Its agenda
is basically to strike out against the United States, against the West,
against the people in the Middle East it doesn't like. And it is funded
entirely from private funds under the control of Usama bin Ladin,
without the kind of objectives that we see that, even on the darkest
days, the Irish parties that were violent had, the PLO had.
So it's an entirely different thing. And I think if s quite
important that people see it as different, because one of the things
that we have to fight against is having the world's narcotraffickers tie
up with these multinational or non-national global terrorist groups in a
way that will provide a threat to every country in the world. It's just
an entirely different situation.

232
September 11,1998 Remarks at a Memorial Service for the Victims of the
Embassy Bombings in Kenya and Tanzania

"... All of us must stand together with our friends from Kenya and
Tanzania and other peaceloving nations-yes, in grief, but also in
common commitment to carry on the cause of peace and freedom, to find
those responsible and bring them to justice, not to rest as long as
terrorists plot to take more innocent lives, and in the end, to convince
people the world over that there is a better way of living than killing
others for what you cannot have today. For our larger struggle, for hope
over hatred and unity over division, is a just one. And with God's help,
it will prevail. We owe to those who have given their lives in the
service of America and its ideal to continue that struggle most of all.
In their honor, let us commit to open our hearts with generosity and
understanding; to treat others who are different with respect and
kindness; to hold fast to our loved ones; and always to work for
justice, tolerance, freedom, and peace.
May God be with their souls.

September 14, 1998 Remarks to the Council on Foreign Relations in


New York City

"... We see around the world the international aggressors, the harborers
of terrorists, the druglords. Who are these countries? They're
authoritarian nations without democracy and without open markets.
Nations that give their people freedom are good neighbors. When nations
turn away from freedom, they turn inward toward tension, hatred, and
hostility.
We now have a chance to create opportunity on a worldwide scale. The
difficulties of the moment should not obscure us to the advances of the
last several years. We clearly have it within our means, if we do the
right things, to lift billions and billions of people around the world into a global middle
class and into participation in global democracy and genuine efforts

233
toward peace and reconciliation. That is a possibility, but recent
events show it is not a certainty. At this moment, therefore, the United
States is called upon once again to lead, to organize the forces of a
committed world, to channel the unruly energies of the global economy
into positive avenues, to advance our interests, reinforce our values,
enhance our security.

September 21,1998 Remarks to the 53d Session of the United Nations General
Assembly in New York City

"... We still are bedeviled by ethnic, racial, religious, and tribal


hatreds; by the spread of weapons of mass destruction; by the almost
frantic effort of too many states to acquire such weapons. And despite
all efforts to contain it, terrorism is not fading away with the end of
the 20th century. It is a continuing defiance of Article 3 of the
Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which says, and I quote,
"Everyone has the right to life, liberty, and security of person."
Here at the U.N., at international summits around the world, and on
many occasions in the United States, I have had the opportunity to
address this subject in detail, to describe what we have done, what we
are doing, and what we must yet do to combat terror. Today I would like
to talk to you about why all nations must put the fight against
terrorism at the top of our agenda.
Obviously, this is a matter of profound concern to us. In the last
15 years, our citizens have been targeted over and over again: in
Beirut; over Lockerbie; in Saudi Arabia; at home in Oklahoma City, by
one of our own citizens, and even here in New York, in one of our most
public buildings; and most recently on August 7th in Nairobi and Dar es
Salaam, where Americans who devoted their lives to building bridges
between nations, people very much like all of you, died in a campaign of
hatred against the United States.
Because we are blessed to be a wealthy nation with a powerful
military and worldwide presence active in promoting peace and security,

234
we are often a target. We love our country for its dedication to
political and religious freedom, to economic opportunity, to respect for
the rights of the individual. But we know many people see us as a symbol
of a system and values they reject, and often they find it expedient to
blame us for problems with deep roots elsewhere.
But we are no threat to any peaceful nation, and we believe the best
way to disprove these claims is to continue our work for peace and
prosperity around the world. For us to pull back from the world's
trouble spots, to turn our backs on those taking risks for peace, to
weaken our own opposition to terrorism, would hand the enemies of peace
a victory they must never have.
Still, it is a grave misconception to see terrorism as only, or even
mostly, an American problem. Indeed, it is a clear and present danger to
tolerant and open societies and innocent people everywhere. No one in
this room, nor the people you represent, are immune.
Certainly not the people of Nairobi and Dar es Salaam; for every
American killed there, roughly 20 Africans were murdered and 500 more
injured, innocent people going about their business on a busy morning.
Not the people of Omagh, in Northern Ireland, where the wounded and
killed were Catholics and Protestants alike, mostly children and women-
and two of them pregnant-people out shopping together, when their
future was snuffed out by a fringe group clinging to the past. Not the
people of Japan who were poisoned by sarin gas in the Tokyo subway. Not
the people of Argentina who died when a car bomb decimated a Jewish
community center in Buenos Aires. Not the people of Kashmir and Sri
Lanka killed by ancient animosities that cry out for resolution. Not the
Palestinians and Israelis who still die year after year, for all the
progress toward peace. Not the people of Algeria, enduring the nightmare
of unfathomable terror with still no end in sight. Not the people of
Egypt, who nearly lost a second President to assassination. Not the
people of Turkey, Colombia, Albania, Russia, Iran, Indonesia, and
countless other nations where innocent people have been victimized by
terror.

235
Now, none of these victims are American, but every one was a son or
a daughter, a husband or wife, a father or mother, a human life
extinguished by someone else's hatred, leaving a circle of people whose
lives will never be the same. Terror has become the world's problem.
Some argue, of course, that the problem is overblown, saying that the
number of deaths from terrorism is comparatively small, sometimes less
than the number of people killed by lightning in a single year. I
believe that misses the point in several ways.
First, terrorism has a new face in the 1990's. Today, terrorists
take advantage of greater openness and the explosion of information and
weapons technology. The new technologies of terror and their increasing availability,
along with the increasing mobility of terrorists, raise chilling prospects of vulnerability to
chemical, biological, and other kinds of attacks, bringing each of us into the category of
possible victim. This is a threat to all humankind.
Beyond the physical damage of each attack, there is an even greater
residue of psychological damage, hard to measure but slow to heal. Every
bomb, every bomb threat has an insidious effect on free and open
institutions, the kinds of institutions all of you in this body are
working so hard to build.
Each time an innocent man or woman or child is killed, it makes the
future more hazardous for the rest of us, for each violent act saps the
confidence that is so crucial to peace and prosperity.

There is no justification for killing innocents. Ideology, religion,


and politics, even deprivation and righteous grievance, do not justify
it. We must seek to understand the roiled waters in which terror occurs;
of course, we must.
Often, in my own experience, I have seen where peace is making
progress, terror is a desperate act to turn back the tide of history.
The Omagh bombing came as peace was succeeding in Northern Ireland. In
the Middle East, whenever we get close to another step toward peace, its

236
enemies respond with terror. We must not let this stall our momentum.
The bridging of ancient hatreds is, after all, a leap of faith, a break
with the past, and thus a frightening threat to those who cannot let go
of their own hatred. Because they fear the future, in these cases,
terrorists seek to blow the peacemakers back into the past.
We must also acknowledge that there are economic sources of this
rage as well. Poverty, inequality, masses of disenfranchised young
people are fertile fields for the siren call of the terrorists and their
claims of advancing social justice. But deprivation cannot justify
destruction, nor can inequity ever atone for murder. The killing of
innocents is not a social program.
Nevertheless, our resolute opposition to terrorism does not mean we
can ever be indifferent to the conditions that foster it. The most
recent U.N. human development report suggests the gulf is widening
between the world's haves and have-nots. We must work harder to treat
the sources of despair before they turn into the poison of hatred. Dr.
Martin Luther King once wrote that the only revolutionary is a man who
has nothing to lose. We must show people they have everything to gain by
embracing cooperation and renouncing violence. This is not simply an
American or a Western responsibility; it is the world's responsibility.

Some people believe that terrorism's principal fault line centers on


what they see as an inevitable clash of civilizations. It is an issue
that deserves a lot of debate in this great hall. Specifically, many
believe there is an inevitable clash between Western civilization and
Western values, and Islamic civilizations and values. I believe this
view is terribly wrong. False prophets may use and abuse any religion to
justify whatever political objectives they have, even cold-blooded
murder. Some may have the world believe that Almighty God himself, the
Merciful, grants a license to kill. But that is not our understanding of
Islam.

237
A quarter of the world's population is Muslim, from Africa to Middle
East to Asia and to the United States, where Islam is one of our fastest
growing faiths. There are over 1,200 mosques and Islamic centers in the United States,
and the number is rapidly increasing. The 6 million Americans who worship there will tell
you
there is no inherent clash between Islam and America. Americans respect
and honor Islam.
As I talk to Muslim leaders in my country and around the world, I
see again that we share the same hopes and aspirations: to live in peace
and security, to provide for our children, to follow the faith of our
choosing, to build a better life than our parents knew, and pass on
brighter possibilities to our own children. Of course, we are not
identical. There are important differences that cross race and culture
and religion which demand understanding and deserve respect.
But every river has a crossing place. Even as we struggle here in
America, like the United Nations, to reconcile all Americans to each
other and to find greater unity in our increasing diversity, we will
remain on a course of friendship and respect for the Muslim world. We
will continue to look for common values, common interests, and common
endeavors. I agree very much with the spirit expressed by these words of
Mohammed: "Rewards for prayers by people assembled together are twice
those said at home."
When it comes to terrorism, there should be no dividing line between
Muslims and Jews, Protestants and Catholics, Serbs and Albanians,
developed societies and emerging countries. The only dividing line is
between those who practice, support, or tolerate terror, and those who
understand that it is murder, plain and simple.
If terrorism is at the top of the American agenda—and should be at
the top of the world's agenda-what, then, are the concrete steps we can
take together to protect our common destiny? What are our common
obligations? At least, I believe, they are these: to give terrorists no
support, no sanctuary, no financial assistance; to bring pressure on
states that do; to act together to step up extradition and prosecution;

238
to sign the global anti-terror conventions; to strengthen the biological
weapons and chemical conventions; to enforce the Chemical Weapons
Convention; to promote stronger domestic laws and control the
manufacture and export of explosives; to raise international standards
for airport security; to combat the conditions that spread violence and
despair.
We are working to do our part. Our intelligence and law enforcement
communities are tracking terrorist networks in cooperation with other
governments. Some of those we believe responsible for the recent bombing
of our Embassies have been brought to justice. Early this week I will
ask our Congress to provide emergency funding to repair our Embassies,
to improve security, to expand the worldwide fight against terrorism, to
help our friends in Kenya and Tanzania with the wounds they have
suffered.
But no matter how much each of us does alone, our progress will be
limited without our common efforts. We also will do our part to address
the sources of despair and alienation through the Agency for
International Development in Africa, in Asia, in Latin America, in
Eastern Europe, in Haiti, and elsewhere. We will continue our strong
support for the U.N. Development Program, the U.N. High Commissioners
for Human Rights and Refugees, UNICEF, the World Bank, the World Food
Program. We also recognize the critical role these agencies play and the
importance of all countries, including the United States, in paying
their fair share.
In closing, let me urge all of us to think in new terms on
terrorism, to see it not as a clash of cultures or political action by
other means or a divine calling but a clash between the forces of the
past and the forces of the future, between those who tear down and those
who build up, between hope and fear, chaos and community.
The fight will not be easy. But every nation will be strengthened in
joining it, in working to give real meaning to the words of the
Universal Declaration on Human Rights we signed 50 years ago. It is
very, very important that we do this together.

239
Eleanor Roosevelt was one of the authors of the Universal
Declaration. She said in one of her many speeches in support of the
United Nations, when it was just beginning, "All agreements and all
peace are built on confidence. You cannot have peace and you cannot get
on with other people in the world unless you have confidence in them."
It is not necessary that we solve all the world's problems to have
confidence in one another. It is not necessary that we agree on all the
world's issues to have confidence in one another. It is not even
necessary that we understand every single difference among us to have
confidence in one another. But it is necessary that we affirm our belief in the primacy of
the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, and therefore, that together we say terror is
not a way to tomorrow; it is only a throwback to yesterday. And together-together-
we can meet it and overcome its threats, its injuries, and its fears with confidence.
Thank you very much.

October 20, 1998 Statement on Signing the Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal
Year 1999

"... Sections 601 and 602 of the Act enhance significantly our ability to
conduct effective counterintelligence and international terrorism
investigations. In addition, section 604 expands the Government's
ability to conduct wiretaps when investigating a broad range of Federal
felonies. The Attorney General will develop comprehensive guidelines and
minimization procedures for the use of this expanded authority and will
amend procedures currently contained in the manual for United States
Attorneys to provide appropriate protection for the rights of Americans.
Until such guidelines and procedures are finalized, the Government will
conduct wiretaps in accordance with the standards provided under current
law. The Department of Justice will include statistics on the use of the
expanded authority in its annual wiretap report to the Congress.

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December 21, 1998 Remarks at the Pan Am Flight 103 Bombing 10th
Anniversary Observance in Arlington, Virginia

"... Even though it is painful today to remember what happened 10 years


ago, it is necessary, necessary to remember that the people on that
plane were students coming home for the holidays, tourists going on
vacation in America, families looking forward to a long-awaited reunion,
business people on a routine flight. Their average age was just 27. Last
week in the annual report on the condition of the health of the American
people, the average life expectancy of Americans has now exceeded 76;
their average age was 27. Beneath them, the people of Lockerbie were
sitting down to supper on a quiet winter evening. And of course, we have
already heard the names; those of you who loved them have relived their
lives in that awful moment.
Now, for 10 years, you have cherished your memories, and you have
lived with the thought, I'm sure, of what might have been. You have
also, for 10 years, been steadfast in your determination to stand
against terrorism and to demand justice. And people all around the world
have stood with you, shared your outrage, admired your fellowship with
one another, and watched with awed respect your determined campaign for
justice. Although 10 years or 20 or 30 or 50 may never be long enough
for the sorrow to fade, we pray it will not be too long now before the
wait for justice and resolution is over.
We dedicate this day of the winter solstice to the memory of all who
were lost, to the families who understand its meaning as no others can.
We dedicate each day that follows-as the Sun rises higher and brighter
in the morning sky and the daylight hours lengthen-to our common
pursuit of truth and justice and to our common efforts to ensure that
what happened 10 years ago to those of you here will not occur again.
I know I speak for every American citizen when I say a simple,
humble, heartfelt thank-you for all you have done to keep the memory and
spirit of your loved ones alive by the memorials you have built, the
scholarships you have funded, the charities you have supported. We thank

241
you for reaching out to one another, to the people of Lockerbie, to all
others who have been victims of terrorism. We thank you for helping to
strengthen the resolve of nations to defeat terror, to deny safe haven
to terrorists, to isolate those who sponsor them. We thank you for
working to improve security for air travelers and for all the lives your
work has saved. We thank you for your determination to see that things
that are good and meaningful and lasting come out of your overpowering
tragedy. And we thank you for not letting the world forget that it is
necessary and right to pursue the perpetrators of this crime, no matter
how long it takes.
I thank you for what you have done to drive me to work harder on
your behalf, not just the imperative of fighting terror but the passion
and commitment and conviction of the families who have spoken to me and
to the members of my administration, who all remind us this cannot be
considered a mere misfortune; this was deliberate murder. And while all
of us have to strive for reconciliation in our hearts, we must also
pursue justice and accountability.
You know better than anyone else it is beyond your power to alter
the past. There is no such thing as perfect justice. No trial or penalty
or illumination of the facts can compensate you for the profound loss
you have suffered. But as long as we can bring those responsible before
the bar of justice and have a real trial, you have a right—and society
has a need-to see that done.
We owe this not only to you but to all Americans who seek justice;
for this was a tragedy felt by every American and, indeed, every man and
woman of good will around the world. And none of us want to live in a
world where such violence goes unpunished and people can kill with
impunity. And none of us will be safe as long as there is a single place
on our planet where terrorists can find sanctuary.
That is why our Nation has never given up the search for justice.
For 10 years we have ensured that Libya cannot be a member of the
international community until it turns over suspects in this case. That
is why, in late August, after speaking with many of you, we put forward

242
the initiative which has already been referred to: try the two suspects
before a Scottish court sitting in The Netherlands.
Since then the Libyan leader, Mr. Qadhafi, has given us mixed
signals. We believe there is still some possibility he will accept our
offer. That would be the best outcome, for it would mean that finally
there would be a trial. But let me be absolutely clear to all of you:
Our policy is not to trust Mr. Qadhafi's claims; it is to test them.
This is a take-it-or-leave-it offer. We will not negotiate its terms. If
the suspects are convicted, they will serve their time in Scotland. And
if the suspects are not turned over by the time of the next sanctions
review, we will work at the United Nations with our allies and friends
to seek yet stronger measures against Libya. In doing so, we will count
on the support of all nations that counseled us to make this proposal in
the first place. If the proposal fails, all should make clear that the
responsibility falls on Mr. Qadhafi alone.

