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Weather

Patrick Doumit
Second grade, Annunciation
High 92 Low 63
Sunny
Full forecast on
page 2A.
Five Questions
1 The Crosby-Sinatra-Kelly flm High
Society was a musical remake of what
classic flm?
2 What U.S. president broke the
Twenty-Year Curse?
3 Who replaced the U.S. Postal
Service as sponsor of its champion
cycling team in 2004?
4 What landlocked nation still has a
naval ensign despite having lost its
access to the sea in 1884s War of
the Pacifc?
5 Whose sayings may have been
collected in the hypothetical Q Doc-
ument?
Answers, 8B
inside
Classifeds 7B
Comics 6B
Obituaries 5A
Opinions 4A
LocaL FoLks
Doris Hardy owns Century 21
Doris Hardy and Associates in
Columbus.
caLendar
Today
MUW gallery reception: The
public is invited to a free recep-
tion from 5:30-7 p.m. for Share
the Wealth: a Print Exchange
Exhibition at the Eugenia Sum-
mer Gallery in the Mississippi
University for Women Art and
Design Building on campus. For
more information, call 662-329-
7341.
Lyceum jazz: Mississippi
States Lyceum Series season
opens with jazz recording artist
Gretchen Parlato at 7:30 p.m.
in Lee Halls Bettersworth
Auditorium on campus. Tickets
are $15 general admission. For
tickets or more information, visit
lyceum.msstate.edu or contact
the Center for Student Activities,
662-325-2930.
Saturday, Sept. 21
Garden tours and open
house: The MSU Extension
Service presents free garden
tours and an open house from
9-11 a.m. near the A.B. McKay
Food Research and Enology Lab
on the North Farm Campus. See
ongoing seminars and demos on
native plants, roses, trees and
more. For information, contact
Dr. Geoffrey Denny, 662-325-
1682.
DISPATCH CUSTOMER SERVICE 328-2424 | NEWSROOM 328-2471
EstablishEd 1879 | Columbus, mississippi
CdispatCh.Com
F
R
E
E
!
thursday | sEptEmbEr 19, 2013
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
President of Yoko-
hama Mississippi,
Tadaharu Yamamo-
to, Alan Easome,
senior director of
operations for Yo-
kohama Tire Cor-
poration and John
Davis of Cadence
Bank, exit the East
Mississippi Com-
munity College
stage after ad-
dressing a crowd
of over 200 at the
Golden Triangle
LINK Quarterly
Luncheon Wednes-
day afternoon.
Autopsy: MSU
student was
thrown from,
run over by
truck
Emboldened House GOP presses fght on Obamacare
By DONNA CASSATA
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON Emboldened con-
servatives who forced House Republican
leaders to push a stopgap spending bill
that unravels President Barack Obamas
health care law are digging in for a long
fght, determined to stop Obamacare
before the frst individual signs up in less
than two weeks.
Just ask the two lawmakers one a
frst-term businessman from North Car-
olina, the other a self-described North
Georgia country boy elected just months
after Obama signed the law who
spurred the rank and fle to pressure the
leadership on the tea partys signature is-
sue.
Our resolve on this
is unrelenting, said Rep.
Mark Meadows, whose let-
ter in July to House Speak-
er John Boehner, R-Ohio,
and Majority Leader Eric
Cantor, R-Va., called for col-
laboration to defund one
of the largest grievances in our time and
attracted 79 Republicans.
Lobbied hard by outside conservative
A big day for Clay County
By NATHAN GREGORy
ngregory@cdispatch.com
As Yokohama offcials pre-
pare to break ground on a Clay
County tire manufacturing
plant next Monday, behind-
the-scenes work has been
taking place to get the project
started on the right foot, Gold-
en Triangle Development Link
and West Point offcials said.
During the Links quarter-
ly luncheon Wednesday, Yo-
kohama Mississippi President
Tadaharu Yamamoto was on
hand to introduce himself to
guests as Link CEO Joe Max
Higgins explained the prog-
ress made on and off the proj-
ect site.
Construction of the park-
ing lot that will serve as a trail-
er city to put the contractors in
is nearly done, Higgins said.
This is the calm before the
storm. Just because you dont
More than 140 republicans signed on to the bill to keep
the government running and delay the health care law
See OBAMACARE, 6A
Yokohama groundbreaking set for Monday
See YOKOHAMA, 6A
Meadows
Classical Week 2013
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
Blake Stacy, Zachary Cuny and Nicholas Dinep-Scheider carry Collin Smith during rehearsal for The Brothers Menaechmus
behind Griffs Hall on the campus of Mississippi State Tuesday night. The production is part of the Shackouls Honors College
Classical Week 2013, a celebration of Greek, Roman and other cultures of the ancient world. Performances begin next Thurs-
day September 26 at 5:00 p.m. in the Zacharias Village Courtyard on campus.
By CARL SMITH
csmith@cdispatch.com
Oktibbeha County consol-
idation efforts could yield a
long-discussed partnership
with Mississippi State Uni-
versity to establish a demon-
stration school, or at least a
more-rigorous partnership,
which will help the university
engage in rural renewal efforts
on an education-
al level.
David Shaw,
MSUs vice presi-
dent for research
and economic de-
velopment, told
fellow consolida-
tion committee
members Wednesday that the
university is interested in a
partnership which could allow
its students to take teaching
theorem out of the classroom
and into a real-world setting:
Oktibbeha Countys own
schools.
We have an opportunity to
look nationally and identify the
best teaching practices, and
then demonstrate them in a
live setting, he said. Theres
defnitely a gap between the-
ory and practice. We can set
up classrooms as observation
rooms where our students can
see (teaching) frst hand, un-
derstand how things could be
done better and have a visual
idea of the theory theyve been
learning about.
There are a number of uni-
versities that have focused a
lot of attention on urban renew-
al from an educational stand-
MSU may be partner in consolidated school district
By CARL SMITH
csmith@cdispatch.com
Eighteen-year- old
Mississippi State Uni-
versity freshman Ka-
leb Dwayne Barker, of
Lucedale, was killed
as a result of multiple
blunt crush injuries
Tuesday after he was
thrown from the bed
of a pickup truck and
then struck by the vehicle, according
to the Starkville Police Department.
Investigators, including the state
chief medical examiner, ended their
investigation Wednesday after an au-
topsy was completed in Jackson.
SPD confrmed the fve occupants
in the 2003 Chevrolet Silverado were
all acquaintances. The SPD press re-
lease said Barker was fatally injured
about 2 a.m. Tuesday after the truck,
while backing up on the McDonalds
(Miss. Highway 12 and Spring Street
location) parking lot, hit a curb and
threw him from its bed. Barker was
then subsequently run over by the
truck as it continued in motion,
jumping the curb and coming to rest
in the lower level parking lot of Cold
Stone Creamery, according to the re-
lease.
Oktibbeha County Coroner Mi-
chael Hunt said Tuesday Barker died
about fve hours later as he was being
airlifted to University Medical Cen-
ter in Jackson.
Three of the trucks occupants
were sitting inside of the vehicle at
the time of the accident. Another,
Halli Camille Reasons, of Dyersburg,
shaw: consolidation could prove a
golden opportunity for implementing
teaching theorem
Shaw
See CONSOLIDATION, 6A
Steede
See AUTOPSY, 6A
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com 2A Thursday, sepTember 19, 2013
DiD you hear?
CONTACTING THE DISPATCH
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Five-Day forecast for the Golden Triangle
Almanac Data National Weather
Lake Levels
River Stages
Sun and Moon Solunar table
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, i-ice, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow
Yesterday 7 a.m. 24-hr.
Lake Capacity yest. change
The solunar
period schedule
allows planning days
so you will be fshing
in good territory or
hunting in good cover
during those times.
Temperature
Precipitation
Tombigbee
Yesterday Flood 7 a.m. 24-hr.
River stage yest. change
Columbus Wednesday
High/low ..................................... 87/69
Normal high/low ......................... 86/62
Record high .......................... 101 (1953)
Record low .............................. 45 (1981)
Wednesday ...................................... 0.00"
Month to date ................................. 0.01"
Normal month to date ...................... 2.14"
Year to date .................................. 45.42"
Normal year to date ....................... 40.01"
Friday Saturday
Atlanta 84 68 s 78 65 t
Boston 77 59 s 75 64 pc
Chicago 77 54 t 69 51 s
Dallas 84 70 t 87 62 pc
Honolulu 89 75 s 88 74 s
Jacksonville 84 67 s 85 72 pc
Memphis 84 69 t 81 62 c
87
70
Friday
Periods of clouds
and sunshine
79
60
Saturday
Heavy rain and a
thunderstorm
79
57
Sunday
Some sun, a t-storm
possible
81
60
Monday
Bright sunshine and
pleasant
Aberdeen Dam 188' 163.56' +0.13'
Stennis Dam 166' 136.64' +0.13'
Bevill Dam 136' 136.29' +0.06'
Amory 20' 11.26' -0.14'
Bigbee 14' 3.62' +0.01'
Columbus 15' 4.66' -0.02'
Fulton 20' 7.27' +0.03'
Tupelo 21' 0.00' none
First
Oct. 11
New
Oct. 4
Last
Sep. 26
Full
Sep. 19
Sunrise ..... 6:40 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:55 p.m.
Moonrise ... 6:56 p.m.
Moonset .... 6:46 a.m.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
Major ... 12:47 a.m.
Minor ..... 7:00 a.m.
Major ..... 1:13 p.m.
Minor ..... 7:25 p.m.
Major ..... 1:41 a.m.
Minor ..... 7:53 a.m.
Major ..... 2:06 p.m.
Minor ..... 8:18 p.m.
Friday Thursday
Friday Saturday
Nashville 86 67 pc 79 60 t
Orlando 88 70 pc 89 73 pc
Philadelphia 80 63 pc 79 64 pc
Phoenix 103 79 s 101 79 s
Raleigh 84 64 s 84 65 t
Salt Lake City 77 59 s 86 58 s
Seattle 72 55 r 65 53 sh
Tonight
Partly cloudy
64
A ThousAnd Words
AP Photo/File
In this Sept. 10, 1973, fle photo, Muhammad Ali, right, winces as Ken Norton hits him with a left to the head
during their re-match at the Forum in Inglewood, Calif. Norton, a former heavyweight champion, has died, his
son said, on Wednesday. He was 70.
Thursday
Say What?
Deontae Skinner is the heart and soul
of what we do here at Mississippi State.
Mississippi State defensive coordinator
Geoff Collins. Story, 1B.
First lady urges marketing
of healthy food to kids
By DARLENE SUPERVILLE
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON Mi-
chelle Obama used the
power of her bully pulpit
Wednesday to push food
companies and television
broadcasters to do more
to promote healthier foods
to children and to do it
faster.
Research shows food
marketing is a leading
cause of childhood obe-
sity because the ads and
promotions lead impres-
sionable kids to then pes-
ter their parents to eat what
they saw on TV, consumer
advocates say.
The frst lady cited
a cultural shift taking
place in Americas eating
habits, and highlighted as
examples salad bars that
are now in many school
lunchrooms and kids
restaurant menus that of-
fer such items as broccoli
and whole-wheat pasta.
But while she said there
has been progress, includ-
ing slight reductions in
childhood obesity rates in
a few states and cities, Mrs.
Obama noted that we
clearly have much more
work to do when 1 in 3
kids in the U.S. is on track
to develop diabetes.
Im here today with
one simple request and
that is to do even more
and move even faster to
market responsibly to our
kids, the frst lady said as
she opened the frst White
House summit on the is-
sue.
AP Photo/ Evan Vucci
First lady Michelle Obama pauses during an event about
food marketing to children in the State Dining Room of
the White House in Washington on Wednesday.
By TIM DAHLBERG
AP Boxing Writer
LAS VEGAS He was the sec-
ond man to beat Muhammad Ali,
breaking Alis jaw and sending him
to the hospital in their 1973 heavy-
weight fght.
Ken Norton frustrated Ali three
times in all, including their fnal
bout at Yankee Stadium where he
was sure he had beaten him once
again.
Norton, who died Wednesday at
the age of 70, lost that fght for the
heavyweight title. But he was for-
ever linked to Ali for the 39 rounds
they fought over three fghts, with
very little separating one man from
the other in the ring.
Kenny was a good, good fght-
er. He beat a lot of guys, said Ed
Schuyler Jr., who covered many of
Nortons fghts for The Associated
Press. He gave Ali fts because Ali
let him fght coming forward in-
stead of making him back up.
Norton is the only heavyweight
champion never to win the title in
the ring, and boxing fans still talk
about the bruising battle he waged
with Larry Holmes for the title in
1978. But it was his frst fght with
Ali that made the former Marine a
big name and the two fghts that fol-
lowed that were his real legacy.
Few gave Norton, who pos-
sessed a muscular, sculpted body,
much of a chance against Ali in their
frst meeting, held at the Sports
Arena in San Diego, where Norton
lived. But his awkward style and
close-in pressing tactics confused
Ali, who fought in pain after his jaw
was broken.
Former heavyweight champion Norton dies
ex-Marine was 70
THE ASSocIATED PRESS
TOKYO Former
Nintendo President Hi-
roshi Yamauchi, who led
the companys transition
from maker of traditional
playing cards to global vid-
eo giant behind the Super
Mario and Pokemon video
games, has died. He was
85.
Kyoto-based Ninten-
do said Yamauchi, who
owned the Seattle Mari-
ners major league base-
ball club before selling it
to Nintendos U.S. unit in
2004, died Thursday of
pneumonia at a hospital in
central Japan.
Yamauchi was compa-
ny president from 1949
to 2002 and engineered
Nintendos global growth,
including developing the
early Family Computer
consoles and Game Boy
portables.
Nintendo was founded
in 1889 and made tradi-
tional playing cards be-
fore venturing into video
games.
Yamauchi is survived
by Katsuhito Yamauchi,
his eldest son. The compa-
ny declined to release oth-
er family details. Funeral
services are scheduled for
Sunday at Nintendo.
Former Nintendo president Yamauchi dies
yamauchi led companys change
from playing cards to video games
THE ASSocIATED PRESS
ALBANY, N.Y. For-
mer NFL offensive line-
man Brian Holloway ini-
tially thought the Twitter
photos showing young
people partying at his
familys second home in
upstate New York were
a hoax. Then he saw pic-
tures of teenagers stand-
ing on the dining room
table he bought with his
Super Bowl bonus.
Holloways rural va-
cation home was trashed
during a Labor Day week-
end party attended by
up to 400 teenagers. Hol-
loway said the partiers
caused at least $20,000
in damage, breaking win-
dows and doors, punching
holes in walls and spray-
ing graffti. He saw the
whole thing unfold live on
Twitter and now hes
using the teens own posts
to reveal
their identi-
ties and to
try to set
them on a
better path.
H o l l o -
way, who
p l a y e d
of f ensi ve
tackle for the New En-
gland Patriots and Los An-
geles Raiders in the 1980s,
said his 19-year-old son, a
University of Southern
Florida sophomore, alert-
ed him to the party after
receiving tweets about it
the night of Aug. 31.
Holloway was at his
home in Lutz, Fla., at
the time and watched as
more tweets about the
party were posted, many
of them accompanied by
photos of young people
drinking throughout his
home in Stephentown, on
the Massachusetts border
25 miles southeast of Al-
bany.
We were getting eye-
witness reports of what
was happening while
it was happening. We
couldnt believe what
was going down, Hollo-
way told The Associated
Press.
Before he could call po-
lice, more tweets reported
that offcers had arrived,
Holloway said. The par-
tygoers scattered across
his 200-acre property,
which includes the main
house and a guest house
set amid rolling country-
side in the foothills of the
Berkshire Mountains.
Ex-NFL players NY home trashed by teens
revelers cause $20K in damage
Holloway
By JONATHAN FAHEy
AP Energy Writer
NEW YORK The fu-
ture of coal is getting dark-
er.
Economic forces, pol-
lution concerns and com-
petition from cleaner fuels
are slowly nudging nations
around the globe away from
the fuel that made the in-
dustrial revolution possible.
The U.S. will burn 943
million tons of coal this
year, only about as much
as it did in 1993. Now its on
the verge of adopting pollu-
tion rules that may all but
prohibit the construction of
new coal plants. And China,
which burns 4 billion tons
of coal a year as much as
the rest of the world com-
bined is taking steps to
slow the staggering growth
of its coal consumption and
may even be approaching a
peak.
Michael Parker, a com-
modities analyst at Bern-
stein Research, calls the
shift in China the begin-
ning of the end of coal.
While global coal use is al-
most certain to grow over
the next few years and
remain an important fuel
for decades after that
coal may soon begin a long
slow decline.
Coal has been the dom-
inant fuel for power gen-
eration for a century be-
cause it is cheap, plentiful,
and easy to ship and store.
But it emits a host of pollu-
tion-forming gases and soot
particles, and double the
greenhouse gas emissions
of its closest fossil fuel com-
petitor, natural gas. Now
utilities are relying more on
natural gas to generate elec-
tricity as discoveries around
the world boost the fuels
supplies. The big, expand-
ing economies of China
and India are building more
nuclear and hydro-electric
power plants. Renewable
energy sources such as
wind and solar, while still a
small fraction of the global
energy mix, are growing
fast as they get cheaper.
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Go to www.cdispatch.com/subscribe
MSU SPORTS BLOG
Visit The Dispatch MSU Sports Blog for breaking
Bulldog news: www.cdispatch.com/msusports
@
Thursday, sepTember 19, 2013 3A
The Pines & Cady Hill
Recovery Center
1011 Main Street Columbus
FREE
$
150 value
Assessments
Wednesdays in September!
Call 327-7916 for an appointment.
Freezer Pleaser Raf f le
Win a freezer donated by Wesley Platt with Financial
Works. Food donated by local restaurants and sta.
Ra e Tickets $2.50, available for purchase at
e Pines & Cady Hill. Drawing Saturday 9/28 at 5:30pm.
Recovery Month
block Party
Saturday, Sept. 28 4-6pm
Join us as we celebrate individuals who are living sober lives.
Free Food & Free Fun Includes:
Face Painting Dunking Booth Corn Hole Toss
Volleyball Live Music Sidewalk Chalk More


T
h
e

D
is
p
a
t
c
h
St. Pauls
Episcopal Church
318 College Street Columbus
St. Pauls Episcopal Church
The Rev. Anne Harris
328-6673 www.stpaulscolumbus.com
Holy Communion
8:00 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.
on Sunday
(Childcare Provided)
Lowndes County
Marriages
Cody Alan Lollar and Victo-
ria Lynne Petty
Rober t Dahlem Brown and
Brittani Taylor
Chase Daniel Gilliland and
Holly Natalie Robinson
Divorces
Michael C. Durkin and
Ruby Durkin
Sammie L. Buckhalter and
Glenda Foote Buckhalter
Jon Mark Caldwell and
Stella Ashley OBrian Cald-
well
Willie Richardson and Tele-
na Richardson
Tyler Bengford and Jas-
mine Lobato
Shawn Shaw and Bridget
Shaw
Stevie Alton Scott Jr. and
Cour tney Anne Scott
Joshua A. Woodard and
Erica Davis Woodard
MaRRIaGES aNd dIvORCES
The following arrests
were reported by the
Lowndes County Sher-
iffs Department and the
Columbus Police Depart-
ment:
Stefanie Kaye Ash-
ton, 29, of 187 Jones Drive,
was arrested at Recovery
House by MDOC Sept. 16
and charged with violation
of probation.
Brandon Terrell Car-
ter, 26, of 2608 Boyd Road,
was arrested on Highway
373 near Noblin Road
by LCSO Sept. 13 and
charged with felony DUI-
third offense and driving
on the wrong side of he
road. He was released the
same day on $5,150 bond.
His court date is sched-
uled for Oct. 8.
John Balab Fleming,
25, of 610 22nd St. N., Apt.
K, was arrested by CPD
Sept. 17 and charged with
three counts of selling co-
caine, selling marijuana
and selling a controlled
substance. He was re-
leased the same day on
$10,000 bond. His court
date is scheduled for Nov.
21.
Douglas Fitzgerald
Gunter, 49, of 901 11th St.
S., Apt. I-4, was arrested by
CPD Sept. 17 and charged
with selling cocaine. He
was released the same
day on a $5,000 bond. His
court date is scheduled for
Nov. 21.
Michael Montez Har-
ris, 34, of 1314 7th Ave. N.,
was arrested at his resi-
dence by CPD Sept. 17 and
charged with two counts
of selling cocaine. Bond
has been set at $7,500. His
court date is scheduled for
Nov. 21.
Derek Lamar John-
son, 27, of 617 16th St. N.,
was arrested in Tuscaloo-
sa, Ala., by MDOC Sept.
16 and charged with viola-
tion of probation.
Clay Kimbra Madi-
son, 48, of 1055 Main St.,
Lot 2 in Caledonia was ar-
rested on Highway 45 by
MHP Sept. 15 and charged
with violation of probation.
Marco Sanchez Rice,
35, of 813 13th St. N., Apt.
E-3, was arrested at 813
8th Ave. N., by LCSO Sept.
13 and charged with two
counts of selling cocaine.
He was released the same
day on a $20,000 bond. His
court date is scheduled for
Nov. 12.
Freddie Edward Rob-
inson, 23, of 1010 2nd St.
S., was arrested in St. Lou-
is by MDOC Sept. 13 and
charged with violation of
probation.
Derrick Ross Wil-
liams, 40, of 912 Oswalt
Road, was arrested at 2300
Main St., by CPD Sept.
14 and charged with driv-
ing under the infuence,
disorderly conduct and
violation of probation. His
court date is scheduled for
Oct. 2.
Johnson Harris Gunter Fleming Carter Ashton
Williams Robinson Rice Madison
By EMILy WAGSTER PETTUS
The Associated Press
JACKSON The Mississippi
Department of Public Safety is
seeking 45 percent more mon-
ey from the state general fund
for the coming year, a far-larger
increase than any other agency
has requested during this weeks
state budget hearings.
Thats just not realistic to
me, Sen. Terry Brown told Pub-
lic Safety Commissioner Albert
Santa Cruz during a contentious
hearing Wednesday.
I understand that youve got
needs, Brown said. Everyone
that comes before us has got
needs.
State revenue has grown 5 per-
cent for each of the past two years,
and leaders expect similar growth
in fscal year 2015, which starts
next July 1. Two other agencies
have requested increases of more
than 20 percent. Several have re-
quested increases of 5 percent or
less, and some are asking for de-
creases in their budgets.
Santa Cruz gave the 14-mem-
ber Joint Legislative Budget Com-
mittee few documents to support
his budget presentation, although
DPS provided documents later to
lawmakers and reporters.
During the hearing, when
Brown asked Santa Cruz to justify
the big increase, the commission-
er looked to other DPS adminis-
trators who shuffed through pa-
pers. After a long pause, Brown,
R-Columbus, cut him off: I with-
draw the ques-
tion.
Santa Cruz said
DPS wants to train
more state troop-
ers. Information
provided after the
meeting showed
DPS is requesting
$7.7 million for
trooper training, about $4 million
more for the state Crime Lab,
more than $2 million more for
the Bureau of Narcotics and an
additional $1.7 million for the Law
Enforcement Offcers Training
Academy, among other increases.
The total requested increase
for DPS is $32 million from the
general fund. The agency is
getting roughly $71 million in
the current budget year and is
requesting nearly $103 million
for fscal 2015. The state-funded
portion of Mississippis overall
budget, for everything from pris-
ons to schools to public safety, is
expected to be more than $5.8
billion.
In an email to The Associated
Press, DPS Deputy Administrator
Kenneth E. Magee said 82 of the
509 state troopers are eligible to
retire now. As of Dec. 1 this num-
ber increases to 102, he said.
He also said $2.9 million would
go to a three-year modernization
of a 20-year-old drivers license is-
suance system and database.
Magee said that for fscal year
2013, which ended this past June
30, DPS received $5.1 million less
than it needed to pay for salaries.
Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves scolded
Santa Cruz for authorizing re-
alignment of some DPS salaries,
an administrative way of moving
money within a budget to give
employees bigger paychecks.
That was not a pay raise, Santa
Cruz responded. Reeves said it
was a pay raise that legislators
didnt authorize as a specifc bud-
get category.
Reeves, a Republican, said
DPS hasnt been spending money
where it should like, for exam-
ple, buying new cars for troopers
who are patrolling the highways
in old, high-mileage vehicles.
Santa Cruz told the Budget Com-
mittee that DPS bought 15 new
vehicles for one of its divisions,
the Mississippi Bureau of Inves-
tigation.
Reeves replied: When you
make purchases of vehicles and
they dont go to people on the
road, I wonder about your prior-
ities.
House Speaker Philip Gunn,
R-Clinton, said he couldnt ex-
plain why DPS didnt provide de-
tailed information to the Budget
Committee during the hearing:
It makes it hard for us to go to
bat for them when we dont have
that basic information.
Miss. lawmakers skeptical of DPS budget request
department of Public Safety seeking 45
percent more money for coming year
Brown
aREa aRRESTS
Coals future darkens around the world
AP Photo/File
In this Wednesday, July 31, 2013, fle photo, a worker levels the coal on a freight train in Taiyuan in northern
Chinas Shanxi province.
