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Toolbox Talk Manual Prepared and Issued by: Robert Burns, Group Head HSE Reviewed and Authorised by

Toolbox Talk Manual

Prepared and Issued by:

Robert Burns, Group Head HSE

Reviewed and Authorised by:

Adnan Naji, Chief Operating Officer – Saif Bin Darwish

Revision History:

 

Revision

Date

Description

 
  • 01 Nov 2010

Changed RA to HIRA

 
  • 02 Oct 2011

References to SMSP & HIRA

     
     
     
 
 

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SITE TOOL BOX TALKS MANUAL SBD SMS Revision: 02 SMSP06/F02 Date : Oct 2011 Issue No:

SITE TOOL BOX TALKS MANUAL

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TOOLBOX TALK MANUAL Contents 1. Trainers Brief: Tips on how to run your toolbox training programme

TOOLBOX TALK MANUAL

Contents

  • 1. Trainers Brief: Tips on how to run your toolbox training programme effectively and efficiently.

  • 2. Index of subjects.

  • 3. Training Techniques

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Section 1. Trainers Brief 1. Make time – plan the session in advance. 2. Ensure that

Section 1. Trainers Brief

  • 1. Make time – plan the session in advance.

  • 2. Ensure that telephone calls or radio pagers will not interrupt you.

  • 3. Make sure that you have a sufficient supply of cards, leaflets and handouts.

  • 4. Read through the briefing notes – becoming fully conversant with the subject before holding the session.

  • 5. Conduct the training session in a suitable location.

  • 6. Speak clearly – ensuring all persons being trained can hear you clearly.

  • 7. Carry out training session in the correct language of the attendees.

  • 8. Answer any reasonable questions you can. Write down any questions that you are not able to reply to at the time and remember to get back to the questioner once you have researched the answer.

  • 9. Try to be enthusiastic and genuine about your subject.

10. Record your record of training given using the Tool Box Talks Attendance Form SMSP06/F01 in the Safety Management System. 11. Ensure that you update your employees on site activities at the same time.

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Section 2. Index of subjects Issue/Revision 2.1 General advice to employees A 2.2 Good housekeeping A

Section 2.

Index of subjects

Issue/Revision

  • 2.1 General advice to employees

A

  • 2.2 Good housekeeping

A

  • 2.3 Noise

A

  • 2.4 Manual handling

A

  • 2.5 Electrical Safety

A

  • 2.6 Tower Scaffolds

A

  • 2.7 General Access Scaffolding

A

  • 2.8 Ladder Safety

A

  • 2.9 Excavations

A

  • 2.10 Confined Spaces

A

  • 2.11 Fire Precautions

A

  • 2.12 Work on existing roads – Motorways

A

  • 2.13 Leptospirosis (Weil’s Disease)

A

  • 2.14 Water jetting

A

  • 2.15 Underground Services

A

  • 2.16 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

A

  • 2.17 Avoiding Dermatitis

A

  • 2.18 Works adjacent to railway lines

A

  • 2.19 Contaminated land

A

  • 2.20 Protection of the public

A

  • 2.21 Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH)

A

  • 2.22 Compressed gas cylinders

A

  • 2.23 Fragile roofs

A

  • 2.24 Highly flammable liquids/LPG

A

Safe transport of

  • 2.25 gas cylinders

A

  • 2.26 Gas welding and cutting

A

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Index Of Subjects Issue/Revision 2.27 Plant movement on site A 2.28 Mobile cranes A 2.29 Fork

Index Of Subjects

Issue/Revision

  • 2.27 Plant movement on site

A

  • 2.28 Mobile cranes

A

  • 2.29 Fork lift trucks

A

  • 2.30 Banksmen / Slingers

A

  • 2.31 Overhead cranes

A

  • 2.32 Hand tools

A

  • 2.33 Portable Electric Tools

A

  • 2.34 Abrasive wheels

A

  • 2.35 Chains, shackles, slings

A

  • 2.36 Compressed air tools

A

  • 2.37 Cartridge operated tools

A

  • 2.38 Work on or near water

A

  • 2.39 Asbestos

A

  • 2.40 Dust

A

  • 2.41 Solvents

A

  • 2.42 Oxygen

A

  • 2.43 Accident/Incident Reporting

A

  • 2.44 TBA

  • 2.45 Pressure systems

A

  • 2.46 Industrial fall arrest harnesses

A

  • 2.47 Permits to Work

A

  • 2.48 Machinery Safety

A

  • 2.49 Battery maintenance

A

  • 2.50 Hazard / Impact Risk Assessment

A

  • 2.51 Gas monitors

A

  • 2.52 Office Safety

A

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Index Of Subjects Issue/Revision 2.53 Working with Display Screens A 2.54 Environmental Matters In preparation 2.55

Index Of Subjects

Issue/Revision

  • 2.53 Working with Display Screens

A

  • 2.54 Environmental Matters

In preparation

  • 2.55 MEWPS

A

  • 2.56 Alcohol and Drugs

A

  • 2.57 Working at Height

A

  • 2.58 Waste Management

A

  • 2.59 Temporary Roadworks

In preparation

  • 2.60 Trainees and Young Persons

In preparation

  • 2.61 Vibration White Finger

In preparation

  • 2.62 Hand Held Circular Saws

In preparation

  • 2.63 Hearing Protection

In preparation

  • 2.64 Legionella (Legionnaires Disease)

A

  • 2.65 Classes of Fire and Use of Fire Extinguishers

A

  • 2.66 Types of Fire Extinguishers

A

  • 2.67 Electric Welding

A

  • 2.68 Duty of Care

A

  • 2.69 Welfare

A

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2.1 General Advice to Employees Health and Safety Law – What you should know Your Employer

2.1

General Advice to Employees

Health and Safety Law – What you should know

Your Employer has a duty under the law to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, your Health, Safety and Welfare at work.

In general, your employer’s duties include:

Making your workplace safe and without risks to health.

Keeping dust, fume and noise under control.

Ensuring plant and machinery are safe and that safe systems are set and followed.

Ensuring that articles and substances are moved, stored and used safely.

Providing adequate welfare facilities.

Giving you the information, instruction, training and supervision necessary for your Health and Safety.

As an Employee you have legal duties which include:

Taking reasonable care for your own Health and Safety and that of others who may be affected by

what you do or do not do. Co-operating with your employer on Health and Safety.

Not interfering with or misusing anything provided for your Health, Safety and Welfare i.e.

Personal Protective Equipment. Reporting to your supervisor any dangerous situation.

READ HEALTH AND SAFETY INFORMATION DISPLAYED ON SITE NOTICE BOARD

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to SMSP 2, 5, 6.