Like the stones of this cairn, our memories of those we lost remain
strong. And so must our determination be to complete on their behalf the
unfinished business ahead. To that solemn task, I pledge you my best
efforts. And I ask for your continued commitment, your continued
involvement, your continued education of your fellow Americans, and your
continued loving memories acted out to benefit those you may never
know-for you are making a safer, fairer, more just world.
God bless you all, and God bless America.

243
1999

January 19, 1999 Address Before a Joint Session of the Congress on the State of the
Union

"... As we work for peace, we must also meet threats to our Nation's
security, including increased dangers from outlaw nations and terrorism.
We will defend our security wherever we are threatened, as we did this
summer when we struck at Usama bin Ladin's network of terror. The bombing of our
Embassies in Kenya and Tanzania reminds us again of the risks faced every day by
those who represent America to the world. So let's give them the support they need, the
safest possible workplaces, and the resources they must have so America
can continue to lead.
We must work to keep terrorists from disrupting computer networks.
We must work to prepare local communities for biological and chemical
emergencies, to support research into vaccines and treatments.

So I say to all of you, if we do these things~if we pursue peace,


fight terrorism, increase our strength, renew our alliances—we will
begin to meet our generation's historic responsibility to build a
stronger 21st century America in a freer, more peaceful world.

January 21, 1999 Interview With Judith Miller and William J. Broad of the New York
Times

"... Before you ask questions, I just want to say that I


really have appreciated the stories you've done [on biological terrorism], because I think
it's so
important that-it's sort of a balance thing, but I want to raise public
awareness of this and awareness also with people with influence who can

244
influence decision making without throwing people into an unnecessary
panic. And I think these stories have been exceedingly valuable.
Sandy was making fun of me today before you came in-Sandy Berger was. He said,
"When you started talking about this 6 years ago, nobody around here-people just
didn't-they hadn't
thought about it."

I've been asking them to think about this for a long,


long time. And of course, we had it more or less in the context of
terrorism because we had the World Trade Center and all the other things
to worry about. But anyway.

Q. But actually, one of my first questions-because we've heard so


many rumors about how you got interested, and none of what has happened
would have happened without your interest. But what was it?
The President. Well, it was-first of all, I spend a lot of time
thinking about 5 years from now, 10 years from now, 15 years from now. I
think that's one of the things that Presidents are supposed to do and
especially when things are changing so much. But we had-keep in mind,
we had the World Trade Center issue; we had the CIA killer; and then
later you had the incident in the Tokyo subway and then Oklahoma City.
We've had a lot of terrorist incidents, culminating in the bombing of
our Embassies in Africa and what happened in Khobar, other things.
One of the things that I have worried about from the beginning, with
the breakdown of the Soviet Union before my time here, was how to help
them deal with the aftermath of the massive nuclear system they have,
and starting with the Nunn-Lugar funds, going all the way up to our
threat reduction proposals in this year's budget-you know, we tried to
hire-keep the scientists and the labs working and do joint projects of
all kinds that would be constructive. But it was pretty obvious to me
that, given the size of the Soviet biological and chemical programs and

245
the fact that we know a lot of other nations are trying to develop
chemical capacity and some biological capacity, that we had not only
nuclear problems but we have a chemical and biological problem.
And of course, the Vice President and others sort of sensitized me to this whole
computer problem. We had the incident with the defense computers just a few months
ago. But before
that, I kept reading about all these non-in the line of national
security-all these computer hackers. You know, I'm technologically
challenged. I can do E-mail and a few other things, you know. But it
struck me that we were going to have to find some way to try to deal
with that, too, because of the defense implications, as well as the
other possibilities.
And I've had all kinds of--l also find that reading novels,
futuristic novels-sometimes people with an imagination are not wrong-
Preston's novel about biological warfare, which is very much based on—
Q. "Hot Zone" or "Cobra Event"? Which one impressed you?
The President. "The Cobra Event."
Q. That's the one.

I would say that if the issue is how probable is it


in the very near-term an American city or community would be affected,
I'd say you probably shouldn't be too worried. But if the issue is, is
it a near certainty that at some time in the future there will be some
group, probably a terrorist group, that attempts to bring to bear either
the use or the threat of a chemical or biological operation, I would say
that is highly likely to happen sometime in the next few years. And
therefore, I would say the appropriate response is not worry or panic
but taking this issue very seriously, expecting all elected officials
with any responsibility in this area to know everything they can, and to
do everything we can both to erect all possible defenses and then to try
to make sure we are doing everything we can to stop this.

246
Now, we know right now~we know that a lot of what we've done
already has delayed WMD programs, some of which I can't talk about, but
slowed the development of WMD programs, of missile technology
development that might deliver such weapons and other things. And we're
doing everything we can to stop or slow down the ability of others,
insofar as we know about it and can do something about it. And
meanwhile, we're doing everything we can both to develop defenses and
emergency responses. But I think we've got an enormous amount of work
out there ahead of us, an enormous amount of work.
And a lot of this has to be done with great cooperation between the
Federal Government-we need cooperation of the private sector on the
cyber issues, the computer issues. We need cooperation with local
government on public health response issues, exposure-if there appears
to be an outbreak. We had all these sort of false alarms of anthrax in
California-how many?~more than a dozen, I think, in the last month. So
we need to be able to diagnose and to treat and also to manage those
things.

Chemical and Biological Weapons

Q. Does one of these threats worry you more than another, and does
any one in particular keep you awake at night?
The President. Well, I have spent some late nights thinking a lot
about this and reading a lot about it. I think in terms of offense
versus defense, if you go back to where we started, the thing that I'm
most interested in~and you will see we've allocated several hundred
million dollars basically to research and to applied research-the thing
that I'm most interested in is developing the ability to quickly contain
biological agents.
A chemical attack would be horrible, but it would be finite. You
know, it's just like-for the people who went through Oklahoma City,

247
nothing could be more horrible. But it didn't spread. The thing that bothers people about
biological agents is that, unless they're properly diagnosed, contained, and treated, that
it could
spread.
For example, we know that if all of us went to a rally on The Mall
tomorrow with 10,000 people, and somebody flew a low-flying crop duster
and sprayed us all with biological agents from, let's say 200 feet, that
no matter how toxic it were, half of us would walk away, for reasons no
one quite understands. You know, either we wouldn't breathe it, or we'd
have some miraculous resistance to it. And the other half of us,
somebody would have to diagnose in a hurry and then contain and treat.
Otherwise, it would be kind of like the gift that keeps on giving, you
know. [Laughter]
And I don't mean that-I'm not trying to be macabre, but you asked
me what keeps me awake at night, and that bothers me. And that's why the
thing that I thought was most important about what we did last year, and
what we learned a little bit from our defense scare-even though it was
on a computer issue, we had this defense issue, plus we were dealing
with all this-we'd studied for a year all this-especially this
biological issue—is we had this work going on in 12 different places in
the Government. So we had to organize our efforts so that we could be
accessible to local governments, so we could work with them to set up
their own preventive mechanisms.
And I have to tell you, it may be-we may have to await-it's a note
I made to myself that we may have to have a perfect defense, I mean,
instantaneous. We may have to depend upon the genome project,
interestingly enough, because once the human genes' secrets are
unlocked, then if you and I think we've been infected, they could take a
blood sample, and there would be a computer program which would show us
if we had, let's say, we had a variant of anthrax. Let's suppose some
terrorist hired a genius scientist and a laboratory to take basic
anthrax and put some variant in it that would be resistant to all known
anthrax antidotes.

248
Q. Okay. Or a Russian scientist.
The President. Yes. So let's just suppose that happened. And what
you would want is to be able to take a blood sample, do an analysis, put
it through a software program that had already been developed, and say,
"Okay, here is-this is how the genes are different. This is the
difference." And then presumably, not too long after we've developed
this, they will already know, well, therefore, this is how you should-
how you should change the vaccine.
And we know now-l know this is kind of bewildering, but keep in
mind this is actually good news because, if there were no genome
project, if there were no rapid way to do quick analysis that would go
right to the tiniest variant, we would be in trouble. And now these
scientists are working on this, and we're actually a little bit ahead of
the original predicted timetable on unlocking the secrets of the gene.
And when that happens, one of the side benefits, I think, will be to be
able to tell these things much more quickly.
But meanwhile, we've got this plan. We're stockpiling the vaccines,
and we're doing all this research which the Government has to fund,
because obviously there's no market for it, right? It's not like-
there's no market for it, and I hope there never will be any market for
it. But we have to pay, the Government has to pay for this research to
develop new vaccines and to manage it along. And I think we will do—I
think we've got a very good increase in the budget, and I really think
it will have broad bipartisan support.
Q. There's a school of worrywarts out there that says this genome
stuff is a double-edged sword, and at some point you can envision ethnic
weapons, looking at racial differences and try to do selective—
Q. And targeting.
Q. Look at Kosovo. Look at how much of the blood that has spilled is
just rooted in this ethnic—
The President. Yes, but I think to be fair, we're a good ways away
from that. I think we need to worry far more about the fact that most of
these groups-we know, for example-let's take something I can talk

249
about because it's public record. We know Usama bin Ladin's network has made an
effort to get chemical weapons.
Q. Biological or just chemical?
The President. Well, we know they've made an effort to get chemical
weapons; they may have made an effort to get biological weapons. We do
not know that they have them. It is true-if you take this thing out to
sort of the science fiction conclusion, obviously the genome project
itself carries the seeds of its own misuse. But right now I'm absolutely convinced that
the advantages dwarf the disadvantages in this area.
Plus, which all the other advantages of it—I mean, it's going to
lead us to~we will save countless lives because we'll know in advance
what predisposition people have, what problems they have-the genome
project would be the seminal event-you know, when it's done, of the
first part of the 21st century, there's no doubt about that.
But to come back to your point, the only point I would make,
whenever you ask me a question like that, I think it's best for you to
remember the formulation that I started with, and it's interesting to
think about the moat and the catapult, the spear and the shield-
anything. It's all a question of people who have money, organization,
and an interest, whether it's political or financial or religious or
whatever, in oppressing other people or holding them down, will always
be looking for new offensive weapons.
Our goal should always be, for the sake of the world as well as the
security of the American people, to make sure not only that we can
defend ourselves and counter-punch, if you will, but to develop with
each new wave of technology to close the gap between offense and
defense. And if we do that, I think that's the strategy that I hope will
become at least an integral part of our national security strategy in
the WMD area.

Q. We've heard about something else that's being considered that I

250
think Bill wants to ask you about.
Q. As you may be aware, Secretary Cohen and people at the Pentagon are talking
about trying to create a new position of commander in chief for the continental United
States because of the terror threat. And it's moving through the system, and at some
point it's going to come to you, probably sometime this summer. Are you
inclined to create that kind of position for the military?

The President. Let me say, I think that we need to have an organized


response, if you will, to what you might call "homeland defense" on
CBW and cyber or computer terrorism issues. And now we've established a
national coordinator on these issues in the White House. We've got this
national domestic preparation office at the Justice Department. We've
got a National Infrastructure Protection Center. We've got a joint task
force on cyber defense already at DOD in response to what they went
through before.
So I want them to look at where we are and make some recommendations
to me. I'm not sure that that is what they're going to recommend, and I
think that I shouldn't give an answer to the question you ask until I
see what the range of options are and what the range of recommendations
is.

Q. Do you have a leaning one way or another?

The President. No, just except to say that it is very important that
we outline every single responsibility that we have as a nation at the
national level and that someone be responsible for it. I want to know-
as I said, one of the things that we learned last year that I think was
a legitimate criticism of what we have done

[[Page 94]]

in our administration is that we had 12 different places where these


activities were going on, and they weren't being properly coordinated

251
and driven in the proper fashion. And we've tried to resolve this. And
this is sort of the last big kind of organizational piece, as far as I
know, that is yet to be resolved. So the military is going to make me a
recommendation, and I will respond accordingly.
Again, the American people-this shouldn't be a cause for alarm;
this should be a cause for reassurance. They should want us to be well-
organized on these things because-remember, for years and years, when I
was a boy, we used to do all those-they had all these fallout shelters,
and every school had its drills and all that. I mean, I'm older than
you, so you wouldn't remember this, but—
Q. No, we did it.
The President. But you know, and we-it was a sensible thing to do
under the circumstances. Thank God we never experienced it. But it was
the sensible thing to do. And so what I want us to do is everything,
within reason, we can to minimize our exposure and risks here, and
that's how I'm going to evaluate this Pentagon recommendation.
Secretary Cohen, I think, is also real focused on this now. I've
been very pleased with the priority he's given it. And I think that all
these guys know that after their experience with the computer issue that
all this-tomorrow's threats may be very different from yesterday's, and
we've got to be ready.
Q. What do you say to people, to skeptics who say all this is just
Pentagon maneuvering, creating new bogeymen to scare us so they can whip
up new budget authority? And it's-and that's a large crowd.
The President. Even though we're talking about hundreds of millions
of dollars and in the aggregate a few billion dollars, it's nowhere near
as expensive as maintaining this sort of basic infrastructure of
defense; the case of public health, the basic infrastructure of public
health.
I say to them, they should understand that we have intelligence-and
a lot of it is in the public arena, you all write about it-about all
the countries that are trying-trie countries and the groups that want
chemical weapons, that want biological weapons, that are trying to get

252
agents, precursor agents that you can use to develop chemicals or basic
agents you can use to develop biological weapons. And everybody knows
now the world is full of hackers that seek to intrude on networks, that
seek to insert bogus codes into programs, and all this sort of stuff.
And it would be completely irresponsible for us not to allocate a
substantial investment in trying to protect America from threats that
will be, in all probability, as likely or more likely in the future than
the threats we think we face today.
That's why we started this conversation by saying, I don't want to
say anything that will overly alarm anybody. I'm not trying to stir up a
lot of false threats. But if you look at just what the UNSCOM people in
Iraq-they say that they don't believe that the reporting in Iraq is
consistent with what they believe the chemical capacity there is.
If you look at the fact with regard to chemicals, with the Chemical
Weapons Convention, if we can get it properly implemented, at least we
will be able to track probably, that plus intelligence, large volumes of
chemical stocks. But with biological stocks, a very small laboratory
with the right materials to work with, you could develop supplies that
could kill a large number of people. It simply is irresponsible for us
not to both do the best we can with public health protections, do the
best research we can on vaccines, stockpile what we know works, and then
get out there and try to build a defense and an ability to interrupt and
stop, with export controls and any other way we can, these developments.
And it costs money. But to me, it's money well spent.
And if there is never an incident, nobody would be happier than me
20 years from now if the same critics would be able to say, "Oh, see,
Clinton was a kook; nothing happened." I would be the happiest man on
Earth. I would be the happiest man on Earth. If they could say, "He
overexaggerated it; nothing happened; all he did was make a bunch of
jobs for scientists and build the Pentagon budget," I would be elated
20 years from now to be subject to that criticism because it would mean
that nothing happened, and in no small measure because of the efforts
we've made.

253
any country with any sense, if they wanted to attack us, would try to do it through a
terrorist network, because if they did it with a missile we'd know who did it, and then
they'd be sunk. It would be-that's a deal where they're bound to lose, big time.

Q. Would you respond with nuclear weapons to a biological attack?

The President. Well, I never discuss the nuclear issue. I don't


think that's appropriate. But I think that we would have at least a proportionate, if not a
disproportionate, response if someone committed an act of war against
the United States. That's what we would do. And if somebody willfully
murdered a lot of our civilians, there would be a very heavy price to
pay.

January 22, 1999 Remarks at the National Academy of Sciences

"... I would like to thank Sandy Berger for many things, including indulging
my nagging on this subject for the better part of 6 years now. I was so
relieved that Dr. Lederberg, not very long ago-well, last year-brought a distinguished
panel of experts together to discuss this bioterrorism threat, because I then had experts
to cite
for my concern and nobody thought I was just reading too many novels
late at night. [Laughter]

In the struggle to defend our people and values and to advance them
wherever possible, we confront threats both old and new: Open borders
and revolutions in technology have spread the message and the gifts of
freedom, but have also given new opportunities to freedom's enemies.