China, which burns as much coal as
the rest of the world combined, is
taking steps to slow consumption
4A Thursday, sepTember 19, 2013
Opinion
BIRNEY IMES SR. Editor/Publisher 1922-1947
BIRNEY IMES JR. Editor/Publisher 1947-2003
BIRNEY IMES III Editor/Publisher
PETER IMES General Manager
SLIM SMITH Managing Editor
BETH PROFFITT Advertising Director
MICHAEL FLOYD Circulation/Production Manager
DISPATCH
THE
ReadeRs comment
slimantics
Early this year,
when the qualify-
ing period began
for the mayor and
council races be-
gan, I found it odd
that more people
didnt choose to
run. As you will
recall, two council
positions were
uncontested and
only one council
race had as many as
three candidates. In
the mayors race, two challeng-
ers faced incumbent Robert
Smith.
Given the general down-
ward trajectory of the city,
you might have thought more
people would be inspired to
jump into the fray. Hardly.
Marty Turner turned out
to be the only new face on
the council and Smith easily
retained his throne.
Now that the elections are
a few months in our rear-view
mirror and weve had the
opportunity to see the mar-
ginally-new city government
in action, I believe the lack of
candidates can be attributed to
poor marketing.
I am convinced that some
would-be candidates might
have been prompt-
ed to seek offce
if only they have
been made aware of
some of the bene-
fts they may have
failed to notice.
Join the Coun-
cil. See the World!
would have been an
excellent marketing
slogan, I think.
Its been a busy
summer for the
council and city
offcials, what with all that
packing and unpacking and
getting on planes, etc.
This month, councilmen
Kabir Karriem, Joseph Mick-
ens and Turner will head
to Washington, D.C. for a
Congressional Black Caucus
legislative conference. Last
month, the same three council-
men, along with Gene Taylor
and Charlie Box and six other
city offcials spent three days
of intense, exhaustive study of
ways to develop the Tenn-Tom
Waterway in the grim confnes
of the Grand Hotel Marriott
Resort, Golf Club and Spa,
located on the spartan beaches
of Point Clear, Ala.
Since their return, its all
they seem to want to talk
about ways to develop the
Tenn-Tom. Day and night, its
we can do this on the Tenn-
Tom and according to the
extensive notes I took at the
conference, we should do this.
Such is their zeal, that citizens
are often compelled to cross
the street when they see a city
offcial approaching for fear
that they will be button-holed
for a long soliloquy about plans
for the Tenn-Tom Waterway.
Now, it appears Taylor is
headed for Seattle for a Nation-
al League of Cities conference.
I would not be at all sur-
prised if Taylor doesnt come
back with plans to build a
Space Needle right here in
Columbus, probably as part
of that Tenn-Tom Waterway
development.
Then Taylor, Smith and
Mickens are off to Tunica,
which is rumored to have a ca-
sino and nice restaurants, for a
Municipal League Conference.
I see a foating casino in our
future, dont you?
All of this traveling comes
at a time when the city is
already more than $5,600
over budget for administrative
travel.
It also comes shortly after
the city put the fnishing touch-
es on its budget for next year.
The council cut funding for
most departments, although
it did somehow manage a
healthy increase for adminis-
tration, because, you know, all
that travelin aint cheap.
Of all the departments, the
citys fre department took
the biggest hit, losing about
$580,000. On the bright side,
theres a pretty good chance
the mayor and councilmen will
be safely out of town in the
event of a fre.
Travel is also very much
on the minds of the folks who
run Lowndes County. And by
folks who run Lowndes Coun-
ty, I mean, of course, board of
supervisors president Harry
Sanders and supervisor Leroy
Brooks.
This week, Sanders got a
ruling from the state attor-
ney generals offce over a
controversy that began when
Brooks turned in his expenses
for a trip to Biloxi for a June
conference. Brooks arrived at
the conference a day early, but
turned in that days expenses
for reimbursement and was
paid for it. Later, Sanders
insisted that Brooks repay that
portion, which amounted to
$199. Brooks refused. In fact,
he said he would rather duke it
out in court than cough up the
two Benjamin.
So that was the end of it,
right?
Are you nuts? It would be
easier to convince a wolf to let
go of a pork chop that it would
be for Sanders to let go of this.
So off to the AGs offce
Sanders went, returning with a
ruling that says the county can
withhold Brooks pay check
until he coughs up that $199.
After initially saying he
would get his own AG opinion,
Brooks fnally relented and
paid the $199 this morning,
which is really a shame, in one
sense.
I dont know how they han-
dle pay-day for supervisors.
Here, I walk around the offce
every other Friday and hand
checks to my employees.
If thats the way they do it
with the supervisors, I would
have paid good money to watch
Sanders dole out the checks as
Brooks held frm in his refusal
to pay up: Heres your check,
John. Here ya go, Jeff,. Heres
your check Bill....No soup for
you, Leroy!
Public service can be a
thankless job, I realize.
But nobody said it isnt wild-
ly entertaining.
Slim Smith is the managing
editor of The Dispatch. His
email address is ssmith@cdis-
patch.com.
The following is an edited selection of reader
comments posted at the end of stories and columns
published on-line. More can be found at www.cdispatch.
com.
Voice of the People: Cameron Triplett
KJ705: We created a nation of victims when our
reaction to 9/11 was cowardly panic. We created a
nation of helpless victims when we allowed the Patriot
Act, Homeland security, militarized police forces
funded by unconstitutional forfeitures and property
seizures, warrant-less wiretapping of citizens, and
NSA spying on every byte of traffc on the Internet.
We continue to create a nation of helpless victims
when we act against our own self interest by fur-
thering policies that promote guns as the answer to
every boogie man we might think to be afraid of. The
were only safe if everyone has a gun mentality is
pure cowardice. Only criminals will have guns is an
expression of abject fear.
Swampthing2: Mr. Triplett: Before I take issue with
any of the points you made in your letter, let me frst
admit that I have been guilty of inelegant criticism of
one of your previous letters and I consider my action
at that time to be a mistake that did nothing to help
anyone no matter what anyone said or what I felt at
the time.
More lengthy refection led me to see that my ap-
proach was unproductive and for that I apologize. Fur-
thermore, although I virtually never agree with you, I
do applaud both your commitment to your ideals and
your willingness not only to take a stand but also to
do so in public, and frequently. I feel your perspective
is always worth considering and I do see attempts on
your part to be objective, and that is always a good
thing (in my opinion, of course!). None of us ever
fully achieve objectivity but it is always worth doing
the best that you can on that score (again, opinion
noted). In any case, though there is much that I could
comment on in your letter from Wednesdays paper, I
will here address only your comment regarding your
claim that the liberal agenda of the media (I assume)
prevents reportage on black-on-white killings, etc.
You cite no data on this point, however, so readers
are left to take your word that this is fact, something I
am not inclined to do, if I am to be honest.
I come from a world in which evidence is required
to back up statements and conclusions, and I typically
fnd your letter and those of pretty much all other
commenters, liberal and conservative alike, to be
basically devoid of same. Without taking it any fur-
ther, while your letter would appear to be in response
to Mondays mass-shooting in Washington DC, you
seem to have ignored the fact that 1) it was black-
on-white, etc; and 2) it was thoroughly covered by
both national and local press. Aside from that, I offer
no contradictory evidence here - I havent checked,
Mondays event, may in fact be rare. But I am not
making any forceful claims here, either, just raising a
procedural point.
An opportunity to talk about gun laws? Not a
chance.
Roland Reagan: Gun laws are easy, solving the
problems and treatments of the mentally ill are very
hard. In our efforts not to stigmatize people who are
mentally ill we have as a result, enabled mass murder.
To the rising pile of
shooting rampages,
Americans can now
add the rapid-fre
murder of 15 people at
the Washington Navy
Yard. It is a sign of
our remarkable times
that this horrid deed
seems to pale next to
the massacre of 20
schoolchildren in sub-
urban Connecticut last
December.
Behind virtually every one of
these slaughters is a loner who
had shown signs of being mentally
ill. The Navy Yard suspect, Aaron
Alexis, had complained to police in
Rhode Island of enemies passing
vibrations through hotel walls.
He was questioned in Fort Worth,
Texas, for fring a bullet into an
apartment ceiling and in Seattle
for shooting out a cars tires.
Though every incident pointed
to a sick mind, none was serious
enough to raise a fashing red fag.
Worrisome how many unbalanced
people fy below the offcial radar.
Its hard to believe there are
more mentally unwell people in
America than elsewhere. But there
are more of other troubling things
in this country: isolation, a mes-
merizing parade of violent images
and easy access to weaponry.
Im not going to dwell here on
the gun control issue except to say
this: Its one thing to want frearms
for hunting or self-defense. Its
another to demand a right to own
weapons that can murder large
numbers in seconds.
That refects a cracked
worship of killing pow-
er, especially attractive
to the unstable.
Many argue that
mental illness, not the
fow of guns, drives
these crimes. They are
not entirely wrong. But
how do you keep killing
machines out of crazy
hands? Laws requir-
ing a sanity check for
gun buyers sound sensible, but
the guns used by the slayer of the
schoolchildren in Newtown, Conn.,
were bought by his supposedly
rational mother. Adam Lanzas
mother went to bars to brag about
her guns while leaving them
unlocked at the home she shared
with her clearly troubled son.
We learn that Alexis, like
Lanza, like the Columbine High
School shooters, spent long hours
hypnotized by violent video games.
So pervasive have these games
become that the public now shrugs
at the likes of Grand Theft Auto,
once considered shocking for its
anti-social violence. The casual
bloodletting in the new Grand
Theft Auto V is said to be oiled by
humor and satire, injecting more
confusion into already-confused
minds.
There is debate on whether
these games promote violent
behavior. The case that they do
seems strong enough to have com-
pelled one video game maker to
hire a crack lobbying frm to stop
a Senate bill that would sponsor
research into the possible connec-
tion.
Much research suggests that
ordinary people playing violent
video games do experience height-
ened feelings of belligerence,
along with higher heart rate and
blood pressure. In his own study,
Brad Bushman, a professor of
communications and psychology at
Ohio State University, found that
typical college students playing
violent games for only 20 minutes
a day for three days became more
aggressive.
Most players dont act on their
anger, because they come to the
game in fairly good mental health,
Bushman wrote in response to the
Navy Yard massacre. But what
about players who already are pre-
disposed to violence? He added,
Violent video games are just one
more factor that may be pushing
them toward violence.
Americas mass shootings seem
to be about several things. Theyre
about a culture that bombards
people with images of casual
homicide, that likes to wave guns,
that doesnt pay enough attention
to mental illness. Though mass
killings occur in other developed
countries, our especially deadly
mix of factors may explain why
they happen here with grotesque
predictability. Its something toxic
in the air.
Froma Harrop, a syndicated
columnist, writes for the Providence
(Rhode Island) Journal. Her e-mail
address is f harrop@projo.com.
Violence in our air
On guns, mental
health and violence
Off to see the world
Local elected offcials avail themselves of travel
opportunities and taxpayers pick up the tab
Slim Smith
Froma Harrop
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com Thursday, sepTember 19, 2013 5A
James Buddy Burns
Incomplete
gunterandpeel.com
Dedicated... Caring... Committed
When Caring Counts...
1131 Lehmberg Rd. Columbus 662-328-1808
www.lowndesfuneralhome.net
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY
Tom Guyton, Jr.
Mr. Tom W. Tommy Guyton, 80, of Macon,
MS passed away at Regency Hospital in Merid-
ian, MS on Tuesday, September 17, 2013. Mr.
Guyton was the son of the late Tom Watson and
Dorothy Misso Guyton. With the exception of
a term of service with the U.S. Air Force, lived
all of his life in Noxubee County, MS.
Mr. Tommy, as he was best known, was born
in Macon on November 24, 1932, and gradu-
ated from Macon High School in the Class of
1951. During his stint with the Air Force, he
was stationed at Goodfellow Air Force Base in
San Antonio, TX with the 3545th Maintenance
& Supply Group. Soon after his discharge from
service, he married the love of his life, Janet
Holliman, to whom he was married for over
50 years. Mrs. Janet had already gone to be
with the Lord and was awaiting her husband in
Heaven.
Mr. Tommy was a very diverse person who
had many interests, both in business and rec-
reation. He was a dairy and beef cattle farmer,
as well as the owner of Cade Hardware, frst in
Brooksville, MS and later in Macon. Also, along
with his wife, he was owner of Beauty Chateau
and A. Klaus & Co. in Macon. He was an avid
sportsman who enjoyed hunting and fshing as
well as golfng. He also enjoyed traveling.
His family members variously describe him
as: outgoing, loving, kind, caring and as a very
dedicated father and friend. Mr. Tommy en-
joyed celebrating life and always tried to live
life to the fullest measure. He was always will-
ing to share his time and knowledge.
He loved people, as was evidenced not only
by his involvement with community and civic
organizations, but by his willingness to help
anyone in need. Mr. Tommy was a past mem-
ber of the Brooksville Rotary Club, the Noxu-
bee County Chamber of Commerce, and was
a longtime member of the Zach Brooks Golf
Course in Macon. He was a charter member
of the Macon Lions Club and had recently been
honored for over 50 years of involved service.
Mr. Tommy was a faithful member of Calvary
Baptist Church in Macon.
Mr. Tommy is survived by his mother-in-law,
Mrs. Anna Belle Holliman of Macon; two daugh-
ters, Mrs. Teleah Carter (Claude) of Columbus,
MS and Mrs. Beverly Ross (Bill) of Macon.
Also surviving him are his two sisters, Mrs.
Jean Anderson (Fred) of Utica, MS and Mrs.
Juanita Hamill (Verely)of Brookhaven, MS; as
well as, one brother-in-law, Mickey Holliman
(Babs) of Tupelo, MS; and his three grandchil-
dren, Anna Leigh Whitehead (Jonathan) and
Emily Vernon (Nick), both of Louisville, MS
and Trent Ross (Krystal) of Macon. Also left
to mourn his passing are fve great-grandchil-
dren.
Mr. Tommys funeral service will be held
on Friday, September 20, 2013, at 11:00 A.M.
from Calvary Baptist Church with his son-in-
law, Bro. Bill Ross and Bro. Jimmy Hunter off-
ciating. Interment will follow in the family lot
at Salem Cemetery near Macon. Visitation will
be held at the church from 9:00 until 11:00 A.M.
prior to the funeral.
In lieu of fowers, any memorials should be
made to the missions of Calvary Baptist Church
or to the donors favorite charity.
You may sign the online register book or
leave a condolence at www.cockrellfuneral-
home.com
Paid Obituary-Cockrell Funeral Home
AreA obituAries
COMMERCIAL DISPATCH
OBITUARY POLICY
Obituaries with basic informa-
tion including visitation and
service times, are provided
free of charge. Extended obit-
uaries with a photograph, de-
tailed biographical information
and other details families may
wish to include, are available
for a fee. Obituaries must be
submitted through funeral
homes unless the deceaseds
body has been donated to
science. If the deceaseds
body was donated to science,
the family must provide offcial
proof of death. Please submit
all obituaries on the form
provided by The Commercial
Dispatch. Free notices must
be submitted to the newspa-
per no later than 3 p.m. the
day prior for publication Tues-
day through Friday; no later
than 4 p.m. Saturday for the
Sunday edition; and no later
than 7:30 a.m. for the Monday
edition. Incomplete notices
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notices must be fnalized by 3
p.m. for inclusion the next day
Monday through Thursday; and
on Friday by 3 p.m. for Sunday
and Monday publication. For
more information, call 662-
328-2471.
Todd Burgess
COLUMBUS
Todd Burgess, 73, died
Sept. 15, 2013, at his
residence.
Mr. Burgess was
born Feb. 28, 1941.
He was a veteran of
the U.S. Army and the
U.S. Air Force. He was
formerly employed with
Hunt.
He was preceded in
death by his parents;
and his wife, Jackie
Burgess.
Survivors include
his daughter, Roxanne
Burgess of Hot Springs,
Ark., and Tracey Tuck-
er of Texas; sons, Mike
Wiginton of Minnesota
and Ron Wiginton
of Illinois; and three
grandchildren.
Memorials may
be made to the Todd
Burgess Memorial
Fund, Lowndes Funeral
Home, 1131 N. Lehm-
berg Road, Columbus,
MS 39702.
R.C. Taylor
NOXUBEE R.C.
Taylor, 53, died Sept.
13, 2013, at Starkville
Manor Nursing Home.
Services are Friday
at 1 p.m. at Second
James Creek with the
Rev. Michael Tate offci-
ating. Burial will follow
in Woodlawn CME.
Visitation is today from
noon to 5 p.m. at Car-
ters of Macon.
Mr. Taylor was born
June 23, 1960, to the
late Napoleon Skin-
ner and Sadie Taylor
Turner. He was former-
ly employed with Dee
River Farming.
In addition to his par-
ents, he was preceded
in death by his siblings,
Hattie Mae Beck and
Bobby C. Taylor.
Survivors include
Jimmie Lee, Joe L.,
G.L. Taylor and Willie
Mae Hopkins, all of
Brooksville.
Mary Woolsey
CEDAR BLUFF
Mary Weedon Woolsey,
57, died Sept. 18, 2013,
at North Mississippi
Medical Center.
Services are Satur-
day at 11 a.m. at Calvert
Funeral Home. Visita-
tion is Saturday from
9:30 a.m. until time of
services.
Mrs. Woolsey was
born Dec. 22, 1955, to
the late Cleo Gertrude
Shank and Lawrence
Arthur Weedon. She
was formerly employed
as a packer with Blazon
Tube Company.
In addition to her
parents, she was
preceded in death by
her husband, Dennis
Robert Woolsey.
Survivors include
her daughter, Hope
Weedon of West Point;
sister, Debbie Weiss of
Olney, Ill.; and three
grandchildren.
James Burns
COLUMBUS
James Burns, 73, died
Sept. 18, 2013, at Bap-
tist Memorial Hospital
Golden Triangle.
Arrangements are
incomplete and will be
announced by Gunter
& Peel Funeral Home.
By ANDREW MIGA
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON The na-
tions health care spending will
jump by 6.1 percent next year
as the big coverage expansion
in President Barack Obamas
overhaul kicks in, government
experts predicted Wednesday.
Thats more than 2 per-
centage points higher than
the growth rate forecast for
this year, and compares with a
growth rate that has hovered
under 4 percent, historically
low, for the past four years.
Much of the increase project-
ed for next year is attributed to
the new health care program,
which is expected to provide in-
surance coverage to millions of
currently uninsured Americans
beginning Jan. 1.
Without it, the estimated
growth would be 4.5 percent,
according to the report Wednes-
day from Medicares Offce of
the Actuary. The fndings were
published online by the journal
Health Affairs.
Other factors driving up
spending include an improving
economy and the aging of the
nations population.
Over the longer term, the
health care overhaul would
only be a modest contributor
to spending increases, the re-
port said. From 2012 to 2022,
the new law is projected to add
about 0.1 percent to average an-
nual health spending growth.
In all, Obamas plan will
add $621 billion to health care
spending over that 10-year pe-
riod, while expanding coverage
to some 30 million uninsured
people, experts said.
Some 11 million people are
expected to gain health insur-
ance coverage in 2014, mostly
through new state insurance
markets the law sets up or
through expanded eligibility
for Medicaid, the federal-state
insurance program for low-in-
come people.
Medicaid enrollment alone is
expected to increase by 8.7 mil-
lion people next year.
Many of the newly insured
are expected to be younger
and healthier. Theyre expect-
ed to devote a larger share of
their health care spending to
prescription drugs and physi-
cian and clinical services and a
smaller share to hospital spend-
ing.
Out-of-pocket spending for
individuals and families is pro-
jected to fall 1.5 percent in 2014
because of the new coverage
and lower cost-sharing for peo-
ple with improved coverage.
The report said the recent
low rates of spending growth
are a persistent effect of the
economic recession, which in-
cludes employers shifting more
health care costs to employees,
pressure on government bud-
gets and consumers forgoing or
delaying treatment.
National health spending is
expected to grow at an average
annual rate of 5.8 percent from
2012 to 2022, 1 percentage point
higher than the growth rate for
the overall economy in that pe-
riod, the experts said. As a re-
sult, the share of gross domes-
tic product devoted to health
care is forecast to rise from 17.9
percent in 2011 to 19.9 percent
by 2022, the report said.
The most signifcant one-
time effects on spending of the
coverage expansions under
Obamas plan are expected to
subside beginning in 2016.
Government says health spending to jump next year
improving economy, aging population,
coupled with new health care program
driving up spending
online:
Health Affairs: content.healthaf-
fairs.org/lookup/doi/10.1377/
hlthaff.2013.0721
Education offcials: Fully
fund budget next year
By JEFF AMy
The Associated Press
JACKSON Missis-
sippi education offcials
are making their legally
mandated push to sup-
port the states school
funding formula, but its
not clear theyll be any
more successful next fs-
cal year than in other re-
cent years.
State Department of
Education offcials made
their pitch to the Joint
Legislative Budget Com-
mittee on Wednesday.
Lawmakers would
have to add $264.5 mil-
lion to the Mississippi
Adequate Education
Program in the budget
year beginning July 1 to
provide what the formula
calls an adequate amount
of aid to local school dis-
tricts. According to pre-
liminary estimates, the
gap would be down from
$293 million in the cur-
rent budget.
AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki
Law enforcement offcials from multiple agencies examine the two cars pulled from Foss Lake, in Foss, Okla., on
Wednesday. The Oklahoma State Medical Examiners Offce says authorities have recovered skeletal remains of
multiple bodies in the Oklahoma lake where the cars were recovered.
ThE AssocIATED PREss
FOSS, Okla. An
Oklahoma sheriff says the
families of six people who
have been missing for
more than 40 years should
be able to gain some clo-
sure with the discovery of
cars and bones believed to
be connected to the cases.
What still lingers,
though, are questions
about how the skeletal
remains and two vehicles
ended up submerged in
Custer Countys Foss
Lake, said Sheriff Bruce
Peoples. Hes hopeful the
answers will come, help-
ing solve a pair of mys-
teries that have haunted
residents for more than a
generation.
Now the family will
know, and thats what we
look at as an important
part of our job, Peoples
said. Its going to close
a very unhappy chapter
in their lives, but nothing
any worse than having
those lingering questions
and wondering what hap-
pened.
Were the victims in the
two separate cold cases
murdered and dumped in
the lake about 100 miles
west of Oklahoma City?
Or did they take a wrong
turn, drive off the edge of
the boat ramp and end up
submerged?
Its way too early to
tell at this point, Peoples
said. Well treat it as a
crime until were able to
determine its a simple car
wreck.
Divers conducting a
training exercise with so-
nar equipment found the
1969 Camaro and early
1950s Chevrolet at the bot-
tom of Foss Lake on Tues-
day. The vehicles were in
about 12 feet of water
about 50 feet from the end
of a boat ramp.
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Obamacare
continued from Page 1a
groups such as the Club
for Growth, the Madison
Project and the Senate
Conservatives Fund, Re-
publicans turned the letter
into legislation sponsored
by third-term Rep. Tom
Graves, a 43-year-old from
Ranger, Ga., who lists his
high school loves as foot-
ball, algebra and his Mo-
hawk haircut.
More than 140 Republi-
cans signed on to the bill to
keep the government run-
ning and delay the health
care law. On Wednesday,
the House leadership sig-
naled it had acquiesced
to rank-and-fle demands
and set a vote for Friday
on legislation to fund the
government through Dec.
15 at existing levels while
permanently defunding
the health care law.
Meadows, Graves and
other conservatives de-
clined to discuss the like-
lihood that the Democrat-
ic-led Senate would reject
their bill and dismissed
talk that their actions
would cause a politically
debilitating government
shutdown similar to the
House Republican stand-
off with Democratic Pres-
ident Bill Clinton in 1995-
96.
This is not 1995. This
is very different today,
Graves told reporters. I
suggest you interview the
folks who come to our
town halls and you see
the hurt and the pain and
the concern in their eyes.
Youll understand why we
have the resolve and the
constitution here to stand
up for them.
Republicans insist this
is their last, best chance
to stop the law. Although
some provisions are fair-
ly well-established, such
as children remaining on
their parents insurance
plans until age 26, a cru-
cial change goes into ef-
fect Oct. 1. Thats when
millions of people without
access to job-based health
care will be able to enroll
online through new state
insurance markets for cov-
erage effective at the start
of next year.
Sept. 30 is a critical
day, Meadows, 54, who
traded a sandwich shop
for real estate develop-
ment, said in an interview.
All of us are united in
understanding that once
you start enrollment, it
becomes a totally differ-
ent dynamic even though
theyre not receiving ben-
efts. When somebody
enrolls in something, they
assume they will be get-
ting them. Thats why the
American people are ex-
pecting us to fght now, not
delay the fght until next
year some time.
Republicans also con-
tend that Senate Dem-
ocrats from Republi-
can-leaning states who
voted for the law will switch
sides as they look ahead to
tough re-election bids next
year. Politically, fip-fop-
ping on such a high-profle
vote could be devastating
for an incumbent. Still,
Republicans are looking
forward to making several
Democrats Mark Pryor
of Arkansas, Mark Begich
of Alaska, Mary Landrieu
of Louisiana and Kay Ha-
gan of North Carolina
vote again with Obama
on a law that opinion polls
show remains confusing
and unpopular.
Yet even proponents in
the Senate acknowledge
that their chances of de-
funding Obamacare are
slim.
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas,
a chief sponsor in the Sen-
ate, acknowledged that
Majority Leader Harry
Reid, D-Nev., likely has the
votes to remove the provi-
sion defunding the health
care law and send back to
the House a bill to keep the
government operating.
Cruz said in a statement
that House Republicans
then must stand frm.