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2.2 Good Housekeeping • The following points are presented to assist supervisors when giving Safety Awareness

2.2

Good Housekeeping

The following points are presented to assist supervisors when giving Safety Awareness

Talks. The particular points made here are in the interests of good housekeeping throughout work areas, in or out of work hours. Whether at home, visiting friends or at places of amusements, we expect our surroundings to be comfortable, neat and tidy. When at work, the same applies. We should regard good housekeeping at work with the same importance as “at home”. Do

not always rely on others to clear things up, it is just as easy to put tools away tidily as it is to leave them laying around benches, on the floor, on scaffolding, resting on pipes or other positions where they can create a tripping hazard, fall onto a person or be damaged in a fall. A place for everything and everything in its place. If dismantling anything, stack parts away neatly and tidily. Do not leave materials in

gangways, they could cut off someone’s escape route or cause a tripping hazard. If dismantling anything constructed of wood, make sure all nails are removed. If this is not possible hammer nails flat, making sure that no parts are left protruding that could cause injury to fellow employees. Damaged lengths or parts of wood should be guarded as these also present hazards. All rubbish should be placed in tidy bins or skips to be removed. In this way, should a fire

occur, it can be confined to a small area and dealt with quickly and efficiently, thus preventing the fire spreading, especially in high winds. If tools get damaged, get them repaired or replaced. Do not leave them lying around to

cause hazards. When finishing work put personal overalls and other gear in lockers provided, do not just

leave things lying about hoping they will be there when you return. If you notice rubbish piling up which you can not remove, bring this to the attention of your

supervisor who will make arrangements to have it removed. Should you be working at height and notice loose objects on boards or walkways, put them somewhere where they can not be dislodged. They could fall and injure someone.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 32

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2.3 Noise Being exposed to noise in excess of 85dB (A) can damage the sense of

2.3

Noise

Being exposed to noise in excess of 85dB (A) can damage the sense of hearing in some people. 85dB (A) is roughly the level of noise where you have to shout in order to be heard when a person is only one metre away from you. A jet engine taking off at a distance of 25 metres from you is likely to produce a noise level in excess of 140dB (A).

Noise assessment of areas needs to be carried out to ensure that where hearing protection is needed then it is identified. Where practical, action to silence noisy equipment should have also been undertaken. Areas where silencing is not possible will have been designated Hearing Protection Areas and suitably signed at practical locations.

Nobody in their right mind would set upon a path of deliberately trying to damage their hearing. However, being regularly exposed to heavy noise levels – without taking safety precautions - could result in occupational deafness.

Occupational deafness develops slowly at first – an individual may have difficulty hearing conversation to start with, then Tinnitus (a constant ringing in the ears) develops. The last stages, perhaps before total deafness, would need the sufferer to wear a hearing aid.

As we use our sense of hearing for pleasure – to enjoy music, watch films or television and to communicate effectively – as well as to pick up danger signals (such as fat moving cars, sirens, etc.) it is well worth looking after your hearing.

You can protect your hearing by ensuring you adhere to the following points:

Wearing ear defenders where noise levels of 85dB (A) is exceeded. These areas should

 

normally be signed. If you have trouble being understood or understanding a conversation at a distance of one metre then it is likely that the noise level is above 85dB (A). Ear defenders should not be worn if they are cracked or damaged in any way. Check your

ear defenders for damage prior to use from the manufacturer’s guide which should be followed for any maintenance required. Ensure that headband of the ear defenders are not slack and that the ear muffs fit properly.

Report damaged and noisy plant equipment for repair.

 

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• Be aware of the risk attached to working in a noisy environment. Excessive noise can

Be aware of the risk attached to working in a noisy environment. Excessive noise can cause

stress, lead to accidents and also damage hearing. Immediately consult your doctor if you suffer any problem with your hearing and inform your supervisor.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to SMSP 12 & 34

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2.4 Manual Handling We lift, manoeuvre and handle goods every day of our lives in one

2.4

Manual Handling

We lift, manoeuvre and handle goods every day of our lives in one way or another, not just whilst at work but also during social activities such as gardening, DIY, shopping and sport. A bad back or injury today, could, and regularly does, turn into a painful back problem for life! Lifting incorrectly could also lead to a hernia, sprains, strains and even fractures. Therefore, before lifting items take a few seconds to think – it could save a lot of pain!

Lifting safely

Can a trolley or mechanical lifting aid be used to lift the item instead of handling the item manually?

Be kitted-up for the job and, if practicable, obtain firm - grip gloves. The gloves will also offer

protection against cuts, punctures and friction burns. Wear safety shoes to ensure a good floor – surface grip to prevent slipping whilst manoeuvring. The

shoes will also provide protection from falling objects. Before lifting assess the weight of the item to be carried. Is the load weight of the object evenly

distributed throughout the load? Obtain assistance to lift unbalanced, awkward or heavy items.

Check your line of travel. Is the route you intend to take free from obstacles and tripping hazards?

LIFT USING THE 5 STAGES METHOD

  • 1. Stand close to the load – spread your feet.

  • 2. Bend your knees – keep your back straight.

  • 3. Grasp the load firmly.

  • 4. Lift smoothly and evenly with your legs taking the strain. It is important not to twist your trunk or to jerk or shove your body.

  • 5. Hold the load close to your body.

Remember

Lift the load from floor to knee, then knee to carrying position and always keep back straight. DO NOT ALLOW THE LOAD TO OBSTUCT YOUR VIEW!

your

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to SMSP 09 & 36 HIRA 85

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2.5 Electrical Safety The hazard of electricity is well known. It is, however, not generally appreciated

2.5

Electrical Safety

The hazard of electricity is well known. It is, however, not generally appreciated that a low voltage shock of only 240 volts can, under certain circumstances, be enough to kill. Many people have received an electric shock by unwittingly becoming part of an electrical circuit. However, the severity of injury that could occur depends on exactly where in the body the electrical current flows and for how long.

How does an electric current affect the body?

Breathing could stop – the nervous system becomes temporarily paralysed.

Heart beating is interrupted – blood stops being circulated through the body.

Damage to nerves and muscles – internal bleeding and burns.

Injuries would also occur due to a number of related factors:

BURNS due to arcing/electrical fires.

FALLS due to a loss of balance after touching electrical equipment.

CUTS OR MECHANICAL INJURY due to machinery starting unexpectedly.

Relevant legislation imposes many restrictions on employers in order to protect staff from the dangers of electricity. As a reminder, there are a few golden rules that need to be followed in order to safeguard both yourself and others:

Never assume a circuit is dead. Always test before carrying out work.

Working on live equipment is forbidden.

Safety equipment/PPE should be used and/or worn.

Physically “lock off” equipment that can be inadvertently reconnected.

Check cables and equipment.

Ensure earthing/earth loading is adequate.

Report/action faults and problems.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 22, 25 and 28 SMSP 26

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2.6 Tower Scaffolds Many of the accidents involving tower scaffolds occur when a ladder is put

2.6

Tower Scaffolds

Many of the accidents involving tower scaffolds occur when a ladder is put on top of the platform to extend the height of the tower. The tower becomes unstable and if a person climbs the ladder his weight may push the tower outwards and make it overturn.

There are a number of different types of tower available which may be either prefabricated or specially built from regular scaffold. Whatever type you are using follow these basic rules and stay safe:

To erect any tower scaffold a person must be competent. For specially built towers that means using qualified scaffolders. For prefabricated tower scaffolds that means following the manufacturer’s instructions. More complicated prefabricated towers may require some training by the manufacturer before you are competent to erect them. If in doubt check with your HSE Manager/Engineer/Officer. Aluminium alloy towers are very light. Make sure that they remain stable and cannot overturn during use or be blown over when left unattended. Lightweight towers should only be used for access and light work such as cleaning, painting, etc. Heavier work requires a more substantial industrial type of tower or a purpose built scaffold tower. The manufacturer’s instructions should tell you either the maximum height to which the tower should be erected or, for free-standing towers, the maximum height to least-base ratio. These limitations must be followed. The normal recommended ratio for towers used outside is 3:1. If this information is not available you should play safe and assume a lower ratio of 2:1. Make sure the tower is upright by adjusting legs if necessary and that all locking devices are correctly secured before use. Tie the tower to the structure if possible to increase stability. Always use the outriggers and ensure that they are correctly and securely attached. Outriggers can be used to increase the effective base size so that the tower can be constructed higher. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions. The working platform must have a safe means of access on the narrowest side of the tower. Do not climb the frame unless it has built-in ladder sections with rungs no more than 300mm apart and the styles no more than 480mm apart. If the frame can be used, climb it from the inside. If not, use internal ladders or stairways fixed firmly to the tower. Never climb up the outside – you may make the tower overturn. The platforms must have guard rails and toe boards fitted if they are higher than 2m. The tower must rest on a firm base. Do not erect the tower directly on recently made-up ground, timber spanning excavations, etc. When using a mobile tower, make sure the castors are locked.