254
Scientific advances have opened the possibility of longer, better lives;
they have also given the enemies of freedom new opportunities.
Last August, at Andrews Air Force Base, I grieved with the families
of the brave Americans who lost their lives at our Embassy in Kenya.
They were in Africa to promote the values America shares with friends of
freedom everywhere, and for that they were murdered by terrorists. So,
too, were men and women in Oklahoma City, at the World Trade Center,
Khobar Towers, on Pan Am 103.
The United States has mounted an aggressive response to terrorism,
tightening security for our diplomats, our troops, our air travelers;
improving our ability to track terrorist activity; enhancing cooperation
with other countries; strengthening sanctions on nations that support
terrorists.
Since 1993, we have tripled funding for FBI antiterrorist efforts.
Our agents and prosecutors, with excellent support from our intelligence
agencies, have done extraordinary work in tracking down perpetrators of
terrorist acts and bringing them to justice. And as our airstrikes
against Afghanistan-or against the terrorist camps in Afghanistan last
summer showed, we are prepared to use military force against terrorists
who harm our citizens. But all of you know the fight against terrorism
is far from over. And now, terrorists seek new tools of destruction.
Last May, at the Naval Academy commencement, I said terrorist and
outlaw states are extending the world's fields of battle from physical
space to cyberspace, from our Earth's vast bodies of water to the
complex workings of our own human bodies. The enemies of peace realize
they cannot defeat us with traditional military means, so they are
working on two new forms of assault, which you've heard about today:
cyber attacks on our critical computer systems, and attacks with weapons
of mass destruction, chemical, biological, potentially even nuclear
weapons.
We must be ready-ready if our adversaries try to use computers to
disable power grids, banking, communications and transportation
networks, police, fire, and health services, or military assets. More

255
and more, these critical systems are driven by and linked together with
computers, making them more vulnerable to disruption. Last spring, we
saw the enormous impact of a single failed electronic link when a
satellite malfunctioned: disabled pagers, ATM's, credit card systems,
and television networks all around the world. And we already are seeing
the first wave of deliberate cyber attacks, hackers break into
Government and business computers, stealing and destroying information,
raiding bank accounts, running up credit card charges, extorting money
by threats to unleash computer viruses.
The potential for harm is clear. Earlier this month, an ice storm in
this area crippled power systems, plunging whole communities into
darkness and disrupting daily lives. We have to be ready for adversaries
to launch attacks that could paralyze utilities and services across
entire regions.
We must be ready if adversaries seek to attack with weapons of mass
destruction, as well. Armed with these weapons, which can be compact and
inexpensive, a small band of terrorists could inflict tremendous harm.
Four years ago, the world received a wake-up call when a group unleashed
a deadly chemical weapon, nerve gas, in the Tokyo subway. We have to be ready for
the possibility that such a group will obtain biological weapons. We have to be ready to
detect and address a biological attack promptly, before the disease spreads.
If we prepare to defend against these emerging threats, we will show
terrorists that assaults on America will accomplish nothing but their
own downfall.
Let me say first what we have done so far to meet this challenge.
We've been working to create and strengthen the agreement to keep
nations from acquiring weapons of mass destruction, because this can
help keep these weapons away from terrorists, as well. We're working to
ensure the effective implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention,
to obtain an accord that will strengthen compliance with the Biological
Weapons Convention, to end production of nuclear weapons material. We
must ratify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty to end nuclear tests once
and for all.

256
As I proposed Tuesday in the State of the Union Address, we should
substantially increase our efforts to help Russia and other former
Soviet nations prevent weapons material and knowledge from falling into
the hands of terrorists and outlaw states. In no small measure we should
do this by continuing to expand our cooperative work with the thousands
of Russian scientists who can be used to advance the causes of world
peace and health and well-being but who, if they are not paid, remain a
fertile field for the designs of terrorists.
But we cannot rely solely on our efforts to keep weapons from
spreading. We have to be ready to act if they do spread. Last year, I
obtained from Congress a 39 percent budget increase for chemical and
biological weapons preparedness. This is helping to accelerate our
ongoing effort to train and equip fire, police, and public health
personnel all across our country to deal with chemical and biological
emergencies. It is helping us to ready Armed Forces and National Guard
units in every region to meet this challenge and to improve our capacity
to detect an outbreak of disease and save lives, to create the first-
ever civilian stockpile of medicines to treat people exposed to
biological and chemical hazards, to increase research and development on
new medicines and vaccines to deal with new threats.
Our commitment to give local communities the necessary tools already
goes beyond paper and plans. For example, parked just outside this
building is a newly designed truck we have provided to the Arlington,
Virginia, Fire Department. It can rapidly assist and prevent harm to
people exposed to chemical and biological dangers.
Our commitment on the cyber front has been strong, as well. We've
created special offices within the FBI and the Commerce Department to
protect critical systems against cyber attack. We're building
partnerships with the private sector to find and reduce vulnerabilities,
to improve warning systems, to rapidly recover if attacks occur. We have
an outstanding public servant in Richard Clarke, who is coordinating all these efforts
across our Government.
Today I want to announce the new initiatives we will take to take us

257
to the next level in preparing for these emerging threats. In my budget,
I will ask Congress for $10 billion to address terrorism and terrorist-
emerging tools. This will include nearly $1.4 billion to protect
citizens against chemical and biological terror, more than double what
we spent on such programs only 2 years ago.
We will speed and broaden our efforts, creating new local emergency
medical teams, deploying in the field portable detection units the size
of a shoebox to rapidly identify hazards, tying regional laboratories
together for prompt analysis of biological threats. We will greatly
accelerate research and development, centered in the Department of
Health and Human Services, for new vaccines, medicines, and diagnostic
tools.
I should say here that I know everybody in this crowd understands
this, but everyone in America must understand this: The Government has
got to fund this. There is no market for the kinds of things we need to
develop, and if we are successful, there never will be a market for
them. But we have got to do our best to develop them. These cutting-edge
efforts will address not only the threat of weapons of mass destruction
but also the equally serious danger of emerging infectious diseases. So
we will benefit even if we are successful in avoiding these attacks.
The budget proposal will also include $1.46 billion to protect
critical systems from cyber and other attacks. That's 40 percent more
than we were spending 2 years ago. Among other things, it will help to
fund four new initiatives: first, an intensive research effort to detect
intruders trying to break into critical computer systems; second, crime—excuse
me-detection networks, first for our Defense Department, and later for
other key agencies so when one critical computer system is invaded,
others will be alerted instantly, and we will urge the private sector to
create similar structures; third, the creation of information centers in
the private sector so that our industries can work together and with
Government to address cyber threats; finally, we'll ask for funding to
bolster the Government's ranks of highly skilled computer experts,
people capable of preventing and responding to computer crises.

258
To implement this proposal, the Cyber Corps program, we will
encourage Federal agencies to train and retrain computer specialists, as
well as recruiting gifted young people out of college.
In all our battles, we will be aggressive. At the same time I want
you to know that we will remain committed to uphold privacy rights and
other constitutional protections, as well as the proprietary rights of
American businesses. It is essential that we do not undermine liberty in
the name of liberty. We can prevail over terrorism by drawing on the
very best in our free society: the skill and courage of our troops, the
genius of our scientists and engineers, the strength of our factory
workers, the determination and talent of our public servants, the vision
of leaders in every vital sector.
I have tried as hard as I can to create the right frame of mind in
America for dealing with this. For too long the problem has been that
not enough has been done to recognize the threat and deal with it. And
we in Government, frankly, weren't as well organized as we should have
been for too long. I do not want the pendulum to swing the other way now
and for people to believe that every incident they read about in a novel
or every incident they see in a thrilling movie is about to happen to
them within the next 24 hours.
What we are seeing here, as any military person in the audience can
tell you, is nothing more than a repetition of weapons systems that goes
back to the beginning of time. An offensive weapons system is developed,
and it takes time to develop the defense; and then another offensive
weapon is developed that overcomes that defense, and then another
defense is built up—as surely as castles and moats held off people with
spears and bows and arrows and riding horses, and the catapult was
developed to overcome the castle and the moat.
But because of the speed with which change is occurring in our
society, in computing technology, and particularly in the biological
sciences, we have got to do everything we can to make sure that we close
the gap between offense and defense to nothing, if possible. That is the
challenge here.

259
We are doing everything we can, in ways that I can and in ways that
I cannot discuss, to try to stop people who would misuse chemical and
biological capacity from getting that capacity. This is not a cause for
panic. It is a cause for serious, deliberate, disciplined, long-term
concern. And I am absolutely convinced that if we maintain our clear
purpose and our strength of will, we will prevail here.
And thanks to so many of you in this audience and your colleagues
throughout the United States and like-minded people throughout the
world, we have better than a good chance of success. But we must be
deliberate, and we must be aggressive.
Thank you very much.

February 26, 1999 Remarks on United States Foreign Policy in San Francisco

"... There is a danger that deadly weapons will fall into


the hands of a terrorist group or an outlaw nation and that those
weapons could be chemical or biological. There is a danger of deadly
alliances among terrorists, narcotraffickers, and organized criminal
groups.

We must avoid both the temptation to minimize these dangers and the
illusion that the proper response to them is to batten down the hatches
and protect America against the world. The promise of our future lies in
the world. Therefore, we must work hard with the world to defeat the
dangers we face together and to build this hopeful moment together, into
a generation of peace, prosperity, and freedom. Because of our unique
position, America must lead with confidence in our strengths and with a
clear vision of what we seek to avoid and what we seek to advance.

260
Our third great challenge is to build a future in which our people
are safe from the dangers that arise, perhaps halfway around the world,
dangers from proliferation, from terrorism, from drugs, from the
multiple catastrophes that could arise from climate change.
Each generation faces the challenges of not trying to fight the last
war. In our case, that means recognizing that the more likely future
threat to our existence is not a strategic nuclear strike from Russia or
China but the use of weapons of mass destruction by an outlaw nation or
a terrorist group.
In the last 6 years, fighting that threat has become a central
priority of American foreign policy. Here, too, there is much more to be
done. We are working to stop weapons from spreading at the source, as
with Russia. We are working to keep Iraq in check so that it does not
threaten the rest of the world or its region with weapons of mass
destruction. We are using all the means at our disposal to deny
terrorists safe havens, weapons, and funds. Even if it takes years,
terrorists must know there is no place to hide.
Recently, we tracked down the gunman<Kansi, Mir Aimal> who
killed two of our people outside the CIA 6 years ago. We are training
and equipping our local fire, police, and medical personnel to deal with
chemical, biological, and nuclear emergencies, and improving our public
health surveillance system, so that if a biological weapon is released,
we can detect it and save lives. We are working to protect our critical
computer systems from sabotage.
Many of these subjects are new and unfamiliar and may be
frightening. As I said when I gave an address in Washington not very
long ago about what we were doing on biological and computer security
and criminal threats, it is important that we have the right attitude
about this. It is important that we understand that the risks are real,
and they require, therefore, neither denial nor panic. As long as people
organize themselves in human societies, there will be organized forces
of destruction who seek to take advantage of new means of destroying

261
other people.
And the whole history of conflict can be seen in part as the race of
defensive measures to catch up with offensive capabilities. That is what
we're doing in dealing with the computer challenges today; that is what
we are doing in dealing with the biological challenges today. It is very
important that the American people, without panic, be serious and
deliberate about them, because it is the kind of challenge that we have
faced repeatedly. And as long as our country and the world is around,
unless there is some completely unforeseen change in human nature, our
successors will have to do the same.

March 15, 1999 Remarks to the Legislative Conference of the International


Association
of Fire Fighters

"... As we approach a new century, we have to ask our firefighters to


meet yet a new challenge: to protect our citizens from terrorists armed
with chemical and biological weapons. Today I want to talk about these
new threats and about the efforts we're undertaking to equip and train
our Nation's firefighters to deal with those threats, thanks in large
parttothelAFF.

The 21st century will be a fascinating time. I envy those of you who
are in this audience who are younger than me, which is most of you,
because you'll live to see more of it. It will be a century in which
limitless opportunities will be linked to dangerous new threats. Here's
why: Open borders and fast-paced technological change fuel our
prosperity; they create new job opportunities, new business
opportunities every day; they also make life more interesting and they
spread the message of freedom quickly around the globe.

262
But the more open and flexible societies are, the more vulnerable
they can become to organized forces of destruction. They give new
opportunities to the enemies as well as the friends of freedom. For
example, scientists now use the Internet to exchange ideas and make
discoveries that can lengthen lives. But fanatics can also use it to
download formulas for substances and bombs that can be used to shorten
lives.
In most instances of domestic terror, the first professionals on the
scene will be the firefighters. They're becoming the frontline defenders
of our citizens, not just from accidents and arsonists but from those
who would seek to sow terror and so undermine our way of life. The truth
of this is apparent to anyone who saw that unforgettable photograph of
firefighter Chris Fields, cradling in his arms a tiny victim of the Oklahoma City bombing.
Since 1996, the number of weapons of mass destruction threats called
in to firefighters, police, and the FBI has increased by fivefold. The
threat comes not just from conventional weapons, like the bomb used in
Oklahoma City, but also from chemical weapons, like the nerve agent that
killed 12 but injured thousands in Tokyo in the subway just 4 years ago,
and even from biological weapons that could spread deadly disease before
anyone even realizes that attack has occurred.
I have been stressing the importance of this issue, now, for some
time. As I have said repeatedly, and I want to say again to you, I am
not trying to put any American into a panic over this, but I am
determined to see that we have a serious, deliberate, disciplined, long-
term response to a legitimate potential threat to the lives and safety
of the American people. [Applause] Thank you.
The only cause for alarm would be if we were to sit by and do
nothing to prepare for a problem we know we could be presented with.
Nothing would make me happier than to have people look back 20 years
from now and say, "President Clinton overreacted to that. He was overly
cautious." The only way they will say that is if we are over cautious,

263
if we're prepared, we can keep bad things from happening.
Now, last fall the Attorney General announced plans to create a national domestic
preparedness office, a one-stop shop where State and local first responders can get the
equipment, the training, the guidance they need from a variety of Federal agencies. I
proposed and Congress agreed to a 39 percent increase in resources for
chemical and biological weapons preparedness.
In the budget I submitted last month to Congress, I asked for $10
billion to combat terrorism, including nearly 1.4 billion to protect
citizens against chemical and biological terrorism here at home, more
than double what we spent on such efforts just 2 years ago.
Today I want to talk about the specifics of our domestic
antiterrorism initiative that will most affect the people in this room
and those whom you represent.
First, equipment: Later this year, the Justice Department will
provide $69\1/2\n in grants to all 50 States and the large
municipalities to buy everything from protective gear to chemical/
biological detection devices. Next month, we'll be asking you to tell us
what you need.
Second, training: This year, the Departments of Justice and Defense,
along with FEMA, will invest nearly $80 million in new and existing
training efforts for firefighters, EMS personnel, and other first
responders. We want all of these resources to be accessible to the
National Domestic Preparedness Office.
Third, special response teams: The Department of Health and Human
Services has helped 27 metropolitan areas develop specially trained and
equipped medical response teams that can be deployed at a moment's
notice in the event of chemical or biological attack. These teams,
composed of local medical personnel, will get to the scene quickly, work
closely with firefighters and police, and ensure that patients are
safely transported to hospitals. Our goal is a response team in each of
the Nation's major metropolitan areas, and my new budget moves us in
that direction.
But the need is too urgent to wait for Congress to act on the budget

264
at the end of the year. Therefore, Secretary Shalala will notify Congress today that she
plans to spend an additional $11 million this year to create medical response teams in
12
more metropolitan areas, including Salt Lake City, the home of the 2002
Winter Olympics.
Fourth, advice from the frontline: Later this year, the Department
of Defense will name members of a new weapons of mass destruction
advisory panel. Three of the seventeen panel members will be
firefighters. [Applause] Thank you. Next month, the National Domestic
Preparedness Office will hold a conference with fire and police chiefs
and hazardous materials experts to develop guidelines for dealing with
biological and chemical threats and incidents.
With action in these four areas, to better equip and train local
firefighters and other first responders, we can save lives and show
terrorists that assaults on America will accomplish nothing but their
own downfall.