But other Republican
senators dismiss the tac-
tic as time-consuming and
unrealistic. The fscal year
ends Sept. 30.
Its a political ploy,
said Sen. Tom Coburn,
R-Okla., who says he op-
poses stopgap spending
bills in general. Tell me a
bill that the presidents go-
ing to sign and fgure out
how we get there, and then
Ill support that.
House Republicans re-
fused to discuss hypotheti-
cals about what the Senate
might do to their bill. They
insist that their approach
gives the House leverage.
You play offense, said
Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y.
We send them a solid plan
that America is behind,
then its up to the Senate
and its up to the president
to decide whether our plan
makes sense or whether
they want to draw a line in
the sand and shut the gov-
ernment down.
AP Photo/ Evan Vucci
In this Jan. 3, 2013, fle photo, Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., right, participates in a mock
swearing-in ceremony with Speaker of the House Rep. John Boehner in Washington.
Yokohama
continued from Page 1a
see anything happening
doesnt mean theres not
things happening.
West Point Mayor Rob-
bie Robinson said the city
has selected a bid from
Texas-based Landmark
Structures to construct
the plants water tank.
Later this month West
Point selectmen will open
sealed bids for installation
of water and sewer ca-
pabilities. In addition to
helping fnance those fac-
ets of the project, the city
will provide fre services
to the plant. Clay County
will fnance other infra-
structural components,
including road and rail
spur construction.
Our selectmen are a
positive group of people,
Robinson said. Theyve
worked to-
gether and
are a great
team. We
want to see
this job and
this com-
pany com-
plete.
Hi ggi ns
provided updates on fu-
ture developments relat-
ed to the Yokohama proj-
ect, including evaluation
of adjacent parcels and
gauging business inter-
est near the plant as con-
struction of its frst phase
ensues.
We will start market-
ing and trying to iden-
tify who might be the
appropriate customer
to be across the street
from Yokohama, down
the road from Yokohama,
with Yokohamas input, as
to what companies they
would like to see (close to
them), Higgins said.
Yamamoto and other
company representatives
have been visiting the
Golden Triangle area
this week touring various
manufacturing facilities
in the region, according
to a press release issued
by the Link.
The tire manufactur-
ing plants frst phase,
which is expected to cre-
ate 500 jobs, is slated to
open in October 2015. At
full capacity, the plant
will have the capability
to produce a million tires
a year. All four phases of
the plant are slated for
completion by 2023.
Yokohama manage-
ment have located at the
Thad Cochran Research,
Technology and Econom-
ic Development Park at
Mississippi State Univer-
sity while the frst phase
of construction takes
place.
The plant will be at the
Prairie Belt Powersite,
which the Link helped
develop prior to luring
the Japanese tire man-
ufacturing frm to Clay
County.
Yokohama will in-
vest $1.2 billion $300
million for each phase
while the state has
committed $130 million,
including $70 million in
the form of general obli-
gation bonds for the frst
phase.
Robinson
Consolidation
continued from Page 1a
point. We have the oppor-
tunity to ask, What does
it take to do that from a
rural standpoint? he
added. We see this as a
golden moment to take
what we were already
discussing and planning
and use this to kick start
the conversation.
Shaws comments
came Wednesday while
the Commission on
Consolidated Starkville
School District Structure
frst broached potential
school confgurations
under a unifed district.
University leaders have
discussed the idea of
utilizing a demonstra-
tion school or program
in the past, he said, but
state-mandated consol-
idation has brought the
idea to surface. To im-
plement such a plan, a
new facility would not be
needed immediately as
the two school systems
merge in 2015, Shaw
said, but the university
could put its muscle into
fundraising opportuni-
ties for future construc-
tion.
We may very well ask
what is available now to
then start making plans
and goals to have our
own facility. If you think
about what an Overstreet
(School) or an Emerson
(Family Center) could do
to start things, we could
then set a goal to build a
facility, he said. Its one
of those situations where
we are uniquely posi-
tioned to set some goals
in that regard.
Any partnership, he
said, would be in con-
junction with the district
and not create competi-
tion like magnet or char-
ter schools.
Facilities were a com-
mon theme Wednesday
as Oktibbeha County
School District Con-
servator Margie Pulley
and Starkville School
District Superintendent
Lewis Holloway laid out
various scenarios on how
to merge students into a
unifed school system.
While the commission
made no decisions on
the matter, most seemed
to support keeping the
countys two elementary
schools intact while ex-
ploring an option to bring
in high school students
to the citys system. Fa-
cility upgrades could be
mapped out by the con-
solidation committee and
implemented once the
districts are merged.
Holloway called a plan
to bring grades 9-12 to
Starkville High School,
an idea that would send
2015 enrollment past the
1,500 mark for the cam-
pus, the most obvious
situation. Increased
enrollment would strain
the schools cafeteria,
he said. Under that plan,
the campus could require
an almost $500,000 im-
provement to that wing
alone.
Another idea pitched
pull ninth graders out
of SHS and move them to
another facility would
ease the high schools
capacity and curtail the
need for cafeteria expan-
sion. Holloway pitched
the idea of building a
new school for grades
8-9, which could cost an
estimated $14 million. A
cheaper model, he said,
would be to bring the
countys eighth and ninth
graders to Armstrong
Middle School and then
construct a new school
for grades 6-7 in the city.
Committee members
mulled adding addition-
al grades to the countys
elementary schools, but
Pulley said that was the
least-ideal plan since a
seventh grade option has
different requirements
than elementary class-
rooms, which in turn
would raise costs. Even
if left intact, she said
the countys elementary
schools would require
physical renovations and
construction projects:
East Oktibbeha County
Elementary, for example,
needs a new parking lot,
gymnasium repairs and
cosmetic touchups.
We think the high
school (option) works;
the elementary in the
county works, Holloway
said. The problem is
grades 7-8.
The potential MSU
partnership, Shaw said
during that point of dis-
cussion, could focus its
efforts on the middle
school arena.
Wed love to see it
grow beyond (grades
6-8), he said, but the
partnership itself could
not service the districts
entire middle school en-
rollment. Consolidation
committee members will
meet again 5 p.m. Oct. 3
at the county education
building.
Autopsy
continued from Page 1a
Tenn., was in the trucks
bed along with Barker.
She was also injured in the
incident but was released
that same day from OCH
Regional Medical Center.
The driver of the 2003
Chevrolet Silverado, Saw-
yer Tomas Steede, 18, of
Lucedale, was arrested
Tuesday and charged
with aggravated DUI. He
was released on a $50,000
bond.
Barker, Reasons and
Steede, all freshmen at
MSU, lived at Rice Hall,
MSU confrmed Tuesday.
Barker and Steede were
roommates.
Go Dawgs!
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com Thursday, sepTember 19, 2013 7A
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By ERIC TUCKER
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON The man
who gunned down 12 people at the
Washington Navy Yard on Monday
visited two hospitals in the weeks
before the rampage but denied
that he was depressed or having
thoughts of harming himself or oth-
ers, the Department of Veterans Af-
fairs said Wednesday.
Aaron Alexis, a former Navy re-
servist who died in a police shootout
after the rampage, complained of
insomnia during an Aug. 23 emer-
gency room visit to the VA Medical
Center in Providence, R.I. He was
given sleep medication and advised
to follow up with a doctor. He made
a similar visit fve days later to the
VA hospital in Washington, when he
again complained of not being able
to sleep because of his work sched-
ule. His medication was reflled.
Alexis appeared alert and ori-
ented during the visits and denied
feeling depressed or anxious or
wanting to do harm, the VA said.
The VAs statement, presented
to lawmakers Wednesday, comes as
investigators continue focusing on
the erratic behavior of a 34-year-old
man who law enforcement offcials
say was grappling with paranoia
and reported hearing voices and be-
ing followed.
Two weeks before his ER visit, for
instance, he complained to police
in Rhode Island that people were
talking to him through the walls
and ceilings of his hotel room and
sending microwave vibrations into
his body to deprive him of sleep.
Navy offcials said the Newport po-
lice reported the incident to offcers
at the base security offce, but noth-
ing more was done about it because
he did not appear to be a threat to
himself or anyone else at the time.
Despite the apparent concerns
over his mental health and past run-
ins with the law, Alexis maintained
his security clearance as he arrived
in Washington in late August for a
job as an information technology
employee at a defense-related com-
puter company.
VA: Gunman didnt reveal homicidal thoughts
AP Photo/U.S. Navy, Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Pedro A. Rodriguez
In this photo provided by the U.S. Navy, an FBI evidence response team
vehicle is parked outside Building 197 at the Navy Yard in Washington as
evidence is collected Wednesday.
Mans mom: I dont
know why he did it
ThE AssoCIATEd PREss
OTTAWA, Ontario
Passengers screamed Stop!
Stop! seconds before their
bus crashed through a cross-
ing barrier and into a com-
muter train during morning
rush hour in Canadas capi-
tal on Wednesday, killing six
people and injuring 34.
He smoked the train,
witness Mark Cogan said
of the bus driver, who was
among those killed. He
went through the guard
rail and just hammered the
train, and then it was just
mayhem.
It was not immediately
clear what caused the bus to
smash through the lowered
barrier at a crossing in sub-
urban Ottawa.
Six killed as Canada bus
strikes passenger train
AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo
People wade through water in a stores parking lot looking for valuables, south of Acapulco, in Punta Diamante,
Mexico on Wednesday.
By MIChAEL
WEIssENsTEIN
The Associated Press
ACAPULCO, Mexico
Mexicos government
said 58 people were miss-
ing after a massive land-
slide smashed through
a tiny coffee-growing
village deep in the coun-
trys southern mountains,
where fresh waves of rain
threatened to unleash
more danger for rescue
workers trying to evacu-
ate the last residents from
the isolated hamlet.
The storm that dev-
astated Mexicos Pacif-
ic coast over the week-
end regained strength
Wednesday and became
Hurricane Manuel, dump-
ing rain on fshing villag-
es on the coast of Sinaloa
state. It is a third blow
to a country still reeling
from the one-two punch
of Manuels frst landfall
and Hurricane Ingrid on
Mexicos eastern coast.
Federal offcials raised
the death toll from Man-
uel from 60 to 80 earlier
Wednesday. They said
they were not yet declar-
ing the 58 dead in the vil-
lage of La Pintada several
hours north of Acapulco,
but it appeared unlikely
that they had survived.
58 more missing after massive storm
Death toll from Hurricane Manuel
raised from 60 to 80 people
AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Adrian Wyld
A bus passenger carries a child following a train and
city bus collision in Ottawa on Wednesday.
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com 8A Thursday, sepTember 19, 2013
Featuring Columbus & Mississippi Items
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AP Photo/Mini Miss Committee
This undated photo provided by the Mini Miss committee shows Oceane Scharre, 10, elected Mini Miss France
2011, left, and Miss France 2011 Mathilde Florin. Frances Senate voted Tuesday to ban beauty pageants for
children under 16, in an effort to protect children from being sexualized too early.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PARIS Child beauty pageants
may soon be banned in France, af-
ter a surprise vote in the French
Senate that rattled the pageant in-
dustry and raised questions about
how the French relate to girls sex-
uality.
Such contests, and the made-
up, dolled-up beauty queens they
produce, have the power to both
fascinate and repulse, and have
drawn criticism in several coun-
tries. France, with its controlling
traditions, appears to be out front in
pushing an outright ban.
French legislators stopped short
of approving a measure banning
anyone under 16 from modeling
products meant for grown-ups a
sensitive subject in a country re-
nowned for its fashion and cosmet-
ics industries, and about to host
Paris Fashion Week.
The proposed childrens pageant
amendment sprouted from a debate
on a womens rights law. The leg-
islation, approved by a vote of 197-
146, must go to the lower house of
parliament for further debate and
another vote.
Its language is brief but sweep-
ing: Organizing beauty compe-
titions for children under 16 is
banned. Violators who could
include parents, or contest organiz-
ers, or anyone who encourages or
tolerates childrens access to these
competitions would face up to
two years in prison and 30,000 eu-
ros ($40,000) in fnes.
It doesnt specify whether it
would extend to things like online
photo competitions or pretty baby
contests.
While child beauty pageants are
not as common in France as in the
U.S., girls get the message early on
here that they are sexual beings,
from advertising and marketing
campaigns and even from de-
partment stores that sell lingerie
for girls as young as 6.
The U.S. has also seen contro-
versy around child beauty pageants
and reality shows like Toddlers &
Tiaras. Such contests gripped the
public imagination after the 1996
death of 6-year-old beauty queen
JonBenet Ramsey, as images of her
splashed over national television
and opened the eyes of many to the
scope of the industry.
We are talking about children
who are only being judged on their
appearance, and that is totally con-
trary to the development of a child,
the French amendments author,
Chantal Jouanno, told The Associ-
ated Press.
The question of the hyper-sex-
ualization is deeper in the United
States than in France, but the le-
vees are starting to fall. Before we
are hit by the wave, the point is to
say very clearly: Not here.
She insisted she isnt attacking
parents, saying that most moms
dont realize the deeper societal
problems the contests represent.
French Senate says non
to mini-Miss pageants
Proposed amendment would give violators up to
two years in prison and 30,000 euros in fnes
Governor says
2012 hurricane
damaged wiring
causing fre
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRENTON, N.J. Gov.
Chris Christie on Wednes-
day defended his decision
to use federal Superstorm
Sandy recovery money to
help rebuild businesses
burned by a devastating
boardwalk fre last week.
Christie said board-
walk-area businesses in
Seaside Park and Seaside
Heights are entitled to the
money because Sandy was
cited as a contributing
cause of the fre. He said
businesses destroyed or
damaged by the fre but
unaffected when the me-
ga-storm hit last October
would be eligible for aid.
However, he said, no mon-
ey intended for residents
would be used to aid busi-
ness owners.
The part of this that ab-
solutely cannot be disput-
ed is that the intent of the
business fund, the federal
government said, was to
restore business in these
communities, Christie
said at a news conference
after signing an economic
stimulus bill. The fact is
this was contributed to by
Sandy and is now going to
diminish the business ac-
tivity in Seaside Park and
Seaside Heights.
Investigators blamed
Sandy for damaging electri-
cal wiring that touched off
the four-block fre. Christie
said local inspectors are re-
sponsible for making sure
electrical systems are safe
after last falls storm.
Christie: Sandy
aid for burned
nJ shore
businesses
SECTION
B
SPORTS EDITOR
Adam Minichino: 327-1297
SPORTS LINE
662-241-5000
Sports
THE DISPATCH n CDISPATCH.COM n THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
Skinner
InSIDE
n WEST ALABAMA: Lamar
County and Sulligent battle
for country bragging rights.
Page 3B
InSIDE
n KICKING WOES: Devon Bell
working to improve his game.
Page 3B
College Football
See SKINNER, 3B
See RAIDERS, 4B
See PATRIOTS, 4B
Jim Lytle/Special to The Dispatch
Oak Hill Academy coaches Daniel Merchant and Freddie Brister
talk things over with sophomore Heath Ford (2).
By MATTHEW STEVENS
mstevens@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE Mississip-
pi State defensive coordinator
Geoff Collins cant mention se-
nior linebacker Deontae Skin-
ner without getting emotional.
Its that human emotion that
makes Skinner not only of the
favorite players of Collins and
the MSU staff but has allowed
him to transform into one of
the more dominant three-down
linebackers in the Southeastern
Conference.
Deontae Skinner is the
heart and soul of what we do
here at Mississippi State, Col-
lins said. He is the most favor-
ite player that Ive ever coached
in my entire career.
When Skinner arrived on
the MSU campus as a physical
athletic option at
linebacker from
nearby Noxubee
County High
School, he was
asked to do a lot
of mixing be-
tween standing
up at linebacker
and being in a
stance at defen-
sive line. Three years later,
Skinner is completely com-
fortable with not only the free
fowing havoc system of Collins
but also in his element chas-
ing down speed backs that led
to three tackles at Auburn last
week.
Theres not much that De-
ontae Skinner doesnt do well
in this defense by now, MSU
freshman linebacker Richie
Brown said. Whether he is
blitzing or backpedaling or
even switching up on the fy his
pursuit, its not an accident why
hes always around the ball.
While fellow teammate and
starting middle linebacker
Benardrick McKinney got all
the preseason attention in the
second level of MSUs defense,
Skinner is the one that is tied
with him for the Bulldogs (1-2)
lead in tackles with 19. It was
Skinner that came up with the
frst turnover of the 2013 sea-
son in the frst possession of
the second week of the season
versus Alcorn State.
We always are practicing
either knocking the ball out or
going up and getting it when its
in the air, Skinner said. Its
something people dont real-
ize just watching but causing
turnovers doesnt just happen
by luck. It is a skill that can be
developed.
When the MSU defense
had questions about ability to
rush the passer, it was Skinner
that took Nick Marshall to the
ground for the frst of three
sacks in a 24-20 loss at Auburn
last weekend. It was only the
third time in 15 games that
MSU had recorded three or
more sacks in a game.
I think Benardrick McKin-
ney said it best after the game
Saturday that we stopped wor-
rying about our individual
assignments and just started
to try having more fun fying
around, Skinner said. When
Skinner blossoms into dominant linebacker for Bulldogs
Prep Football
FALCONS, PATRIOTS FACE HUGE CHALLENGES
Oak Hill Academy looks to keep winning
Jim Lytle/Special to The Dispatch
Columbus High School se-
nior running back Kendrick
Conner (28) ran for 158
yards and three touch-
downs in the Falcons
41-14 win at West Point
Friday night. RIGHT: Senior
Jalen Stewart (29), shown
here defecting a pass
from West Points Josh
Ewing (2), helped lead a
defensive unit, which held
West Point to 251 yards of
total offense.
This week, Columbus
travels to Louisville, while
West Point travels to Noxu-
bee County. Meanwhile,
Heritage Academy travels
to Hillcrest Christian.
By AdAM MiNicHiNo
aminichino@cdispatch.com
The banging of met-
al on metal in the weight
room was a ftting back-
drop for Tony Stanford as
he talked about perhaps
his biggest victory in his
time as Columbus High
Schools football coach.
Columbus 41, West
Point 14.
If you were one of
the high school football
fans who saw the score
on Twitter or heard it
on a scoreboard show
driving home from your
game, you have to admit
you were surprised, not
that the Falcons beat the
Green Wave, but that they
beat them by 27 points in
West Point.
Just listen for a mo-
ment, though, and the
banging of the offensive
players in the weight room
tells you all you need to
know. When Stanford frst
arrived in Columbus as an
assistant coach for Bubba
Davis, the coaching staff
focused on getting the
Falcons stronger so they
could be more physical.
Stanford continued that
mind-set when he took
over for Davis prior to the
2010 season. The Falcons
have built on that foun-
dation each season and,
in turn, have developed
a reputation for being
a hard-hitting, physical
team.
On Friday, they proved
it with an exclamation
point.
It all comes down to
our kids ability to play
hard, Stanford said. We
challenged them all week
that West Point is sup-
posed to be the most phys-
ical team around here and
we want to be more phys-
ical. We have kind of built
our program around we
want to be one of the most
physical teams around.
The kids took the chal-
lenge and played hard.
With Damian Moore
leading the defense and
Kendrick Conner fueling
the offense, the Falcons
had all of the answers
against West Point. Co-
lumbus (2-1) hopes to ex-
tend its winning streak
to three at 7 p.m. Friday
when it faces another kind
of challenge against Class
3A favorite Louisville.
While West Point fa-
vors a straight-ahead run-
ning game that prefers to
smack opponents in the
face, Louisville will rely
on senior quarterback
Wyatt Roberts, a Jackson-
ville State commitment, to
lead an up-tempo offense
that will pitch the football
all over the feld.
Against the Green
Wave, the Falcons crowd-
ed the line of scrimmage
to try to prevent senior
running back Aeris Wil-
liams, a Mississippi State
commitment, from get-
ting outside or running
up inside of the defensive
line. He said the key to
stopping Williams was not
allowing him to break past
the frst line of defense
and to deny him space to
create plays.
Stanford said the Fal-
By AdAM MiNicHiNo
aminichino@cdispatch.com
Consider the lesson
learned because Barrett
Donahoe and the Heritage
Academy football team
have moved on.
After a 37-0 loss to
Jackson Academy on
Friday night, theres not
much else Donahoe and
the Patriots can do. As
disappointing as the home
loss to the nine-time state
champions was, the silver
lining for Heritage Acade-
my (3-1) is it comes early
enough in the season for
the team to use it as an ex-
ample of what not to do and
how not to play, especially
if it wants to have a chance
to defend its Mississippi
Association of Indepen-
dent Schools Class AAA,
Division II state title.
We did what we had to
do with that game flm, we
broke it down, we watched
it as a group, Donahoe
said. They embarrassed
us as a coaching staff and
a football team. We closed
the laptop after the flm
session and said we were
done. They were a better
football team. We didnt
play good. When you put
those two things togeth-
er, it was ugly, and it was
ugly.
Donahoe said prior to
the game that he wanted
his players to treat it as just
another conference game,
even though Heritage
Academy never has defeat-
ed Jackson Academy. With
a game at 7 p.m. Friday at
Hillcrest Christian in Jack-
son up next, Donahoe has
turned his focus toward
correcting the issues that
contributed to his teams
By ScoTT WAlTErS
swalters@cdispatch.com
Oak Hill Academy faces a
ranked opponent Friday night
when it faces Newton County
Academy.
It is not like that is anything
new for the Raiders. As it stands
now, seven of 10 opponents this
season are ranked.
We have played three
ranked opponents in our frst
fve games, Oak Hill Academy
coach Daniel Merchant said. It
has been a challenge but it has
also allowed us to see what we
are made of.
Kickoff is set for 7 p.m. in
Decatur.
Oak Hill Academy enters the
contest at 2-2 overall, thanks to
last Fridays 20-15 Mississip-
pi Association of Independent
Schools Class AA, District 2
win over Winston Academy. In
the victory, the Raiders rallied
from down 15-0 to secure the
victory.
They came out and hit us
with the triple-option, Mer-
chant said. We were not pre-
pared for that. We were able to
make some adjustments and
they didnt score after the frst
quarter. On offense, we faced a
few more blitzes that we had ex-
pected. It was a sign of maturity
and that we stayed calm, made
adjustments and found a way to
win the game.
Through its frst four games,
the Raiders have knocked off
Hartfeld Academy and Win-
ston Academy, while losing
shootouts to highly-touted
Tri-County Academy and Mar-
shall Academy.
Overall, I am pleased with
where we are through four
games, Merchant said. You
can always get better at block-
ing and tackling. That is what
we have been working on in
Patriots
ready to
move on
See FALCONS, 3B
Columbus ready
to build on win
over West Point
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com 4B Thursday, sepTember 19, 2013
Pigskin Picks Pigskin Picks
Week
HIGH SCHOOL
West Point at Noxubee County
Columbus at Louisville
New Hope at Amory
East Webster at Caledonia
Starkville Academy at
Magnolia Heights
COLLEGE
Arkansas at Rutgers
Auburn at LSU
Tennessee at Florida
Boise State at Fresno State
Louisiana Tech at Kansas
Through the course of football season these local school
principals will be selecting their winning teams, both in High School
and College. Look in Thursdays edition of
The Dispatch to keep up with their predictions.
Billie Smith
Fairview Elementary
16-14
Cindy Wamble
Heritage Academy
19-11
West Point
Louisville
New Hope
Caledonia
Magnolia Heights
Arkansas
LSU
Florida
Boise State
Kansas
Billy Wilbanks
Starkville Academy
15-15
West Point
Columbus
New Hope
Caledonia
Starkville Aca.
Rutgers
LSU
Florida
Fresno State
Kansas
Hattie Thomas
Noxubee County H.S.
19-11
Noxubee County
Louisville
Amory
East Webster
Starkville Aca.
Arkansas
Auburn
Tennessee
Boise State
LA Tech
Tim Dickerson
Hamilton High School
20-10
Noxubee County
Louisville
New Hope
East Webster
Magnolia Heights
Rutgers
LSU
Florida
Fresno State
Kansas
Keith Fennell
Starkville High School
15-15
West Point
Louisville
New Hope
East Webster
Magnolia Heights
Rutgers
LSU
Florida
Fresno State
LA Tech
Randy Barnett
Caledonia High School
17-13
Noxubee County
Louisville
New Hope
Caledonia
Starkville Aca.
Arkansas
LSU
Boise State
Kansas
Florida
Yandell Harris
Oak Hill Academy
17-13
West Point
Columbus
New Hope
East Webster
Magnolia Heights
Arkansas
LSU
Florida
Fresno State
Kansas
Samuel Williams
West Point H.S.
18-12
West Point
Louisville
New Hope
Caledonia
Magnolia Heights
Arkansas
LSU
Florida
Boise State
Kansas
Noxubee County
Louisville
New Hope
East Webster
Starkvilla Aca.
Arkansas
LSU
Florida
Boise State
Kansas
Robert Sanders
West Lowndes Elem.
14-16
Jill Savely
Columbus High School
17-13
Noxubee County
Louisville
New Hope
East Webster
Magnolia Heights
Arkansas
LSU
Florida
Fresno State
Kansas
Chris Hamm
Victory Christian Aca.
17-13
Top
Pickers
Tim Dickerson
Hamilton High School
20-10
Hattie Thomas
Noxubee County H.S.
19-11
Cindy Wamble
Heritage Academy
19-11
Samuel Williams
West Point H.S.
18-12
West Point
Columbus
New Hope
East Webster
Starkville Aca.