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• Never move a mobile tower with people or materials on it. Make sure there are

Never move a mobile tower with people or materials on it. Make sure there are no power lines,

obstructions or holes in the ground on your intended route. Specially built scaffold towers must be inspected every week and after extremes of weather and

adaptations. The details must be entered in the scaffold Register. Do not attempt to work at heights if you are feeling unwell and susceptible to giddiness.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 03 and 83

SMSP24

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2.7 General Access Scaffolding General access scaffolds are a common sight on many sites and it

2.7

General Access Scaffolding

General access scaffolds are a common sight on many sites and it is possible you will have to use one at some stage. Like everything else, if constructed and used correctly, they are perfectly safe.

By following a few basic guidelines we can all be safe on scaffolding:

The stability of the scaffold will be affected by how it is used. Therefore it is important that the right

design of scaffold is erected for your intended work. Scaffold erection is a skilled task and should only be carried out by qualified and competent persons. Safety should be part of the erection and dismantling process – such as not allowing these operations to be carried out when the area is open to the public. After erection, scaffolds must be inspected by a Competent Person every week and the details

entered in the scaffold Register. In addition they must be inspected after bad or excessively dry weather or particularly high winds which may have affected their strength and stability or after any adoption. Toe boards must be at least 150mm high with the top handrail

Toe boards and end toe boards or other barriers up to a sufficient height to prevent materials and

tools falling off the platform, should be fixed to all working platforms where a person or material may fall more than 2m. Materials must not be stored on scaffolds overnight. Look out for contractors storing materials on

elevated levels (or working in any other unsafe manner), and report it to your supervisor. Guard rails and end guard rails must be fitted inside the standards (upright poles) on scaffolds from

which a person can fall more than 2m. Adequate stability is normally achieved by “tying” the scaffold to the structure that they are serving.

The main types of ties are drilled- in anchor or cast-in anchor, through-tie, box-tie and reveal-tie. It is not important to know what sort of tie is used but that the scaffold is properly tied. At least one tie is required for every 32m 2 of scaffolding and more if the scaffolding is sheeted (due to wind forces). The ladders to scaffolds must be secured overnight to prevent unauthorised persons climbing onto

scaffold. Access ladders must be fixed at the top and must extend at least 1.07m above the landing place.

Modification or dismantling of the scaffold must only be carried out by a Competent Person.

Never mix scaffold components of steel and alloy.

Do not attempt to work at height if you are feeling unwell or susceptible to giddiness.

 

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For further information: HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 02 SBD SMS Revision: 02 SMSP06/F02 Date :

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 02

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2.8 Ladder Safety Ladders and steps are frequently used on most sites often without a second

2.8

Ladder Safety

Ladders and steps are frequently used on most sites often without a second thought. All ladders used at work must be suitable for their intended purpose. Ladders generally are one of two types, fixed or portable, and may be constructed in a variety of materials principally wood or metal.

Never use an unsound ladder. They should be checked regularly for any signs of defects. Follow this 5 point checklist:

i)

Wooden ladders: look for splits, cracks or warps.

ii)

Metal ladders: check for mechanical damage.

iii)

Wedges and tie rods should be tight, metal reinforcement to

iv)

stiles in place. Feet should not be damaged the inserts in metal ladders must be in good condition.

v)

All other fittings should be secure and in good order.

Ladders are only to be used for access/egress, not as a working platform.

Foot wear worn by persons using a ladder must be suitable for maintaining a satisfactory grip.

Use clear varnish to protect wooden ladders, do not use paint.

When using portable ladders make sure they are set up on firm, level ground and there should be

no makeshift use of bricks, blocks or timber to gain extra height. The correct slope for a ladder is 1 in 4 i.e. 300mm out for every 1200mm up.

Always stake or bury the foot of the ladder and tie it at the top.

Portable ladders must be long enough, they should project at least 1200 mm above the landing

platform. Always face the ladder and use both hands for climbing and descending.

Only one person to use the ladder at a time.

Do not lean either outwards or sideways from the ladder – move it.

Do not carry loads on ladders – use a hoist rope.

When using steps make sure they are fully extended before you go up.

Fixed ladders must also be checked regularly. If you are working above 2 metres you must use fall

protection; usually on a ladder this would be a harness and line. Ladders should not be placed on or leant against fragile surfaces or fittings.

Do not attempt to work at height if you are feeling unwell or susceptible to giddiness.

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REPORT ALL DAMAGE IMMEDIATELY For further information: HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 04 SBD SMS Revision:

REPORT ALL DAMAGE IMMEDIATELY

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 04

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2.9 Excavations Digging an excavation on a site may be a worker’s first and last job.

2.9

Excavations

Digging an excavation on a site may be a worker’s first and last job. If the sides collapse, there may be no escape. There is almost no ground which will not collapse under certain conditions. If there is any doubt whatsoever about the safety of the sides, they should be timbered or battered. Timbering materials should always be provided on site. NB. The law requires the sides of any excavation that may be liable to collapse (Hazard / Impact Risk Assessment) must be supported or battered back to a safe angle which depends on type of ground whenever there is a risk of collapse or falling materials. Most deaths occur in trenches less than 2.5 metres deep. Most accidents occur in ground conditions with no visible defects; the trench sides seem clean and self-supporting. Rain water and dry weather increase the chance of failure.

Before work commences:

Ensure a permit to excavate is provided by competent person. Determine methods of excavating,

installing and removing support work. Provide an adequate supply of material for support work, barriers (and correct traffic notices where

appropriate). If road works signs are needed they need to be erected by street works supervisor. Determine positions of all public services and ensure that they are adequately marked, and/or

disconnected using such information as provided by drawings, cable locating equipment, ground boxes etc.

For the purposes of excavations, no ground should be considered “good” or “safe” until it has been investigated by a competent person. Check whether excavation will affect adjoining roads or buildings.

Always seek advice before excavating below existing foundations. It may be necessary to provide

shoring, i.e. raking or flying shores or both. Prevent access – especially of children.

Provide adequate and sufficient ladders and ropes for securing access and egress.

Checks during Operations:

Ensure sound material is being used for support work.

Ensure that approved and safe methods are adopted for the installation of support work in

excavations. A competent person should be in attendance at all times. Ensure that all working surfaces are safe.

Install timbering as soon as excavation sides are trimmed. This should be done from ground level

or from inside existing timbering. Do not enter an unsupported excavation. Ensure that all support work is secure and that props and wedges are tight and properly maintained.

 

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• Check for signs of over-stress in support work, damage from plant and, when timber is

Check for signs of over-stress in support work, damage from plant and, when timber is used, make

long term check for disease/defects i.e. dry rot, shakes etc. Check for water or soil seeping through support work.

Check for signs of earth peeling/cracking at unsupported faces.