April 5, 1999 Statement on the Delivery of the Pan Am Flight 103 Bombing
Suspects to Dutch Custody

"... I am gratified that the two suspects accused in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight
103 were delivered by the United Nations to the custody of Dutch authorities. Legal
proceedings will now take place in accordance with the U.S.-UK initiative for a Scottish
trial before a Scottish court sitting in The Netherlands.
The terrorist bombing of Pan Am 103 provoked outrage the world over.
It led to more than 10 years of effort by the United States and United
Kingdom, with the support of other nations, to bring the suspects to
justice.
I am especially thankful for the repeated intervention of U.N.
Secretary-General Kofi Annan, who worked tirelessly to implement the Security Council
resolutions. I am also deeply grateful for the efforts of President Mandela, President

265
Mubarak, and the Saudi Ambassador to the United States, Prince Bandar, on behalf of
King Fahd and Crown Prince Abdullah, (of Saudi Arabia)
But most important, today is a day to remember the men and women who
lost their lives on Pan Am 103.1 know their loved ones have suffered
greatly. They, too, have labored hard to bring justice. Last December,
on the 10th anniversary of the bombing, I renewed my pledge to the
families that I would make my best efforts to bring the accused to
trial. Now, at last, the road to justice has begun.

April 6, 1999 Remarks on Proposed Hate Crimes Prevention Legislation

"... Isn't it interesting to you that we are on the eve of a new century and
a new millennium, which will be largely characterized by globalization,
the explosion of technology, especially information, and the integration
of people, and the number one security threat to that is the persistence
of old, even primitive, hatreds? Don't you think that's interesting?
So what I worry about all the time is whether terrorists can get on
the Internet and figure out how to make chemical and biological weapons
to pursue agendas against people of different ethnic or religious
groups.

April 12, 1999 Remarks to the Community at Barksdale Air Force Base in Bossier
City, Louisiana

"... We know in the years ahead, when we're going to have to fight
terrorism, when we're going to have to fight organized crime and drug
trafficking, when we're going to have to fight the spread of weapons of
mass destruction, when we're going to have to join together with
countries to fight the spread of disease and environmental problems
across national boundaries, that we will have to work with Europe.

266
May 7, 1999 Remarks at a Democratic National Committee Dinner in Austin

"... If we can't solve this problem [ethnic hatred], it's very difficult to understand
how our children are going to live in peace in a world where every
radical terrorist group can get on the Internet and figure out how to
build a bomb or get weapons or do anything else they want to do. We have
got, at least, to tell people that in the world of the 21st century, it
is not okay to kill people just because they're of a different race or
ethnicity or religion.

May 12, 1999 Remarks Announcing Proposed Anticrime Legislation

"... Finally, the crime bill will strengthen our efforts to combat
international crime and terrorism. The threat of weapons of mass
destruction is real and increasing in an age of technological change and
open borders. The bill will make it a Federal crime to possess the biological agents used
in such
weapons without a legitimate, peaceful purpose.

May 13, 1999 Remarks to the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States at Fort
McNair, Maryland

"... In a world where the future will be threatened by the growth of terrorist groups, the
easy spread of weapons of mass destruction, the use of technology including the
Internet, for people to learn how to make bombs and wreck countries, this is also a
significant security issue. Particularly because of Kosovo's location,
it is just as much a security issue for us as ending the war in Bosnia
was.

267
May 16, 1999 Remarks at a Democratic National Committee Luncheon in San
Diego, California

"... I believe that we had to be a much more active force for peace in the world, but I
thought we had to be willing to use our power to stand up against terrorism, weapons of
mass destruction, and ethnic and religious cleansing and killing. And most of the last 6
years have been an effort by the Vice President and our administration, our Cabinet, and
all the rest of us, working with me to try to find ways to put those ideas into concrete
policies and make
them come alive in the country.

Even our biggest threats grow out of that. We are increasingly


vulnerable because of the openness of our society and the openness of
our technology to people who would use this for destructive forces

May 19, 1999 Remarks at a Democratic National Committee Luncheon in New York
City

"... We've tried to be a force for reducing the threat of weapons of mass destruction,
and we've made a lot of progress in that and for standing up against terrorism and
the emerging threats of biological and chemical weapons in the hands of
organized criminals or terrorists. We've worked on all that. And we've
tried to expand global prosperity through trade initiatives.

And I think the fact-it's amazing to me how many American Jews have
told me they support what we are doing for Kosovar Muslims. It is a

268
great thing. It is something special. We have no territorial ambitions
there. We have no economic ambitions there. We, in fact, are going to
have to spend more money to help them rebuild the area and build it
higher than it was. What we want is for our children to be able to live
in the world where they can maximize the explosion of technology and
maximize the openness of borders, and you cannot do that in a world
where you're worried about being blown up by a terrorist who is driven
by ethnic, religious, or racial hatred.

May 20, 1999 Statement on Senate Action on 1999 Emergency Supplemental


Appropriations Legislation

"... This final legislation does show significant improvement upon


Congress's earlier versions. Gone are the Congress's proposed cuts that
weakened anti-terrorism programs, especially Embassy security upgrades;

June 25, 1999 The President's News Conference

"... I have tried to do what I think is right for my country here. I


believe that the young people of America are likely to live in a world
where the biggest threats are not from other countries but from horrible
racial, ethnic, and religious fighting, making people very vulnerable to
exploitation from organized criminals, drug runners, terrorists, who
themselves are more and more likely to have weapons of mass destruction
no matter how hard we work against it.
So I think anything I can do to reduce terrorism, to reduce the
ability of terrorists to have weapons of mass destruction, or to stand
against racial and ethnic genocide and cleansing is a good thing for our
future.
You know, that's all I can tell you. I did what I thought was right.
I still believe it was right. And I'll keep working to make it work out.

269
And the public and the members of the other party and others, people can
react however they like. I just have to do what I think is right, and
that's what I'll do.

July 1, 1999 The President's News Conference With President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt

"... President Mubarak and I also discussed our common determination to


fight terrorism in all its forms.

We discussed this issue quite extensively, and


this has been a subject of great concern to me. It's one thing we've
shared over the last 6 years. A few years ago, I gave a speech at the
United Nations, at the opening session, about terrorism and asked that
we focus on it.
We have asked the Congress to provide substantial resources to look
into what else we can do to fight terrorism, to deal with the threats of
biological and chemical weapons and the prospect that they might get
into the hands of terrorists. We have to consider the prospect in the
future that, as the President said, the most serious security threats to
nations will not be from other nations but from terrorist groups that
cross national borders and that may well form presently unprecedented
allegiances with other illegal groups, organized crime groups, drug
traffickers, weapons profiteers.
And so I think that all the nations of the world that are interested
in stability and peace for their people are going to have to have a much
higher level of cooperation on these issues. So I'm for doing anything
that can be done to increase that.

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July 6, 1999 Statement on the National Emergency With Respect to the Taliban

"... I have signed an Executive order imposing financial and other


commercial sanctions on the Afghan Taliban for its support of Usama bin
Ladin and his terrorist network. The Taliban
has allowed the territory under its control to be used as a safe haven
and base of operations for Usama bin Ladin and the al-Qaida
organization, who were responsible for the bombings of our Embassies in
Nairobi, Kenya, and Dares Salaam, Tanzania, last year, murdering 12
Americans, nearly 300 Kenyans and Tanzanians, and wounding another
5,000. To this day, bin Ladin and his network continue to plan new
attacks against Americans, without regard for the innocence of their
intended victims or for those non-Americans who might get in the way of
his attack. The United States has tried repeatedly, directly and working
with other governments, to persuade the Taliban to expel bin Ladin to
the United States for trial or, if that is not possible, to a third
country where he will face justice for his crimes, and to end the safe
haven it gives to bin Ladin's network, which lives and trains in
Taliban-controlled Afghanistan. These efforts have failed. The Executive
order I have signed will deepen the international isolation of the
Taliban, limit its ability to support terrorist networks, and
demonstrate the need to conform to accepted norms of international
behavior. The order does not affect humanitarian aid, food, and medical
supplies for civilian use. It is not aimed at the people of Afghanistan
but at the Taliban. Those who nurture terrorism must understand that we
will not stand by while those whom they protect target Americans.

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August 6, 1999 Statement on the Anniversary of the United States Embassy
Bombings in
Kenya and Tanzania

"... One year ago twin explosions at America's Embassies in Nairobi and
Dar es Salaam claimed the lives of 12 dedicated Americans, 44 Kenyan and
Tanzanian nationals working to support our diplomatic efforts, and more
than 200 others going about their daily lives. Thousands more were
injured, many seriously.
The intended victims of this vicious crime stood for everything that
is right about our country and the world: Americans and Africans working
together for peace and progress and a better future. They were good
people, taken from us precisely because they were doing good.

Terrorists murdered these men and women and tore the hearts of those
who loved them. But their violence could not and did not destroy the
ideals for which their victims stood. Instead, we have only intensified
our commitment to fundamental values: democracy and human rights,
justice and tolerance.
Their violence could not and did not damage America's bonds with
Kenya, Tanzania, and the other striving nations of Africa. Instead, our
Governments and peoples worked hand in hand to respond to the tragedy,
and we remain united in our determination that terrorism will not
destroy Africa's progress.
Their violence could not and did not make America shrink from the
world. Instead of giving in to those who wish us harm, we have stayed
engaged to promote freedom and opportunity, fight hunger and disease,
build peace and stability, and thereby protect our national interests;
and we have intensified the struggle against terrorist violence and
strengthened security to protect our people. We have increased pressure
on the Taliban and Afghanistan to deliver suspects in the Embassy
bombings. Working with our friends abroad, we have tracked down,

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arrested, and indicted key suspects. And we will not rest until justice
is done.

The struggle against violent hate and for a peaceful and tolerant
world is far from over. But in the end, we will prevail against
terrorism, because the spirited dedication of men and women like those
who perished last August 7th lives on among people of good will all over
the world. No bullet or bomb can ever destroy it.

August 16,1999 Remarks at the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States 100th
National Convention in Kansas City, Missouri

"... Thanks to you, we will begin a new century with a truly historic
achievement, for in the last few years, for the first time in all of
human history, more than half the world's people live under free
governments freely elected. Still, you and I know this is not a world
free from danger. There is the potential for major wars, rooted in
ethnic and religious hatred. There is the chance that former adversaries
will not succeed in their transition to democracy and could become
adversaries again. There is the risk that nuclear, chemical, and
biological weapons will fall into the wrong hands. There is the risk of
terrorist groups with increasing access to money, to technology, to
sophisticated weaponry. There is the possibility that global financial
vulnerabilities could overwhelm free societies. Therefore, we cannot
assume that, because we are today secure and at peace, we don't need
military strength or alliances or that, because we are today prosperous,
we are immune from turmoil half a world away.

Of course, international engagement costs money, but the costliest

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peace is far cheaper than the cheapest war. Ever since I became
President, I've been trying hard to convince Congress of that basic
truth. It has been a considerable challenge. Our international affairs
programs, which fund everything from resolving conflicts to
strengthening young democracies, to combating terrorism, to fighting
dangerous drugs, to promoting our exports, to maintaining our Embassies
all around the world, amount to less than one percent of the Federal
budget and less than one-fifteenth of our defense budget. But I regret
to say that since 1985 these programs have been cut significantly. This
year the House and Senate have passed spending bills that would cut our
request for international affairs by more than $2 billion. In other
words, we're cutting the very programs designed to keep our soldiers out
of war in the first place.

We also have a responsibility to protect American people from the


dangers most likely to surface in the 21st century. The gravest of those
may not be another country launching a nuclear weapon but that weapons
of mass destruction will fall into the hands of terrorists and their
rogue-state sponsors. We have worked to reduce that doomsday scenario.
Since 1992, our support has helped to deactivate almost 5,000 nuclear
warheads in the former Soviet Union; to eliminate nuclear weapons from
three former Soviet republics; to strengthen the security of weapons and
materials at over 100 sites; to tighten export controls in Russia and to
purchase hundreds of tons, literally hundreds of tons, of highly
enriched uranium that otherwise could be used for nuclear weapons that
end up in the wrong hands.
This effort has received strong bipartisan support in the Congress
for which I am very grateful. Today, the Russian economy is struggling,
as we all know. The average salary of a highly trained weapons scientist
in Russia-listen to this--the average salary of a highly trained
weapons scientist in Russia is less than $100 a month.

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Now, for a small investment, we can help them turn that expertise to
peaceful projects that help the world and draw a living wage doing it.
Or we can do nothing and pray that each and every one of those thousands
of scientists will somehow resist the temptation to market their
expertise to those who wish to do us and the cause of freedom harm.
Common sense says to me that we ought to give them something useful and
good to do and let them make a decent living.
That's why, in my State of the Union Address, I proposed increasing
funding for threat reduction by two-thirds over the next 5 years. I want
to work with Congress to make these investments to make the world a
safer place.

September 17, 1999 Statement on the Terrorist Attacks in Russia

"... The American people share the world's outrage over these cowardly
acts. These attacks were aimed not just at innocent people across
Russia; they also targeted fundamental human rights and democratic
values, which are cherished by Russia and other members of the
international community. We must not allow terrorists to achieve their
underlying objective, which is to undermine democratic institutions and
individual freedoms.
People across Russia who have been affected by these attacks are now
beginning the hard task of rebuilding their lives. Their courage and
resilience sets an example for all of us. President Yeltsin and Prime Minister Putin
have also made important appeals to their countrymen that these attacks
should not lead to new incidents of intolerance or bigotry and that the
public should remain calm and unified in response.
In the days and weeks ahead, we will intensify our cooperation with
Russian authorities to help prevent terrorist acts. The struggle against
terrorism is a long and difficult road, but we must not lose our
resolve. America stands ready to work with Russia to protect our
citizens from this common threat.

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September 18, 1999 Radio Remarks on Terrorist Attacks in Russia

On behalf of the American people, I want to extend our deepest


condolences to the families and friends of those who lost their lives in
the recent terrorist bombings in Russia. We share your outrage over
these cowardly acts. We know what kind of pain such tragedies can cause.
Our own citizens have suffered from repeated acts of terrorism.
Not very long ago, a terrorist bombing took the lives of more than
160 Americans in our State of Oklahoma. The World Trade Center in New
York City was bombed. Last year bombings at our Embassies in east Africa
took the lives of American diplomats, along with hundreds of Kenyans and
Tanzanians.
The crimes they suffered remind us that terrorism knows no borders,
and that acts of terror anywhere are a threat to humanity everywhere.
While we stand united with you in our grief, we also stand united with
you in our resolve that terrorism will not go unpunished and will not
undermine the work of democracy.
The United States is ready to work with Russia and the Russian
people to stand against the scourge of terrorism. We are working with
the allies elsewhere to make sure there is no safe haven for terrorists,
and we want to work with Russia to isolate nations that support terror.
Together, we can ensure that the future belongs to peacemakers not bomb
throwers.
In the days ahead, our thoughts and our prayers will be with you as
you work to rebuild from these terrible tragedies.

September 21, 1999 Remarks to the 54th Session of the United Nations General
Assembly in New York City

"... Primitive claims of racial, ethnic, or religious superiority, when married to advanced
weaponry and terrorism, threaten to destroy the greatest potential for human
development in history, even as they make a wasteland of the soul.
Therefore, we look to the future with hope but with unanswered

276
questions. In the new millennium, will nations be divided by ethnic and
religious conflicts? Will the nation-state itself be imperiled by them
or by terrorism? Will we keep coming closer together instead, while
enjoying the normal differences that make life more interesting?

Just as important is the challenge of keeping deadly weapons away


from terrorist groups. They may have weaker capabilities than states,
but they have fewer compunctions about using such weapons. The
possibility that terrorists will threaten us with weapons of mass
destruction can be met with neither panic nor complacency. It requires
serious, deliberate, disciplined concern and effective cooperation from
all of us.

October 8, 1999 The President's News Conference With Prime Minister Jean Chretien
of Canada in Ottawa

"... I believe that there will still be rogue states that want nuclear,
chemical, and biological weapons. I, furthermore, believe that there
will be enemies of all nation states-terrorist groups, organized
criminals, drug runners-who will be increasingly likely to have access
to miniaturized, but powerful weapons of mass destruction. And what I
would like to leave office doing is not getting credit for anything-l
don't give a rip who gets the credit for it. What I want is the Chemical
Weapons Convention to be enforced, the Biological Weapons Convention to
have teeth added to it so it actually means something, and this
Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty to be in place so at least we have a shot
to reduce the number of nuclear states and the sophistication of their
weapons and their ability to use them. That's the whole deal with me.
Because I think that our successors are going to have a whole lot of
headaches from all these groups, and we need to minimize risk because as

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societies grow more open they'll be more vulnerable to being terrorized
by people who have access to this. That's the whole deal with me. I
don't care who gets credit for it; I just want there to be a framework
for dealing with it.

