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I. Unit Analysis and Realignment: A: Evaluating the Materials (as they are) 1.

From the options provided at the library I selected the teacher edition textbook entitled Art Talk, intended for a high school setting. The unit Ive decided to focus on is Unit 3: The Principles of Art. It covers four chapters (8-11), all in which have specific principles of art. Chapter 8: Rhythm, Pattern, and Movement In this chapter students explore how the principles of rhythm and pattern are used to add a sense of movement to artworks. Chapter 9: Balance Students learn why balance is important in art and how visual weight is created. Chapter 10: Proportion Students learn about the Golden Mean, the two kinds of visual scale, and human proportions. Chapter 11: Variety, Emphasis, Harmony, and Unity This chapter explains how artists use variety, emphasis, and harmony to express ideas and feelings. Also in this chapter, students discover a major important principle of art, unity. The purpose of this unit is for the students to understand, analyze, and apply the principles of art. They must understand how they are effectively used in different mediums, as well as discuss/critique works of art from history to broaden their knowledge. Lastly they will apply what they have learned in studio assignments to convey their full understanding. 2. This unit gives many objectives for each chapter, making the learning targets very clear. They meet up very nicely with both the state and national standards. Big Idea: Structure in the Arts Visual Arts (Kentucky)
Program of Studies: Understandings High School Enduring Knowledge - Understandings AH-HS-SA-U-2 Students will understand that the principles of design and the elements of visual art are intentionally applied in creating works of art. AH-HS-SA-U-3 Students will understand that responding to and critiquing works of art involves an Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts High School Skills and Concepts - Visual Arts AH-HS-SA-S-VA1 Students will use appropriate terminology to analyze and evaluate the use of elements of art (e.g., line, shape, form, texture, color) and principles of design (emphasis, pattern, balance, contrast) in a variety of visual artworks AH-HS-SA-S-VA2 Related Core Content AH-HS-1.4.1 Students will analyze or evaluate the use of the elements of art and principles of design in a variety of artworks. DOK 3 (Incorporates knowledge about elements of art and principles of design from th primary through 8 grade) Elements of art: Line, Shape, Form,

understanding of elements, principles, and structures appropriate to each area of the arts. AH-HS-SA-U-4 Students will understand that existing and emerging technologies can inspire new applications of structural components

Students will expressively use the elements of art, principles of design, and a variety of processes in creating artworks AH-HS-SA-S-VA3 Students will apply organizational structures and evaluate what makes them effective or not effective in communicating ideas AH-HS-SA-S-VA4 Students will analyze and evaluate the use of elements of art (e.g., line, shape, color properties, color schemes/groups, form, texture, space, value) and principles of design (e.g., repetition, emphasis, pattern, balance, contrast, rhythm, proportion, movement) in a variety of two and three dimensional artworks AH-HS-SA-S-VA5 Students will identify and use a variety of subject matter in viewing and creating visual artworks (representational e.g., landscape, portrait, still life, nonrepresentational e.g., abstract, non-objective)

Texture, Space (perspective: aerial or atmospheric, two-point linear perspective), Value (lightness and darkness, tints and shades), Color (color theory - primary, secondary, intermediate hues, intensity brightness and dullness, color schemes/groups triadic, complementary, analogous) Principles of design: Repetition, Pattern, Rhythm, Movement, Contrast, Proportion, Balance (symmetrical, asymmetrical, radial), Emphasis (focal point), Variety, Unity AH-HS-1.4.2 Students will analyze or evaluate the use of media and art processes in creating artworks. DOK 3 Media (plural)/Medium (singular) (Properties of media need to be known in order to respond to artworks) Two-dimensional: paint (watercolor, tempera, oil, acrylic), fabric, yarn, paper, ink, pastel (oil and chalk), fiber, photography, computer-generated design/art Three-dimensional: clay, wood, glass, metal, stone, plaster Art processes: Two-dimensional: drawing, painting, fiber art (e.g., fabric printing, stamping, batik, tie-dye), printmaking, photography Three-dimensional: textiles, fiber art (e.g., constructing

with fiber, weaving, rugs, crocheting, knitting, quilting), ceramics, sculpture, architecture Subject matter: representational (e.g., landscape, portrait, still life), nonrepresentational (e.g., abstract, non-objective)