Check that there are adequate ladders, that they are maintained, secured and used correctly.

When pumping, ensure that there are adequate pumps and that soil is not being drawn from behind

support work. Monitor for unhealthy atmospheres which may include gas monitoring/lack of oxygen.

Ensure that spoil heaps and materials etc. are kept back 1 metre from the edges of the excavation.

Ensure that there are adequate barriers/notices/warning lights.

The edges of excavations should be provided with guard rails, hand rails and toe boards. Bridges

and gangways should be provided with hand-rails and toe boards. Ensure that “stops” for dumpers, tipping lorries etc are well anchored.

Ensure that all passing traffic is kept back from edge of excavation.

Ensure correct method of withdrawing support work is issued; if unsafe to strike – leave in.

Ensure that machine operators have the best possible vision of work in progress.

Ensure that services are marked and protected and adequately supported when exposed in

excavations. Carry out inspections daily, prior to each shift, after use of explosives or after inclement weather,

particularly frost and rain. Ensure that a record of all examinations is properly recorded in the F91 or appropriate form, and signed by a competent person.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 35 and 41

SMSP25

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2.10 Confined Spaces The definition of a confined space is: • A place which is substantially,

2.10

Confined Spaces

The definition of a confined space is:

A place which is substantially, though not always entirely enclosed

OR

A place where there is a reasonably foreseeable risk of serious injury from hazardous substances or conditions within the space or nearby.

This definition covers closed tanks, vessels, sewers, open topped tanks, vats, paint spraying rooms, ducts, boreholes, building voids, underground (basement) tank rooms or boiler rooms etc.

Wherever possible, work must be carried out from outside of the confined space. A Permit to Work will always be necessary.

Points that must be considered and addressed:

Oxygen content: can it be displaced by gas leaking in from elsewhere of from purge gas.

Oxidisation, rusting or bacterial growth (uses up oxygen in air).

Oxygen being consumed by people, process of combustion

Welding Toxic gas – is it likely to be present i.e. hydrogen sulphide (from sewage or decaying vegetation), carbon monoxide (from engines, incomplete combustion, LPG), carbon dioxide (from fermentation or naturally in rocks, soils).

Other fumes or vapours such as ammonia, chlorine, sodium and from petrol and solvents.

The above gasses, fumes and vapours must be eliminated or measures taken to control the risk.

The use of any form of internal combustion engine within the confined space is to be prohibited.

Petrol or LPG (explosive in range of 2% in air) created by spillage or leakage.

Flammable atmospheres may be created by very small quantities of gasses such as:

Methane and hydrogen sulphide (from sewage or decaying matter (explosive in range of 4% in

air) Solvents, acetone, toluene, white spirit, benzene, thinners (explosive range 2% in air upwards).

Monitoring of these gasses should be constant.

No person is allowed to work within a confined space unless undertaken an Approved Course.

 

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• A safe system of work using a Permit to Work and Hazard / Impact Risk

A safe system of work using a Permit to Work and Hazard / Impact Risk Assessment must be completed by Competent Person. This must be briefed to all parties concerned.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 33

SMSP30

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2.11 Fire • Ensure that you know what to do in case of fire by reading

2.11

Fire

Ensure that you know what to do in case of fire by reading your fire drill procedure.

Make certain you know your escape route. Read your emergency fire drill procedure.

Keep fire doors and shutters clear and unobstructed.

Don’t obstruct access to fire extinguishers, learn how they operate – read the labels or ask.

Don’t hang clothing over or near heating equipment.

Don’t let paper, oily rags or other rubbish accumulate.

Do not smoke in forbidden areas. Where you are allowed to smoke always stub out cigarette ends.

Use proper containers for flammable liquids, not open tins or buckets.

Handle flammable liquids at a safe distance from possible sources of ignition.

Check the area before and after using blow-lamps, welding and cutting equipment to prevent fires.

Smouldering materials can burst into flame hours later if left. Asphalt pots, crucibles, smouldering irons and gas rings must be on non-combustible stands.

Switch off from the mains any electrical equipment when not in use.

Never try to extinguish an electrical fire by using water.

Do not place yourself at risk if you try to tackle a fire. Make sure you always have an escape route.

Know who the appointed Fire Wardens are.

PLAN IN ADVANCE – YOU WON’T HAVE THE TIME WHEN FIRE BREAKS OUT.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 46

SMSP13

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2.12 Work on Existing Roads It is your duty to take care of your health and

2.12

Work on Existing Roads

It is your duty to take care of your health and safety and the health and safety of all other persons who may be affected by your acts or omissions.

You must be ALERT at all times and keep a sharp look out, not only for vehicles and plant movements, but also for vehicles which have entered the site in error.

All operatives will wear high visibility clothing at all times.

 

All vehicles will display appropriate “Highways Contractors” or “Highways Maintenance”

notice at rear of vehicle. All vehicles must be fitted with Amber flashing beacons on roof or top of vehicle and these

will be switched on whilst entering/leaving the works area. You must obey the instructions of your supervisor.

You must not take part in, or encourage “horse-play” of any kind.

You must not enter the part of the Highway open to traffic. It is an offence to do so and you

could be prosecuted. You may only enter or exit the site at the designated points. You must not move cones or signs unless it is absolutely essential and you are authorised to

do so – always replace them in original position afterwards. Make sure safety zones are maintained. Children and pets are not allowed on the site under any circumstances.

If you see an accident on the Highway, use the nearest Emergency Telephone on the site to

contact the police. You must never attempt to assist at any accident on the Motorway, unless the police ask for

your help. The police will organise the rescue and emergency service. Unless you follow police instructions, you could become a casualty yourself. When buffer lanes are in use they must be kept clear at all times. Entry is not permitted for

vehicles or personnel. In the event of an accident the buffer lane is used as access for emergency vehicles. When driving on site keep a sharp look out for any other operations, e.g. excavating, piling,

and concreting. Slow down when approaching people working, make sure that they are aware of your presence. You must only enter and leave site at the authorised points, you must not enter or leave the site by any other route. Observe site speed limits.

 

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• Take particular care when entering and leaving site where traffic leaves or merges with •

Take particular care when entering and leaving site where traffic leaves or merges with

Highway traffic. Most important – Van and Wagon Drivers do not reverse without the assistance of a

banksman. Good housekeeping is essential on site. All rubbish and surplus materials should be removed as soon as possible.

CURRENT CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCE MUST BE HELD BY PLANT OPERATIVES AT ALL TIMES.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 67

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2.13 Leptospirosis (Weil’s Disease) Instructions to men working in contact with sewage Whenever you go to

2.13

Leptospirosis (Weil’s Disease)

Instructions to men working in contact with sewage

Whenever you go to your doctor or a hospital on account of illness show your Weil’s Disease card and explain your occupation to those attending you.

What is Leptospirosis? Weil’s Disease

This is a serious and sometimes fatal infection that is transmitted to humans by contact with urine from infected rats.

The Hardjo form of leptospirosis

This is transmitted from cattle to humans.

What are the symptoms?

Both diseases start with a flu-like illness with a persistent and severe headache.

Who is at risk?

Anyone is at risk who is exposed to rat or cattle urine or to fatal fluids from cattle. Workers who have contracted leptospirosis in recent years include:

Vets, meat inspectors, butchers, abattoir and sewer workers and workers in contact with canal and river water.

How might I catch it?