Arknasas
LSU
Florida
Fresno State
Kansas
West Point
Columbus
New Hope
East Webster
Magnolia Heights
Arkansas
LSU
Florida
Boise State
LA Tech
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Patriots
Continued from Page 1B
frst loss and to making sure the
team gets back on track.
I think we have emphasized
what not to do enough already,
Donahoe said. If we have to con-
tinue to emphasize that as what not
to do and that continues to be an
issue, were not the caliber of foot-
ball team I thought we were. That
game hopefully stands alone in our
actions and the way we played.
Donahoe said the Patriots need
to play better assignment football,
to tackle better, to be faster on of-
fense, and to play as if they want
to compete in a game rather than
just get through it. He said missed
assignments are one thing, but the
Patriots has way too many instanc-
es of a lack of effort in missing the
assignments. He said those issues
are solvable, but he realizes it will
take all of the coaches and all of the
players being committed to chang-
ing those things to make sure the
Patriots get back to their winning
ways.
Heritage Academy generated
little offense against a fundamental-
ly sound defense that allowed few
yards after contact. The Patriots
also had diffculty handling senior
running back Duncan Maxwell,
who rushed for a touchdown and
caught a touchdown pass in the
frst half. He didnt play in the sec-
ond half because the game was well
in hand.
Despite the fast start to the sea-
son, Donahoe said inexperience
caught up to the Patriots against the
Raiders. He said he and the coaches
have to step back and realize they
have a lot of frst-year players in key
spots and young players in others.
Still, he said it was surprising to see
what he saw from his team.
We had gone through a stretch
of 11 games dating back to the
Clarksdale Lee game from last year
where we had not seen us fail to
compete, Donahoe said. I refer-
ence back to the MRA game last
year, where we failed to compete in
the second half of that game and we
say a lot of the same habits. When
you have been consistent over the
course of 10 or 11 games with your
attitude and your efforts, to see us
begin to slip a bit was surprising. It
was eye-opening for us.
Donahoe knows the loss will be
a motivation for him and his coach-
es. He hopes it will be the same for
his players. He told them they can
look at the game from a glass half
full and a glass half empty perspec-
tive. He hopes everyone takes the
glass half full approach and asks
what can the Patriots learn from the
game and about themselves moving
forward.
All is not broken, and we need
to be very understanding that we
played a very good football team
and we didnt compete at that lev-
el, though, Donahoe said, and we
have to fnd a way to compete at that
level.
Raiders
Continued from Page 1B
practice. A little extra
work on the fundamen-
tals never hurts. We have
a chance to be a pretty
good team if we keep im-
proving each week.
In the win over Win-
ston, Oak Hill fnished
with 285 yards of total of-
fense, including 258 rush-
ing yards on 54 carries.
Drew Riley had 17
rushes for 76 yards, in-
cluding a 16-yard touch-
down run. Samuel Harrell
added 10 rushes for 49
yards, including a 20-yard
touchdown run. Joseph
Caskey had two rush-
es for 33 yards, includ-
ing the game-winning
touchdown and follow-up
2-point conversion. Drake
Riley had 20 carries for
73 yards, while A.J. Iseley
had three carries for 31
yards.
We had some good,
long drives, Merchant
said. We held the upper
hand for most of the sec-
ond half, even though
we didnt win until a late
score there at the end.
A member of District
3-1A, Newton County
Academy is 3-1. The Gen-
erals opened with three
straight wins, before fall-
ing 41-6 to Canton Acade-
my last Friday.
They are an I-forma-
tion team, Merchant said.
They are going to line
up and try to run it down
our throats. We just have
to be disciplined and stay
on our reads. Defensively,
they play with a nine-man
front. Those fronts have
given us fts this year. So,
we have worked hard in
practice this week to try
to make adjustments bet-
ter against that type of
defense. It will be a physi-
cal game and we will have
to perform really well on
both sides of the ball.
After going winless in
2011, Oak Hill Academy
stopped that skid with a
13-6 in last seasons meet-
ing in West Point.
West Point (1-2)
at Noxubee co. (2-2)
West Point will be
looking to get the offense
kick-started again when it
travels to Noxubee Coun-
ty for the fnal non-region
game of the season.
Kickoff is set for 7 p.m.
Friday in Macon.
Last season, these two
squads played one of the
best games in the area,
as the eventual Missis-
sippi High School Activi-
ties Association Class 4A
state champion Noxubee
County took a 6-0 victory
at West Point.
West Point coach Chris
Chambless hopes to see
more offense in the re-
match.
Noxubee County has
an excellent tradition,
Chambless said. Even
though they are young,
you know you are going to
see a well-coached team
excited to play.
Last week, West Points
offense was stuck in neu-
tral in the second half of
a 41-14 home loss to Co-
lumbus. The Green Wave
had entered that contest
averaging 44 points per
game. Lead back Aeris
Williams was held to un-
der 100 yards for the frst
time this season and only
found the end zone once.
After two successful
drives in the frst half,
West Point did not score
in the games fnal half.
We struggled with
consistency, Chambless
said. Sometimes, you
have a big game (a 55-33
win over Starkville the
week before) and then
you struggle when you
dont have the same kind
of success. We got im-
patient and struggled to
build long drives.
Despite the 1-2 start,
West Point should still
rebound and be a factor
in the Region 1-5A race.
Right away, the challenge
will be supreme as the
frst region opponent is
unbeaten Oxford on the
road Sept. 27.
Its all about consis-
tency and working hard
each week to get better,
Chambless said.
Follow Scott Walters on
Twittter @dispatchscott.
Prep Football
Todays Game
Hamilton at Falkner, 7 p.m.
Fridays games
Columbus at Louisville, 7 p.m.
New Hope at Amory, 7 p.m.
West Lowndes at French Camp, 7 p.m.
West Point at Noxubee County, 7 p.m.
East Webster at Caledonia, 7 p.m.
Aberdeen at Itawamba AHS, 7 p.m.
Sebastopol at East Oktibbeha, 7 p.m.
Noxapater at West Oktibbeha, 7 p.m.
Heritage Academy at Hillcrest Christian, 7 p.m.
Starkville Academy at Magnolia Heights, 7 p.m.
Oak Hill Academy at Newton Academy, 7 p.m.
Immanuel Christian at Heidelberg Acad., 7 p.m.
Central Academy at Rebul Academy, 7 p.m.
Central Holmes at Winston Academy, 7 p.m.
Ezekiel at Victory Christian, 7 p.m.
Cold Springs at Aliceville, 7 p.m.
Lamar County at Sulligent, 7 p.m.
Brilliant at Pickens County, 7 p.m.
South Lamar at Lynn, 7 p.m.
Pickens Academy at South Choctaw, 7 p.m.
Prep Cross Country
Todays meet
MSU hosts Bulldog High School Invitational
Saturdays meets
Starkville High at Saltillo Invitational
Prep Soccer
Todays matches
Magnolia Heights at Starkville Academy, 4 p.m.
Heritage Academy at Immanuel Christian, 5 p.m.
Prep Softball
Todays games
Kemper Academy at Starkville Academy, 4 p.m.
New Hope at Columbus, 6 p.m.
Starkville at Grenada, 6 p.m.
Saturdays games
New Hope at Houston Tournament
Prep Volleyball
Todays matches
Canton at New Hope, 6 p.m.
Columbus at Caledonia, 6 p.m.
Starkville at West Lowndes, 6 p.m.
Saturdays match
Caledonia at Belmont, noon
College Football
Saturdays games
Colorado State at Alabama, 6 p.m.
Troy at Mississippi State, 6:30 p.m.
Mens College Golf
Fridays match
MSU at ACC/SEC (Kingston Springs, TN)
Saturdays match
MSU at ACC/SEC (Kingston Springs, TN)
Sundays match
MSU at ACC/SEC (Kingston Springs, TN)
Womens College Golf
Friday through Sunday
Alabama at Mason Rudolph Championship
(Franklin, TN)
MSU, Ole Miss at Mercedes Benz Championship
(Knoxville, TN)
Southern Miss at Lady Paladin Invitational
(Greenville, SC)
College Soccer
Fridays matches
Alabama at Florida, 6 p.m.
Missouri at Mississippi State, 7 p.m.
Ole Miss at Arkansas, 7 p.m.
Alcorn State at Southern Miss, 7 p.m.
Sundays matches
Southern Miss at Auburn, 2 p.m.
Arkansas-Little Rock at Ole Miss, 5 p.m.
College Volleyball
Fridays matches
Southern Miss vs. Chattanooga (Oxford), noon
Alabama at Clemson, 6 p.m.
Mississippi State at Belmont, 6:30 p.m.
Southern Miss at Ole Miss, 7 p.m.
Saturdays matches
Alabama vs. Delaware (Clemson), 9 a.m.
Miss. State vs. UAB (Nashville), 10 a.m.
Chattanooga at Ole Miss, 11 a.m.
Southern Miss vs. Louisiana (Oxford), 2 p.m.
Miss. State vs. Arkansas State (Nashville), 3:30
p.m.
Alabama vs. Troy (Clemson), 3:30 p.m.
Louisiana-Lafayette at Ole Miss, 7 p.m.
Junior College Football
Todays games
East Mississippi at Mississippi Delta, 7 p.m.
Itawamba at Holmes, 7 p.m.
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
6:30 p.m. Clemson at NC State, ESPN
GOLF
8 a.m. European PGA Tour, Open dItalia, frst
round, at Turin, Italy, TGC
Noon PGA Tour, TOUR Championship, frst
round, at Atlanta, TGC
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, WGN
NFL
7 p.m. Kansas City at Philadelphia, NFL
Network
PREP FOOTBALL
7 p.m. Coppell (Texas) at Garland (Texas), FS1
SAILING
2:30 p.m. Americas Cup, race 15 and 16, at
San Francisco (if necessary), NBC Sports
SOCCER
Noon UEFA Europa League, Swansea City at
Valencia, FS1
2 p.m. UEFA Europa League, Tromso at Totten-
ham, FS1
WNBA
6 p.m. Playoffs, frst round, game 1, Washing-
ton at Atlanta, ESPN2
8 p.m. Playoffs, frst round, game 1, Phoenix
at Los Angeles, ESPN2
Friday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m. Atlanta at Chicago Cubs, SportSouth
6 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, MLB Network
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m. Boise State at Fresno State, ESPN
CALENDAR
oN ThE AiR
bRiEFLy
Local
Cohen to address Starkville Quarterback Club
Mississippi State baseball coach John Cohen will speak to the
Starkville Quarterback Club on Thursday at the Starkville Country
Club.
We are extremely pleased and excited to have coach Cohen
speaking at our meeting, Starkville QB Club President Daniel
Bryant said. After reaching the College Work Series Champion-
ship games this year, coach Cohen and his staff brought a level
of achievement to our baseball program unsurpassed in school
history. Our club is eager to hear him talk about our team and antic-
ipation for next year.
The social hour will begin at 6 p.m., dinner will be served at
6:30 p.m., and the meeting will start at 7 p.m. Scott Sallach, MSUs
tight ends coach, will update members on the MSU football team
and provide a scouting report for Troy, the opponent at 6:30 p.m.
Saturday in Starkville.
Vollor Law Firm is sponsoring this weeks speaker. The dinner
will be pork chops, sweet potatoes, English peas, rolls, salad bar,
dessert, and tea.
There will not be a quarterback club meeting next week since
MSU has an open date. The next scheduled meeting will be Oct.
3, 2013.
QB club information is available online at www.starkvillequar-
terbackclub.com or by phone at 662-323-6546.
n Caledonia softball beats Leake Central: Makayla Taylor,
Lindsey Hall, Emily Hicks, and Stephanie Wilkes all had two hits
Tuesday to lead the Caledonia High School slow-pitch softball
team to a 6-3 victory against Leake Central.
Holli Carter, Nicole Kifer, Landri Brown, and Alex Burns had
singles for the Lady Confederates. Hope Harbin had a triple and
was the winning pitcher.
Caledonia plays host to West Lowndes on Tuesday.
Miss. State
Mens tennis opens play today at SEC Invitational
STARKVILLE After weeks of practice in the sweltering heat
of Mississippi, the Mississippi State mens tennis squad will finally
get to showcase their skills this weekend when they open the
2013-14 season in Nashville, Tenn., at the Vanderbilt-hosted SEC
Invitational.
The tournament, consisting of singles and doubles participants
from 13 Southeastern Conference schools, begins today, with
first and second round action in singles and doubles, and runs
until Sunday. The singles draw consists of seven rounds to decide
a champion, while doubles will have six rounds to determine a
winner.
Leading the way for the Bulldogs is senior Malte Stropp, a 9-16
seed, ranked 40th in the nation by the ITA. The All-SEC star from
Dusseldorf, Germany, is one of 20 singles players to receive a first-
round bye and will face Kentuckys Beck Pennington, who received
a first-round bye as well.
Sophomore Jordan Angus, who last season clinched MSUs
first trip to the NCAA Round of 16 since 2001, received his first ca-
reer ITA singles ranking of 113th this fall. He will face Vanderbilts
Jeff Offerdahl in first round action.
In doubles, Angus and Stropp will pair together for the first
time since their appearance in last years NCAA Doubles Champi-
onship tournament. The sixth-ranked and second-seeded duo will
face off against Floridas No. 60 team of Florent Diep and Michael
Alford in the second round.
States trio of newcomers will see their first experience in the
Maroon and White at the SEC Invitational. Freshmen Florian Lakat
and Robin Haden will open up their collegiate careers in singles
play, as Lakat opens against Kentucky sophomore Kevin Lai, while
Haden faces off against Floridas Alford.
Junior college transfer Tassilo Schmid begins his MSU
career paired with Lakat in doubles play, as the tandem earned a
first-round bye and will face Ole Miss William Kallberg and Stefan
Lindmark. Haden will also compete in doubles action, pairing
up with South Carolinas Ben Barnette to face Alabamas Saxon
Buehning and Sean Donohue in the opening round.
Were really excited to get to Nashville and compete in the
SEC Invitational, seventh-year head coach Per Nilsson said. Our
guys will have the chance to play some of the top players in the
nation, which is great experience and a good way to start off our
season.
Ole Miss
Volleyball team plays host to Rebel Classic
OXFORD Coming off a 3-1 week at the TCU Nike/Molten
Invitational in Fort Worth, Texas, the Ole Miss volleyball team (7-3)
returns home to host the Rebel Classic on Friday and Saturday at
the Gillom Sports Center.
The Rebels will face Southern Miss on Friday at 7 p.m., fol-
lowed by a doubleheader Saturday against Chattanooga (11 a.m.)
and Louisiana-Lafayette (7 p.m.).
We havent hosted two tournaments in quite some time, Ole
Miss volleyball head coach Joe Getzin said. Were looking forward
to being back at home for the next couple of weeks. What that
allows us to do is get a little more training time in. It allows us to
work on some things as we go forward.
Offensively, weve got to continue to work on producing better
numbers and getting more kills per swing. We have different styles
of teams in the Rebel Classic this weekend, a little bit scrappier
than what we face in the SEC. Thats always a point where you
have to stay patient.
Ole Miss went 3-1 in the Lonestar State last week, defeating
Grambling State, Stephen F. Austin and Houston by 3-0 scores
before falling to tournament-host TCU in front of a raucous environ-
ment in five sets.
The Rebels recorded their second and third highest hitting
percentages of the rally scoring era at the TCU Nike/Molten Invi-
tational. Ole Miss hit at a .425 clip in a 3-0 victory over Stephen F.
Austin, and hit .419 one match earlier in a 3-0 win over Grambling
State.
n Football to host 50-year anniversary of championship:
At Oxford, almost a half century has passed since the 1963 Ole
Miss football team won the Southeastern Conference Champion-
ship, one of six SEC titles the Rebels have won.
It was the 17th team at the University of Mississippi under
Coach John Vaught and it earned the league title with a 5-0-1 SEC
record, while finishing 7-1-2 overall. Members of that 1963 team will
return to campus for a special reunion the weekend of October 12
when the current Rebels host Texas A&M in Vaught-Hemingway
Stadium.
Winning the SEC championship was a great accomplishment
for us, said team co-captain and All-America center-linebacker
Kenny Dill. It was a tradition to which we had grown accustom.
Mens tennis opens campaign: At Oxford, the Ole Miss mens
tennis team is set to begin the 2013-14 season at the inaugural
SEC Coaches Championship in Nashville, Tenn.
This tournament replaces the SEC Indoor Championships
which was held every January. It features all 13 teams from the
nations top conference, which boasted 10 teams in the final top
25 last year.
The tournament starts Thursday morning with two rounds of
singles followed by two rounds of doubles. Friday features the third
and fourth round of singles followed by the third round of doubles.
Singles quarterfinals will be on Saturday, followed by doubles quar-
terfinals and semifinals. Play wraps up Sunday with the singles
semifinals and finals and the doubles final.
Four of the Rebels will compete this weekend, led by junior
William Kallberg (Stockholm, Sweden), who begins the season
ranked No. 65 in the nation in singles. He will be joined by soph-
omores Stefan Lindmark (Stockholm, Sweden) and Zach Wilder
(Oxford). Marking his debut this weekend will be redshirt freshman
Vinod Gowda (Bangalore, India).
We are very excited about the start of the season, head
coach Billy Chadwick said. As always the SEC is the toughest
league in the nation, and our SEC Coaches Championship is one
of the premier fall events.
In his first collegiate match, Gowda will play Vanderbilt junior
Anton Kovrigin. Wilder will face LSUs Harrison Kennedy. Both
Kallberg and Lindmark received a bye in the first round. Kallberg
will face Arkansas Jacob Herndon and Lindmark will face Florida
freshman Maxx Lipman, in the second round.
Both doubles teams received first round byes. Kallberg and
Lindmark will face a freshmen Mississippi State duo of Florian
Lakat and Tassilo Schmid. Gowda and Wilder will face the winner
of a Vanderbilt vs. Arkansas matchup.
All-American Nik Scholtz, who is ranked No. 7 in the nation,
represented his country (South Africa) in Davis Cup last weekend
and is not competing this weekend.
Junior colleges
Itawamba C.C. alters soccer schedule
FULTON Itawamba Community College head soccer coach
Mike Sullivan announced the Lady Indians and Indians road match-
es against Meridian original scheduled for Saturday, September
28th has been rescheduled to Friday, September 27th.
From Special Reports
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com 2B Thursday, sepTember 19, 2013
Baseball
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 92 61 .601
Tampa Bay 83 68 .550 8
Baltimore 81 70 .536 10
New York 80 72 .526 11
Toronto 69 82 .457 22
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 88 64 .579
Cleveland 82 70 .539 6
Kansas City 80 72 .526 8
Minnesota 65 86 .430 22
Chicago 60 92 .395 28
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 89 63 .586
Texas 82 69 .543 6
Los Angeles 74 78 .487 15
Seattle 67 85 .441 22
Houston 51 101 .332 38
Tuesdays Games
Toronto 2, N.Y. Yankees 0
Detroit 6, Seattle 2
Baltimore 3, Boston 2
Texas 7, Tampa Bay 1
Cincinnati 10, Houston 0
Cleveland 5, Kansas City 3
Chicago White Sox 4, Minnesota 3
Oakland 2, L.A. Angels 1
Wednesdays Games
Minnesota 4, Chicago White Sox 3
L.A. Angels 5, Oakland 4, 11 innings
N.Y. Yankees 4, Toronto 3
Seattle 8, Detroit 0
Baltimore 5, Boston 3, 12 innings
Tampa Bay 4, Texas 3, 12 innings
Kansas City 7, Cleveland 2
Cincinnati 6, Houston 5, 13 innings
Todays Games
Seattle (Paxton 2-0) at Detroit (Fister 12-9),
12:08 p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 6-9) at Cleveland (U.
Jimenez 12-9), 6:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 11-11) at Toronto (Red-
mond 3-2), 6:07 p.m.
Baltimore (Tillman 16-6) at Boston (Lackey
9-12), 6:10 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 12-9) at Tampa Bay (M.Moore
15-3), 6:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Correia 9-12) at Oakland (Straily
10-7), 9:05 p.m.
Fridays Games
Houston at Cleveland, 6:05 p.m.
San Francisco at N.Y. Yankees, 6:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 6:08 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 6:10 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 6:10 p.m.
Texas at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Oakland, 9:05 p.m.
Seattle at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 90 62 .592
Washington 81 71 .533 9
Philadelphia 71 81 .467 19
New York 68 83 .450 21
Miami 56 96 .368 34
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 89 63 .586
Pittsburgh 87 65 .572 2
Cincinnati 87 66 .569 2
Milwaukee 68 83 .450 20
Chicago 63 89 .414 26
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 87 65 .573
Arizona 77 74 .510 9
San Diego 71 80 .470 15
San Francisco 70 82 .461 17
Colorado 69 84 .451 18
Tuesdays Games
Washington 6, Atlanta 5, 1st game
Washington 4, Atlanta 0, 2nd game
Philadelphia 6, Miami 4
San Diego 5, Pittsburgh 2
San Francisco 8, N.Y. Mets 5
Milwaukee 4, Chicago Cubs 3
Cincinnati 10, Houston 0
St. Louis 11, Colorado 4
L.A. Dodgers 9, Arizona 3
Wednesdays Games
Atlanta 5, Washington 2
Miami 4, Philadelphia 3, 10 innings
San Diego 3, Pittsburgh 2
N.Y. Mets 5, San Francisco 4
Milwaukee 7, Chicago Cubs 0
St. Louis 4, Colorado 3
Cincinnati 6, Houston 5, 13 innings
Arizona 9, L.A. Dodgers 4
Todays Games
San Diego (Kennedy 6-9) at Pittsburgh (Cole
8-7), 11:35 a.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 12-9) at N.Y. Mets
(Niese 7-7), 12:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 2-2) at Milwaukee
(Lohse 10-9), 1:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Wacha 3-1) at Colorado (Oswalt 0-6),
2:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Nolasco 13-10) at Arizona (Miley
10-10), 2:40 p.m.
Miami (H.Alvarez 4-4) at Washington (G.Gon-
zalez 10-7), 6:05 p.m.
Fridays Games
Atlanta at Chicago Cubs, 1:20 p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 6:05 p.m.
Miami at Washington, 6:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 6:05 p.m.
San Francisco at N.Y. Yankees, 6:05 p.m.
Arizona at Colorado, 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 9:10 p.m.
League leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING_MiCabrera, Detroit, .347; Trout, Los
Angeles, .330; Mauer, Minnesota, .324; ABel-
tre, Texas, .317; Cano, New York, .311; DOrtiz,
Boston, .309; Hosmer, Kansas City, .303.
RUNS_Trout, Los Angeles, 108; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 100; CDavis, Baltimore, 100; AJones,
Baltimore, 97; AJackson, Detroit, 95; Encarna-
cion, Toronto, 90; Ellsbury, Boston, 89.
RBI_MiCabrera, Detroit, 134; CDavis, Balti-
more, 134; Cano, New York, 104; Encarnacion,
Toronto, 104; Fielder, Detroit, 102; AJones, Bal-
timore, 102; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 98.
HITS_ABeltre, Texas, 186; Machado, Balti-
more, 185; Trout, Los Angeles, 185; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 182; Pedroia, Boston, 181; AJones,
Baltimore, 178; Cano, New York, 177; Hosmer,
Kansas City, 177.
DOUBLES_Machado, Baltimore, 51; Lowrie,
Oakland, 43; CDavis, Baltimore, 41; Pedroia,
Boston, 40; AlRamirez, Chicago, 39; Trout, Los
Angeles, 39; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 36; Napoli,
Boston, 36; DOrtiz, Boston, 36; Saltalamac-
chia, Boston, 36.
TRIPLES_Gardner, New York, 10; Trout, Los
Angeles, 9; Ellsbury, Boston, 8; Drew, Boston,
6; AGordon, Kansas City, 6; LMartin, Texas, 6;
BMiller, Seattle, 6.
HOME RUNS_CDavis, Baltimore, 51; Mi-
Cabrera, Detroit, 44; Encarnacion, Toronto,
36; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 34; ADunn, Chicago,
32; AJones, Baltimore, 31; Longoria, Tampa
Bay, 29.
STOLEN BASES_Ellsbury, Boston, 52; RDa-
vis, Toronto, 42; Andrus, Texas, 40; Rios,
Texas, 37; Altuve, Houston, 35; Trout, Los
Angeles, 33; JDyson, Kansas City, 32; LMartin,
Texas, 32.
PITCHING_Scherzer, Detroit, 19-3; CWilson,
Los Angeles, 17-6; Colon, Oakland, 16-6; Till-
man, Baltimore, 16-6; MMoore, Tampa Bay,
15-3; AniSanchez, Detroit, 14-7; Lester, Bos-
ton, 14-8; Griffin, Oakland, 14-9; Masterson,
Cleveland, 14-10; Guthrie, Kansas City, 14-11.
ERA_AniSanchez, Detroit, 2.51; Colon, Oak-
land, 2.73; Iwakuma, Seattle, 2.76; Darvish,
Texas, 2.79; Scherzer, Detroit, 2.95; FHernan-
dez, Seattle, 3.01; Sale, Chicago, 3.08.
STRIKEOUTS_Darvish, Texas, 256; Scherzer,
Detroit, 227; Sale, Chicago, 214; FHernandez,
Seattle, 200; Verlander, Detroit, 195; Master-
son, Cleveland, 188; AniSanchez, Detroit, 188.