October 15, 1999 Statement on United Nations Security Council Action Against
International Terrorism and the Taliban

I applaud the U.N. Security Council for taking a strong stand


against international terrorism today and demanding that the Taliban
stop harboring Usama bin Ladin. The Security
Council's resolution, which passed by a unanimous vote, will result in
economic sanctions being placed on the Taliban if they do not deliver
bin Ladin within 30 days to a country where he can be brought to
justice.
The Security Council's action demonstrates the international
community's understanding of the threat posed by bin Ladin and his network of
terrorists. Despite the condemnation of scores of countries after the 1998 bombing of
our Embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, the Taliban has continued to allow bin Ladin and
his
network to operate training camps, make threats against the United
States and others, and plan terrorist operations from their bases in
Afghanistan. Now the international community has spoken with one voice.
The sanctions the U.N. has chosen parallel the unilateral ones that the
United States placed on the Taliban in July and will result in the
restriction of landing rights of airlines owned, leased, or operated by
or on behalf of the Taliban, the freezing of Taliban accounts around the
world, and the prohibition of investment in any undertaking owned or
controlled by the Taliban.
The international community has sent a clear message. The choice
between cooperation and isolation lies with the Taliban.

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October 29, 1999 Remarks at an Anti-Defamation League Dinner in Atlanta

"... There's still plenty of extremists and terrorists out there.


There's still people all over the world who represent the forces of
destruction and the enemies of the nation-state-not simply Israel, but
everywhere-working to develop weapons of mass destruction that can be
miniaturized and carried around and used at a moment's notice. And the
same technology that gives you a tiny, tiny cell phone that guys with
big fingers like me can hardly dial these days will lead to the
miniaturization of weapons in the 21st century.
Make no mistake about it. Our problems with the enemies of peace,
with the terrorists, are far from over. And I'll make you a prediction.
Within 10 years, it will be normal to see a very sophisticated alliance
all around the world between terrorists, drugrunners, and organized
crime, maximizing the same modern technologies that we all seek to
access to do good.

November 8, 1999 Remarks in an On-Line Townhall Meeting

"... I think the real problem is the danger that in the future, rogue states and
terrorist groups might, themselves, get missile technology that could
pierce America's traditional defenses. So we're working on missile
defense, and we're also working with the Russians to see if we can agree
to make some amendments to the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty so that we
can put the missile defense up if we can develop it, and they can share
the benefits of it.
Now, let me also say to all of you, not to be unnecessarily
alarmist, but I think we need to be realistic here. I think in the
future, future Presidents will have to tell you that we'll also have to
worry about defenses from miniaturized nuclear, chemical, and biological
weapons in the hands of terrorists who won't need missiles to try to
deliver them.
So it will be a whole new world out there, and there's a lot of

279
blessings from the end of the cold war, but we'll have to deal with more
and different threats. And I would favor doing whatever is responsible
to enhance the national security of the United States, including
deploying the right kind of missile defense system.

we essentially assumed the leadership of the post-cold-war world, whether it's in


expanding NATO or fighting against ethnic cleansing in the Balkans or working to deal
with the
challenges of terrorism in the 21st century. So I think it will be seen as a time of
transformation, of hope, of genuine opportunity, and genuine community in America.

November 8, 1999 Remarks at Georgetown University

"... We have to continue to do more to fight terrorism around the


world. And we must do what is necessary-and for the young people here,
I predict for 20 years this will become a national security issue—we
have to do more to reverse the very real phenomenon of global warming
and climate change.
To meet those challenges and more, we simply must hold on to the
qualities that sustained us throughout the long cold war, the wisdom to
see that America benefits when the rest of the world is moving toward
freedom and prosperity, to recognize that if we wait until problems come
home to America before we act, they will come home to America.
We need the determination to stand up to the enemies of peace,
whether tyrants like Milosevic or terrorists like those who attacked our
Embassies in Africa. We need faith in our own capacity to do what is
right, even when it's hard, whether that means building peace in the
Middle East or democracy in Russia or a constructive partnership with
China. We need the patience to stick with those efforts for as long as
it takes and the resources to see them through. And most of all, we need

280
to maintain the will to lead, to provide the kind of American leadership
that for 50 years has brought friends and allies to our side, while
moving mountains around the world.

November 9, 1999 Remarks at a Democratic National Committee Hispanic


Leadership Forum Dinner

"... What are the security threats of the 21 st century?

The proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, nuclear, chemical, and biological, and
the possibility that they can be made in smaller quantities, like everything else is smaller.
We've got
cell phones so small now my big old fingers won't even hit the numbers
right. The miniaturization of all things technical will apply to
weapons, as well, make no mistake about it. This is a serious challenge,
the growth of terrorism around the world, the prospect that the
terrorists, the drug runners, the organized criminals will all start
working together, and the rampant threat of racial, ethnic, and
religious wars-big challenges.

November 11,1999 Remarks at a Veterans Day Ceremony in


Arlington, Virginia

"... we must continue to be the world's leading force for peace and freedom, against
terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. It means we must keep
the commitment I have had since the moment I took the oath of office,
that our men and women in uniform will remain the best trained, best
equipped, best prepared in the world.

281
Of course, it also costs money to help struggling young democracies
to stand on their feet as friends and partners of the United States, as
we've tried to do from Poland to Russia to Nigeria to Indonesia. It
costs money to make sure nuclear weapons in the former Soviet Union are
secure, for the terrorists and leaders who wish us harm do not acquire
the means to kill on a more massive scale. It costs money to support the
peacemakers in places like the Middle East and the Balkans and Africa,
so that regional conflicts do not explode and spread.
But all of you know, better than most, that freedom is not free. And
all of you know, far better than most, that the costliest peace is far
cheaper than the cheapest war.

November 15, 1999 Statement on United Nations Sanctions Against


the Taliban

Today the President of the United Nations Security Council certified that the economic
sanctions against the Taliban laid out in Resolution 1267 one month ago are now in
effect. These sanctions are being implemented because the Taliban has spurned the
unanimous demand of the Security Council and refused to deliver
Usama bin Ladin to a country where he can face justice for his acts of terrorism,
including the bombing of America's Embassies in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam.
The international community has again spoken with one voice, and its
resolve to combat the threat of international terrorism is clear. The
U.N. sanctions parallel the unilateral ones that the United States
placed on the Taliban in July and will result in the restriction of
landing rights of airlines owned, leased, or operated by or on behalf of
the Taliban, the freezing of Taliban accounts around the world, and the
prohibition of investment in any undertaking owned or controlled by the
Taliban. I ask all the nations of the world to do their utmost so that
these sanctions are implemented fully and swiftly.

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The message to the Taliban is unmistakable: bin Ladin's training camps must be
closed; the threats and operational activity must cease, and bin Ladin must answer for
his crimes. The people of Afghanistan have already paid a high price in
isolation because of the Taliban's continued harboring of this
terrorist, and that toll will now increase. It is time for the Taliban
to heed the will of the United Nations and end the threat of terrorism
that emanates from within Afghanistan.

November 15, 1999 Remarks to the Turkish Grand National Assembly


in Ankara

"... There is still much to be done. We must help Russia to complete its
momentous democratic revolution. We must be clear with Russia that its
fight against terrorism is right but that the use of indiscriminate
force against civilians is wrong, likely to exacerbate the very tensions
Russia wants to resolve. We must keep working together to resolve the
conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh. We must secure the region's energy
resources in a way that protects the Bosphorus, helps newly free states
to stand on their feet, empowers Turkey and Europe's future growth.
We'll have a chance to address all these challenges when nearly a third
of the world's nations gather at the OSCE Summit in Istanbul this week.
When we step back and look ahead, it is possible to imagine two very
different futures over the next generation. Without too much trouble, a
pessimist might foresee a dark future, indeed, a Middle East with the
peace process shattered, Saddam's aggression unchecked, democracy
collapsed in the Caucasus in central Asia, extremism and terror
spreading across the region, more violence in the Balkans, military
coups, unstoppable nuclear tensions in Pakistan and India.
But there is another vision, one that requires a strong Turkey
playing its rightful role at the crossroads of the world, at the meeting
place of three great faiths. It is possible to see that brighter future,
one of rising prosperity and declining conflict; one in which tolerance
is an article of faith, and terrorism is seen, rightly, as a travesty of

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faith; a future in which people are free to pursue their beliefs and
proclaim their heritage; in which women are treated with equal respect;
in which nations see no contradiction between preserving traditions and
participating in the life of the world; a future of growing respect for
human rights that protect our differences and our common humanity; and,
specifically, a future in which nations that are predominantly Muslim
are increasingly partners with nations that are not, acting in concert
in ways, large and small, to realize the shared hopes of their people.

November 20, 1999 Remarks to Business and Community Leaders in


Athens

"... We should be working together to fight global threats that know no borders,
including the scourge of terrorism. Terrorists have struck within the borders of the United
States; they have struck here claiming American and Greek lives. The
American people and the Greek people deserve justice and the strongest
possible efforts by our Governments to end this menace. I am grateful
that we are working more closely to do just that.

November 20, 1999 Remarks at a Dinner for the Conference on Progressive


Governance for the 21st Century in Florence, Italy

"... I believe that the biggest problems to our security in the 21st century and to this
whole modern form of governance will probably come not from rogue states or from
people with competing views of the world in governments, but from the enemies of the
nation-state, from terrorists and drugrunners and organized criminals who, I predict, will
increasingly work together and increasingly use the same things that are fueling our
prosperity: open borders, the Internet, the miniaturization of all sophisticated
technology, which will manifest itself in smaller and more powerful and
more dangerous weapons. And we have to find ways to cooperate to deal
with the enemies of the nation-state if we expect progressive
governments to succeed.

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December 22, 1999 Interview With Larry King of CNN's "Larry King Live"

" ... we know that at the millennium, a lot of people who may
even be a little crazy by our standards or may have a political point to
make, may try to take advantage of it. So we are on a heightened state
of alert. We're working very hard on it. No one can guarantee that
nothing will happen. But all I can say is we're working very hard.
And my advice to the American people would be to go on about their
business and do what they would intend to do at the holiday season but
to be a little more aware of people and places where they find themselves. And if you
see something suspicious, well, call us and let us know. Call the authorities. We're
working very,
very hard on this.

Mr. King. Colin Powell says that maybe by doing all this, you've
scared them off. You know, if you make people fear the alert so much,
that might cause terrorists to have a second thought.

The President. Well, they should have a second thought, because


we're working it hard.

Mr. King. In cooperation with other nations?

The President. Absolutely.

December 22, 1999 Interview With Charlie Rose of CBS' "60


Minutes II"

Mr. Rose. Mr. President, because of the recent arrest and heightened
security concerns at airports, do you expect, worry that there will be

285
an incident of terrorism before the first of the year?

The President. Well, we are on a heightened state of alert, and


we're doing a lot of work on this. But I would say to the American
people, they should go on about their business and celebrate the
holidays as they would, but they should be aware. You know, this whole
millennial idea draws out a lot of people who are maybe, by our
standards, deranged, and other people maybe want to use it for their own
political ends. So if people see anything suspicious, they should report
it to the authorities as quickly as possible. But otherwise, I should
say, they should go on about their business. We're working very, very
hard on this.

Mr. Rose. It worries you?

The President. No, I'm concerned, but I think we have, I think, the
best law enforcement folks we could have, and they are working very
hard. And we're doing quite well so far. So I have every hope that we'll
get through it. But I think that what I would ask the American people to
do is not to stay at home and hide but just to keep their eyes open. If
they see something that looks fishy, tell the authorities and we'll get
on it. But they should know that we're working this very hard.

Mr. Rose. Do you expect in the next 10, 20 years to be a terrorist


attack in the United States, thinking about the recent events, thinking
about the potential for germ warfare, the potential for biological
attacks, and the potential—

The President. Oh, absolutely. I think that's a threat.

Mr. Rose. A likelihood?

286
The President. Well, I think it's highly likely that someone will
try. And keep in mind, the World Trade Center was blown up just a few
years ago. We were fortunate to catch the people who did it. Oklahoma
City had the terrible explosion.
What I think will happen—let me back up a minute. I have done
everything I could as President to try to organize the permanent
Government, the people who will be here when I am gone, and the Congress
to deal with the long-term threat of biological, chemical, and small-
scale nuclear war, as well as the increasing sophistication of
traditional weapons. And we are doing a massive amount of work now in
preparation to try to minimize the chances that it will occur and-God
forbid if it should occur-to try to minimize the impact of it.

the organized forces of destruction will take maximum advantage of new


technologies and new scientific developments just like democratic
societies do. So I think, just like the computers are all being
miniaturized and people carry these little pads around that have-and
now you've got these gadgets where you can use as a telephone or a
typewriter, do E-mail, and all that. Well, the same miniaturization will
apply to biological and chemical weapons. And if people should get
nuclear materials that can be made into a bomb, to nuclear materials,
which is why we've worked so hard with Russia to control access to that
stuff.
So we've just got to be ready. There will always be bad guys out
there in the world who will try to take advantage of people's
vulnerabilities.

Mr. Rose. But aren't the odds against us, when you describe that
kind of technological advantage-l mean, and just recently two people
trying-in separate cases-trying to get inside America's borders with
explosives-it gets more and more easier to conceal, and more and more

287
the likelihood that an American city—

The President. Well, if you go back through all of human history and
you look at conflicts in weapons systems-and that's what we're talking
about, biological, chemical weapons—offense always precedes defense;
that is you've got to know what you're defending against.
So my goal in this whole thing, trying to mobilize the country on
biological, chemical weapons, and make sure the Government is doing
everything possible, is to close the gap between offense and defense.
And the answer to your question is we won't be severely-there might be
incidences. I mean, the World Trade Center was blown up; Oklahoma City
was blown up. We've got a guy in the laboratory in the Middle West,
almost 5 years ago, who was trying to develop biological agents,
political extremist.

Mr. Rose. And there are scary ideas coming out of science, where
viruses can attack certain ethnic groups?

The President. Yes, there are people that—

Mr. Rose. The potential of science to do harm is alarming.

The President. But you know, it's always been that way. I mean, it's
always been that way. And I think that I'm actually more optimistic
than-keep in mind, no one believes that someone's going to come in and
kill everybody in America. That's what we worried about during the cold
war. And we still have to deal with these traditional threats. That's
why India and Pakistan is perhaps~the Kashmiri issue is perhaps the
most dangerous one in the world today because you've got two nuclear
powers there who are somewhat uncertain about one another and why we
have to work hard to avoid that.
But yes, there will be problems. Yes, there could be terrible
incidences. But I would say to the American people, they should, on

288
balance, be hopeful. But what they should do is to support the
leadership of this country in putting maximum resources into research
and development so that we're prepared. And I think we will grow
increasingly sophisticated in picking these people up, increasingly
sophisticated in detecting these weapons, and what we can't afford is to
have a long period of time where these offensive capabilities of the new
age are better than the defensive capabilities. If we can close the gap
between offense and defense, we'll be fine.

Mr. Rose. What's interesting about a conversation about the future


with you is that because of this office and your curiosity, you see and
know more than almost anyone. I mean, you are aware because you talk to
the scientists; you talk to people responsible.

The President. I think about it a lot.

Mr. Rose. You do?

The President. Sure. I have to. See, I think one of the jobs of the
President, because of the unique opportunity of the office you just
described it, is to always be thinking about what will happen 10, 20, 30
years from now, and to allocate some time and effort to make decisions
for which there will be almost no notice.
You know, right now, I mean, hardly anybody reports on or thinks
about the work we're doing in biological warfare or chemical warfare-
the speech I gave at the National Science Foundation-but it's fine.
It's what my former national security aide, Tony Lake, used to call "the
dog that doesn't bark." And there is a sense in which there's a bunch
of dogs in this old world you don't want to bark.

Mr. Rose. It's the old notion about if the tree falls in the forest
and nobody hears it, did the tree fall? Can you-are there things that
we don't know about that alarm you, this sense of science and where it's

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at and what's coming down the pike, that gives you great pause?

The President. Well, there are a lot of things that concern me. You
know, we've done a lot of work-the other thing that, besides the
chemical and biological weapons-trying to protect computer systems.

December 31, 1999 Remarks at the "Millennium Around the World"


Celebration

"... And then there are the new problems: the organized forces of crime,
narcotrafficking, terror; governments too weak to handle the sweeping forces of
globalization and their impact on their people; ordinary people across
the world who have yet to see the benefits of democracy and free
enterprise but have borne the burden of the economic and social changes
some can delay but none can avoid.