The bacteria can get into your body through cuts and scratches and through the lining of the mouth, throat and eyes after contact with infected urine or contaminated water, such as in sewers, ditches, ponds and slow-flowing rivers.

How can I prevent it?

Get rid of rats. Don’t touch them with unprotected hands. Cover all cuts and broken skin with waterproof plasters before and during work. Wear protective clothing. Wash your hands before and after visiting the toilet or touching any contaminated clothing or other materials, and always before eating, drinking or smoking.

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What else should I do? Report any illness to your doctor. Tell the doctor about your

What else should I do?

Report any illness to your doctor. Tell the doctor about your work, show this card. Leptospirosis is much less severe if it is treated promptly. If your doctor decides you have Leptospirosis tell your employer, who should then report it to the Enforcing Authorities. Every injury or accident at work, however trivial must be reported. Ensure that details are entered in the Accident Book and an Accident Report Form completed.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 32, 51 and 52

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2.14 Water Jetting DO NOT . DO NOT commence work on site without necessary permission. DO

2.14

Water Jetting

DO NOT

.

DO NOT

commence work on site without necessary permission.

DO NOT

commence any jetting operation until warning signs are on show and area roped

DO NOT

off. operate without adequate personal protection for eyes, head, ears, hands, feet

DO NOT

and body. run any equipment with any leakage whatsoever without rectifying.

DO NOT

attempt to tighten any pressure joint whilst equipment is under pressure.

DO NOT

by-pass safety cut-outs. Do check reasons for malfunction. (Low water, blocked

DO NOT

filters, low oil level etc) operate with guns and control valves not functioning correctly. (Failing to shut

DO NOT

off, or leaking) operate guns or control valves with the operating lever tied back, wedged or

DO NOT

locked in the “on” position. operate with badly worn or undersized nozzles.

DO NOT

continue to operate if any unauthorised personnel enter the operating area.

DO NOT

operate equipment at power levels which can produce a reaction force greater

DO NOT

than the operator can comfortably absorb. leave unit running unattended.

DO NOT

leave equipment unattended on site.

DO NOT

store unserviceable equipment. (Notify supervisor)

DO NOT

leave the site in a dangerous or untidy condition.

DO NOT

leave site without notifying all parties. (Engineers, site agents, occupiers etc.)

DO NOT

use any other fitting other than the manufacturer’s recommendations.

DO:

Contact Safety Section before commencement. Contact Site Engineer, obtain necessary permits and note special precautions. Erect barriers, rope off the clear area. Erect warning signs. Ensure adequate water supply.

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Check fluid levels on engine, gearbox and pump. (Lubrication oil, fuel and water) Lay out equipment

Check fluid levels on engine, gearbox and pump. (Lubrication oil, fuel and water) Lay out equipment and visually inspect for damage. (Hoses, connections etc) Assemble equipment checking all joints. Ensure filters are clean. Fully prime equipment and bleed where necessary. Fire gun or lances and/or control valves. Visually check that correct size and type of nozzle is fitted for the application. Increase pressure slowly until operating conditions are reached. Re-check hose couplings and joints for leaks. Rectify all leaks, ensuring that the unit is shut down and line pressure released before making adjustments. Ensure all operators are wearing suitable protective clothing and are correctly positioned. Regularly rotate team members’ positions to minimise fatigue. Regularly check operating conditions. (Oil and water pressure, condition of filters, pipe work and hoses). Ensure that all pressure in lines is released on any shutdown. On completion strip down equipment and store in a clean condition. Ensure your Certificate of Competency is available for inspection. Ensure you work as a team … Always.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 72

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2.15 Underground Services Different types of underground or above ground services present different levels of risk

2.15

Underground Services

Different types of underground or above ground services present different levels of risk but all should be treated with caution.

The following advice to be included with all the services listed below. Obtain a permit to dig, carry out operation in accordance with method statement. Presume all services are live until proven dead. Do not use mechanical means of excavation within 2 metres of any 11kv electrical cable or 1 metre of any other service safe digging methods must be used. If undertaking excavation work in the highway an accredited street works supervisor must supervise the work. Although there are recommended minimum depths for all services, they will be closer to the surface than normal especially in the vicinity of works, structures or other services.

Electricity

Overhead Power Lines

Treat all overhead lines as “live”.

Take advice of Electricity Board on clearance.

Barriers or “goalposts” are for your safety, do not circumvent them.

If an electricity cable is broken avoid contact. If in cab do not attempt to leave, keep everyone clear and call electricity company.

Underground Cables

Use cable locating device i.e. cat and genny.

Hand dig trial pits for exact location.

Mark all known cables.

Gas Mains

Remember gas has a flammable and explosive content.

 

Treat with extreme caution – at slightest hint of gas escape, leave area and no smoking or

naked lights– call Transco emergency services and prevent any members of the public and vehicles approaching. Mark all known pipes.

 

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• Protect pipes when moving heavy plant over them. Water Mains • Water mains do not

Protect pipes when moving heavy plant over them.

Water Mains

Water mains do not carry the same danger as electricity and gas but cause great

inconvenience if fractured. Trace line if main by trial pits.

If damaged call Water Board.

Mark all known pipes.

Protect pipes when moving heavy plant over them.

Sewers

Trace sewers through line of manhole covers.

There is a danger to health if a foul sewer is fractured – leave excavation and report to Sewer Authority.

National Colour Coding System for Buried Services

Black

Electricity

Red

High Voltage Electricity

Blue

Water

Yellow

Gas

Grey/White

Telecommunications

Green

Cable Television

It must be remembered that some pipes and services were laid over 100 years ago and there is a wide range of materials and colours used. The principle ones, excluding cement, asbestos, plastic, metallic are:

Gas

Cast Iron, yellow PVC, yellow steel, steel

Water

Cast iron, black PVC, steel grey PVC, blue PVC, copper lead or asbestos.

Electricity

Black PVC, red PVC, braided steel, hessian wrapped

Telecom

Black PVC, grey PVC, natural PVC.

REPORT ALL DAMAGE IMMEDIATELY TO YOUR SUPERVISOR

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For further information: HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 35 SBD SMS Revision: 02 SMSP06/F02 Date :

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 35

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2.16 Personal Protective Equipment PPE is all equipment which is intended to be worn or held

2.16

Personal Protective Equipment

PPE is all equipment which is intended to be worn or held by a person at work which protects him/her against one or more risks to his/her health and safety.

The PPE Regulations impose certain duties on all of us:

The Employer

Must provide suitable PPE to all employees who may be exposed to a risk to their health and safety while at work and provide training in its use.

Managers and Supervisors

Must ensure that all PPE is properly stored and maintained in clean, efficient and working order.

Must ensure all their staff are trained to use the PPE.

Must ensure all their staff use the appropriate PPE when necessary.

Must keep a register of PPE and regularly inspect it.

You (the employee)

Must co-operate with your employer and use the PPE supplied to you when necessary.

Must report any defects to their PPE.

The general philosophy is that where risks to health and safety are identified the first priority is to eliminate the risk by providing safer alternatives, i.e. a safe place strategy. Or to provide “collective” protection, e.g. fume extraction, barrier rails, etc or by changing the working method. Only when it is not possible to achieve the required degree of protection by any other method should PPE be considered, i.e. a safe person strategy. Your section should be keeping a PPE register and carrying out regular inspections of your PPE. If any of your equipment is damaged do not use it; replace it before you carry out any operation that the PPE is intended to protect you from.