SAVES_JiJohnson, Baltimore, 47; MRivera,
New York, 44; GHolland, Kansas City, 43; Na-
than, Texas, 39; Balfour, Oakland, 38; AReed,
Chicago, 38; Perkins, Minnesota, 36.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING_Cuddyer, Colorado, .331; CJohn-
son, Atlanta, .327; McCutchen, Pittsburgh,
.327; MCarpenter, St. Louis, .324; Werth,
Washington, .323; YMolina, St. Louis, .319;
Craig, St. Louis, .315; Tulowitzki, Colorado,
.315.
RUNS_MCarpenter, St. Louis, 119; Choo, Cin-
cinnati, 103; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 96; Votto,
Cincinnati, 96; Holliday, St. Louis, 94; McCutch-
en, Pittsburgh, 93; JUpton, Atlanta, 91.
RBI_Goldschmidt, Arizona, 116; BPhillips, Cin-
cinnati, 101; Bruce, Cincinnati, 100; FFreeman,
Atlanta, 100; Craig, St. Louis, 97; AdGonzalez,
Los Angeles, 97; Pence, San Francisco, 93.
HITS_MCarpenter, St. Louis, 190; McCutchen,
Pittsburgh, 180; Pence, San Francisco, 174;
DanMurphy, New York, 173; Segura, Milwau-
kee, 173; Votto, Cincinnati, 170; Goldschmidt,
Arizona, 168.
DOUBLES_MCarpenter, St. Louis, 51; YMo-
lina, St. Louis, 41; Bruce, Cincinnati, 38; Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 38; Desmond, Washing-
ton, 37; GParra, Arizona, 37; DanMurphy, New
York, 36; Rizzo, Chicago, 36.
TRIPLES_SMarte, Pittsburgh, 10; Segura,
Milwaukee, 10; CGomez, Milwaukee, 9; Span,
Washington, 9; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 7;
Hechavarria, Miami, 7; Venable, San Diego, 7;
EYoung, New York, 7.
HOME RUNS_PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 33; Gold-
schmidt, Arizona, 33; Bruce, Cincinnati, 30;
DBrown, Philadelphia, 27; CGonzalez, Colora-
do, 26; JUpton, Atlanta, 26; Pence, San Fran-
cisco, 25; Zimmerman, Washington, 25.
STOLEN BASES_Segura, Milwaukee, 44;
EYoung, New York, 39; ECabrera, San Diego,
37; CGomez, Milwaukee, 36; SMarte, Pitts-
burgh, 36; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 27; Pierre,
Miami, 22; Revere, Philadelphia, 22.
PITCHING_Zimmermann, Washington, 18-8;
Wainwright, St. Louis, 17-9; JDe La Rosa, Col-
orado, 16-6; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 16-7; Greinke,
Los Angeles, 15-3; 7 tied at 14.
ERA_Kershaw, Los Angeles, 1.94; Fernandez,
Miami, 2.19; Harvey, New York, 2.27; Greinke,
Los Angeles, 2.75; Bumgarner, San Francisco,
2.83; ClLee, Philadelphia, 2.95; Strasburg,
Washington, 2.96.
STRIKEOUTS_Kershaw, Los Angeles, 214;
Wainwright, St. Louis, 209; Samardzija, Chica-
go, 203; ClLee, Philadelphia, 201; HBailey, Cin-
cinnati, 193; Harvey, New York, 191; AJBurnett,
Pittsburgh, 191.
SAVES_Kimbrel, Atlanta, 48; RSoriano, Wash-
ington, 41; Mujica, St. Louis, 37; AChapman,
Cincinnati, 36; Romo, San Francisco, 35;
Gregg, Chicago, 32; Street, San Diego, 31;
Cishek, Miami, 31.
Football
NFL standings
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 2 0 0 1.000 36 31
Miami 2 0 0 1.000 47 30
N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 28 30
Buffalo 1 1 0 .500 45 46
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 0 0 1.000 61 52
Indianapolis 1 1 0 .500 41 41
Tennessee 1 1 0 .500 40 39
Jacksonville 0 2 0 .000 11 47
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 1 1 0 .500 41 55
Cincinnati 1 1 0 .500 41 34
Pittsburgh 0 2 0 .000 19 36
Cleveland 0 2 0 .000 16 37
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 2 0 0 1.000 45 18
Denver 2 0 0 1.000 90 50
Oakland 1 1 0 .500 36 30
San Diego 1 1 0 .500 61 61
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 1 1 0 .500 52 48
Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500 63 60
N.Y. Giants 0 2 0 .000 54 77
Washington 0 2 0 .000 47 71
South
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 2 0 0 1.000 39 31
Atlanta 1 1 0 .500 48 47
Carolina 0 2 0 .000 30 36
Tampa Bay 0 2 0 .000 31 34
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 2 0 0 1.000 55 51
Detroit 1 1 0 .500 55 49
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 66 54
Minnesota 0 2 0 .000 54 65
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 2 0 0 1.000 41 10
St. Louis 1 1 0 .500 51 55
San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 37 57
Arizona 1 1 0 .500 49 48
Thursdays Game
New England 13, N.Y. Jets 10
Sundays Games
Kansas City 17, Dallas 16
Houston 30, Tennessee 24, OT
Green Bay 38, Washington 20
Chicago 31, Minnesota 30
Atlanta 31, St. Louis 24
San Diego 33, Philadelphia 30
Miami 24, Indianapolis 20
Baltimore 14, Cleveland 6
Buffalo 24, Carolina 23
Arizona 25, Detroit 21
New Orleans 16, Tampa Bay 14
Oakland 19, Jacksonville 9
Denver 41, N.Y. Giants 23
Seattle 29, San Francisco 3
Mondays Game
Cincinnati 20, Pittsburgh 10
Todays game
Kansas City at Philadelphia, 7:25 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 22
San Diego at Tennessee, noon.
Arizona at New Orleans, noon.
St. Louis at Dallas, noon.
Cleveland at Minnesota, noon.
Houston at Baltimore, noon.
N.Y. Giants at Carolina, noon.
Detroit at Washington, noon.
Tampa Bay at New England, noon.
Green Bay at Cincinnati, noon.
Atlanta at Miami, 3:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at San Francisco, 3:25 p.m.
Jacksonville at Seattle, 3:25 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, 3:25 p.m.
Chicago at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, Sep. 23
Oakland at Denver, 7:40 p.m.
Top 25 schedule
Todays game
No. 3 Clemson at NC State, 6:30 p.m.
Saturdays games
No. 1 Alabama vs. Colorado State, 6 p.m.
No. 4 Ohio State vs. Florida A&M, 11 a.m.
No. 5 Stanford vs. No. 23 Arizona State, 6 p.m.
No. 6 LSU vs. Auburn, 6:45 p.m.
No. 7 Louisville vs. Florida International, 11
a.m.
No. 8 Florida State vs. Bethune-Cookman, 5
p.m.
No. 9 Georgia vs. North Texas, 11:21 a.m.
No. 10 Texas A&M vs. SMU, 6 p.m.
No. 13 UCLA vs. New Mexico State, 9:30 p.m.
No. 15 Michigan at UConn, 7 p.m.
No. 16 Miami vs. Savannah State, 6 p.m.
No. 17 Washington vs. Idaho State, 2 p.m.
No. 18 Northwestern vs. Maine, 2:30 p.m.
No. 19 Florida vs. Tennessee, 2:30 p.m.
No. 20 Baylor vs. Louisiana-Monroe, 3 p.m.
No. 22 Notre Dame vs. Michigan State, 2:30
p.m.
No. 24 Wisconsin vs. Purdue, 2:30 p.m.
No. 25 Texas State vs. Texas Tech, 6 p.m.
Transactions
Wednesdays moves
BASEBALL
American League
DETROIT TIGERS_Announced Toledo (IL)
manager Larry Parrish will return next season.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS_Placed LHP Danny
Duffy on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Sept. 8
and 1B Carlos Pena on the 60-day DL. Select-
ed the contract of RHP Yordano Ventura from
Omaha (PCL). Recalled 3B Irving Falu and LHP
Chris Dwyer from Omaha (PCL).
TAMPA BAY RAYS_Transferred OF Brandon
Guyer to the 60-day DL. Recalled SS Tim Beck-
ham from Durham (IL). Selected the contract of
OF Freddy Guzman from Durham.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS_Placed 1B Edwin En-
carnacion and LHP Brett Cecil on the 15-day
DL; Encarnacion retroactive to Monday and
Cecil to Friday.
United League
SAN ANGELO COLTS_Exercised 2014 options
on LHP Demetrius Banks, C Tyler Wagner, INF
Steve Rinaudo and OF Justin Reed.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS_Named Lindsey
Hunter assistant coach.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL_Reduced the one-game suspension of
Tampa Bay S Dashon Goldson to a $100,000
fine. Fined Tennessee S Bernard Pollard
$42,000 for his hit on Houston WR Andre
Johnson.
CINCINNATI BENGALS_Placed DE Robert
Geathers on injured reserve. Signed CB Curtis
Marsh. Re-signed S Jeromy Miles. Released
LB J.K. Schaffer.
CLEVELAND BROWNS_Traded RB Trent
Richardson to Indianapolis for a 2014 first-
round draft pick.
DENVER BRONCOS_Placed OT Ryan Clady
on injured reserve. Signed OT Winston Justice.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS_Released FB Toben
Opurum. Signed S Bradley McDougald to the
practice squad.
Canadian Football League
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS_Added RB
Bradley Randle and OL Terriss Paliwoda to
the practice roster. Released RB Shawnbrey
McNeal from the practice roster.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS_Returned F
Oliver Bjorkstrand to Portland (WHL), D Dillon
Heatherington to Swift Current (WHL), G Os-
car Dansk to Erie (OHL), F Josh Anderson to
London (OHL) and F Nick Moutrey to Saginaw
(OHL).
DETROIT RED WINGS_Returned Fs Andreas
Athanasiou and Anthony Mantha and D Marc
McNulty to their junior teams. Released F Bar-
clay Goodrow.
WASHINGTON CAPITALS_Agreed to terms
with F Domenic Monardo on a contract with
Reading (ECHL).
WINNIPEG JETS_Agreed to terms with gener-
al manager Kevin Cheveldayoff on a contract
extension.
ECHL
GWINNETT GLADIATORS_Signed F Alex
Hutchings and D Martin Lefebvre.
COLLEGE
BYU_Suspended LB Spencer Hadley indefi-
nitely.
HOFSTRA_Named Adia Revell womens assis-
tant basketball coach.
LETOURNEAU_Named Danny Kambel sports
information director.
TEXAS-PAN AMERICAN_Named Anthony
Anderson womens assistant basketball coach.
WISCONSIN-OSHKOSH_Named Scott Beyer
womens softball coach.
Thursday Night NFL: Chiefs at Eagles
Reid returns home tonight
by ROb MAADDI
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA Andy Reid
cleared his throat, uttered some fa-
miliar phrases and downplayed his
return to Philadelphia.
Same old Andy.
Thats not where Im at right
now, Reid said when asked if its go-
ing to be emotional when his Kan-
sas City Chiefs (2-0) play the Eagles
(1-1) on Thursday night.
I dont feel that way. If we
werent playing a football game
against a good football team, maybe
your mind goes there. I dont see my
mind going there. My mind is going
to be on the job at hand and what
weve got to get accomplished in a
tough place to play.
Clearly, Reid is still a stoic guy.
But he also has to be aware of the
spicy plot in which he is the center-
piece?
Reid led the Eagles to nine play-
off appearances, six division titles,
fve NFC championship games and
one Super Bowl before he was fred
after going 4-12 last year in his 14th
season.
While hes off to an excellent
start with the Chiefs, who were 2-14
last year, Chip Kelly has reinvigorat-
ed the Eagles and their fans with his
fast-paced offense and all-around
energy.
I have great respect for Andy,
Kelly said. If youre a coach in the
NFL, anybody head coaches in one
spot for 14 years, you kind of look to
them and say, Holy Smokes! If you
just walk down these hallways and
look at the championships, the divi-
sion championships, the conference
championships, what hes done, hes
had a huge impact on this organiza-
tion.
Theres not a lot of guys out
there in this profession that carry
themselves, from a coaching stand-
point, when you get a chance to be
around them, like Andy Reid.
Five things to watch for in
Chiefs-Eagles:
WHAT GIVES ON THE
GROUND?: Led by LeSean Mc-
Coys NFL-best 237 yards rushing,
the Eagles are second in the league
with 352 yards on the ground. The
Chiefs defense is second against
the run, allowing 54 yards per
game. Something has to give.
PASS-HAPPY ANDY VS. PO-
ROUS SECONDARY: Reid has al-
ways employed a pass-frst philos-
ophy and its no different with the
Chiefs. Alex Smith has thrown on
59 percent of Kansas Citys plays,
excluding his scrambles that prob-
ably started as pass plays.
BLOCKING POE: Chiefs nose
tackle Dontari Poe already has 3
sacks, including 2 on Tony Romo
last week.
The big guy is a disruptive force
and presents a diffcult challenge
for the Eagles.
MISTAKE-FREE MIKE: Mi-
chael Vick is off to an excellent
start in Chip Kellys up-tempo of-
fense. Hes making smart decisions,
protecting the ball and operating
the read option to perfection. Vick
threw for a career-best 428 yards
last week and has a 119.0 passer
rating. Hes accounted for six TDs
(four passing, two rushing) and
zero interceptions.
TIRED LEGS: The Eagles are
the frst team in NFL history to
start the season with three games
in 11 days.
The Chiefs are playing their
third game in 12 days. Expect some
weary players out there.
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com Thursday, sepTember 19, 2013 3B
Prep Football: West Alabama Preview
Lamar County looks to nail down county championship
By Barry allen
Special to The Dispatch
VERNON, Ala. Lamar
County High School is aiming
for the Alabama High School
Activities Associations Class
2A state championship this sea-
son.
In the meanwhile, the Bull-
dogs want to nail down the La-
mar County championship.
This is a really big game
for us against a big rival, La-
mar County senior Jacob Smith
said. We want to make a deep
playoff run. We know that beat-
ing the rivals is a good way to
get that started.
Lamar County (3-0, 2-0 Re-
gion 4-2A) travels to Sulligent
(0-3, 0-2) looking to complete
the in-county series sweep of
its rivals.
Kickoff is set for 7 p.m. Fri-
day at Brown Stadium in Sulli-
gent.
Lamar County opened the
season with a 41-0 win over ri-
val South Lamar and win Friday
night against the Blue Devils
will give the Bulldogs their ffth
straight county championships.
The Bulldogs are 8-1 against
Sulligent and South Lamar
since the 2009 season.
This is big game for our
kids and the community, Ad-
ams said. This is for the coun-
ty championship and a chance
to go 3-0 in the region, which is
really important. I told our play-
ers they will never forget this
game Friday night.
Smith has helped anchor a
Lamar County defense which
has allowed 19 points all sea-
son.
We knew we had to step it
up defensively to have a chance
this season, Smith said. De-
fense is how you win champion-
ships. We knew we had the of-
fense to go a long way. We just
had to become more physical
and do a better job on that side
of the ball.
Sulligent own a 34-28-5 all-
time series lead but the Bull-
dogs have won the last four
meetings, including last years
18-14 nail-biter in Vernon, Ala.
Lamar County posted a 6-3 win
in its last trip to Sulligent in
2011.
The defning moment of the
season thus far came in the re-
gion opener against Oakman in
week two. The Bulldogs held a
slim 21-19 lead and took over
the ball inside their own 1-yard
line following a punt. Lamar
County proceeded to march 99
yards and chewed up more than
10 minutes off the clock for a
game-clinching touchdown in a
28-19 win.
I think that showed a lot
about this team and the mental-
ity that we are trying to have,
Adams said. Now we have to
continue to build off that each
week.
Adams said the success of
the team has come from the of-
fensive and defensive line, and
that the defense has played sol-
id all year as a unit.
The Bulldogs defense al-
lowed 340 points in 13 games
last season and two teams
scored more than 50 points.
This year, Lamar County is al-
lowing 6.3 points per game and
pitched two shutouts in wins
over South Lamar (41-0) and
R.C. Hatch (45-0).
Our whole defensive unit
has played really well, Adams
said. They remember back to
last year and there were times
we gave up a ton of points. That
has been one of our selling
points this year.
Smith, juniors Jeremy Den-
ton, Christian Clay and Devante
McClellan, and sophomore
Temijah Lang have provided a
solid foundation up front.
Our theme is do you job, do
it well and when you get there
arrive in a bad mood. We have
gotten more guys around the
football this year because they
have taken that approach.
Sulligent (0-3, 0-2 Class 2A,
Region 4) is seeking its frst win
of the season. The Blue Devils
have struggled on both sides of
the ball this season. They have
been outscored 108-17 against
Hamilton (42-0), Cold Springs
(20-14) and Aliceville (46-3).
West AlAbAmA schedule Week 4
All games Friday at 7 p.m.
n Cold Springs (2-1) at Aliceville (2-1)
Aliceville looks for a 3-0 start in Region 4-2A play ... The Yellow Jackets
have already won twice on the road in region play and are averaging
30.3 points per game ... In a win over Sulligent, Christopher Crowell
had eight receptions for 130 yards and a touchdown
n Brilliant (2-1) at Pickens County (3-0)
Pickens County has scored 138 points in the last two weeks, includ-
ing a 78-point outburst last week against Lynn ... Senior quarterback
Devonte Simon scored six touchdowns against Lynn ... The Tornadoes
have scored 70 or more points three times under coach Patrick Plott
n South Lamar (0-3) at Lynn (1-2)
South Lamar hopes to end a 14-game losing streak when the Stal-
lions travel to Lynn ... South Lamar was outscored 92-7 in the frst
two games of the season by Lamar County and Pickens County, but
showed marked improvement last week in a 22-12 loss to Brilliant ...
Canaan Fleming had two touchdowns for the Stallions in that defeat
n Pickens Acad. (3-0) at South Choctaw (1-2)
Pickens Academy seeks their second consecutive 4-0 start ... Senior
quarterback Josh Lewis put on another show last Friday night as
Pickens Academy defeated Southern Academy 35-18. Lewis rushed for
261 yards and two touchdowns, while also throwing a 40-yard touch-
down and returning an interception 50 yards for another score
By MaTTHeW STeVenS
mstevens@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE Dev-
on Bells attitude isnt like
most kickers and that
might just be his problem.
The Mississippi State
sophomore kicker isnt
always calm and doesnt
have a casual view of life
and his job on the football
feld. He wants badly to
be a incredibly reliable
feld goal kicker and that
burning desire is what
his coach feels like is his
hurdle to becoming a sig-
nature weapon for MSU in
2013.
Devon is a big effort
guy and kicking is a skill,
MSU coach Dan Mullen
said. Thats something
we constantly talk about:
Is the skill related to the
effort? Sometimes he
starts trying harder and
harder.
Bells constant search-
ing for answers has led
to confounding statistics
from feld goals from 30-
39 yards away, arguably
the most common feld
goal attempts in football.
From that specifc dis-
tance range, Bell is cur-
rently 6-of-12 in 16 career
games including missing
a 35-yard attempt wide
right in the frst quarter
Saturday in a 24-20 loss at
Auburn.
Its not a mental prob-
lem I need to overcome,
Im not nervous and Im
not thinking about other
things, Bell said Mon-
day. Im simply kicking
the ball too hard, period.
Its an easy fx.
So in Bells mind the
easy fx can be correct-
ed before MSU (1-2) takes
the feld to host Troy (2-1)
Saturday night at Davis
Wade Stadium (6:30 p.m.,
FSN South). However,
Mullen has concerns
Bell actually has a bet-
ter percentage on feld
goals beyond 40 yards (5-
of-8) in his college career
and was recruited to MSU
from Warren Central
High School in Vicksburg
for the strength of his leg.
Mullen, who has
coached the special teams
in a staff effort, compared
Bells struggled with mid-
range feld goals to skill
of swinging a golf club in
terms of the rhythm and
consistency required.
The harder you try to
swing (a golf club) when
you get frustrated, the
more sideways its going
to go, Mullen said. As a
effort guy, hes got to stop
the effort and focus on the
skill and its sometimes
hard to do for a young
player.
Bell is actually a avid
and profcient golfer and
compared his mentality
on mid-range feld goals
as standing on the tee
overlooking a very diff-
cult par-4 hole.
Its like pulling driver
on a tight par-4 and then
trying to hit the ball as
hard as you can, Bell said
of his current mindset on
all feld goals. Who cares
how far the ball goes if its
not straight?
Out of high school,
Bell was named frst-
team All-America selec-
tion by Sports Illustrat-
ed. His best prep game
was where he connected
on four feld goals, in-
cluding a career-long 55
yard attempt against Jim
Hill High School and his
strong leg made him an
easy selection to partici-
pate in the Mississippi-Al-
abama All-Star Game,
where he connected on
a 30-yard feld goal. Bell
was the frst kicker re-
cruited by Mullens staff
at MSU and eventually de-
cided to stay at home by
picking Mississippi State
over Ole Miss, Auburn or
Florida State.
While he was at MSUs
Big Dawg Camp two
years ago, former MSU
kicker Brian Hazelwood
was a guest instructor
and instantly saw the raw
tools that Mullen and the
MSU staff saw in Bell. He
also saw a mentality thats
just different than a nor-
mal kicker.
I love his mentality
because if he misses a
kick, hes out of his mind
but he wants to go harder,
harder, harder but some-
times you have to work
on the skill aspect and not
the effort, Mullen said.
Last season as a fresh-
man Bell set three indi-
vidual season records
by hitting 14-of-21 feld
goals, 43-of-44 PATs
and averaged 60.3 yards
on 64 kickoffs, with 13
touchbacks. He fnished
the 2012 regular season
seventh in scoring among
true freshmen in Football
Bowl Subdivision pro-
grams with 85 points.
The MSU sophomore
kicker understands he
must turn around this
slump because hes going
to be asked at least once
in the fnal nine games to
attempt a incredibly im-
portant kick where itll be
thousands of fans watch-
ing him alone. MSU walk-
on kicker Evan Sobiesk
has only attempted and
converted on two extra
point attempts in his col-
lege career.
I get that Im the one
thats got to put the ball
through the uprights for
my team and put points
on the board, Bell said.
Thats my job.
One of Mullens favor-
ite things about Bell is his
mentality to demand he
be treated like a football
player and not just a kick-
er as the specialists have
a tendency to be looked
upon as independently
contracted from the team.
Ive always been a
competitive, Type-A per-
sonality and thats just
how Im comfortable feel-
ing about life, Bell said.
Its the most diffcult
thing for me to dial back
the effort in order for bet-
ter results. Not too many
things are that way in this
world.
However, now that hes
on campus as the only
scholarship kicker on the
roster, Mullen would like
Bell to rein back on his
intensity as he tries to
overcome his slump on
mid-range kicks.
He has a very strong
leg. With him, its that
consistency, MSUs ffth-
year head coach said. He
just needs to have a nice,
smooth consistent leg
swing. That leg swing will
make the feld goals. He
doesnt need to kick it like
a kickoff every time.
Follow Matt Stevens
on Twitter @matthewcste-
vens.
Kicker Bell still searching for confdence with the Bulldogs
Skinner
continued from Page 1b
we started getting the
three-and-outs on defense,
we started noticing that we
were having more fun but
still doing our jobs at the
same time.
Skinner and his ability
to react to the zone-read
option better than in the
season-opening loss to
then No. 13 Oklahoma
State was a big reason why
Auburns highly acclaimed
running attack was held
to just 120 yards Saturday.
The Tigers running backs
Tre Mason, Corey Grant
and Cameron Artis-Payne
werent able to get to the
perimeter and held to just
3.33 yards per carry.
Our main thing each
and every week is to stop
the run frst as a point of
pride for this defense,
Skinner said. I take it
upon myself to make sure
teams cant run the ball
physically on us because
thats simply an effort
thing. Stopping the pass
gets more into scheme and
coaching. Run defense is
how much does one side
want it.
On a defense that is
void of much senior lead-
ership, Skinner is seen as
a veteran among arguably
the deepest talent pools
position-wise for the Bull-
dogs on that side of the
ball. He arrived at MSU as
a 230-pound athlete that
needed to be coached di-
rectly the intricacy of play-
ing linebacker consistently
in the SEC. Five years lat-
er, Skinner is a 250-pound
ready-made prospect in
the middle of the feld that
has eye of many scouts
and player personnel ex-
ecutives in the National
Football League as a pos-
sible middle to late round
selection.
Skinner brings plen-
ty of size to the inside of
the Bulldogs linebacking
corps, NFL.com draft
analyst Chase Goodbread
said after watching Skin-
ner practice in August.
Skinner started every
game last season and is
showing good instincts for
fnding the ball between
the tackles.
Skinner has learned
slowly the instincts need-
ed to be a highly produc-
tive linebacker after dom-
inating at defensive end
as a senior for coach M.C.
Miller at Noxubee County
High School. He led his Ti-
gers team to the Class 4A
championship as a senior
but was considered a proj-
ect at the next level after
being ranked as the No. 28
strong linebacker prospect
in the country by national
recruiting website Scout.
com.
Even as a ffth-year se-
nior, youll still see Skin-
ner using his Twitter ac-
count or on the sidelines
in person on Friday nights
supporting the defending
Class 4A champion Noxu-
bee County program now
led by Tyrone Shorter.
Off the feld, Skin-
ner has even rebounded
from the controversy of
two years ago when he
was arrested in July 2011
on a domestic violence
charge where it was later
determined Justice Court
judge to have the charges
retired. Because of how
he conducted himself
through that process and
handled the negative at-
tention brought to Skinner
and the MSU program for
a short time in that sum-
mer, Skinner is seen as
a person open to talking
with younger players on
their responsibilities once
they arrive on campus.