Chapter 8 Rhythm, Pattern, and Movement Lesson I: Rhythm and Pattern Identify rhythms and patterns in the world around them. (AH-HSSA-S-VA1) Understand how rhythm and pattern add a sense of movement to a work of art. (AH-HS-SA-U-2) Compare and contrast the use of pattern in personal artworks. (AH-HS-SA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-SA-S-VA3, AHHS-1.4.1) Lesson II: Types of Rhythm and Pattern Identify and explain motif and pattern. (AH-HS-SA-S-VA1) Name and identify the types of rhythm. (AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AHHS-SA-S-VA3) Compare and contrast the use of pattern in artworks. (AH-HS-SAU-2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-SA-S-VA3, AH-HS-1.4.1) Lesson III: How Artist Use Rhythm to Create Movement Use the principle of rhythm to create their own artworks. (AH-HSSA-U-2) Compare and contrast the use of rhythm in artworks. (AH-HS-SAU-2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1) Chapter 9 Balance Lesson I: Visual Balance Explain why balance is important in an artwork. (AH-HS-SA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-1.4.1) Describe how visual weight is created and produce it in their own artwork. (AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-SA-S-VA3, AH-HS-1.4.1) Compare and contrast the use of balance in artworks. (AH-HS-SA3, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-SA-S-VA3) Create visual solutions that emphasize balance using direct observation and imagination. (AH-HS-SA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-SVA2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA4, HS-SA-S-VA5, AH-HS-1.4.2)

Lesson II: Informal Balance Define informal balance. (AH-HS-SA-S-VA1) Describe how to achieve informal balance in artworks. (AH-HSSA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-1.4.1) Demonstrate effective use of art media in design. (AH-HS-SA-U2, AH-HS-SA-U-4, AH-HS-SA-S-VA2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA4, HSSA-S-VA5, AH-HS-1.4.2) Lesson III: The Expressive Qualities of Balance Describe the expressive qualities of balance. (AH-HS-SA-3, AHHS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-1.4.1) Identify the use of various types of balance. (AH-HS-SA-U-2, AHHS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-SA-S-VA3, AH-HS-1.4.1) Chapter 10 Proportion Lesson I: The Golden Mean Explain and recognize the Golden Mean. (AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HSSA-S-VA1) Describe the relationship of the Golden Mean to the human body. (AH-HS-SA-S-VA1) Lesson II: Scale Understand how we perceive proportion and scale. (AH-HS-SA-SVA1) Measure and draw human faces and bodies with correct proportions. (AH-HS-SA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA4, HS-SA-SVA5, AH-HS-1.4.2) Create visual solutions using direct observation. (AH-HS-SA-SVA2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA4, HS-SA-S-VA5, AH-HS-1.4.2) Lesson III: How Artists Use Proportion and Distortion Understand how artists use proportion and distortion to create meaning. (AH-HS-SA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HS-1.4.1) Compare and contrast the use of proportion in artworks. (AH-HSSA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-SA-S-VA3, AH-HS-1.4.1) Chapter 11 Variety, Emphasis, and Harmony Lesson I: Variety, Emphasis, and Harmony Identify and describe variety, emphasis, and harmony in works of art. (AH-HS-SA-U-3, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-1.4.1) Compare and contrast the use of emphasis in artworks. (AH-HSSA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HS-SA-S-VA3, AH-HS-1.4.1)

Create visual solutions with emphasis using their imagination. (AH-HS-SA-S-VA2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA4, AH-HS-SA-S-VA5, AH-HS-1.4.2)

Lesson II: Unity Identify the principle of unity in artworks. (AH-HS-SA-U-2, AHHS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-1.4.1) Compare and contrast how artists achieve unity in artworks. (AHHS-SA-3, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-SA-S-VA3, AH-HS-1.4.1) National Visual Arts Standards 1. Use knowledge of structures and functions 2. Reflect upon and assess the characteristics and merits of their work and work of others 3. Understand and apply media, techniques, processes 4. Use knowledge of structures and functions 5. Choose and evaluate a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas Textbook Content In depth text information regarding all art principles, and studio lessons that allow students to discuss their work and participate in group critiques. Students create: Paintings that express movement through the use of rhythm and repetition. Ceramic masks that are symmetrical that relate to the masks of the Kuba people. Asymmetrical balance painting Mixed media piece using the Golden Mean Digital fantasy creatures with thoughtful composition in mind. Decorated found object that identifies a variety of designs characteristics. Faith Ringgold. The Men: Mask Face Quilt #2. 1986. Philip Moulthrop. White Pine Mosaic Bowl. 1993. M.C. Escher. Reptiles. 1943. Chaing Ziong. Hmong Story Cloth. 1987. Central Tibet, Tsang (Ngor Monastery), Sakya Order. Four Mandalas of the Vajravali Series. 1429-56.

6. Understand art in relations to history and cultures

7. Reflect upon and assess the characteristics and In class critiques merits of their work and work of others 8. Connect visual arts with other disciplines Social Studies, Performing Arts (stage version of The Lion King), Language Arts.