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PPE is available for protection from: • Atmospheric contamination – dust, fumes, mist, gas, low oxygen,

PPE is available for protection from:

Atmospheric contamination – dust, fumes, mist, gas, low oxygen, noise etc

Radiation – ionising and non-ionising

Impact and abrasion – head, hand, foot, body.

Foul weather – heat, humidity, sand storms.

Emergencies – tank escape, etc.

Head Protection

The most common hazard for which protection is provided is against falling objects. The protection is provided by the strength of the hard hat material and a properly adjusted cradle acting as a shock absorber. It is therefore most important that the hard hat internal cradle is adjusted to fit you correctly. Do not write on or deface your hard hat as it will impair its effectiveness ( i.e. by using waterproof or solvent marker pens). Replace your hard hat at recommended intervals (i.e. every two years). Bump caps are used to protect against bruising and abrasion by personnel working in confined spaces. They are only designed to protect against these minor risks and must not be used as protection against falling objects. Snoods, hair nets, hats and caps made of various materials are available to prevent hair becoming entangled in moving machinery.

Body Protection

Chemical Resistant

Use of chemical resistant clothing falls into the following general grades:

Light duty: uncoated cotton or synthetic fabrics in the form of overalls, smocks and laboratory coats

are satisfactory for protection against low-level splashes of diluted chemicals. Medium duty: additional protection provided by aprons on top of light duty protective clothing.

Heavy duty: PVC coated fabric in the form of overalls or two-piece suits. Usually used in conjunction with acid hoods. This clothing should always be washed and hosed down before removal.

High Visibility Clothing

There are many varieties of high visibility clothing on the market today. Tabards and coats to the correct standard are available from the Acton Stores or via your Supervisor and must be worn according to site rules.

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Other types Leather and flame retardant fabrics for use by welders; Kevlar leggings, etc. for chain

Other types

Leather and flame retardant fabrics for use by welders; Kevlar leggings, etc. for chain saw workers; foul weather protection.

Hand protection

There are a variety of glove designs and materials to protect against:

Absorption

Abrasions

Wounds

Dermatitis

Penetration

Electric shock

Temperature

Etc.

The type required depends on the operation being carried out. Gloves are available from your supervisor. Check with your Supervisor if in doubt about the type you should be using. Barrier creams and hand cleaners are also available and you are strongly recommended to make use of them.

Foot Protection

Safety Footwear may be needed to protect against:

Toe Injuries

Penetration

Slipping

Heat

Oil / Water

Electric shock

Static electricity

Chemicals

Molten metals

Respiratory Protection

Where harmful materials are present as dusts, fumes, gases or there is an oxygen-deficient atmosphere, steps must be taken to control the situation. Generally this can be done by isolation and the provision of exhaust systems. Where such control measures are not possible appropriate respiratory or breathing apparatus must be used. Note the difference between the two types:

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Breathing apparatus – provides uncontaminated air or oxygen. Respiratory apparatus – purifies the air breathed from

Breathing apparatus – provides uncontaminated air or oxygen. Respiratory apparatus – purifies the air breathed from the atmosphere.

Hearing Protection

Noise is covered in a separate Toolbox subject. Briefly, there are three main types of hearing protection:

Ear Plugs

Only effective in relatively low noise level areas.

Ear muffs or ear defenders

Provide the level of protection for most of activities. The combined hard hat and ear defender is also available.

If you are in doubt about the correct standard of equipment to use

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 11 SMSP 12

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2.17 Avoiding Dermatitis The use of some degreasants, adhesives, oils, chemicals and solvents can have a

2.17

Avoiding Dermatitis

The use of some degreasants, adhesives, oils, chemicals and solvents can have a terrible effect on the skin, particularly if exposure is regular and for long periods. In some cases this results in severe irritation, acute soreness and blistering of the skin which is known as “Occupational or Industrial Dermatitis”. Mild soreness or itching may simply be an allergic reaction to a particular substance. IF YOU SUFFER FROM ANY FROM OF SKIN IRRITATION INFORM YOUR SUPERVISOR AND SAFETY OFFICER.

Prevention of Dermatitis

Read the label on the adhesive, chemical, oil, degreasant or substance. If it recommends wearing

hand protection do so! Can a milder or less harmful product be used instead?

Check the COSHH assessment undertaken – does it recommend specific PPE or conditions in which

the product should be used? Don’t wear oily or dirty overalls/uniform as many substances will eventually be absorbed by the skin

and cause a problem. Do not keep oily rags or contaminated materials in your pocket. This practice can in some

circumstances lead to cancer of the scrotum or cause skin irritations as substances are absorbed through fabric and onto the skin. Arrange for repair or replacement of uniform or overalls which are badly worn or have holes.

Use only specially formulated hand cleaners to remove substances such as oil, paint etc from your skin. The use of white spirit, petrol or similar solvents will damage the skin. The use of white spirit, petrol or similar solvents will damage the skin, cause irritation or sensitisation.

Clean your hands before eating, smoking or drinking, when going home, off shift or when about to perform other duties.

Use a suitable barrier cream if you cannot feasibly work with gloves.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to SMSP 18

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2.18 Works Adjacent to Railway Lines Working close to Railway Lines is subject to a variety

2.18

Works Adjacent to Railway Lines

Working close to Railway Lines is subject to a variety of regulations according to the usage of the line and the power source of the trains. You will be required to undergo a formal induction course.

Always wear approved high visibility vests.

Do not go on the line side unless you have the proper authority.

Do not start work on or near the line until you are clearly familiar with safety arrangements and have

been told it is safe to do so. If you suffer from defective hearing, defective vision or any illness that may cause temporary

incapacity you must declare it. You must observe all warning indications and notices.

Be alert to approaching trains or movement.

Acknowledge audible warning form any approaching train.

Always keep at least 3 metres clearance between yourself, clothing, tools, equipment and electrified

lines. Never use metal objects such as ladders, tapes or chains when working near electric conductor rails.

Do not allow any part of vehicles or plant to come within 2 metres of any line on which train

movements may take place. Always ensure that crane jibs and rig mast operate away from or parallel to the rail lines.

Where jibs/masts must face a line a special anchor system should be used.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer

Refer to SMSP 15 & 40

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2.19 Contaminated Land There is increasing awareness generally of contamination and piling companies are frequently being

2.19

Contaminated Land

There is increasing awareness generally of contamination and piling companies are frequently being asked to pile into land that has become contaminated with a whole variety of contaminants.

On contaminated sites your health could be damaged through skin absorption, skin penetration, ingestion or inhalation.

You must separate yourselves from direct contact with the contaminated soil by wearing the

protective clothing provided, and the use of barrier creams. Always wash before eating and at the end of each work period. Be sure to wash your hands before

and after using the toilet. Smoking may lead to ingestion of contaminated material – you should avoid if possible or wash

your hands first. You must not eat on site as this may lead to ingestion of contaminated soil.

If you get any tar-like or other substances on your skin, wash them off with a proprietary cleaner

followed by soap and water and if necessary change your clothing. If you have even the slightest cut or scratch, get it thoroughly cleaned by the first aider and

covered with a waterproof dressing. Ensure details entered in Accident Book. Non-working clothes should be left in the area provided and overalls should be put on before

starting work. When leaving the site protective clothing should be stored in the area provided, where necessary

wash and shower thoroughly. Any health disorders must be reported to your supervisor i.e. headaches, stomach aches etc.

You must not go into any trench, pit or confined space unless you have a Permit to Work.