December 31,1999 Remarks at the "America's Millennium"


Celebration

"... If the story of the 20th century is the triumph of freedom, what
will the story of the 21st century be? Let it be the triumph of freedom
wisely used, to bring peace to a world in which we honor our differences
and, even more, our common humanity. Such a triumph will require great
efforts from us all.
It will require us to stand against the forces of hatred and
bigotry, terror and destruction, it will require us to continue to
prosper, to alleviate poverty, to better balance the demands of work and
family, and to serve each of us in our communities. It will require us
to take better care of our environment. It will require us to make
further breakthroughs in science and technology, to cure dread diseases,
heal broken bodies, lengthen life, and unlock secrets from global

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warming to the black holes in the universe. And perhaps most important,
it will require us to share with our fellow Americans and, increasingly,
with our fellow citizens of the world the economic benefits of
globalization, the political benefits of democracy and human rights, the
educational and health benefits of all things modern, from the Internet
to the genetic encyclopedia to the mysteries beyond our solar system.

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2000-2001

January 1, 2000 The President's Radio Address

"... It's clear that our fate in America increasingly will be tied to the
fate of other nations and other people around the world. We must have
prosperous partners to trade with, secure democracies to share the
burdens of peacekeeping, and mutual effort to combat challenges that
know no borders, from terrorism to environmental destruction. To advance
our interests and protect our values in this new, interconnected world,
America clearly must remain engaged. We must help to shape events and
not be shaped by them.

January 7, 2000 Remarks on the National Plan for Information Systems Protection

"... I want to talk just a moment about steps we are taking today to
defend our citizens from those who would use cyberspace to do us harm.
There has never been a time like this in which we have the power to
create knowledge and the power to create havoc, and both those powers
rest in the same hands.
We live in an age when one person sitting at one computer, can come
up with an idea, travel through cyberspace, and take humanity to new
heights. Yet, someone can sit at the same computer, hack into a computer
system and potentially paralyze a company, a city, or a government.
Thanks to the hard work of many people, our computer systems were
ready for Y2K. But that experience did underscore how really
interconnected we all are. Today, our critical systems, from power
structures to air traffic control, are connected and run by computers.
We must make those systems more secure so that America can be more
secure.
Today we are releasing a national plan to defend America's
cyberspace, the product of a 3-year effort. This plan is not the end of

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the discussion, but the beginning of a dialog with Congress, with the
American people, and especially with the private sector. We need to do
more to bring people into the field of computer security. That's why I
am proposing a new program that will offer college scholarships to
students in the field of computer security in exchange for their public
service afterward. This program will create a new generation of computer
security specialists who will work to defend our Nation's computers.
We also need to accelerate and broaden our research into computer
security. Today I am proposing to create a new institute that will fill
research gaps that neither public nor private sectors are filling today.
The Institute for Information Infrastructure Protection will bring to
bear the finest computer scientists and engineers from the private
sector, from universities, and from other research facilities to find
ways to close these gaps.
As part of the 2001 budget, I am requesting $91 million for these
and other reforms as part of an overall $2 billion budget to help meet
our security challenges. I will work hard to get these measures passed.
I will continue to work equally hard to uphold the privacy rights of the
American people, as well as the proprietary rights of American
businesses. As I said before, it is essential that we do not undermine
liberty in the name of liberty.

January 12, 2000 Remarks to the Democratic Leadership Council

"... Our country has helped to further the cause of peace from Northern
Ireland to the Middle East to Bosnia and Kosovo to Haiti; established
new partnerships with Latin America, Asia, and Africa for economic
cooperation; restrained the nuclear missile programs of North Korea;
fought against Iraq's weapons of mass destruction program; worked to
reduce the threat of terrorism, chemical and biological weapons; cut
thousands of nuclear weapons in the arsenals of Russia and the United
States; expanded NATO; increased our debt relief and economic assistance
to the poorest countries of the world. We have helped to minimize

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economic problems in Asia and Mexico and concluded over 270 trade
agreements, all with a view toward implementing the basic ideas that
were articulated in 1992 and developed in the years before through the
Democratic Leadership Council.

We ought to dedicate ourselves to building a world in which


there is a more human face on the global economy and in which we work
with our friends and neighbors to deal with the new threats of
terrorism, ethnic, racial, and religious warfare, and chemical and
biological weapons.

January 18, 2000 Interview With Francine Kiefer and Skip Thurman of the Christian
Science Monitor in Boston

"... Well, I think, first of all, it is unrealistic to think that such systems [American
computer networks] would not be the targets of our adversaries. I think they're far more
likely to be the targets of terrorists, organized criminals, narcotraffickers, than other
countries.
I believe that the answer is that we have got to be as strong as we
possibly can be in the whole area of cyberspace safety. We've got to be
as resistant to cyberterrorism and assault as we possibly can.
And interestingly enough, this is something we get to practice on
every day a lot, because every day there are always people trying to
break into our computers, break into the Defense Department computers,
break into various security computers. And so we get to work at it every
day. And we've given a lot of thought to how you protect power systems,
how you protect telephone systems, how you protect financial records.
And so all I can say is that the question you asked confirms what I
said at the National Academy of Sciences, I guess over a year ago. I
think that's when I spoke there. We have got to be prepared to deal with
the explosion of technology in ways that could threaten our security,

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not only on data systems themselves. Another thing you're going to see-
everything involving technology is getting smaller, the miniaturization
of everybody. Everybody's got their little notepads now.

And in the whole history of combat among nation-states and before that, feudal groups
or tribal groups, the normal thing that happens is a weapons system will be developed,
and it
will enjoy a period of success, and then a defense will be developed to
it, and then there will be equilibrium until a new weapons system is
developed that will give some dominance, and then you'll have some
equilibrium. What we're trying to do with this massive investment we're
making against bioterrorism, chemical terrorism, nuclear terrorism,
cyberterrorism, is to collapse the timespan between offense and defense.
One of the things, for example, that we really hope that will come
out of the human genome is that we'll be able to develop software
programs that will immediately adjust the antidote for certain viruses.
If there's a biological warfare attack and you've got a mad scientist
somewhere who changes the—I'm just making this up-but who changes the
anthrax virus, for example, in some way it's never before been changed,
and so then this person-and then they spread it over 400 people in some
town, and they begin to come around-what we're attempting to do with
the human genome project, what I think one of the corollary benefits
will be is that you'll have software packages developed so that you will
be able to immediately analyze that, and someone will tell you exactly
how you would have to modify the antidote to anthrax to meet the new
strain that is resistant to all known antidotes.

I've tried to make sure that when I left office we would have in place a properly funded,
properly staffed system to prepare for the security threats of the 21st century. All the

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press goes to the high-dollar hardware systems-should we have a
strategic defense initiative, a missile defense.

January 26, 2000 Interview With Jim Lehrer of PBS' "NewsHour"

"... I want to lay the foundation for America dealing with what I think will be the biggest
security
challenges of the 21st century.
I believe--you know, all the attention today is on whether we can
develop a missile defense and, if so, whether we can deploy it without
falling out with the Russians and our friends and other countries who
question this. But the likeliest threat, in my view, is brought on by
the intersection of technology and the likelihood that you'll have
terrorists and narcotraffickers and organized criminals cooperating with
each other, with smaller and smaller and more difficult to detect
weapons of mass destruction and powerful traditional weapons. So we've
tried to lay in a framework for dealing with cyberterrorism,
bioterrorism, chemical terrorism. This is very important. Now, this is
not in the headlines, but I think it's very, very important for the next
10 or 20 years. I think the enemies of the nation-state in this
interconnected world are likely to be the biggest security threat.

January 27, 2000 Address Before a Joint Session of the Congress on the State of the
Union

"... A third challenge we have is to keep this inexorable march of


technology from giving terrorists and potentially hostile nations the
means to undermine our defenses. Keep in mind, the same technological
advances that have shrunk cell phones to fit in the palms of our hands
can also make weapons of terror easier to conceal and easier to use.
We must meet this threat by making effective agreements to restrain
nuclear and missile programs in North Korea, curbing the flow of lethal

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technology to Iran, preventing Iraq from threatening its neighbors,
increasing our preparedness against chemical and biological attack,
protecting our vital computer systems from hackers and criminals, and
developing a system to defend against new missile threats, while working
to preserve our ABM missile treaty with Russia. We must do all these
things.
I predict to you, when most of us are long gone but some time in the
next 10 to 20 years, the major security threat this country will face
will come from the enemies of the nation-state, the narcotraffickers and
the terrorists and the organized criminals who will be organized
together, working together, with increasing access to ever more
sophisticated chemical and biological weapons. And I want to thank the
Pentagon and others for doing what they're doing right now to try to
help protect us and plan for that, so that our defenses will be strong.
I ask for your support to ensure they can succeed.

January 29, 2000 Remarks to the World Economic Forum and a Question-and-Answer
Session in Davos, Switzerland

"... But the openness and mobility, the flexible networking and
sophisticated communications technologies that have made globalization
what it is-so totally consuming—all these factors have also made us
more vulnerable to some of our oldest
problems.
Terrorism, narcotraffickers, and organized criminals, they can use
all this new technology, too, and take advantage of the openness of
societies and borders. They present all of us with new security
challenges in the new century. The spread of disease; ethnic, racial,
tribal, religious conflicts, rooted in the fear of others who are
different--they seem to find ways to spread in this globalized era. And
the grinding poverty of more than a billion people who live on less than

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a dollar a day and live for a year on less than what it costs to stay in
a nice hotel at night-they, too, are part of the globalized world. A
few of us live on the cutting edge of the new economy; too many of us
live on the bare edge of survival, without the means to move up.

We have got a chance to build a 21st century world that walks away,
not only from the modem horrors of terrorists and bio- and
chemical terrorism and technology but away from ancient racial,
religious, and tribal hatred. Growth is at the center of that chance. It
gives people hope every day. But the economics must be blended with the
other legitimate human concerns. We can do it—not by going back to the
past but by going together into the future.

February 17, 2000 Remarks to the Opening of the National Summit on Africa

"... the central reality of our time is globalization. It is tearing down barriers between
nations and people. Knowledge, contact, and trade across borders within and between
every
continent are exploding. And all this globalization is also, as the
barriers come down, making us more vulnerable to one another's problems:
to the shock of economic turmoil, to the spread of conflict, to
pollution, and, as we have painfully seen, to disease, to terrorists, to
drug traffickers, to criminals who can also take advantage of new
technologies and globalization, the openness of societies and borders.

Because we want to build a world in which our security is not threatened by the spread
of armed conflict, in which bitter ethnic and religious differences are resolved by the

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force of argument, not the force of arms, we must be involved in Africa. Because we
want to build a world where terrorists and criminals have no place to hide and where
those who wish
harm to ordinary people cannot acquire the means to do them harm, we
must be involved in Africa. Because we want to build a world in which we
can harness our natural resources for economic growth without destroying
the environment, so that future generations will also have the chance to
do the same, we must be involved in Africa.

March 21, 2000 Interview With Peter Jennings of ABC's "World News Tonight" in New
Delhi

"... The Pakistanis are great people, too. They've been good allies of ours. They've
helped us even in my time, since the end of the cold war, to get terrorists, the terrorists
involved-one involved in the World Trade Center, one
involved in the CIA killing. They've helped us in other contexts. I want
to continue to be a good ally for them. But I think they have to have a
plan for restoring democracy, and they have to have a nonviolent plan
for resolving their differences with India.

the more nuclear weapons you have, the more nuclear material you have, the more risk
you have that that nuclear material will be subject to pilfering. So you have to worry
about-not only about other states becoming nuclear states but even terrorists getting
ahold of small-scale nuclear weapons. I just think that it takes the world in the wrong
direction. It's an honest disagreement we have with the Indians.

March 22, 2000 Remarks to a Joint Session of Parliament in New Delhi

"... A fourth challenge we face is to protect the gains of democracy and

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development from the forces which threaten to undermine them. There is
the danger of organized crime and drugs. There is the evil of
trafficking in human beings, a modern form of slavery. And of course,
there is the threat of terrorism. Both our nations know it all too well.
Americans understood the pain and agony you went through during the
Indian Airlines hijacking. And I saw that pain firsthand when I met with
the parents and the widow of the young man who was killed on that
airplane. We grieve with you for the Sikhs who were killed in Kashmir,
and our heart goes out to their families. We will work with you to build
a system of justice, to strengthen our cooperation against terror. We
must never relax our vigilance or allow the perpetrators to intimidate
us into retreating from our democratic ideals.

March 25, 2000 Television Address to the People of Pakistan From Islamabad,
Pakistan

"... There are obstacles to your progress, including violence and


extremism. We Americans also have felt these evils. Surely we have both
suffered enough to know that no grievance, no cause, no system of
beliefs can ever justify the deliberate killing of innocents. Those who
bomb bus stations, target Embassies, or kill those who uphold the law
are not heroes. They are our common enemies, for their aim is to exploit
painful problems, not to resolve them.
Just as we have fought together to defeat those who traffic in
narcotics, today I ask Pakistan to intensify its efforts to defeat those
who inflict terror.

Today, the United States is dramatically cutting its nuclear


arsenal. Around the world nations are renouncing these weapons. I ask
Pakistan also to be a leader for nonproliferation. In your own self-
interest, to help us to prevent dangerous technologies from spreading to

300
those who might have no reservations at all about using them, take the
right steps now to prevent escalation, to avoid miscalculation, to
reduce the risk of war.

May 2, 2000 Remarks at the Council of the Americas 30th Washington Conference

"... Last year, drug trafficking and civil conflict [in Colombia] led to more than 2,500
kidnappings; a murder rate 10 times ours, which is virtually the highest of any country in
the advanced world; terrorist activity that is now probably the worst in the world. Thirty-
five thousand people have been killed and one million more made homeless in the last
decade alone. Drugs fund guerrillas on the left and paramilitaries on the right.

As we know, the globalization of our societies is presenting us a


lot of new challenges. The issue in Colombia is just the beginning. You
will see, more and more, drug cartels, organized criminals, gunrunners,
terrorists working together.

May 5, 2000 Remarks on the Employment Report and an Exchange With


Reporters

QUESTION: Mr. President, the State Department, the other day, issued an international
report on terrorism. And also, this was the last of your administration, sir, and as Usama
bin Ladin is still at large, so what do you have to say about international terrorism and all
the—

President Clinton: You mean about bin Ladin still being at large? Well, we're doing our
part to change it. And I hope we'll be successful.

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May 10, 2000 Interview With Diane Rehm of WAMU National Public Radio

"... I think that the likelihood is that the security problems over the next 30 years-that's
what you asked me about~will be from-we may have a conflict with other nations. I
hope
we won't. That's one of the reasons I hope this China initiative will
pass. I hope we won't, but I think it's virtually certain that there
will be kind of a global rough alliance between the terrorists, the
gunrunners, the narcotraffickers, the organized criminals. I think it's
virtually certain that the technological advances which may allow us to
put computers and DMA strands together in a way that are exponentially
powerful may make it possible for the bad guys to have very small-l
mean, less than the palm of your hand—sized chemical, biological, and
nuclear weapons. We don't know.
So we're going to have-and I think the enemies of the nation-state,
the enemies of the ordered society, under the guise of religious or
ideological causes or maybe just making their purses bigger, will
probably be a bigger security threat 20 to 30 years from now than other
nations will be to America and to others.