Its also why he was a easy
choice by the committee
for the Butkus Award, giv-
en to the best linebacker in
college football, to put him
on its preseason watch list
for the 2013 season.
From the time Ive got
here to where he is right
now, youre talking about a
unbelievable human being
and a high character play-
er for us in this program,
Collins said.
Follow Matt Stevens on
Twitter @matthewcstevens.
Falcons
continued from Page 1b
cons had two days of
hard, physical practices,
which made him believe
the team would be ready
come game night.
Our kids have bought
into believing the weight
room has made us better
and were getting real
physical, and people dont
like to play us because we
are so physical, Stanford
said. I think it is true. We
have gotten to where we
can stand in there with
West Point and South Pa-
nola and play as physical
as they do. I think we have
proven that the last couple
of years. What gives us
the most trouble is those
spread-out teams.
Against the Wildcats,
the Falcons likely will try
to use their physicality
up front to get pressure
on Roberts so he doesnt
have time.
If Columbus cant use
its strength to control
Roberts and Louisville,
it could be a long eve-
ning. But Stanford feels
his players will be up for
a new and different chal-
lenge Friday and in the
weeks to come when they
begin region play.
I think they feel they
did something people
didnt think they could
do, Stanford said. They
met the challenge, and
now they have to do it
week in and week out.
That is the challenge. You
have 15-, 16, 17-year-old
young men. Their mind
changes from week to
week. They have to learn
to control their thinking
and be ready for a chal-
lenge every week. They
cant come back fat af-
ter playing a real good
ballgame. That will be
the biggest problem this
week. Are they going to
show up or are they going
to come out fat?
college Football
By erIC OlSOn
The Associated Press
Nebraska is ready to move on from Bo Pelinis
profane rant against fans two years ago.
Chancellor Harvey Perlman and athletic di-
rector Shawn Eichorst said in a joint statement
Wednesday that they believe the football coach
was sincere in his apology for what he said in an
audio leaked to the Deadspin.com sports website
this week.
There was no mention of any disciplinary ac-
tion taken against Pelini.
The comments made by Head Football
Coach Bo Pelini in 2011, published Monday, are
unfortunate and deeply concerning to us, as they
would be to anyone who loves this university,
the statement said. Our coaches, staff and stu-
dent-athletes must be held to a high standard
and Coach Pelinis remarks were unfair to the
legions of Nebraska fans and not what we expect
from a representative of this university.
Perlman and Eichorst declined interview re-
quests. Messages were left for Pelini.
Pelinis rant has captivated a Cornhuskers fan
base that has sold out an NCAA-record 328 con-
secutive games since 1962.
Pelini became unhinged minutes after the
Huskers had beaten Ohio State 34-27 in Lincoln
in October 2011.
The Deadspin audio caught Pelini speaking
off air with Husker Sports Network play-by-play
man Greg Sharpe and associate athletic director
for community relations Chris Anderson.
Nebraska backs Pelini
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com Thursday, sepTember 19, 2013 5b
Business
money tip
n Choose home repair contractors wisely. Favor con-
tractors who have successfully performed work for people
you know. Insist on a written, fxed-price bid. Dont make
full payment until satisfactory completion of the work.
Source: americasaves.org
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Where Do Dividends
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GoBox acquires RDI
Rob Graham, President
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sion. RDI Founder, Rus-
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Business Brief Building permits
City of Starkville
Aug. 1-31
n 209-B Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.;
Commercial Addition; Armor Fire &
Safety
n 801 Russell St.; Commercial Addi-
tion; Nix-Unger Construction
n 100 Fellowship St.; Commercial
Electrical; Live Wire Electric
n 400 Russell St.; Demolition; Burns
Dirt Construction
n 17 Canal St.; Demolition; Owner
n 618 Sherwood Road; Foundation;
Springer Engineering
n 101 Northgate Drive; Residential
Addition; Owner
n 301 Washington St. S.; Residential
Addition; Joe Couvillion
n 207 Montgomery St. N.; Residential
Addition; Owner
n 1000 Louisville St.; Residential
Electrical; Joe Gaskin Electric
n 700 Old West Point Road; Residen-
tial Electrical; Live Wire Electric
n 904 Imes St.; Residential Electric;
Live Wire Electric
n 500 Linden Circle; Residential Elec-
tric; Travis Coleman
n 208 Lindbergh Blvd.; Residential
Gas; Dennis Dill
n 609 McKee St.; Residential Gas;
Owner
n 505 Montgomery St. N.; Residential
Gas; Robert Turnipseed
n 403-B University Drive; Residential
Gas; Kane Overstreet
n 511 Jackson St. S.; Residential New
Construction; Charles E. Morgan
n 139 Cherokee Drive; Residential
New Construction; Carson Creations
n 115 Suzanne Ave.; Residential New
Construction; Charles E. Morgan
n 205 Suzanne Ave.; Residential New
Construction; Charles E. Morgan
n 155 Cherokee Drive; Residential
New Construction; Carson Creations
n 1010 Lynn Lane; Sign Construction;
Gentry Signs
n 101 Academy Road; Sign Construc-
tion; Mid-South Signs
n 518 Montgomery St. S.; Sign Con-
struction; Mitchell Signs
n 1301 Stark Road; Sign Construc-
tion; All South Signs, Inc.
n 905 Stark Road; Sign Construction;
Mitchell Signs
n 305 Highway 182E; Sign Construc-
tion; Sign Design
n 111 Laurel East Cove; Swimming
Pool; TNT Pool Consultant
n 310 Washington St. S.; Erosion
Control; Joe Couvillion
n 139 Cherokee Drive; Erosion Con-
trol; Carson Creations
n 115 Suzanne Ave.; Erosion Control;
Charles E. Morgan
n 400 Russell St.; Erosion Control;
Burns Dirt Construction
n 205 Suzanne Drive; Suzanne Ave.;
Erosion Control; Charles E. Morgan
n 155 Cherokee Drive; Erosion Con-
trol; Carson Creations
n 17 Canal St.; Erosion Control; Owner
n 207 Montgomery St. N.; Erosion
Control; Owner
Lowndes County
Sept. 18
n Steven Smith; North Smith Mill
Road; Construct Storage/Shop; Owner
n David Phillips; 30 Valleybrook Drive;
Construct Storage/Shop; Custom
Home Builders
n Barry Goode; 346 Mill Road; Con-
struct Storage/Shop; Owner
n Mike and Martha Ellis; Mockingbird
Lane; Construct Single Family Resi-
dence; Omni Contracting
n Myra Reeves; 5828 Highway 50
E. Move Mobile Home; Alans Mobile
Home
n Myra Reeves; 5828 Highway 50 E.;
Set Up Mobile Home; Jimmy Estes
n Jim Garrett; 7710 Wolfe Road; Con-
struct Storage/Shop; Owner
Get promoted? Win an award? Send us your business brief.
news@cdispatch.com subject: Business brief
DILBERT
ZITS
GARFIELD
CANDORVILLE
BABY BLUES
BEETLE BAILEY
DOONESBURY
MALLARD FILMORE
FOR SOLUTION SEE THE
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
IN CLASSIFIEDS
FAMILY CIRCUS
D
EAR ABBY:
In response
to Contem-
plating Change
in Rhode Island
(June 23), who
is considering
retiring with a
friend to a city
with a warmer
climate, I would
offer the same
advice we have
given our friends.
She should know
that shell need
to be proactive
in developing a
social network in
her new location.
My wife and I also moved
far south when we retired.
We wanted neighbors with a
variety of ages so we could
hear children play nearby from
time to time. We purchased a
house in a normal neighbor-
hood instead of a retirement
community. But we soon
realized that, unlike us, our
neighbors had jobs, family
responsibilities and little time
for us. More disconcerting was
going grocery shopping and no
longer seeing the three or four
acquaintances we would see
back home.
Without jobs to occupy our
time and give us a framework
for social contact, we found
ourselves isolated. To solve
that problem we joined organi-
zations and did volunteer work
to meet new friends. Our story
has a happy ending, but it took
some effort to make it hap-
pen. Contemplating should
be prepared to do the same.
MIKE IN SPARKS, NEV.
DEAR MIKE: Contemplat-
ing Change
asked if readers
had experience
moving far away
at her age (late
60s). You, and
many others,
wrote to share
overwhelmingly
positive feed-
back. Thank you
for it:
DEAR ABBY:
For the women
planning to buy a
retirement home
together, please
tell them there
are wonderful
places everywhere. I have
moved 15 times since the age
of 70 and at 91 am moving
again. (No, I am not trying to
stay ahead of the sheriff.) I
have sought more pleasant
climates as well as the com-
pany of ambitious writers. For
the last move, I am going to a
retirement community where I
dont have to cook, wash dish-
es or clean house because itll
be done for me. LIFETIME
WRITER IN SEDONA, ARIZ.
DEAR ABBY: I want to
encourage your Rhode Island
reader. Renting frst is excel-
lent advice. Research what
you want in your new destina-
tion. Make sure its a growing
community where transplants
will be welcome.
Be outgoing. Join a church,
community center or other
place to meet people. No one
will beat a path to your door or
care about your former home.
Dont make negative compari-
sons to locals, and dont cling
to your old friend.
If all goes well, consider
buying a twin home/duplex
where you can be close but
have your own space. Im glad
I moved. I now have more
diverse friends than ever
before. RETIREE IN SOUTH
CAROLINA
DEAR ABBY: Yes rent
frst to check housemate com-
patibility. As to a new social
community, check out nearby
colleges or universities. Many
offer programs for creative
learning in retirement or some-
thing similar. One can make
friends with shared interests
through classes. Also, fnd a
local newcomers club.
NANCY IN ASHEVILLE, N.C.
DEAR ABBY: Youre never
too old to make new friends.
My suggestion to the ladies
would be to consider buying
what is referred to as a park
model (manufactured home)
in an RV park. They could even
try renting one in a few differ-
ent parks to get a feel for the
park and location. These parks
have all kinds of activities go-
ing on from morning til night.
MICHIGAN SNOWBIRD
DEAR ABBY: Moving into
an over-55 community was
the perfect solution when we
relocated. There was instant
community with loads of activi-
ties and opportunities to make
new friends.
When you buy, make sure
you own the land as well as
the house. Public libraries,
churches, schools and nursing
homes will welcome you
as volunteers, and you can
become as immersed in the
new community as you want.
We LOVE being relocated.
MARJORIE IN LONGMONT,
COLO.
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com 6B Thursday, sepTember 19, 2013
Comics & Puzzles
Dear Abby
Dear Abby
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Sept.
19). As levelheaded as you
are, you still believe you can
create an existence thats
entirely different from the one
that surrounds you now and
youre right! The lucky place
you land in October is just the
beginning. Your concentrated,
organized effort will continue
through 2014. By July, the
transformation is complete.
Leo and Scorpio people adore
you. Your lucky numbers are:
24, 12, 8, 6 and 26.
ARIES (March 21-April
19). When its not going your
way, you may feel like sulking,
panicking, throwing a tantrum
or making an impulsive move,
but you dont because youre
not a child. Your restraint will
be rewarded.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20). Insecurity is only a habit,
and habits can be broken.
If you feel worry creeping
in, have a talk with yourself.
Confdence is also a habit,
and youll fall right into it in
tonights social setting.
GEMINI (May 21-June
21). As for that thing that was
bothering you yesterday, today
youll be feeling a lot smarter
about things and more aware
of the entire spectrum of pos-
sible solutions.
CANCER (June 22-July
22). Control is an illusion, not
a solution to lifes problems.
Needing, craving and seeking
control are all things that
people do when they lack
a deep-seated confdence.
Youre so attractive when you
go the other direction.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22).
You dont have to know what
youre looking for to fnd a
stellar deal. The best part is
that when you stumble upon
greatness, you recognize it
and seize the opportunities
therein.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Youll have the urge to create
order, so follow through. Tak-
ing the time to organize your
world will bring stress levels
down for you and for everyone
you interact with from now
through the weekend.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
Beware of people who feel the
need to describe themselves
to you. Youll come to your
own conclusion about who
someone is by the actions
that person takes. Stories and
preferences also provide good
clues.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
21). Spending time with
children, creative people,
entertainers and others who
lack inhibition will inspire you
to freely shed a few layers of
self-consciousness and have
fun.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21). You have that
wow factor now, and people
will want to hear more about
whats going on in your life and
business. Take numbers so
you can follow up later when
you have more time.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). Finally, youll spend time
with a comfortable person you
so enjoy. Its refreshing that
you dont have to jump through
hoops or pretend to be who
youre not to get somewhere
with this person.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). Social niceties come eas-
ily to you, but you dont always
choose to use them. In todays
case, you sense it will be more
effective to bluntly say what
you mean.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20). You certainly dont need
validation now, and yet its
still thrilling to hear favorable
comments. The person who
recognizes your uniqueness
will also steal your heart.
Horoscopes
By KEN SWEET
AP Markets Writer
NEW YORK The stock
market hit a record high
Wednesday as investors cheered
the Federal Reserves surprise
decision to keep its economic
stimulus program in place.
Stocks traded slightly lower
throughout the morning, but
took off immediately after the
Feds decision in the early after-
noon. Bond yields fell sharply
their biggest move in nearly
two years. The price of gold had
its biggest one-day jump in four
years as traders anticipated that
the Feds decision might cause
infation.
Fed policymakers decided to
maintain the central banks $85
billion in monthly bond purchas-
es, a program that has been in
place since December 2012. The
bond purchases encouraged
borrowing by keeping interest
rates low and encouraging in-
vestors to buy stocks by making
bonds more expensive in com-
parison.
While the U.S. economy
appeared to be improving, the
banks policymakers decid-
ed to await more evidence that
progress will be sustained be-
fore deciding to slow the bond
purchases. The bank also cut its
full-year economic outlook for
this year and next.
Stock traders shrugged off
the Feds dimmer outlook and
focused on the prospect of con-
tinued stimulus.
The S&P 500 surged 20.76
points, or 1.2 percent, to
1,725.52, slicing through its pre-
vious all-time high of 1,709.67
set on Aug. 2.
The Dow Jones industrial
average jumped 147.21 points,
or 1 percent, to 15,676.94, also
above its previous record high of
15,658.36 from Aug. 2.
The fate of the Feds econom-
ic stimulus program has been
the biggest question on Wall
Street for months. It was widely
expected that the Fed would cut
back on its bond buying at the
September meeting.
Stock market sets record after Fed keeps stimulus
Gold had biggest one-day jump in four years
THE DISPATCH cdispatch.com THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 7B
662-328-2424 | 662-329-1521 FX | classieds@cdispatch.com | cdispatch.com/classieds
INDEX
0 Legals
100 Service
103 Air Conditioning & Heating
106 Appliance Repair
107 Asphalt & Paving
109 Automotive Services
112 Building & Remodeling
115 Carpeting/Flooring
118 Childcare
121 Chimney Cleaning
124 Contractors
125 Computer Services
127 Electrical
130 Excavating
132 Fitness Training
133 Furniture Repair &
Renishing
136 General Services
138 Housecleaning
139 Insulation
140 Insurance
141 Interior Decorators
144 Jewelry/Watch Repair
147 Lawn Care/Landscaping
150 Locksmiths
153 Machinery Repair
156 Mobile Home Services
159 Moving & Storage
162 Painting & Papering
165 Pest Control
168 Plumbing
171 Printing
174 Roong & Guttering
177 Saws & Lawn Mowers
178 Sitting with Elderly/Sick
179 Stump Removal
180 Swimming Pools
183 Tax Service
186 Tree Service
189 Upholstery
191 Welding
200 Announcements
205 Card of Thanks
210 Fraternal & Lodge
215 Good Things To Eat
220 In Memorial
225 Instruction & School
230 Lost & Found
235 Personals
240 Special Notices
260 Travel/Entertainment
300 Employment
305 Clerical & Ofce
310 Data Processing/ Computer
315 Domestic Help
317 Engineering
320 General Help Wanted
325 Management Positions
330 Medical/Dental
335 Opportunity Information
340 Part-Time
345 Positions Wanted
350 Professional
355 Restaurant/Hotel
360 Sales/Marketing
365 Trades
370 Truck Driving
400 Merchandise
403 Air Conditioners
406 Antiques
409 Appliances
412 Auctions
415 Baby Articles
418 Bargain Column
421 Bicycles
424 Building Materials
425 Burial Plots
427 Business Furniture &
Equipment
430 Camera Equipment
433 Clothing
436 Coins & Jewelry
439 Computer Equipment
442 Farm Equipment & Supplies
445 Firewood
446 Flea Markets
448 Furniture
451 Garage Sales
454 General Merchandise
457 Household Goods
463 Lawn & Garden
466 Merchandise Rentals
469 Musical Instruments
470 Satellites
472 Sporting Goods
475 Stereos & TVs
478 Wanted To Buy
500 Pets & Livestock
510 Free Pets
515 Pets
520 Horses/Cattle/Livestock
525 Pet Boarding/Grooming
530 Supplies/Accessories
535 Veterinarians
540 Wanted To Buy
600 Financial
605 Business Opportunity
610 Business Opportunity
Wanted
612 Check Cashing
615 Insurance
620 Loans
625 Mortgages
630 Stocks & Bonds
635 Business for Sale
700 Rentals
705 Apartments
710 Commercial Property
715 Houses
718 Hunting Land
719 Land for Rent/Lease
720 Mobile Homes
725 Mobile Home Spaces
730 Ofce Spaces
735 Resort Rentals
740 River Property
745 Rooms
750 Storage & Garages
752 Vacation Rentals
755 Wanted to Rent
760 Waterfront Property
800 Real Estate
805 Commercial Property
810 Farms & Timberland
815 Houses - Northside
820 Houses - East
825 Houses - New Hope
830 Houses - South
835 Houses - West
845 Houses - Caledonia
850 Houses - Other
852 Hunting Land
855 Investment Property
860 Lots & Acreage
865 Mobile Homes
870 Mobile Home Spaces
875 Resort Property
880 River Property
885 Wanted to Buy
890 Waterfront Property
900 Transportation
905 Auto Accessories/Parts
910 Auto Rentals & Leasing
915 Autos for Sale
920 Aviation
925 Boats & Marine
930 Camper/R.V.s
935 Golf Carts
940 Motorcycles/ATVs
945 Trailers/Heavy Equipment
950 Trucks, Vans & Buses
955 Wanted to Buy
THE DISPATCH
CLASSIFIEDS
DEADLINES (Deadlines subject to change.)
For Placing/Canceling Classied Line Ads:
Sunday paper deadline is Thursday 5:00 P.M.
Monday paper deadline is Friday 12:00 P.M.
Tuesday paper deadline is Monday 12:00 P.M.
Wednesday paper deadline is Tuesday 12:00 P.M.
Thursday paper deadline is Wednesday 12:00 P.M.
Friday paper deadline is Thursday 12:00 P.M.
LEGAL NOTICES deadline is 3 business days prior to rst
publication date
Please read your ad on the rst day of publication. We accept responsibility only for the rst
incorrect insertion. | The Publisher assumes no nancial responsibility for errors nor for
omission of copy. Liability shall not exceed the cost of that portion of space occupied by such
error. | All questions regarding classied ads currently running should be directed to the
Classied Department. | All ads are subject to the approval of this paper. The Commercial
Dispatch reserves the right to reject, revise, classify or cancel any advertising at any time.
Advertisements must be paid for in advance.
You may cancel at any time during regular business hours and receive a refund for days not published.
FREE SERVICES
Bargain Column Up to 4 lines (approximately 20 characters per
line). Runs for 3 days. For items $100 or less ONLY. More than one item
may be in same ad, but combined prices can not exceed $100.
Free Pets Up to 4 lines. Runs for 3 days.
Lost & Found Up to 4 lines. Runs for 3 days.
These ads are taken by fax, e-mail or in person at our ofce.
Free ads will not be take by telephone.
DAILY RATES
4 Lines/6 Days
$19.20
4 Lines/12 Days
$30.20
4 Lines/26 Days
$46.80
Rate applies to
commercial operations
and merchandise
over $1,000.
Call 328-2424 for rates
on additional lines.
SUPER SAVER
6 Days $12.00
12 Days $18.00
Over 6 lines is $1 per
additional line.
Six lines or less, consecu-
tive days. | Rate applies
to private party ads of
non-commercial nature
for merchandise under
$1,000. Must include
price in ad.
1 ITEM PER AD.
No pets, rewood, etc.
GARAGE SALE
4 Lines/1 Day
$9.20
4 Lines/3 Days
$18.00
Price includes 2 free
garage sale signs.
RAIN GUARANTEE:
If it rains the day of
your sale, we will
re-run your ad the next
week FREE! You must
call to request free
re-run.
WANTED: MULE or
horse drawn wagon for
rides at a party on
11/2/13 from 2-5pm.
Call 240-9703
Wanted 540
SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPS
Rare solid white/blue
eyes. DOB 8/20. Price
negotiable. Call 662-
328-6890 or 617-5449
BORDER COLLIE with
papers. 1 yr. old mother
w/5 wk. old male pup.
$300 obo. 328-2749
5 FEMALE CKC minia-
ture long haired
Dachshund puppies.
Parents on site. $400.
Call 662-549-2608
Pets 515
10 WK. old female Ger-
man Shepard mix pup-
py. Loveable. 329-3105
Free Pets 510
GUN SMITH. Over 45
yrs. exp. (As good as
the best, better than
most). New & used
guns, new scopes, re-
pairs rebuilding, clean-
ing & scopes, mounted
& zeroed on range, an-
tique guns restored, &
wood refinished. Ed
Sanders, West Point. 3
mi. N. Barton Ferry on
Darracott Rd. Open Tue-
Sat. Call for appt. 494-
6218
Sporting
Goods 472
HOTDOG CART. Stain-
less steel. Grill with
boiler, umbrella, bread-
box, flags, accessories
& misc. Propane.
$2500. 407-716-1446
General
Merchandise 460
226 DEERTRAIL off
Pleasant Hill Rd. 3 Fami-
ly sale Fri. & Sat. 7am
until. Lots of goodies!
Garage Sales:
New Hope 453
20 JUSTIN Circle. Sat.
7-12pm. Sectional sofa
& recliner, stove, desk
& numerous other items
Garage Sales:
North 452
BEAUTIFUL CHINA clos-
et/display cabinet. Oak
finish. $300. Old 3
drawer single dresser.
Oak finish. Good cond.
$100. 2 wht. angel
lamps $25 both. Secre-
tary. Mahogany. No
doors. $100. Tall book
case. Blk. $15. Call
327-4775. Leave mes-
sage
Furniture 448
SOLID WOOD chester
drawers, older but in
great condition. $65
firm. 662 -368-1523
SOCCER CLEATS, Nike
T-90, sz. 10. $20. 35
practice softballs, good
shape. $35.549-0010
SET OF bunk beds
with mattresses.$65 for
both or $35 for one.
Call 327-4009
PLAYPEN FOR sale. Ex-
cellent condition $50.
Call 662-352-9484
NICE CLOTH easy chair.
$30. 30 pair ladies high
heel shoes. New. $60.
Call 386-1859
JVC CD player with de-
tachable face for auto.
$75. Call 270-991-
9299
HUSKY WET saw. $75.
Call 270-991-9299
CHESTNUT SLEIGH bed
frame. Very nice. $100.
251-9968
BABY TOYS for birth to
2 yrs. Ex. cond. Too
many to name. $50 for
all. Call 662-352-9484
2 MATCHING wood end
tbls. $35 ea. Paisley full
comforter set. $29.
244-0416
Bargain
Column 418
Wonderful Estate sale
of Rhonda Cribbs
Junkin. 7813 Hwy. 12 E.
Steens, MS 39766. Fri.
9/20 & Sat. 9/21, 9-5
pm, Sun. 9/22, 1-4pm.
Beard/Walker Estates.
Pics@estatesale.net
Auctions 412
WE SELL used appli-
ances & haul off your
old ones. CALL 662-
549-5860 or 662-364-
7779
Appliances 409
NOW HIRING weekend
& part-time local drivers.
Must have Class A CDL
& dump trailer exp. Call
or come by Volume
Freight. 662-434- 6506
Truck Driving 370
NATIONWIDE DEMOLI-
TION company is seek-
ing experienced demoli-
tion laborers, riggers &
burners for a local job in
West Point, MS. Must
be able to pass physical
& drug screening. Must
be dependable & have
your own transportation.
10 Hr. OSHA a plus, but
not required. Must
speak English. Please
call 770-621-8495
Trades 365
WORK FROM home, re-
tire early. Send email
to: soundman900@
gmail.com for link to
free video
Opportunity
Information 335
PHLEBOTOMY
CERTIFICATION
Workshop
9/28/13
Fee $400
877-741-1996
www.medical2.com
Medical &
Dental 330
SERVICE PERSON
needed for mobile home
park. References & ex-
perience required. Must
have own transporta-
tion. Call 434-6000 to
inquire
SEEKING SANTA Claus.
Looking for an individual
with a real beard to be
Santa Claus in the area.
Must be able to work ev-
ery day starting Nov 16 -
Dec 24 & have a REAL
white beard. Please
email photo & resume
to: info@thesantahous
es.com. 205-201-3893
RESIDENTIAL MAINTE-
NANCE technician want-
ed in Columbus, MS.