The following should be reported immediately:

  • 1. Patches of thick, black material, blue powders, yellow powders or any other suspicious substance.

  • 2. Strange smells, especially of rotten eggs.

  • 3. Any sign of fire.

  • 4. Containers containing any sort of substance.

AVOID CONTACT – STAY CLEAR

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For further information: HSE Manager/Officer Refer to SMSP 18, 41 & 44 SBD SMS Revision: 02

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to SMSP 18, 41 & 44

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2.20 Protection of the Public It is extremely important that all third parties are protected against

2.20

Protection of the Public

It is extremely important that all third parties are protected against possible accidents and injuries on site. Curiosity attracts the public to construction sites, particularly children. It must be remembered that we have to protect not only the young and fit, but also the old, the infirm and the blind.

A perimeter fence or hoarding should be erected around the construction site and along public

rights of way. Sometimes it may be appropriate to employ the services of a watchman or security organisation.

Notices should be displayed warning the public of the dangers on construction sites.

A compound for the storage of materials, tools and plant items should be provided.

Excavations should be backfilled, securely covered or protected before being left unattended.

All mechanical plant should be immobilised and where possible securely locked in a safe place.

Buckets and blades on plant should be grounded.

Ladders should be removed to a secure compound or rendered un-climbable.

Electricity supplies to all equipment which is not required to be energised when the site is

unoccupied should be locked off. Care must be taken not to obstruct footpaths, and other public access routes.

Partially used cartridge strips should not be left lying around the site.

Children are not allowed on sites.

Any public footpaths must be kept clear and/or pedestrian routes provided and signed as such.

Materials liable to be blown away by the wind must be lashed down when not in use.

Remember the standard of protection for the old, infirm and children is higher than for able bodied

construction workers, so when providing protective measures think of them, not yourself. It is not a defence in law that a person was a trespasser and should not have been on the site.

Further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to SMSP 19, 20 and 21.

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2.21 COSHH “COSHH” stands for the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health. The aim of these

2.21

COSHH

“COSHH” stands for the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health. The aim of these controls is to protect employees from harmful substances, e.g. wood-dust from sanding machines, fumes from solvent adhesives, etc.

Generic COSHH Assessments have been produced and are held on site. Chemicals which are purchased locally should have been assessed by the line manager purchasing the product with the assistance from the Safety Officer as necessary.

The risks to staff that follow the manufacturer’s instructions and safe systems of work are normally low. However, failing to wear PPE, or using PPE that has not been adequately maintained, could put you and your colleagues at risk. Similarly a product used in an unsafe condition or manner could be harmful.

Therefore, to ensure you are not put at risk when using chemicals or equipment whilst at work, follow these procedures:

Before starting work, read the label and follow the manufacturer’s instructions, e.g. wearing gloves

and goggles when using descalers and degreasants. Ensure ventilation/fresh air is adequate when applying adhesives and solvents.

Ensure that the correct PPE is available. Stores should be able to provide all suitable equipment

and clothing to you. Check that the PPE is available to use before you start the job.

Ensure that local exhaust ventilation systems are working properly and that they are regularly

maintained, e.g. ventilation from wood-working machinery, etc. A record should be kept of all maintenance work undertaken. PPE should be regularly checked and, if necessary, replaced. Filters should be replaced as

recommended by the manufacturer, and more frequently if heavily used. A PPE “log” should be kept, detailing who the PPE is issued to, recording maintenance and filter replacements. Follow the safe system of work when using hazardous items.

Do not eat or drink whilst handling hazardous items.

Report any defects or faults to equipment and plant.

Do not transfer hazardous items into unlabeled containers, e.g. decanting acid into small lemonade bottle, etc.

 

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• Know what safety precautions to take when handling substances you deal with frequently. Be •

Know what safety precautions to take when handling substances you deal with frequently. Be

aware of what to do should an emergency arise, e.g. splashing solvent into your eyes or onto clothing (emergency instructions are normally incorporated into the label of the product). If you are not sure that a substance you have been asked to use has been adequately assessed,

speak to your line manager. Should you require assistance or advice on how to use a product in a dangerous area (e.g. a confined space) call the HSE Team for advice. If you feel ill or drowsy whilst using a product or carrying out a particular task stop immediately and

speak to your manager for advice. Move to an area of fresh air and if necessary obtain treatment from the First Aider. Do not allow anyone to return to where you were working – or to continue your work in another area – if you have become ill as a direct result of carrying out a particular job. Ensure that your manager investigates. As well as protecting yourself, consider the possible effects of the use of chemical products and substances on other people who may be indirectly exposed.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to SMSP 18

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2.22 Compressed Gas Cylinders • Treat every cylinder as “full” and handle carefully. • Always use

2.22

Compressed Gas Cylinders

Treat every cylinder as “full” and handle carefully.

Always use a carrier and secure the cylinder into it.

Always secure acetylene flammable gas cylinders in an upright position both in use and in storage.

Store all cylinders so that they can not fall.

Keep them away from sun, artificial heat, flammable materials, corrosive chemicals and fumes.

Avoid damage to valves and fittings and do not use them for lifting and carrying.

Keep valves and fittings of oxygen cylinders free from oil and grease.

See that gloves (if worn) are free from oil and grease.

Open cylinder valves slowly, and close sufficiently to shut off gas – never use force.

Always lift cylinders from trucks – do not drop or slide them.

Keep hose lines clear of traffic lanes and hot slag.

Remember – handling cylinders is a two man job.

Do not use flammable gas or oxygen cylinders without flashback arrestors.

Regular inspection of hoses gases etc should be undertaken before use.

Transport cylinders in open not closed vehicles without ventilation.

Do not smoke when using compressed gases.

Make sure you know the emergency fire procedures including types of fire extinguishers to be used.

Ensure a suitable fire extinguisher is immediately available for hot work.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer HIRA 08 and 60 SMSP 7, 13 and 18.

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2.23 Fragile Roofs Every year many workers die as a result of falling from a fragile

2.23

Fragile Roofs

Every year many workers die as a result of falling from a fragile roof. HSE statistics reveal that falls often from as little as three metres can lead to a fatality. Falls from fragile roofs leave workers badly injured, some so severely injured, that they are never able to walk again.

A roof may look secure enough to walk on, particularly if the roof is not signed as a Fragile Roof. It may bear the weight of one or two people and then all of a sudden the surface collapses – there is nothing to save you from falling.

What constitutes a fragile roof surface? Plastic sheeting Wired glass Wood wool slabs Asbestos/fibre cement sheets Corrugated steel sheeting (particular if rusted) Skylights

Points to Consider

All work on roofs must be the subject of a local Hazard / Impact Risk Assessment prior to the work:

If access is needed near skylights protect staff by fixing guard-rails barriers within two metres of the

approach to sky/roof lights. Sign the barriers appropriately. If crawling-boards can be used they must only be used by a competent person. This involves two

secured boards (at least 430mm) wide used to span the purlins. Suitable roof-edge protection must be provided.

Protection from fragile guttering or other surfaces must be provided if access is necessary.

All persons must be protected from debris and other material likely to be removed or fall from

roofing. Loose material and tools should be kept away from the edge of roof surfaces.

Staff should not work in heavy rain or gusty conditions.

Ladders should be secured.