May 17, 2000 Commencement Address at the United States Coast Guard Academy
inNew London, Connecticut

"... The central reality of our time is that the advent of globalization
and the revolution in information technology have magnified both the
creative and the destructive potential of every individual, tribe, and
nation on our planet.
Now, most of us have a vision of the 21st century. It sees the
triumph of peace, prosperity, and personal freedom through the power of
the Internet, the spread of the democracy, the potential of science as
embodied in the human genome project and the probing of the deepest
mysteries of nature, from the dark holes of the universe to the dark
floors of the ocean.
But we must understand the other side of the coin, as well. The same

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technological advances are making the tools of destruction deadlier,
cheaper, and more available, making us more vulnerable to problems that
arise half a world away—to terror, to ethnic, racial, and religious
conflicts, to weapons of mass destruction, drug trafficking, and other
organized crime.
Today, and for the foreseeable tomorrows, we, and especially you,
will face a fateful struggle between the forces of integration and
harmony and the forces of disintegration and chaos. The phenomenal
explosion of technology can be a servant of either side or, ironically,
both. Of course, our traditional security concerns have by no means
vanished. Still we must manage our relationships with great and
potentially great powers in ways that protect and advance our interests.
We must continue to maintain strong alliances, to have the best trained,
best equipped military in the world, to be vigilant that regional conflicts do not
threaten us.

your class will play an even larger role in defending and


advancing America's security. It is very important to me, as the
Commander in Chief, that each and every one of you understand the
threats we face and what we should do to meet them.
First, international terrorism is not new, but it is becoming
increasingly sophisticated. Terrorist networks communicate on the World
Wide Web, too. Available weapons are becoming more destructive and more
miniaturized, just as the size of cell phones and computers is
shrinking-shrinking to the point where a lot of you with large hands
like mine wonder if you'll be able to work the things before long. You
should understand that the same process of miniaturization will find its
way into the development of biological and chemical and maybe even
nuclear weapons. And it is something we have to be ready for.
As borders fade and old regimes struggle through transitions, the

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chance for free agents looking to make a profit on weapons of destruction and personal
chaos is greater. In this sort of environment, cooperation is profoundly
important—more vital than ever. We learned that in the days leading up
to the millennium.
We are joined today by the Ambassador from Jordan to the United
States, Dr. Marwan Muasher. He's sitting here behind me. He's an excellent
representative of his country. And I want to tell you a story that, unfortunately, will not be
the last example you will have to face.
Last December, working with Jordan, we shut down a plot to place
large bombs at locations where Americans might gather on New Year's Eve.
We learned this plot was linked to terrorist camps in Afghanistan and
the organization created by Usama bin Ladin, the man responsible for the 1998
bombings of our embassies in Tanzania and Kenya, which cost the lives of Americans
and hundreds of Africans.
A short time later, a customs agent in Seattle discovered bomb
materials being smuggled in to the U.S., the same materials used by bin
Ladin in other places. Thankfully, and thanks to Jordan, New Year's
passed without an attack. But the threat was real, and we had to
cooperate with them, with the Canadians, with others throughout the
world.
So the first point I wish to make is, in a globalized world, we must
have more security cooperation, not less. In responding to terrorist
threats, our own strategy should be identical to your motto: Semper
paratus-always ready.
Today I'm adding over $300 million to fund critical programs to
protect our citizens from terrorist threats, to expand our intelligence
efforts, to improve our ability to use forensic evidence, to track
terrorists, to enhance our coordination with State and local officials,
as we did over New Year's, to protect our Nation against possible
attacks. I have requested now some $9 billion for counterterrorism
funding in the 2001 budget. That's 40 percent more than 3 years ago, and
this $300 million will go on top of that. It sounds like a lot of money.
When you see the evidence of what we're up against, I think you will

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support it, and I hope you will.
We also have to do all we can to protect existing nuclear weapons
from finding new owners. To keep nuclear weapons and nuclear materials
secure at the source, we've helped Russia to deactivate about 5,000
warheads, to strengthen border controls and keep weapons expertise from
spreading. But Russia's economic difficulties have made this an even
greater challenge.
Just for example, I know you know that when you decided to become a
Coast Guard officer, you made a decision that you would not be wealthy.
But let me give you some basis of comparison. The average salary today
of a highly trained weapons scientist in Russia is less than $100 a
month. Needless to say, there are a lot of people who'd like to develop
nuclear weapons capability who are out there trying to hire those folks.
The programs that we fund in joint endeavors to secure the Russian
nuclear force and the materials and to do other kinds of joint research
help to give such scientists a decent living to support their families.
And I think we have to do even more to help them turn their expertise to
peaceful projects. We shouldn't just depend upon their character to
resist the temptation to earn a living wage with all of their knowledge
and education. And we have asked Congress for extra funding here to help
Russia keep its arsenal of nuclear weapons secure.

I also want you to know, as I said earlier, we've got to be ready


for the prospect of biological and chemical warfare. We saw that in the
sarin gas attack in Japan 4 years ago. We've established a national
defense preparedness office to train first responders, using new
technology to improve our ability to detect these agents quickly. And
we're doing all we can to see that poison gas and biological weapons are, in fact,
eliminated from
the face of the Earth.
We have to do the same when it comes to problems in cybersecurity.

305
Today, critical systems like power structures, nuclear plants, air
traffic control, computer networks, they're all connected and run by
computers. Two years ago we had an amazing experience in America and
around the world. We saw that a single failed electronics link with one
satellite malfunction disable pagers, ATM's, credit card systems, and TV
and radio networks all over the world. That was an accident. The "love
bug" was not an accident.
So to protect America from cybercrime and cyberterrorism, we have
developed a national plan for cybersecurity, with both public and
private sector brains putting it together. We're asking for increased
funding to implement this plan to protect our vital networks. That's
something else I hope you will support.

Remember the story I told you about the millennium and the help we
got from Jordan and the work we did with Canada. It wouldn't have
mattered what we had done; if they hadn't helped us, we'd have had bombs
going off here as we celebrated the millennium. We have got to be more
involved in a cooperative way with other nations to advance our national
security.
America has been called a shining city on a hill. That doesn't mean
our oceans are moats. It doesn't mean our country is a fortress. If we
wait to act until problems come home to America, problems are far more
likely to come home to America. I hope when you leave here today as new
officers, you will be convinced that more than any previous time in
history, your Nation must be engaged in the world, paying our fair
share, doing our fair share, working with others to secure peace and
prosperity where we can, leading where we must, and standing up for what
we believe.

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May 21, 2000 Remarks to the Democratic Leadership Council in Hyde Park, New
York

"... We said we believed, quote, "the U.S. must remain energetically


engaged in the worldwide struggle for individual liberty, human rights,
and prosperity, not retreat from the world." That idea, turned into
action, has given us a stronger and expanded NATO, new initiatives
against terrorism and weapons of mass destruction, progress on peace in
Northern Ireland and the Middle East, forceful stands against ethnic
cleansing in Bosnia and Kosovo, and new initiatives to expand trade and
advance democracy in Africa, the Caribbean Basin, Latin America, and the
Asian-Pacific region.

And last, we will continue to lead the world away from terror,
weapons of mass destruction, and destructive ethnic, racial, and
religious conflicts, toward greater cooperation and shared peace and
prosperity.

May 25, 2000 Remarks at the Sons of Italy Foundation Dinner

"... How are we going to deal with the new security challenges from
terrorists and rogue states and narcotraffickers? Someone told me the
Ambassador from Colombia is here tonight. The next big national security challenge we
have is getting the Congress to pass America's share of helping to save the oldest
democracy
in Latin America, in Colombia, and I hope all of you will support that. We have got to
prove that a free system of free people can defeat narcotraffickers and civil war and
terrorists. We've got to prove that.

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June 5, 2000 Remarks to the Russian State Duma in Moscow

"... A second goal of our partnership should be to meet threats to our


security together. The same advances that are bringing the world
together are also making the tools of destruction deadlier, cheaper, and
more available. As you well know, because of this openness of borders,
because of the openness of the Internet, and because of the advances of
technology, we are all more vulnerable to terrorism, to organized crime,
to the spread of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons-which
themselves may someday be transferred, soon, in smaller and smaller
quantities, across more and more borders, by unscrupulous illegal groups
working together. In such a world, to protect our security we must have
more cooperation, not more competition, among like-minded nation-states.
Since 1991, we have already cooperated to cut our own nuclear
arsenals by 40 percent; in removing nuclear weapons from Belarus,
Ukraine, and Kazakhstan; in fighting illicit trafficking in deadly
technology. Together, we extended the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty,
banned chemical weapons, agreed to end nuclear testing, urged India and
Pakistan to back away from nuclear confrontation.
Yesterday President Putin and I announced two more important steps. Each of us will
destroy 34 tons of weapons-grade plutonium, enough to build thousands of nuclear
weapons. And we
will establish a system to give each other early warning of missile tests and space
launches to avoid any miscalculation, with a joint center here that will operate out of
Moscow 24 hours a day, 7 days a week-the first permanent, joint United States-Russian
military cooperation ever. I am proud of this record, and I hope you are, too.
We will continue to reduce our nuclear arsenals by negotiating a
START III treaty and to secure the weapons and materials that remain.
But we must be realistic. Despite our best efforts, the possibility
exists that nuclear and other deadly weapons will fall into dangerous
hands, into hands that could threaten us both-rogue states, terrorists,
organized criminal groups. The technology required to launch missiles
capable of delivering them over long distances, unfortunately, is still
spreading across the world.

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The question is not whether this threat is emerging; it is. The
question is, what is the best way to deal with it? It is my strong
preference that any response to strengthen the strategic stability and
arms control regime that has served our two nations so well for decades
now-if we can pursue that goal together, we will all be more secure.

Let me say that this whole debate on missile defense and the nature
of the threat reflects a larger and, I think, more basic truth. As we
and other nation-states look out on the world today, increasingly we
find that the fundamental threat to our security is not the threat that
we pose to each other, but instead, threats we face in common-threats
from terrorist and rogue states, from biological, chemical, and nuclear
weapons which may be able to be produced in increasingly smaller and
more sophisticated ways; public health threats, like AIDS and
tuberculosis, which are now claiming millions of lives around the world
and which literally are on the verge of ruining economies and
threatening the survival of some nations. The world needs our leadership
in this fight, as well. And when President Putin and I go to the G-8 meeting in July, I
hope we can support a global strategy against infectious disease.

It is truly ironic that at a time when we're living in this sort of


world with all these modern potentials, that we are grappling with our
oldest problems of human society--our tendency to fear and then to hate
people who are different from us. We see it from Northern Ireland to the
Middle East to the tribal conflicts of Africa to the Balkans and many
other places on this Earth.
Russia and America should be concerned about this because the
stability of both of our societies depends upon people of very different
ethnic, racial, and religious groups learning to live together under a

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common framework of rules. And history teaches us that harmony that
lasts among such different people cannot be maintained by force alone.
I know when trying to come to grips with these problems, these old
problems of the modern world, the United States and Russia have faced
some of our greatest difficulties in the last few years. I know you
disagreed with what I did in Kosovo, and you know that I disagreed with
what you did in Chechnya. I have always said that the Russian people and
every other people have a right to combat terrorism and to preserve the
integrity of their nations. I still believe it, and I reaffirmed that
today. My question in Chechnya was an honest one and the question of a
friend, and that is whether any war can be won that requires large
numbers of civilian casualties and has no political component bringing
about a solution.

June 17, 2000 Statement on the Anniversary of the Geneva Protocol of 1925

"... Today, one of the greatest threats to American and global security
is the danger that adversary nations or terrorist groups will obtain and
use chemical or biological weapons. The international agreements we have
reached banning these weapons are a critical component of our effort to
protect against this threat.
In my 1998 State of the Union Address, I called on the international
community to strengthen the Biological Weapons Convention with a new
international inspection system to help detect and deter cheating.
Significant progress has been made in Geneva at the Ad Hoc Group of BWC
States Parties toward achieving this goal. We urge all participants in
this process to work toward the earliest possible conclusion of a BWC
Protocol that will further strengthen international security.
On this 75th anniversary of the Geneva Protocol, I call on the
countries of the world who have not yet done so to join the Geneva
Protocol, CWC, and BWC. I call on all parties to strictly adhere to
these agreements and to work to strengthen them. It is more urgent than

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ever that, true to the words of the Geneva Protocol, their prohibitions
"shall be universally accepted . .. binding alike the conscience and
the practice of nations."

July 5, 2000 Interview With Joe Klein of the New Yorker in New York City

"... I wanted to try to create a unified Europe, which included an


expanded NATO, supporting European unification, and dealing with all the
countries around. I wanted to try to get Turkey into Europe as a bulwark
against fundamentalist terrorism. That required some progress between
Greece and Turkey, and we made some, not enough to suit me.

[Referencing the 1993 Special Forces raid on Aideed] So what happened was, we had
this huge battle in broad daylight where hundreds and hundreds of Somalis were killed,
and we lost 18
soldiers, in what was a U.N. action that basically, if I were going to do it again, I would
treat it just like—if we were going to do that, I'd say, "Okay, I need to know what's
involved here, and let's do this the way we planned out the military action we took
against Saddam Hussein, for example, or the military action I took to try to get Usama
bin Ladin's training camps, or anything else."

August 14, 2000 Remarks at a National Democratic Institute Luncheon in Los Angeles

"... I hope we will be very creative in the ways we fight terrorism and
chemical and biological warfare, cyberterrorism, and what I think will
be the most likely threat to our security over the next 20 years, which
is that the miniaturization process that we see, inevitably, part of
technology that now allows you to have a little computer in your palm
with a screen and a keyboard that people with big hands like me can't

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use anymore-will also-you will see this with weapons. And it is far
more likely that we will deal with those kinds of weapons in the hands
of terrorists, with enormous destructive potential, even than we will
have to fend off hostile missiles coming in. And I hope we'll have a
bipartisan consensus about how to imagine the new most likely security
threats of the 21st century.

August 26, 2000 Remarks to a Joint Session of the Nigerian National Assembly in
Abuja

"... Whether we like it or not, your destiny is tied to mine, and mine to
yours, and the future will only make it more so. You can see it in all
the positive things we can build together and in the common threats we
face from enemies of a nation-state, from the narcotraffickers, the
gunrunners, from the terrorists, from those who would develop weapons of
mass destruction geared to the electronic age, very difficult to detect
and easy to move.
Now, we have to decide what we're going to do with the fundamental
fact of modern life, our interdependence. Is it possible for the Muslims
and the Christians here to recognize that and find common ground? Can we
find peace in Jerusalem between the Muslims, the Christians, and the
Jews? Can we find peace in the Balkans between the Muslims, the Orthodox
Christians, and the Catholics? Will we ever bring and end to the
conflict between the Catholics and the Protestants in Northern Ireland-
I mean, finally ever really have it over with completely? Can the Hindus
and the Muslims learn to live together in Kashmir?
Isn't it interesting, when I came here, in part to help you move
into the information revolution more quickly, to spread its benefits to
more of your people, that all over the world, in this most modern of
ages, we are bedeviled by humanity's oldest problem: the fear of the
other, people who are different from us?

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This week the first of five Nigerian peacekeeping battalions began
working with American military trainers and receiving American
equipment. With battalions from Ghana and other African nations, they
will receive almost $60 million in support to be a commanding force for
peace in Sierra Leone and an integral part of Nigeria's democratization.
We think the first battalions will be ready to deploy with U.N. forces
early next year. We expect them to make an enormous difference in
replacing the reign of terror with the rule of law. As they do, all of
west Africa will benefit from the promise of peace and stability and the
prospect of closer military and economic cooperation, and Nigeria will
take another step toward building a 21 st century army that is strong and
strongly committed to democracy.

September 1, 2000 Remarks at Georgetown University

"... I came today to talk about a subject that is not fraught with
applause lines but one that is very, very important to your future: the
defense of our Nation. At this moment of unprecedented peace and
prosperity, with no immediate threat to our security or our existence,
with our democratic values ascendant and our alliances strong, with the
great forces of our time, globalization and the revolution in
information technology, so clearly beneficial to a society like ours
with our diversity and our openness and our entrepreneurial spirit, at a
time like this, it is tempting but wrong to believe there are no serious
long-term challenges to our security. The rapid spread of technology
across increasingly porous borders raises the specter that more and more
states, terrorists, and criminal syndicates could gain access to
chemical, biological, or even nuclear weapons and to the means of
delivering them, whether in small units deployed by terrorists within
our midst or ballistic missiles capable of hurtling those weapons
halfway around the world.

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we have pursued new technologies that could strengthen our defenses against a
possible attack, including a terrorist attack here at home.
None of these elements of our national security strategy can be
pursued in isolation. Each is important, and we have made progress in
each area. For example, Russia and the United States already have
destroyed about 25,000 nuclear weapons in the last decade. And we have
agreed that in a START III treaty, we will go 80 percent below the level
of a decade ago.
In 1994, we persuaded Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Belarus, three of the
former Soviet Republics, to give up their nuclear weapons entirely. We
have worked with Russia and its neighbors to dispose of hundreds of tons
of dangerous nuclear materials, to strengthen controls on illicit
exports, and to keep weapon scientists from selling their services to
the highest bidder.
We extended the nuclear nonproliferation treaty indefinitely. We
were the very first nation to sign the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, an
idea first embraced by Presidents Kennedy and Eisenhower. Sixty nations
now have ratified the test ban treaty. I believe the United States
Senate made a serious error in failing to ratify it last year, and I
hope it will do so next year.
We also negotiated and ratified the international convention to ban
chemical weapons and strengthened the convention against biological
weapons. We've used our export controls to deny terrorists and potential
adversaries access to materials and equipment needed to build these
kinds of weapons.
We've imposed sanctions on those who contribute to foreign chemical
and biological weapons programs. We've invested in new equipment and
medical countermeasures to protect people from exposure. And we're
working with State and local medical units all over our country to
strengthen our preparedness in case of a chemical or biological
terrorist attack, which many people believe is the most likely new
security threat of the 21st century.