Position is full-time. Ex-
cellent benefits & com-
petitive salary. Must be
EPA & HVAC type II or
higher certified. For con-
sideration fax resume to
662-327-0091
PAINTERS WANTED
Residential
Must have references
& over 5 years
experience. Call Derek
662-364-0048
OVERALL HANDYMAN
needed, who does not
mind hard work. Send
resume to Box 497 C/O
The Commercial Dis-
patch, P.O. Box 511,
Columbus, MS, 39703
MECHANICAL CON-
TRACTOR in Aliceville,
Al has openings for X-
Ray Carbon & Stainless
Pipe Welders & X-Ray
Carbon & Stainless
Plate Welders. No
phone calls. Please mail
resume to PO Box 441,
Aliceville, Al 35442.
Attn: Recruiting or email
to deborah@lavender
inc.com
HVAC TECHNICIANS
wanted. STAR SERVICE,
INC. of JACKSON is tak-
ing applications for em-
ployment in the COLUM-
BUS/STARKSVILLE
area. Exc. bnfts/in-
come. For confidential
consideration, call or
forward resume to: Stan
Rasberry, STAR SER-
VICE, INC. P.O. Box
720339, Byram, MS
39272. Phone: 1-800-
478-0486; Fax: 601-
373-0459. www.star-
service.com
COMMERCIAL LINES
customer service repre-
sentative. Must be a
motivated & hard-work-
ing team player. Salary
neg. Based on experi-
ence. Benefits package
included. Send resume
to Swoope Insurance
Agency, PO Box 787,
Columbus, MS 39703
CALEDONIA UNITED
Methodist Church seeks
pianist for Sunday morn-
ing worship service &
choir practice on Wed.
nights. Salary commen-
surate with experience
& ability. To audition
email resume with pi-
anist in the subject to:
to jonbob@bellsouth.
net
ATTENTION. UP TO
$800 Bi-Weekly. Per
agreement, due to mas-
sive expansion rapid ad-
vancement with leader-
ship positions available.
Start immediately no ex-
perience necessary neat
in appearance. 662-
268-8085
General Help
Wanted 320
GROWING STARKVILLE
company needs experi-
enced accountant or
bookkeeper. Quickbooks
experience required.
Fast pace, exciting
growth & opportunities.
Send resume with
salary requirements to:
accprofits2013@
gmail.com. EOE
Clerical &
Office 305
Adoption:
Affectionate, Artistic,
Musical, Financially
Secure Couple await
baby. Expenses paid.
800-557-9529
Lisa & Kenny
Special
Notices 240
LET US HELP find your
lost pet. Email, fax, mail
or bring your information
by the office and we will
run your lost & found ad
in the Pet Finder for 3
days FREE!
LOST BRN/GRAY
striped Tabby. Female.
Frankie $100 reward.
417-838-8918
Lost & Found 230
~Fully Insured ~Big
trees ~Small trees
~Trees over house
~Storm cleanup ~
~Brush clearing~ FREE
QUOTES. Call today.
662-801-7511
J.R. BOURLAND
Tree & Stump
Removal. Trimming
w/bucket truck
Licensed & Bonded
Firewood 4 sale LWB
$75. 662-574-1621
J&A TREE REMOVAL
Work from a bucket
truck. Insured/bonded.
Call Jimmy for a
free estimate
662-386-6286
A&T Tree Service
Bucket truck & stump
removal. Free est.
Serving Columbus since
1987. Senior citizen
disc. Call Alvin @
242-0324 / 241-4447.
We'll go out on a limb
for you!
Tree Service 186
SULLIVAN'S PAINT
SERVICE
Certified in lead removal
Offering special prices
on interior & exterior
painting, pressure
washing & sheet rock
repairs. Free Estimates
Call 435-6528
QUALITY PAINTING.
Int/ext, sheetrock repair
& finishing, pressure
washing. No job too
large or small. Free est.
435-0882
Painting &
Papering 162
JESSE & BEVERLY'S
LAWN SERVICE
Mowing, landscaping,
tree cutting, sodding &
clean-up. 356-6525
MURRAY'S LAWN
service of Caledonia.
Let me help you clear
your property. Bush hog-
ging, tilling & leveling.
Very reasonable prices.
Also do commercial cut-
ting. Call 662-242-8809
J&R LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & weed eating
reasonable rates & ex-
cellent service. Trim
hedges & prune. Call
662-574-0786 for free
estimate
Lawn Care
Landscaping 147
RETAINER WALL, drive-
way, foundation, con-
crete/riff raft drainage
work, remodeling, base-
ment foundation, re-
pairs, small dump truck
hauling (5-6 yd) load &
demolition/lot cleaning.
Burr Masonry 242-0259
MICHELE'S A-1 clean-
ing. Antebellum homes,
business, residential,
steam cleaning. Free
est. & ref. Mention ad,
10% off. 205-399-6182
General
Services 136
TOM HATCHER, LLC
Custom Construction,
Restoration, Remodel-
ing, Repair, Insurance
claims. 662-364-1769.
Licensed & Bonded
TODD PARKS
CONSTRUCTION
New Construction, Re-
modeling, Repairs, Con-
crete. Free est. Call or
email 662-889-8662 or
toddparks.construction
@gmail.com
REMODELING OF all
types. Apartment main-
tenance, brick masonry,
stone work & painting.
Free estimates. 574-
7325 or 570-3430.
HAMLETT'S
CONSTRUCTION
Painting and all types
of home repairs,
inside & out & more
662-386-1234
DOUG'S HOME Improve-
ments. Remodeling con-
tractor for 35 yrs. We do
pressure washing. Ser-
vicing the Golden Tri-
area 423-582-0482
Building &
Remodeling 112
CASH FOR your car?
Don't sell or trade
your used car for
less than it's worth!
For the most cash call
662-574-3527
Automotive
Services 109
I WILL CONVEY only such title as
vested in me as Substituted
Trustee.
WITNESS MY SIGNATURE on
this 28th day of August, 2013.
Shapiro & Massey, LLC
SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEE
Shapiro & Massey, LLC
1910 Lakeland Drive
Suite B
Jackson, MS 39216
(601)981-9299
706 Spruce Street
Columbus, MS 39702
13-006529JC
Publication Dates: September 5,
12, 19, and 26, 2013
Legal Notices 001
SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEE'S
NOTICE OF SALE
WHEREAS, on August 11, 2006,
Exzell Williams, a married man,
and wife, Crystal Williams exe-
cuted a certain deed of trust to
Jay Morris, Attorney Morris &
McCalla, Trustee for the benefit
of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A.
which deed of trust is of record
in the office of the Chancery
Clerk of Lowndes County, State
of Mississippi in Book 2006 at
Page 22605; and
WHEREAS, JPMorgan Chase
Bank, National Association has
heretofore substituted Shapiro &
Massey, LLC as Trustee by in-
strument dated February 13,
2013 and recorded in the afore-
said Chancery Clerk's Office in
Bk Mort 2013 at Page 5612;
and
WHEREAS, default having been
made in the terms and condi-
tions of said deed of trust and
the entire debt secured thereby
having been declared to be due
and payable in accordance with
the terms of said deed of trust,
JPMorgan Chase Bank, National
Association, the legal holder of
said indebtedness, having re-
quested the undersigned Substi-
tuted Trustee to execute the
trust and sell said land and
property in accordance with the
terms of said deed of trust and
for the purpose of raising the
sums due thereunder, together
with attorney's fees, trustee's
fees and expense of sale.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, Shapiro &
Massey, LLC, Substituted
Trustee in said deed of trust, will
on October 3, 2013 offer for
sale at public outcry and sell
within legal hours (being be-
tween the hours of 11:00 a.m.
and 4:00 p.m.), at the South-
east Door of the County Court-
house of Lowndes County, locat-
ed at Columbus, Mississippi, to
the highest and best bidder for
cash the following described
property situated in Lowndes
County, State of Mississippi, to-
wit:
Lot No. One Hundred Fifty (150)
in Chilcutt Subdivision, First Ex-
tension, a subdivision of Lown-
des County, Mississippi, as
shown by plat recorded in Plat
Book 2, Page 30 in the office of
the Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi; SUBJECT
TO restrictive covenants and
conditions contained in instru-
ment dated July 18, 1958, and
recorded in Book 280 at Page
456.
continued next column
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI
COUNTY OF LOWNDES
NOTICE OF SALE
WHEREAS, the following ten-
ants entered into leases with
FRIENDLY CITY MINI-WARE-
HOUSES for storage space in
which to store personal property
and
WHEREAS, default has been
made in the payment of rent and
FRIENDLY CITY MINI-WARE-
HOUSES pursuant to said Leas-
es is authorized to sell the per-
sonal property to satisfy the
past due and any other charges
owed to it by the following ten-
ants.
NOW THEREFORE, notice is
hereby given that FRIENDLY CITY
MINI-WAREHOUSES will offer for
sale, and will sale at auction to
the highest bidder for cash all
personal property in storage
units leased by the following ten-
ants at FRIENDLY CITY MINI-
WAREHOUSES 308 Shoney
Drive Columbus, MS, immediate-
ly following sale on Alabama
Street on the 4
th
day of October
A.D. 2013.
Title to the personal property
to be sold is believed to be
good, but at such sale, FRIEND-
LY CITY MINI-WAREHOUSES will
convey only such title as is vest-
ed in it pursuant to its lease
with the following and its al-
lowed under Mississippi Code
Annotated Section 85-7-121 et
seq (Supp 1988).
William Broothroyd #219N
Brittany Daniel #73N
Jeremie Harris #237N
Yolanda Moore #27N
WITNESS MY SIGNATURE on
this the 3
rd
day of September,
A.D. 2013.
FRIENDLY CITY
MINI-WAREHOUSES
BY: LO
9/5, 9/12 & 9/19/2013
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI
COUNTY OF LOWNDES
Letters Testamentary have been
granted and issued to the under-
signed upon the Estate of Wal-
traud Erika Shephard,
Deceased, by the Chancery
Court of Lowndes County, Mis-
sissippi on the 27
th
day of Au-
gust, 2013. This is to give no-
tice to all persons having claims
against said estate to probate
and register same with the
Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, within 90
(ninety) days from this date. A
failure to so probate and regis-
ter said claim will forever bar the
same.
This the 27
th
day of August,
2013.
Ingetraut Archer,
Executrix of the Estate of
Waltraud Erika Shephard,
Deceased
Publication dates: 9/19, 9/26 &
10/3/2013
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI
COUNTY OF LOWNDES
CAUSE NO: 2013-0135
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Letters Testamentary having
been granted and issued to the
undersigned upon the Estate of
Doris A. Payton, deceased, by
the Chancery Court of Lowndes
County, Mississippi on the 3
rd
day of September, 2013. This is
to give notice to all persons hav-
ing claims against said estate to
probate and register same with
the Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi within 90
days from the date of the first
publication of this notice. A fail-
ure to so probate and register
this claim will forever bar the
same.
This the 4
th
day of September,
2013.
/s/ Charles Miller, Co-Executor
/s/ Brenda Aldridge, Co-Execu-
tor
Publish: 9/12, 9/19 &
9/26/2013
fice of the Chancery Clerk of
Lowndes County, Mississippi.
Suspect to that certain ease-
ment for ingress and egress
conveyed to Mid-South Ware-
housing dated March 28, 2008
and recorded in Deed Book
2008 at Page 2319 in the office
of the Chancery Clerk of Lown-
des County, Mississippi.
I will convey only such title as
is vested in me as Substitute
Trustee.
WITNESS my signature this
the 3rd day of September,
2013.
Jeremy L. Retherford,
Substitute Trustee
Publish: 9/5, 9/12, 9/19 &
9/26/2013
Legal Notices 001
ceiver for Tennessee Commerce
Bank, Franklin, Tennessee, as
evidenced by that certain Assign-
ment of Real Estate Deed of
Trust with an effective date of
October 18, 2012 and recorded
at Book 2012, Page 26750 in
the Office of the Chancery Clerk
of Lowndes County, Mississippi,
the holder of the Deed of Trust
and indebtedness secured there-
by, substituted Jeremy L. Rether-
ford, as Trustee therein, as au-
thorized by the terms thereof, by
instrument dated the 26th day
of July, 2013 and recorded in
the office of the Chancery Clerk
of Lowndes County, Mississippi,
at Book 2013, Page 22499;
NOW THEREFORE, I, Jeremy
L. Retherford, Substitute
Trustee of the Deed of Trust will
on the 27th day of September,
2013, offer for sale at public
outcry, and sell within legal
hours (being between the hours
of 11:00 AM and 4:00 PM) at
the front door of the County
Courthouse of the County of
Lowndes, at Columbus, Missis-
sippi to the highest and best bid-
der for cash the following de-
scribed property situated in the
County of Lowndes, State of
Mississippi, to-wit:
A TRACT OF LAND BEING LOCAT-
ED IN THE SOUTH HALF (S 1/2)
OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER
(SE 1/4) OF THE SOUTHWEST
QUARTER (SW 1/4) OF SECTION
26 AND ALSO IN THE NORTH
HALF (N 1/2) OF THE NORTH-
EAST QUARTER (NE 1/4) AND
PARTIALLY IN THE NORTHEAST
QUARTER (NE 1/4) OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW
1/4) OF SECTION 35 AND ALSO
IN THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER
(SW 1/4) OF THE SOUTHWEST
QUARTER (SW 1/4) OF SECTION
25, TOWNSHIP 19 NORTH,
RANGE 17 EAST, LOWNDES
COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI AND
MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCING AT AN IRON PIN
MARKING THE SOUTHEAST COR-
NER OF SAID SECTION26; RUN
THENCE SOUTH 62 DEGREES
52 MINUTES WEST A DISTANCE
OF 2040.4 FEET TO AN IRON
PIN; RUN THENCE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 07 MINUTES WEST A
DISTANCE OF 620.2 FEET INTO
AN IRON PIN; RUN THENCE
NORTH 00 DEGREES 53 MIN-
UTES WEST A DISTANCE OF
250.0 FEET TO AN IRON PIN;
RUN THENCE SOUTH 88 DE-
GREES 17 MINUTES WEST A
DISTANCE OF 639.9 FEET TO AN
IRON PIN ON THE EAST RIGHT-
OF-WAY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO.
45; RUN THENCE NORTH 28 DE-
GREES 53 MINUTES EAST AND
ALONG SAID EAST RIGHT-OF-
WAY A DISTANCE OF 695.3
FEET TO A POINT; RUN THENCE
NORTHEASTERLY ALONG A
CURVE TO THE RIGHT AND
ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY A
DISTANCE OF 1317.6 FEET
(DELTA = 42 DEGREES, 14 MIN-
UTES, RADIUS = 1787.6 FEET,
CHORD BEARING: NORTH 50
DEGREES 12 MINUTES EAST
1288.0 FEET) TO A POINT ON
THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
MISSISSIPPI HIGHWAY NO. 182
(OLD U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 82);
RUN THENCE NORTH 73 DE-
GREES 37 MINUTES EAST AND
ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
OF SAID MISSISSIPPI HIGHWAY
NO. 182 A DISTANCE OF
1985.4 FEET TO A POINT; RUN
THENCE SOUTH 27 DEGREES
08 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE
OF 1074.9 FEET TO A POINT;
RUN THENCE SOUTH 62 DE-
GREES 52 MINUTES WEST A
DISTANCE OF 7187.7 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND
CONTAINING 100.0 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS.
LESS AND EXCEPT that a certain
4.79 acre tract heretofore con-
veyed to Mid-South Warehousing
and as described in Deed Book
2010 at Page 85 in the office of
the Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi. ALSO,
LESS AND EXCEPT that certain .
43 acre tract conveyed to Mid-
South Warehousing in Deed
Book 2010 at Page 90 in the of-
continued next column
Legal Notices 001
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI
COUNTY OF LOWNDES
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S
NOTICE OF SALE
WHEREAS, on the 28th day of
January, 2007, Magnolia Motor-
plex Associates, LLC executed a
Deed of Trust, Assignment of
Leases and Rents, and Security
Agreement to David A. Rueff, Jr.,
Trustee, Tennessee Commerce
Bank, Beneficiary, which Deed of
Trust is on file and of record in
the office of the Chancery Clerk
of Lowndes County, Mississippi,
at Book 2008, Page 3283, as
modified by document dated
April 2, 2008 that is on file and
of record in the Office of the
Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, at Book
2008, Page 10565 and as mod-
ified by document dated June
22, 2009 that is on file and of
record in the Office of the
Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, at Book
2009, Page 15030 (the Deed
of Trust ); and
WHEREAS default having
been made in the terms and
conditions of said Deed of Trust
and the entire debt secured
thereby having been declared to
be due and payable in accor-
dance with the terms of said
Deed of Trust, the Beneficiary
having requested the under-
signed Substitute Trustee to ex-
ecute the trust and sell said
land and property in accordance
with the terms of said Deed of
Trust for the purpose of raising
the sums due thereunder,
WHEREAS, 2012-SIP-1, Ven-
ture, LLC, a Delaware limited lia-
bility company, as assignee of
the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation in its capacity as re-
continued next column
IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF
LOWNDES COUNTY, MISSISSIP-
PI
IN THE MATTER OF THE LAST
WILL AND TESTAMENT OF EU-
NICE JETHROE
CASE NO. 2013-0068
NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF EU-
NICE JETHROE
Notice is hereby given that Let-
ters Testamentary upon the Will
of EUNICE JETHROE, deceased,
were granted to the undersigned
on August 30, 2013, by the
Chancery Court of Lowndes, Mis-
sissippi, in Cause No. 2013-
0068 upon the docket of said
Court, and all persons having
claims against EUNICE
JETHROE, and her estate shall
present them to the Clerk of the
Chancery Court of Lowndes
County, Mississippi, within (90)
days from the date of this notice
to be filed and probated or they
will forever barred.
This the 19
th
day of August,
2013.
/s/ Ronald V. Jethroe
Publish: 9/19, 9/263 &
10/3/2013
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 AT
PAGE 69 IN THE OFFICE OF THE
CHANCERY CLERK OF LOWNDES
COUNTY MISSISSIPPI. IMPROVE-
MENTS THEREON BEAR THE
MUNICIPAL NO. 813 HEMLOCK
STREET COLUMBUS, MS 39702
THIS ACT IS MADE SUBJECT TO
ANY AND ALL RESTRICTIONS,
EASEMENTS, SERVITUDES, EN-
CUMBRANCES, AND/OR RIGHTS
OF WAY THAT MAY APPEAR IN
THE CHAIN OF TITLE. PROPERTY
ADDRESS: The street address of
the property is believed to be
813 HEMLOCK STREET, COLUM-
BUS, MS 39702. In the event of
any discrepancy between this
street address and the legal de-
scription of the property, the le-
gal description shall control. Ti-
tle to the above described prop-
erty is believed to be good, but I
will convey only such title as is
vested in me as Substitute
Trustee.
THIS LAW FIRM IS ATTEMPTING
TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY IN-
FORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE
USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.
Rubin Lublin, LLC,
Substitute Trustee
1675 Lakeland Drive,
Suite 403
Jackson, MS 39216
www.rubinlublin.com/property
-listings.php
Tel: (877) 813-0992
Fax: (404) 601-5846
PUBLISH: 09/05/2013,
09/12/2013, 09/19/2013,
09/26/2013
Legal Notices 001
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE`S SALE
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI
COUNTY OF LOWNDES
WHEREAS, default has occurred
in the performance of the
covenants, terms and conditions
of a Deed of Trust dated April
22, 2008, executed by SEAN A.
GRAHAM AND SYLVIA WHITE
GRAHAM, conveying certain real
property therein described to
MELISSA H. TALLON, as
Trustee, for MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYS-
TEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR
AXION MORTGAGE GROUP, LLC.,
Original Beneficiary, to secure
the indebtedness therein de-
scribed, as same appears of
record in the office of the
Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi filed and
recorded May 2, 2008, in Deed
Book 2008, Page 11735; and
WHEREAS, on August 21, 2013,
the undersigned, Rubin Lublin,
LLC has been appointed as Sub-
stitute Trustee by instrument
recorded in the office of the
aforesaid Chancery Clerk in
Deed Book 2013, Page 23669;
and NOW, THEREFORE, the hold-
er of said Deed of Trust, having
requested the undersigned so to
do, as Substitute Trustee or his
duly appointed agent, by virtue
of the power, duty and authority
vested and imposed upon said
Substitute Trustee shall, on Oc-
tober 3, 2013 within the lawful
hours of sale between 11:00AM
and 4:00PM at the southeast
front door of Courthouse pro-
ceed to sell at public outcry to
the highest and best bidder for
cash or certified funds ONLY,
the following described property
situated in Lowndes County,
Mississippi, to wit: LOT NO.
TWENTY EIGHT (28) OF CHIL-
CUTT SUBDIVISION, THIRD EX-
TENSION, A SUBDIVISION OF
LOWNDES COUNTY, MISSISSIP-
PI, AS SHOWN BY PLAT
continued next column
NING AT THE SOUTHEAST COR-
NER OF THE NORTHWEST QUAR-
TER OF THE NORTHWEST QUAR-
TER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP
17 SOUTH, RANGE 17 WEST,
LOWNDES COUNTY, MISSISSIP-
PI; THENCE NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 16 MINUTES EAST
ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF SAID
QUARTER-QUARTER SECTION OF
1066.1 FEET; THENCE NORTH
86 DEGREES 06 MINUTES
WEST PARALLEL TO THE SOUTH
RIGHT OF WAY OF A PUBLIC
ROAD KNOWN AS WOODLAWN
ROAD FOR 1854.3 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES
48 MINUTES WEST FOR 177
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 13 DE-
GREES 17 MINUTES EAST FOR
153.1 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE
SOUTH 13 DEGREES 17 MIN-
UTES EAST FOR 162.5 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 75 DEGREES
14 MINUTES WEST FOR 200.9
FEET TO THE EAST RIGHT OF
WAY OF A PUBLIC ROAD KNOWN
AS CALEDONIA-STEENS ROAD
(25 FEET FROM CENTERLINE);
THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG A
CURVE TO THE LEFT (DELTA-03
DEGREES 25 MINUTES, RADIUS
= 2518.5 FEET, CHORD =
NORTH 16 DEGREES 28 MIN-
UTES WEST - 150 FEET) FOR
150 FEET; THENCE NORTH 71
DEGREES 50 MINUTES EAST
FOR 209.9 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EX-
CEPT ALL OIL GAS AND OTHER
MINERALS LYING, ON AND UN-
DER THE ABOVE DESCRIBED
PROPERTY. SUBJECTTO RE-
STRICTIVE COVENANTS AND
CONDITIONS CONTAINED IN AN
INSTRUMENT RECORDED IN
DEED BOOK 1080 AT PAGES
538-542, INCLUSIVE, IN SAID
LAND RECORDS. PROPERTY AD-
DRESS:
The street address of the prop-
erty is believed to be 1332
CALEDONIA STEENS ROAD,
STEENS, MS 39766. In the
event of any discrepancy be-
tween this street address and
the legal description of the prop-
erty, the legal description shall
control. Title to the above de-
scribed property is believed to
be good, but I will convey only
such title as is vested in me as
Substitute Trustee.
THIS LAW FIRM IS ATTEMPTING
TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY IN-
FORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE
USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.
Rubin Lublin, LLC,
Substitute Trustee
1675 Lakeland Drive,
Suite 403
Jackson, MS 39216
www.rubinlublin.com/property
-listings.php
Tel: (877) 813-0992
Fax: (404) 601-5846
PUBLISH: 9/19, 09/26, 10/03
& 10/10/2013
Legal Notices 001
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE`S SALE
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI
COUNTY OF LOWNDES
WHEREAS, default has occurred
in the performance of the
covenants, terms and conditions
of a Deed of Trust dated Novem-
ber 19, 2009, executed by
TROY KEITH DRIVER AND JULIA
KIRK, conveying certain real
property therein described to J.
DOUGLAS DALRYMPLE, as
Trustee, for MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYS-
TEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR
WEST ALABAMA BANK & TRUST,
Original Beneficiary, to secure
the indebtedness therein de-
scribed, as same appears of
record in the office of the
Chancery Clerk of Lowndes
County, Mississippi filed and
recorded November 25, 2009,
in Deed Book 2009, Page
27840; and
WHEREAS, on August 30, 2013,
the undersigned, Rubin Lublin,
LLC has been appointed as Sub-
stitute Trustee by instrument
recorded in the office of the
aforesaid Chancery Clerk in
Deed Book 2013, Page 24429;
and
NOW, THEREFORE, the holder of
said Deed of Trust, having re-
quested the undersigned so to
do, as Substitute Trustee or his
duly appointed agent, by virtue
of the power, duty and authority
vested and imposed upon said
Substitute Trustee shall, on Oc-
tober 17, 2013 within the lawful
hours of sale between 11:00AM
and 4:00PM at the southeast
front door of Courthouse pro-
ceed to sell at public outcry to
the highest and best bidder for
cash or certified funds ONLY,
the following described property
situated in Lowndes County,
Mississippi, to wit:
TRACT OF LAND CONTAINING
0.74 ACRE, MORE OR LESS, LY-
ING THE NORTHEAST QUARTER
OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER
OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 17
SOUTH, RANGE 17 WEST, AND
ALSO KNOWN AS LOT 19 OF
SHILOH PLACE, AN UNRECORD-
ED SUBDIVISION, ALL IN LOWN-
DES COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI, BE-
ING MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN-
continued next column
IN THE CHANCERY COURT
OF LOWNDES COUNTY,
MISSISSIPPI
IN RE: ESTATE OF
THELMA CANTRELL DEE, DE-
CEASED
KATHRYN HALES DEE (WHALEN)
EXECUTRIX
NO. 2013-0141
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Notice is hereby given that all
persons having claims against
the Estate of Thelma Cantrell
Dee, Deceased, are required to
have the same probated and
registered by the Clerk of the
Chancery Court of Lowndes
County, Mississippi; that the
Letters Testamentary were
granted to the undersigned
Kathryn Hales Dee (Whalen), by
the Chancery Court of Lowndes
County, Mississippi in Cause
No. 20113-0089, on the 27
th
day of August, 2013; that a fail-
ure to probate and register such
claims with the Clerk of the
Chancery Court of Lowndes
County, Mississippi for ninety
(90) days, from the first publica-
tion hereof, will bar such claims.