 

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• If crawling-boards cannot be used alternative means of access may be necessary, e.g. scaffolding or

If crawling-boards cannot be used alternative means of access may be necessary, e.g. scaffolding or cherry-picker.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 40 SMSP 09

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2.24 Highly Flammable Liquids (HFL`s) and LPG N.B. HFL`s are those liquids with a flash point

2.24

Highly Flammable Liquids (HFL`s) and LPG

N.B. HFL`s are those liquids with a flash point below 90 degrees F (32 degrees C)

Storage General

Mark “Highly Flammable” – indicate flash point.

Access clear

Fire Extinguishers provided.

Open Air Storage

Concrete base

Mesh fence

Roof cover

Sill and ramp to contain 110% of contents of largest container.

Separation distance 2m from boundary/fixed sources of ignition minimum. Ideally the storage place should be more then 6m from the nearest building, highway or public footpath or other flammable substances.

Storage in a Purpose Built Area

Used exclusively for HFL.

Sill at doorway to contain 110% of contents of largest container.

Well ventilated at low and high level.

Separation distance 6m from boundary/fixed sources of ignition.

Only specially protected electrical equipment to be used within.

Workplace

50 litres (10 gals) or less in fire resistant, marked bin/cupboard capable of containing the contents of the largest HFL container should it leak.

Petrol

Only 15 litres maximum to be stored on site without a license.

 

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Decanting • In open air or fire resistant building. • Into small, marked containers with effective

Decanting

In open air or fire resistant building.

Into small, marked containers with effective closure.

Funnels/trays used.

Spillage mopped up/sanded.

Absorbents disposed of safely.

Use of Highly Flammable Liquids

Good ventilation or mechanical extraction with flame proof motor.

No naked flame or ignition sources.

Waste bins provided, with lids. Impregnated rags should not be left in bins – they can self-combust.

Warning notices displayed.

Fire Extinguishers provided.

Containers with lids, for cleaning brushes etc

Spraying

Identify materials: observe precautions in use and storage.

Use correct equipment.

Protective Equipment/clothing.

Avoid ignition risks.

Warning notices, barriers in use.

Fire extinguishers provided.

Well ventilated (mechanical ventilation within buildings or structures)

COSHH assessment.

Flammable Adhesives

Identify type of adhesive and check precautions for safe usage.

Use exhaust ventilation as necessary – spark free motors.

Use respiratory/protective clothing.

No ignition sources; avoid sparks and naked flames.

Electrical installations – isolate fuses.

Provide warning notices; erect barriers.

Solvent not used to clean hands, surfaces etc.

 

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• Empty containers not to be heated or cut. • Tanks – precautions taken against risk

Empty containers not to be heated or cut.

Tanks – precautions taken against risk of explosion.

Entry into tanks; authorising permit obtained first.

Fire Emergency Procedures

Emergency procedures – provide and display instructions.

Disposal of Containers

Empty – collapse container.

Partially empty – dispose of as Special Waste – refer to supervisor.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer HIRA 08 and 09 SMSP 07

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2.25 Safe transport of gas cylinders The use of vehicles to transport Gas Cylinders to and

2.25

Safe transport of gas cylinders

The use of vehicles to transport Gas Cylinders to and from Site is covered relevant regulations as such we must ensure the following is adhered to at all times.

Where a vehicle is used to carry Dangerous Substances the operator must ensure that it is in good

condition and suitable for the substances being carried on that journey. No more than 5 litres must be carried without the driver holding a Vocational Training Certificate. Operators and those loading vehicles must take reasonable steps to ensure that cylinders are

loaded/unloaded correctly. Ensure that cylinders are properly secured on the vehicle to minimise the risk of damage leakage

etc. Gas cylinders must be stored and transported in an upright position and the use of closed vans and

other closed vehicles must be avoided.

Where closed vehicles have to be used in the case of a small number of cylinders of flammable or toxic gas “adequate ventilation” should be provided and any other precautions that may be necessary. Vehicle operator must obtain sufficient information about the dangerous substances he is carrying

and he is aware of the hazards created by the substance, transport emergency card (tremcards) to be kept on dashboard of vehicle. Vehicle operator must be aware of the emergency procedures in the event of an accident.

He must be a competent trained operator.

Vehicle must carry a suitable fire extinguisher.

No smoking when loading and unloading gases to be erected on entrance door to storage area of vehicle.

Restrictions apply to Carriage of LPG through Tunnels.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to SMSP 07, 13 & 18

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2.26 Welding and Cutting There are two principle types of welding, gas and electric arc, both

2.26

Welding and Cutting

There are two principle types of welding, gas and electric arc, both require considerable care in their use.

Welding is a skilled job; it should only be carried out by those who have received the

necessary training. Electric arc welding can cause eye damage. Protect your eyes and those of others.

Always use and wear appropriate equipment and clothing.

Check the welding machine is earthed and that cables and electrode holder are in good

condition. Gas cylinders should always be held upright and secure.

Keep the welding area free from flammable materials.

Take care to ensure hoses are not punctured and clear them away when not in use.

Never weld or cut inside enclosed vessels or to vessels that have contained flammable

liquids. Use flashback arresters on all gas cylinders.

Keep oil based products away from oxygen bottles and fittings, this is an explosive

combination. Keep a fire extinguisher available and seek proper first aid attention for any burns.

Ensure screening is erected to protect other employees and general public.

For Further Information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 59 and 60 SMSP 13

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2.27 Plant Movement on Site Every year there are numerous serious and fatal accidents throughout the

2.27

Plant Movement on Site

Every year there are numerous serious and fatal accidents throughout the country caused by the movement of plant and equipment on sites.

Unattended reversing is a major cause of accidents, therefore commercial vehicles (including buses, delivery vehicles, cranes or any vehicle where the driver does not have a clear all-round vision), must not be reversed or manoeuvred unless a responsible person is in attendance to help to guide the vehicle.

The banksman or responsible person must be aware of the dangers to himself:

From the machine which he is guiding, bearing in mind the possible restricted vision to the front or

rear of the machine. He must always position himself in a location where he is readily visible to the driver at all times the vehicle is moving and at the same time not a risk to himself. From other machines in the area.

From excavations, trenches etc.

From other obstructions.

From suspended loads.

The banksman and operator must establish with the driver, BEFORE the operation, a system of communication that should be either the recognised signals, or by means of a Klaxon. The banksman must stop operations where anyone is being place at risk – if any dispute arises he must stop the operation and report to the supervisor who will determine priorities.

The banksman, whilst guiding the machine or acting as lookout ahead of the direction of travel, must be particularly conscious of:

The proximity of other personnel.

The proximity and movement of other vehicles.

The proximity of excavations, trenches, batters – (any excavation to which a vehicle is to be guided

e.g. for tipping purposes, must be provided with stop blocks). The proximity of structures, scaffolding or obstructions e.g. boulders.

The proximity of underground services where relevant.

The proximity of electrical overhead lines – site management must ensure that all electrical overhead lines are adequately highlighted and protected in line with company policy – the

 

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• banksman and operator must be made aware of the requirement for notices and goal posts

banksman and operator must be made aware of the requirement for notices and goal posts and their duty to observe them. The danger from suspended loads.

The requirement to ensure that at least 600 mm clearance is always maintained between any part

of the machine and any slewing motion. The danger of unauthorised passengers riding in an unsafe manner.

The banksman must not leave his workplace until the operation has ceased or he has been relieved by a competent deputy.

N.B. Only one banksman must direct the driver.

For further information:

HSE Manager/Officer Refer to HIRA 78 SMSP 10, 17 & 37

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2.28 Mobile Cranes • You must only operate a machine of a type on which you

2.28

Mobile Cranes