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The question is, can deterrence protect us against all those who
might wish us harm in the future? Can we make America even more secure?
The effort to answer these questions is the impetus behind the search
for NMD. The issue is whether we can do more, not to meet today's threat
but to meet tomorrow's threats to our security.
For example, there is the possibility that a hostile state with
nuclear weapons and long-range missiles may simply disintegrate, with
command over missiles falling into unstable hands, or that in a moment
of desperation, such a country might miscalculate, believing it could
use nuclear weapons to intimidate us from defending our vital interests
or from corning to the aid of our allies or others who are defenseless
and clearly in need. In the future, we cannot rule out that terrorist
groups could gain the capability to strike us with nuclear weapons if
they seized even temporary control of a state with an existing nuclear
weapons establishment.
Now, no one suggests that NMD would ever substitute for diplomacy or
for deterrence. But such a system, if it worked properly, could give us
an extra dimension of insurance in a world where proliferation has
complicated the task of preserving the peace. Therefore, I believe we
have an obligation to determine the feasibility, the effectiveness, and
the impact of a national missile defense on the overall security of the
United States.

September 22, 2000 Remarks on the Dedication of the Harry S. Truman


Building

"... With global interdependence growing daily, creating ever-new


opportunities and new and different vulnerabilities, the need for U.S.
leadership in the world has never been greater. The need for building on
Harry Truman's legacy has never been greater.

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But the old American pull of isolationism-or at least, in this age,
cut-way-back-ism-is still there. We should remember what he said:
"Lasting peace," President Truman reminded us, "means bread and
justice and opportunity and freedom for all the people of the world."
My fellow Americans, this is a great day, and this is a good thing. But
we should do more than dedicate this building to Harry Truman. We should
rededicate ourselves today to fulfilling his vision in the new century.
To paraphrase what he said so long ago, it means we have to put a
small percentage of the resources we put into winning the cold war to
work in the world in keeping the peace, advancing global prosperity,
reducing poverty, fighting AIDS, battling terrorism, defending human
rights, supporting free press and democracy around the world.

Around the world, we have to face the threat of proliferation of


weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, narcotrafficking, the
persistent, enduring ethnic, religious, tribal, and racial conflicts
that grip so many places in the world, and new and different threats
that could profoundly affect us all, including global warming and the
rise of AIDS and other infectious diseases, along with the breakdown of
public health systems around the world.
But we're well-positioned to deal with this, thanks in no small
measure to what Harry Truman and his generation did so long ago. He gave
us the opportunities we have today. It's a good thing that we say,
thanks, Mr. President, by naming this building for him. It would be a
far, far better thing if we would follow his lead and give the same set
of opportunities to our grandchildren. I pray God that we will.
Thank you, and God bless you.

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September 26, 2000 Remarks at Georgetown University Law School

"... I'm not even worried about our ability somehow to find a way to deal with the
terrorists and their ability to use the marvels of new technology for biological, chemical,
and other weapons. We'll deal with it fine, as long as we remain committed to the
integrity of the individual but the interdependence within and beyond
our borders, or to go back to Mr. Truman's words, if we're not too stupid and too selfish,
the best is still out there, and the law will lead us.

October 12, 2000 Situation in the Middle East/U.S.S. Cole

"... I have just been meeting with my national security


team on today's tragic events in the Middle East, and I would like to
make a brief statement.
First, as you know, an explosion claimed the lives of at least four
sailors on one of our naval vessels, the U.S.S. Cole, this morning. Many
were injured; a number are still missing. They were simply doing their
duty. The ship was refueling in a port in Yemen while en route to the
Persian Gulf. We're rushing medical assistance to the scene, and our
prayers are with the families who have lost their loved ones or are
still awaiting news.
If, as it now appears, this was an act of terrorism, it was a
despicable and cowardly act. We will find out who was responsible and
hold them accountable. If their intention was to deter us from our
mission of promoting peace and security in the Middle East, they will
fail utterly.
I have directed the Department of Defense, the FBI, and the State
Department to send officials to Yemen to begin the investigation.
Secretary Albright has spoken with President Salih of Yemen, and we
expect to work closely with his government to that effect.
Our military forces and our Embassies in the region have been on
heightened state of alert for some time now. I have ordered our ships in
the region to pull out of port and our land forces to increase their

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security.

October 14, 2000 The President's Radio Address

"... This week an apparent terrorist attack claimed the lives of brave American sailors
off the coast of Yemen, and new violence erupted between Israelis and Palestinians in
the Middle East.
Our sailors aboard the U.S.S. Cole were simply doing their duty, but
a dangerous duty, standing guard for peace. Yesterday I spoke to the
Captain of the Cole, Commander Kirk Lippold. On behalf of all Americans,
I expressed our deepest sympathies and commended him and his crew for
The great job they're doing at this very difficult time.
To our sailors' families, let me say we hold you in our prayers. We
will never know your loved ones as you did or remember them as you will,
but we join you in grief. For your loss is America's loss, and we bow
our heads to God in gratitude for the lives and service of your loved
ones.
In their honor, I have ordered that flags be flown at halfstaff in
the United States, our territories, our Embassies, military bases, and
naval vessels until sunset on Monday. As we see the flag this weekend,
we should think of the families and the sacrifice they have made for
America.
This tragic loss should remind us all that even when America is not
at war, the men and women of our military risk their lives every day in
places where comforts are few and dangers are many. No one should think
for a moment that the strength of our military is less important in
times of peace, because the strength of our military is a major reason
we are at peace. History will record our triumphs on the battlefield,
but no one can ever write a full account of the wars never fought, the
losses never suffered, the tears never shed because the men and women of
our military were risking their lives for peace. We should never, ever
forget that.

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Our military power is not all people see when ships of the United
States enter a foreign port. When U.S. sailors head down the brow of the
ship or our troops set foot on foreign soil, our hosts see in the
uniform of the United States men and women of every race, creed, and
color who trace their ancestry to every region on Earth, yet are bound
together by a common commitment to freedom and a common pride in being
Americans.
That image of unity amidst diversity must confound the minds of the
hate-filled cowards who killed our sailors. They can take innocent life.
They can cause tears and anguish, but they can never heal or build
harmony or bring people together. That is work only free, law-abiding
people can do.
And that is why we will do whatever it takes, for as long as it
takes, to find those who killed our sailors and hold them accountable,
and why we will never let the enemies of freedom and peace stop America
from seeking peace, fighting terrorism, and promoting freedom. For only
by defending our people, our interests, and our values will we redeem
the lives of our sailors and ruin the schemes of their killers.

October 18, 2000 Remarks at the Memorial Service for the U.S.S. Cole in Norfolk,
Virginia

"... The idea of common humanity and unity amidst diversity, so purely
embodied by those we mourn today, must surely confound the minds of the
hate-filled terrorists who killed them. They envy our strength without
understanding the values that give us strength. For for them, it is
their way or no way; their interpretation, twisted though it may be, of
a beautiful religious tradition; their political views, their racial and ethnic views; their way
or no
way.
Such people can take innocent life. They have caused your tears and
anguish, but they can never heal or build harmony or bring people

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together. That is work only free, law-abiding people can do. People like
the sailors of the U.S.S. Cole.
To those who attacked them, we say: You will not find a safe harbor.
We will find you, and justice will prevail. America will not stop
standing guard for peace or freedom or stability in the Middle East and
around the world.

November 11, 2000 Remarks at a Veterans Day Ceremony in


Arlington, Virginia

"... Three such heroes were interred here just in the past few weeks.
They were members of the United States Ship Cole, working to preserve
peace and stability in a region vital to our interests, their lives
taken on October 12th by a brutal act of terrorism. They are: Hull
Maintenance Technician Second Class Kenneth Clodfelter, Electronics
Technician Chief Petty Officer Richard Costelow, and Signalman Seaman
Cheron Gunn.
Let us say to their families and to all the families who lost their
loved ones on the Cole, we are grateful for the quiet, heroic service of
your loved ones. Now they are in God's care. We mourn their loss, and we
shall not rest until those who carried out this cruel act are held to
account.
We all saw the TV images of the Cole and the massive hole in its
side right at the water line. But what many Americans still don't know
about is the heroism that took place after the attack. What we couldn't
see was that entire compartments were flooded, hatches blown open,
doorways bent, parts of the top deck buckled. So, in addition to finding
and bringing home the dead and the wounded, the surviving crew had to
save their ship.

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November 14, 2000 Interview With Terence Hunt and Walter M. Mears of the
Associated Press

"... What is my greatest regret? I may not be able to say yet. I really
wanted, with all my heart, to finish the Oslo peace process, because I
believe that if Israel and the Palestinians could be reconciled, first
the State of Israel would be secure, which is very important to me,
personally, and I think to the American people; secondly, the
Palestinians would be in control of their own destiny; third, a peace
with Syria would follow shortly; and fourth, the Middle East would not
only be stable, which is good for America's interests, and not just
because of the oil but the forces of progress and prosperity—progress
and reconciliation, excuse me--would be stronger in all countries,
including Iran. And I felt that I really think this is a sort of
linchpin which could lead to a wave of positive developments all across
the region. And I think that's very important.
Most of the people in the Middle East are young; there are all these
kids out there. What are they going to-are they going to be raised to
believe their faith requires them to hate the Israelis and the Americans
and anybody else that's not part of their faith and politics? Are they going to be
perpetually poor, even if they have a fairly decent education? Are we going to see that
whole region being
integrated into a global system and these children having a whole
different future, in which they're reconciled with their neighbors in
Israel and deeply involved in the world in a positive way? Are they
going to be using the Internet to talk to terrorist cells about chemical
and biological weapons, or are they going to be using the Internet to
figure out how to grow new businesses and have new opportunities and
build new futures for their families and their children? So if it
doesn't happen I'll be profoundly disappointed, but I'll never regret a
minute I spent on it because I think it's very important for the future.
I have never bought the thesis-on an inevitable collision course
with the Islamic societies, or that the 21st century had to be dominated

321
by terrorists with highly sophisticated weapons, fueled by broad popular
resentment from people who are both disenfranchised and poor. I don't
think it has to be that way, and I think if we could really make a big
dent in this problem, it would give confidence to the forces of reason
and progress throughout the region.

December 8, 2000 Remarks at the University of Nebraska at Kearney, Nebraska

"... give me a few minutes to make the case in the heartland about why there is no
longer a clear, bright line dividing America's domestic concerns and America's foreign
policy concerns and why every American who wants to be a good citizen, who wants to
vote in every election, should know more about the rest of the world and have a clearer
idea about what we're supposed to be doing out there and how it affects how you live in
Kearney. Because I think it is profoundly important.

the same technological breakthroughs that put that computer in the palm of my hand
could end up making it possible to create smaller and smaller chemical or biological or
nuclear weapons in the hands of terrorists. And all the things we're learning about
computers will be learned by people who, because they belong to organized crime units
or narcotraffickers or terrorists, would like to pierce our secure networks
and get information or spread viruses that wreck our most vital systems.
So I'm a wild-eyed optimist. But I've lived long enough to know that
things can happen that are not necessarily what you want, and that every
opportunity brings with it new responsibilities because the organized
forces of destruction can take advantage of them, all these
opportunities, too.

I think it's been good for America and for people around the world. And as I leave

322
office, I think America should continue to build a foreign policy for the global age based
on five broad principles, which I would like to briefly state and explain.

The fourth point I would like to make to you is that this growing
openness of borders and technology is changing our national security
priorities. People, information, ideas, and goods move around more
freely and faster than ever before. That makes us more vulnerable first
to the organized forces of destruction, narcotraffickers, terrorists,
organized criminals—they are going to work more and more together, with
growing access to more and more sophisticated technology.

Part of the challenge is just to get rid of as many weapons of mass


destruction as possible. That's why we got the states of the former
Soviet Union outside Russia to give up their nuclear arsenals, and we
negotiated a worldwide treaty to ban chemical weapons. That's why we
forced Iraq to sell its oil for money that can go to food and medicine,
but not to rebuilding its weapons. And I think the other countries of
the world that are willing to let them spend that money rebuilding their
weapons systems are wrong. And I hope that we can strengthen the resolve
of the world not to let Saddam Hussein rebuild the chemical weapons
network and other weapons systems that are bad.
It's why we negotiated a freeze on plutonium production with North
Korea. Now, dealing with terrorists is harder, as we have seen in the
tragedy of the U.S.S. Cole, Why? Because terrorists, unlike countries,
cannot be contained as easily, and it's harder to deter them through
threats of retaliation. They operate across borders, so we have got to
strengthen our cooperation across borders. We have succeeded in
preventing a lot of terrorist attacks. There were many planned during
the millennium celebration that we prevented.
We have arrested a lot of terrorists, including those who bombed the
World Trade Center and those who were involved in several other killings

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in this country. And make no mistake about it: We will do the same for
those who killed our brave Navy personnel on the U.S.S. Cole.
But the most important thing is to prevent bad things from
happening. And one of the biggest threats to the future is going to be
cyberterrorism-people fooling with your computer networks, trying to
shut down your phones, erase bank records, mess up airline schedules, do
things to interrupt the fabric of life.
Now, we have the first national strategy to protect America's
computer systems and critical infrastructure against that kind of
sabotage. It includes, interestingly enough, a scholarship-for-service
program to help students who are studying information security and
technology, pay for their education if they will give us a couple of
years' service in the Government. It's really hard to get talented
people in the Government, because we can't pay them enough. You've got
27-year-old young people worth $200 or $300 million if they start the
right kind of dot-corn company. It's pretty hard to say, "Come be a GS-
13," you know? [Laughter]
But if we can educate enough people, we can at least get them in
their early years, and that's important. We funded this program for the
very first time this year, thanks to bipartisan support. And let me say,
I'd also like to congratulate the University of Nebraska-some of you
perhaps know this, but Nebraska has set up a new information assurance
center which is dedicated to the same exact goal. We need more
universities to follow your lead. This is going to be a big deal in the
future, a big deal.

December 14, 2000 Remarks at the University of Warwick in Coventry, United


Kingdom

"... I might say, parenthetically, I believe there are national security


and common security aspects to the whole globalization challenge that I
really don't have time to go into today, so I'll just steer off the text

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and say what I think briefly, which is that as we open borders and we
increase the freedom of movement of people, information, and ideas, this
open society becomes more vulnerable to cross-national, multinational,
organized forces of destruction: terrorists; weapons of mass
destruction; the marriage of technology in these weapons, small-scale
chemical and biological and maybe even nuclear weapons; narcotraffickers
and organized criminals; and increasingly, all these people sort of
working together in lines that are quite blurred.

We have seen how abject poverty accelerates turmoil and conflict,


how it creates recruits for terrorists and those who incite ethnic and
religious hatred, how it fuels a violent rejection of the open economic
and social order upon which our future depends. Global poverty is a
powder keg, ignitable by our indifference.

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2001

January 11, 2001 Interview With Mark Knoller of CBS Radio in Dover, New Hampshire

"... But there's a way to continue to work the missile defense issue, and
then there would be a way to put it at the service of all countries, the
technology, which is what President Reagan used to talk about when he
was talking about the Star Wars in the sky and all of that.
Philosophically, he had an idea of making it available to all countries
so that no one would be any more at risk, including from us.
But that technology is not out there now. We're talking about
technology to stop the accidental launch or a terrorist or a country
with two or three missiles that could lob them at you. Two or three
missiles could do a world of damage on the United States or someone
else. So I just think-l think that I left it with a maximum number of
options for the next administration.

January 18, 2001 Farewell Address to the Nation

"... The global economy is giving more of our own people and billions
around the world the chance to work and live and raise their families
with dignity. But the forces of integration that have created these good
opportunities also make us more subject to global forces of destruction,
to terrorism, organized crime and narcotrafficking, the spread of deadly
weapons and disease, the degradation of the global environment.

...I'll leave the Presidency more idealistic, more full of hope than the day I arrived, and
more confident than ever that America's best days lie ahead ... Thank you. God bless
you, and God bless America.

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