Witness my signature on this the
28th day of August 28th, 2013.
Kathryn Hales Dee Whalen, Ex-
ecutrix of the Estate of
Thelma Cantrell Dee
PUBLISH: 9/5, 9/12 &
9/19/2013
Legal Notices 001
IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF
LOWNDES COUNTY,
MISSISSIPPI
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF WILLIE ALMA CALDWELL,
DECEASED
NO: 2013-0112
SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION
TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS-AT-
LAW, NEXT-OF-KIN AND
BENEFICIARIES OF WILLIE ALMA
CALDWELL, DECEASED
You have been made a Defen-
dant in the suit filed in this
Court by Ruth Shaw, petitioner,
seeking determination of heir-
ship, next-of-kin and beneficia-
ries of Willie Alma Caldwell, de-
ceased.
You are summoned to appear
and defend against the com-
plaint or petition filed against
you in this action at 9:30 on the
21
st
day of October, 2013, in
the courtroom of the Lowndes
County Courthouse at
Columbus, Mississippi, and in
case of your failure to appear
and defend a judgment will be
entered against you for the mon-
ey or other things demanded in
the complaint or petition.
Issued under my hand and seal
of said Court, this the 10
th
day
of September, 2013.
Lisa Neese, Clerk
Lowndes County Chancery Court
Post Office Box 684
Columbus, Mississippi, 39703-
0684
By: Tina Fisher, D.C.
Publish: 9/19, 9/26 &
9/3/2013
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI
COUNTY OF LOWNDES
NOTICE OF SALE
WHEREAS, the following ten-
ants entered into leases with
FRIENDLY CITY MINI-WAREHOUS-
ES for storage space in which to
store personal property and
WHEREAS, default has been
made in the payment of rent and
FRIENDLY CITY MINI-WAREHOUS-
ES pursuant to said Leases is
authorized to sell the personal
property to satisfy the past due
and any other charges owed to it
by the following tenants.
NOW THEREFORE, notice is
hereby given that FRIENDLY CITY
MINI-WAREHOUSES will offer for
sale, and will sale at auction to
the highest bidder for cash all
personal property in storage
units leased by the following ten-
ants at FRIENDLY CITY MINI-
WAREHOUSES 903 Alabama St.
Columbus, MS, at 8:30 am on
the 4
th
day of October, A.D.
2013.
Title to the personal property
to be sold is believed to be
good, but at such sale, FRIEND-
LY CITY MINI-WAREHOUSES will
convey only such title as is vest-
ed in it pursuant to its lease with
the following and its allowed un-
der Mississippi Code Annotated
Section 85-7-121 et seq (Supp
1988).
Demetrius Woodrick #221E
Tommy Williams #301E
Terosa A. Ross #241E
Alice Stroud #223E
Ed Clemmons #306E
Debbie Clemmons #60E

WITNESS MY SIGNATURE on this
the 3
rd
day of September, A.D.
2013.
FRIENDLY CITY
MINI-WAREHOUSES
By: L.O.
Publish: 9/4, 9/15 &
9/19/2013
Legal Notices 001
Columbus Orthopaedic
Clinic is seeking an
Experienced Telephone
operator/scheduler
needed for busy
Orthopaedic Clinic.
Please fax your resume
to 662-328-9918 or
drop off your resume to
the clinic at 670 Leigh
Dr., Columbus, MS.
Please do not call the clinic as it will
only delay someone responding to you.
w
w
w
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p
u
b
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i
c
n
o
t
i
c
e
a
d
s
.
c
o
m
/
M
S
/
LEGAL NOTICES
published in
this newspaper
and other
Mississippi
newspapers are
on the
INTERNET
THE DISPATCH www.cdispatch.com 8B THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
Sudoku
YESTERDAYS ANSWER
Sudoku is a number-
placing puzzle based on
a 9x9 grid with several
given numbers. The object
is to place the numbers
1 to 9 in the empty spaces
so that each row, each
column and each 3x3 box
contains the same number
only once. The difIcul|y
level increases from
Monday to Sunday.
Green Party
WHATZIT ANSWER
ACROSS
1 Fashion
6 URL part
11 Gay (historic
bomber)
12 Off limits
13 Most new drivers
14 Skilled
15 Smooth and
lustrous
17 Hot brew
19 Purpose
20 Comics offering
23 Words from an
insulted friend
25 Lug
26 Fizzles
28 Cockpit guesses
29 Doctoral papers
30 Wine choice
31 Writer Rita
Brown
32 Spot
33 Spanish city
35 Plane part
38 Celtic priest
41 Acrobatic
42 Coffee bar order
43 Eccentric
44 Hawke of Holly-
wood
DOWN
1 Old hand
2 Wallet bill
3 Proceeds
4 Arm bone
5 New Yorks time
zone
6 Position
7 Lords wife
8 Playwright
Burrows
9 Soak up
10 Sizzling
16 All things
considered
17 Bengal beast
18 Ham it up
20 Deteriorates
21 Grows in
Brooklyn
22 Gaggle members
24 Naval initials
25 English article
27 Cajole
31 Till ll
33 Incline
34 Blast it!
35 Scoundrel
36 In the past
37 Drill part
39 Give rest!
40 Comfy room
Five Questions
1 The
Philadelphia
Story
2 Ronald
Reagan (by
being elected
in a year end-
ing with o
and surviving
his term)
3 The
Discovery
Channel
4 Bolivia
5 Jesus
CARS
HOUSES
FURNITURE
LOTS
PETS
& MORE...
<RX FDQ QG RU VHOO MXVW DERXW
DQ\WKLQJLQ7KH&ODVVLHGV
CALL US AT
662-328-2424
RUHPDLOXVDWFODVVLHGV#
FGLVSDWFKFRPWRSODFHDQDG
LQWKH
2002 EZ Go golf cart.
Canopy, good tires,
windshield, new battery.
$1900. 662-312-3929
1989 CLUB Car golf
cart. Electric. New
brakes, new front tires,
cover. Runs great.
$1200. Call 662-328-
0914
Golf Carts 935
TOMBIGBEE RIVER RV
Park. 85 Nash Rd. Full
hookups, $295/mo.
Has pavillion w/bath-
house & laundry. Call
328-8655 or 574-7879
2006 PROWLER. 29 ft,
bumper pull, dining
room slide out, new
canopy, hitch included.
Queen bed & full bed
with bunk on top. Call
436-8575
1996 WINNEBAGO Vec-
tra Grand Tour Class A
RV with rear vision cam-
era/monitor and many
extras. Little over
35,000 miles. Asking
$18,500. Call 662-889-
0892
Campers &
RV's 930
NEED A
CAR?
Guaranteed
Credit Approval!
No Turn
Downs!
We offer late model
vehicles w/warranty.
Call us!
We will take an
application over the
phone!
We help rebuild your
credit.
Tousley Motors
662-329-4221
4782 Hwy 45 North
(by Shell Station
& 373 Turn Off )
Autos For Sale 915
UNBELIEVABLE DEAL:
For Sale a New 2013
Southern Rooster 16
x80 3BR/2BA. Incl. lg.
kitchen w/blk appli-
ances, lots of cabinet
space, glamour bath,
vinyl siding/shingled
roof, Ashley Furniture,
washer/dryer, & more!
All for only $245 (plus
escrow) per month! Call
Southern Colonel
Homes, Meridian at 1-
877-684-4857 for more
info. www.southern
colonelmeridian.com
MUST SEE to believe.
2007 River Birch 32x76
4BR/2BA manufactured
home. Large master
bedroom/bath. Must be
moved. Asking payoff
only. Contact Deborah
364-8408
LOW PRICE
GUARANTEE!!
Find your best deal on a
new manufactured
home & I will beat it
guaranteed. Call me to-
day @ 662-213-3648
LOVELY 4BR/2BA
home sitting on a nice
community lake. Home
has many updates &
has been very well main-
tained. Home has brand
new roof & a very large
shop. Possible owner fi-
nancing. Call Kimberly
Reed @ Crye-Leike. 662-
364-1423
4 YRS. free lot rent!!!!
That's right!....4 yrs.
free lot rent at The
Grove Mobile Home
Community! Beautiful
new energy-efficient,
16x80 Clayton home.
3BR/2BA. Move in to-
day at 508 Lehmberg
Rd, Columbus, MS. Call
662-329-9110 for more
details
FOOTBALL KICKOFF
SPECIAL: For Sale. a
New 2013 Southern Es-
tates 28x80, BR/2BA.
Includes floated
sheetrock, awesome
kitchen w/black appli-
ances, huge bedrooms
w/walk in closets, Ash-
ley Furniture, washer/
dryer, 50 TV & much
more! All for only
$387 (plus escrow)!
Call Southern Colonel
Homes, Meridian at 1-
877-684-4857 for de-
tails. www.southern
colonelmeridian.com
Mobile Homes
For Sale 865
LAST 4BR/2BA! Don't
miss out on this home.
DW ready to move in at
The Grove Mobile Home
Community. Easy financ-
ing avail. Only $27,900.
Call 662-329-9110 for
more info today!
BANK REPOS
I have access to 100's
of bank owned repos &
with 575 credit & 10%
down we can put you
into one today. Call
662-213-3648
2005 RIVERBIRCH
Mobile home.
16X80. 3BR/2BA.
Includes 5 ton heating &
cooling unit & dishwash-
er. Must be moved.
PRICE REDUCED!!!
Call 205-712-9325
1995 PALM Harbor. Set
up in The Grove. New
roof, new a/c, 2 cov-
ered porches, carport,
covered patio, landscap-
ing & many extras.
$35k. Must see to ap-
preciate. Call 662-244-
8997
Mobile Homes
For Sale 865
MINI FARM. 11 ac. New
Hope school dist. Has
county water & paved
frontage (Blalock Rd).
Pasture land, barn, & hd
timber, mostly fenced
w/slagged private en-
trance. Priced to sell at
$59,900. 662-549-
8711 or 205-391-8606
SUMMER SIZZLER. 2
acre lots. Good/bad
credit. $995 down.
$197/mo. Eaton Land.
662-726-9648
6 LOTS. Approx. ac.
ea. Some adjoin. New
Hope, Lake Lowndes
area. $8,900 ea. 662-
328-4090/662-328-
9418. Leave message
35 ACRES in N.H. w/24
yr. old pines. $3500/
ac. Will divide into 10
ac. plots. 1.8 ac. on
Tiffany Ln. $7500. 915
6
th
St. S. $4000. Owner
fin. avail. 386-6619
10 AC. 8 mi. E. of West
Point on Clisby Rd. Con-
tact Willie B. Griffin.
1212 Torbert Dr. West
Point. 39773. Located
between West Point
High & Main St. Right of
Eshman Ave. No phone
calls. 1
St
& highest bid-
der
Lots &
Acreage 860
QUIET COUNTRY hill-
side setting with
3BR/2BA, remodeled
home with large in-
ground pool and large
extensively wired shop.
$149,900. FMI call
662-570-9842
BEAUTIFUL CABIN
on 88 ac. Cabin & land
in West Lowndes. 88
ac. of beautiful country
with a 7 ac. lake full of
bass, crappie & other
fish. Land also includes
2 barns, 1 wired, w/7
horse stalls, tack rm. &
extra rm. for storage.
The other is typical pole
barn used to store
equip, etc. Perfect for
horses &/or cattle.
Land is cross fenced &
has plenty of pasture
space. Cabin is 2BR/
1BA with huge living rm,
gorgeous 18 ft. ceilings
& stone fireplace. All
new stainless appli-
ances. Must see to ap-
preciate the beauty! Call
662-549-5588 for more
info. Asking $340,000
3BR/2BA. 1520 sf. Al-
most 1 ac, carport, 2 lg.
Decks, cypress, metal
roof. AL state line.
50/96. $975/mo. or
sell for $145k. 662-
574-5557
3BR/2.5BA, lg. office,
2400 sf, 30 ac. of beau-
tiful rolling hills, 6 mi.
from Vernon, AL. Paved
rd, county water, 2 lg.
hay barns, 48x28 in
ground pool, lg. deck &
full basement. Lots of
extras. Too many to list.
205-695-7688 or 205-
712-0445
Houses For Sale:
Other 850
NEW CONSTRUCTION
6569 Greenfield Rd.
Tibbee Comm. 3BR/
2BA 2.5 ac, 1950 sf,
LR, cstm. cabs, ss appl,
gran. tops, lg. MA, deck.
Move in ready. $218k.
295-0250
Houses For Sale:
West 835
FSBO: FIRST Colony
Sub. 1260sf, 3BR/2BA,
hardwood, tile & carpet;
12x24sf wired shop on
0.73-acre private lot at
end of cul-de-sac. By
appt. only. 662-419-
3144 or 662-822-8104
FSBO. 3BR/2BA 2150
sf. Approx. 1/2 mi. from
school in quiet cul-de-
sac. Private backyard
with in-ground pool, pool
house & shop. $209 K
574-4128 or 574-0991
FSBO 4BR/2BA 1604
sf. Near NH School,
Jacuzzi tub, wood floors,
1yr old roof & central air
unit. Located at END of
cul-de-sac, secluded,
quiet safe area. Large
back deck & wooden
playground. 20x40
wired shop. 3/4 of acre.
Excellent home for rais-
ing children or to relax.
Appraised last yr. At
$130,000. Call 662-
570-5334
FSBO 3BR/2BA house.
1800 sf, screened
porch, in ground sprin-
kler system, new floors,
counter tops, sinks &
paint. $156,000.
251-1233 or 251-1232
Houses For Sale:
New Hope 825
FSBO-BRICK home.
2000 sf, 7/10 ac lot.
3BR/2BA, lg. great rm &
lg kit/dr, tile/carpet,
ch&a, gas fp. 3845 Hwy
50 E. 662-574-1659
2BR/1.5 BA. Brick
home, 2 dining rooms,
nice yard. $70K
662-570-5576
Houses For Sale:
East 820
NORTHHAVEN WOOD
neighborhood. 3403
Camellia Circle. 3BR/
2BA, LR, kitchen, den
w/fireplace, DR, laundry
rm, lg. corner lot.
$124,500. 329-1778.
Shown by appointment
LEE PARK. Remodeled
cottage-style home.
2800 sf, wood floors,
LR, DR, lg. fam rm, bkf-
st rm, 4-5BR/3BA,
deck, carport, lg shaded
lot, much more.
$159,900. 574-3218
3BR/2BA. Large Florida
room, large shop with
a/c, 2100 sf.
$159,999 obo. 364-
2264
Houses For Sale:
Northside 815
OFFICE SPACE
$400 per month
Utilities included
662-328-8037
1100 SF, corner of
Bluecutt Rd. & Chubby
Dr. Call 662-327-2020
Office Spaces 730
RV CAMPER & mobile
home lots. Full hookup
w/sewer. 2 locations
W&N from $75/wk -
$260/mo. 662-251-
1149 or 601-940-1397
RENT TO own 3BR/2BA.
$975 to move in. $475
per month. HUD & SEC-
TION 8. M.H. Park in
Columbus. Call 684-
9936
RENT A fully equipped
camper w/utilities & ca-
ble from $135/wk -
$495/month. 3 Colum-
bus locations. Call 601-
940-1397
MOBILE HOMES to rent
by the wk/mo. 2BR
starting @ $125/wk.
Incl. util. or $325/mo.
Call Don 386-5552
3BR/2BA mobile home
located near MUW.
$400/mo. $400 dep.
Call 244-0070 or 352-
5044
3BR/2BA 16x80 home.
1 yr. lease. Avail. Imme-
diately. 3BR/2BA. 28x
48. Newly renovated.
Fenced back yard w/
screened in porch, stor-
age sheds, & carport.
Should be available mid
of August. Dep. & credit
check req. on both. NO
PETS! Call 434-6000
2BR/1.5BA. Fridge,
washer, dryer & stove. 2
yr. lease. $300 dep.
$300 per month. Possi-
bly for sale. Call 662-
328-5135. 5-9pm
Mobile Homes
For Rent 725
HISTORIC SOUTHSIDE
3BR/2BA brick home.
For sale or lease.
Fridge, nice back deck,
fenced in back yard.
Avail. 11/1. 352-3205
Houses For Rent:
Other 718
3BR/2BA. Screened in
porch, lg. yard w/pecan
& pear trees, 1 ac. Lot.
$950/mo. $950 dep.
All major appl. incl. Call
329-2340
Houses For Rent
West: 715
1,000 SF brick home
2BR/2BA w/appliances
& D/W. CH/A. Located
in Mayhew. $535/mo. +
dep. No HUD. No Pets.
Call 662-327-5266
Houses For Rent
West: 715
3BR/2BA. Quiet area
for elderly, single or cou-
ple. 923 Bennett. Call
662-352-9259 or 328-
4302
2BR/1BA, sm. garage,
yard, no inside pets.
$450/mo. $450 dep.
No HUD. 1 yr. lease.
662-328-4090/662-
328.9418. Leave msg
1 & 2BR apts. avail-
able. Free water & gas.
Call & ask about our
move in special. 662-
244-8944
Houses For Rent:
East 712
COLUMBUS, COUNTRY
Club Hills. 32 Shelley
Rd. 1200 sf, 2 story,
2BR/1 BA, new appls.
incl, top & bottom back
decks, private 3 ac.
neighborhood lake,
cen. h/a. Perfect for sin-
gles or newlyweds. 5
min. to CAFB or 2 min.
to Hwy. 82. Contact for
photos. $800/mo. or
sell $93K. Call 873-
1055 or 574-8855
COLONIAL TOWNHOUS-
ES. 2 or 3 bedroom w/
2-3 bath Townhouses.
$575/$700. 662-549-
9555. Ask for Glenn or
leave message
3BR FOR $450/month.
Next to Propst Park. No
HUD accepted. Call
251-5804 for more info
2BR/1.5BA Town-
house. All appl. incl.
$675/mo. Plus dep.
3100 Sierra Court. 662-
315-1930
Houses For Rent:
Northside 711
OFFICE SPACE in east
Columbus. Starting at
$285-$800/mo. In-
cludes utilities & inter-
net. 662-386-7694 or
364-1030
Commercial
Property For Rent
710
Houses For Sale:
Other 850
Rivergate
Apartments
Quiet Country Living
Studio,
1&2 Bedrooms
Executive Units
Water
Furnished
Monday - Friday
8a-5p
327-6333
300 Holly Hills Rd.
Columbus
Commercial Dispatch
Chateaux
Holly Hills
Apartments
102 Newbell Rd
Columbus
Mon-Fri 8-5
328-8254
Central Heat & Air
Conditioning
Close to CAFB
Onsite Laundry Facility
All Electric/Fully Equipped
Kitchen
Lighted Tennis Court
Swimming Pool
Where Coming
Home is the
Best Part of
the Day
RICHLAND REALTY. Bit-
tersweet Townhouses.
Roomy 2BR/1.5 BA. Mil-
itary discounts. Direct
TV included. Parking
garages, fenced in back-
yards.
Terrace Apartments.
Spacious 2BR/1 BA.
Washer/dryer hook-up,
security system,
Direct TV included.

Commercial Property.
500-6000 sf. Prime lo-
cations. Restaurant,
medical, & office space
available.

Investment Property.
2316 College St. 1BR/
1BA, 2 Lots. $14,000.
662-327-5000
Apartments For
Rent: Other 708
1, 2 & 3 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS &
TOWNHOUSES.
1BR/1BA Apt. $300
2BR/1BA Apt. $350-
$400. 2BR/2BA 3BR /
2BA Townhouses $550-
$800. No HUD allowed.
Lease, deposit, credit
check required. Cole-
man Realty. 329-2323
2BR/2BA. Nice 1250
sq ft, repainted, lg deck,
kit appl, W/D. Close to
MUW & downtown. No
pets. Ref. & credit ck
328-1940/242-2730
2 & 3BR units. $300-
$650. Call 662-327-
8557
1 ROOM efficiency avail-
able. Call Chris Chain
662-574-7879
Apartments For
Rent: Other 708
NORTHSTAR PROPER-
TIES. 500 Louisville St.
1, 2 & 3BR avail. 662-
323-8610. 8-5pm, M-F.
northstarstarkville.com
Exp. basic cable incl
COTTON DISTRICT.
2BR/2BA. Fireplace, all
appliances, central heat
& air. Avail. October 1.
Call 662-617-3356
APARTMENTS &
TOWNHOUSES. CK Re-
alty, LLC has 1 & 2BR
townhouses & apart-
ments. Call for more de-
tails! We also rent fur-
nished townhouses for
Bulldog home games.
662-323-9074
Apartments For
Rent: Starkville
707
SMALL DUPLEX 1BR/
1BA for couple. Appl. in-
cl. $350/mo. Fully furn.
except electricity. Quiet
area near woods & wa-
ter. 356-6123/549-
7744. Leave msg
2BR/1BA duplex. Cale-
donia School District.
Good neighborhood. Par-
tially furnished. $350/
mo. No pets. 356-6123
2BR/1 BA. Central heat
and air w/stove and re-
frigerator (electric).
Washer/dryer connec-
tions (electric). Kid-
friendly neighborhood.
Call 662-436-2255 for
more details
Apartments For
Rent: Caledonia
706
Houses For Sale:
Other 850
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Ieaa|: Cecr|: |||ae:: Cea|er
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625 31st Ave. N.
(Behind K-Mart Off Hwy. 45 N.)
Office Hours Mon-Fri 8-5
662.329.2544
www.falconlairapts.com
1 & 2 Bedrooms
A Cut Above The Rest
H T
Summer Deals
I/Z ell ||r:| ea|| Kea| j|c: a
t|aate |e w|a a trc|:e ler |we
12 month lease required
VIP
Rentals
Apartments
& Houses
1 Bedrooms
2 Bedrooms
3 Bedrooms
Unfurnished
1, 2 & 3 Baths
Lease, Deposi t
& Credit Check
viceinvestments.com
327-8555
307 Hospital Drive
Furnished &
Apartments For
Rent: West 705
Apartments For
Rent: West 705
HISTORIC DOWNTOWN
2 BR apts & loft apts-
beautifully & completely
furnished. Also avail. 1
unfurn loft apt. FMI call
662-574-7176
Apartments For
Rent: South 704
TOWNHOUSE. 2BR/1.5
BA. New ceramic tile &
carpet. Central air &
heat. HUD accepted.
662-425-6954
1, 2, 3 BEDROOMS &
townhouses. Call for
more info. 662-549-
1953
Apartments For
Rent: East 702
1, 2, 3 BEDROOM
apartments & townhous-
es. Call for more info.
662-549-1953
NORTHWOOD TOWN-
HOUSES 2BR, 1.5BA,
CH/A, stove, fridge,
DW, WD hookups, &
private patios. Call
Robinson Real Estate
328-1123
FOR RENT
EASY STREET PROPERTIES
1 & 2BR very clean & main-
tained. Soundproof. 18
units which I maintain per-
sonally & promptly. I rent to
all colors: red, yellow, black
& white. I rent to all ages
18 yrs. to not dead. My du-
plex apts. are in a very quiet
& peaceful environment.
24/7 camera surveillance.
Rent for 1BR $600 w/1yr
lease + security dep. Incl.
water, sewer & trash ($60
value), all appliances incl. &
washer/dryer. If this sounds
like a place you would like
to live call David Davis @
662-242-2222. But if can-
not pay your rent, like to
party & disturb others, you
associate w/criminals &
cannot get along w/others,
or drugs is your thang, you
won't like me because I'm
old school, don't call!!!!
BEAUTIFUL HISTORIC
Downtown 1BR apart-
ment available. Call
Chris Chain 662-574-
7879
2BR TOWNHOUSES
Starting @ $450. Move-
in specials. Short term
leases avail. Next to
hospital. 662-328-9471
1 & 2BR. Move in spe-
cials. Starting @ $600
or $500 w/military disc.
Short term leases avail.
Located next to Hospi-
tal. Fox Run Apts. 662-
328-9471
***$99 1st Month***
Feels like home to me.
Clean 1-4BR remodeled
apts. Stove, fridge, w/d
hookups, mini-blinds.
HUD accepted. Call Mar-
lene. 662-630-2506
Apartments For
Rent: Northside
701
Houses For Sale:
Other 850
OWN YOUR OWN busi-
ness whether a busi-
ness or franchise oppor-
tunity...when it comes to
earnings or locations,
there are no guaran-
tees. A public service
message from The Dis-
patch and the Federal
Trade Commission
NEED EXTRA
INCOME NOW?
Discover Free program
that pays weekly.
See www.GetWeekly
Checks.net
Business
Opportunity 605
2500 Military Rd U Suite 1
Columbus, MS 39705 662-328-7500
www.westrealtycompany.com
Go West
for the Best
WEST REALTY COMPANY
Phyllis Enis
386-3838
Kelly Frady
386-5501
Teleah Carter
386-2900
Top Producers
FOR AUGUST


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