3. Overall, I think that the objectives and learning targets hit both the state and national standards on the nose. There is a wonderful balance between obtaining the knowledge through the text and discussions, and actually applying the knowledge they learned in hands on studio assignments. The only thing I could find room to complain about would be that there needs to be more emphasis on in class critiques in regards to the student body work. Talking about the works of other classmates helps the students better understand the art principles on their own personal level. An increased amount of attention would align with AH-HS-SA-S-VA4 and AH-HS-SA-S-VA5. B: Realignment of Textbook Unit 1. Chapter 8 Rhythm, Pattern, and Movement Lesson I: Rhythm and Pattern Identify rhythms and patterns in the world around them and understand how rhythm and pattern add a sense of movement to a work of art, while being able to compare and contrast the use of them in personal artworks. (AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-SA-U2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA3, AH-HS-1.4.1) Lesson II: Types of Rhythm and Pattern Identify and explain motif, pattern, and the types of rhythm. Compare and contrast the use of pattern in artworks. (AH-HS-SAS-VA1, AH-HS-SA-S-VA3, AH-HS-SA-U-2, -HS-1.4.1) Lesson III: How Artist Use Rhythm to Create Movement Identify and use the principle of rhythm to create their own artworks, and compare and contrast the use of rhythm in the pieces. (AH-HS-SA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1) Chapter 9 Balance Lesson I: Visual Balance Explain why balance is important in an artwork, and describe how visual weight is created and produced in their own artwork. Compare and contrast the use of balance in artworks during a class critique. Create visual solutions that emphasize balance using direct observation and imagination. (AH-HS-SA-U-2, AH-HS-SA3, AH-HS-1.4.1, AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-SAS-VA2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA4, HS-SA-S-VA5, AH-HS-1.4.2) Lesson II: Informal Balance

Define informal balance and explain how to achieve it in artworks. Demonstrate effective use of art media in design. (AH-HS-SA-U2, AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HS-1.4.1, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-SAU-4, AH-HS-SA-S-VA2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA4, HS-SA-S-VA5, AH-HS-1.4.2)

Lesson III: The Expressive Qualities of Balance Describe the expressive qualities of balance and identify the use of various types. (AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-1.4.1, AH-HS-SA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-SA-S-VA3,) Chapter 10 Proportion Lesson I: The Golden Mean Explain and recognize the Golden Mean and describe the relationship it has to the human body. (AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HS-SAS-VA1) Lesson II: Scale Understand how we perceive proportion and scale, and be able to create visual solutions using direct observation. Measure and draw human faces and bodies with correct proportions. (AH-HS-SA-SVA1, AH-HS-SA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA4, HS-SA-S-VA5, AHHS-1.4.2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA2, HS-SA-S-VA5) Lesson III: How Artists Use Proportion and Distortion Understand how artists use proportion and distortion to create meaning, and participate in a class critique that discusses the use of proportion. Effectively measure and draw human faces and bodies with correct proportions. (AH-HS-SA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HS1.4.1, AH-HS-SA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AHHS-SA-S-VA3, AH-HS-1.4.1) Chapter 11 Variety, Emphasis, and Harmony Lesson I: Variety, Emphasis, and Harmony Identify and describe variety, emphasis, and harmony in works of art. (AH-HS-SA-U-3, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-1.4.1) Compare and contrast the use of emphasis in artworks. (AH-HSSA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HS-SA-S-VA3, AH-HS-1.4.1) Create visual solutions with emphasis using their imagination, and discuss other student works. (AH-HS-SA-S-VA2, AH-HS-SA-SVA4, AH-HS-SA-S-VA5, AH-HS-1.4.2) Lesson II: Unity

Identify the principle of unity in artworks and compare how artists achieve unity in artworks. (AH-HS-SA-U-2, AH-HS-SA-S-VA1, AH-HS-1.4.1, AH-HS-SA-3, AH-HS-SA-S-VA3)

2. 1. The principle of art that indicates movement by the repetition of elements and objects. A.) Movement B.) Rhythm (Identify rhythms and patterns in the world around them and understand how rhythm and pattern add a sense of movement to a work of art, while being able to compare and contrast the use of them in personal artworks.) C.) Balance D.) Pattern 2. The principle of art used to crate the look and feeling of action and to guide the viewers eyes throughout the work of art. A.) Movement (Identify and use the principle of rhythm to create their own artworks, and compare and contrast the use of rhythm in the pieces.) B.) Pattern C.) Rhythm D.) Emphasis 3. The type of balance that results when equal, or very similar elements are placed on opposite sides of a central axis. A.) Mirror B.) Informal Balance C.) Symmetry D.) Formal Balance (Describe the expressive qualities of balance and identify the use of various types.) 4. A special type of formal balance in which two halves of a balanced composition are identical, mirror images of each other. A.) Symmetry (Describe the expressive qualities of balance and identify the use of various types.) B.) Formal Balance C.) Informal Balance D.) Unity 5. When the forces or elements of a design radiate from a central point. A.) Radial Balance (Describe the expressive qualities of balance and identify the use of various types.) B.) Informal Balance C.) Formal Balance D.) Harmony

6. The principle of art concerned with the size relationship of one part to another. A.) Balance B.) Harmony C.) Proportion (Understand how we perceive proportion and scale, and be able to create visual solutions using direct observation. Measure and draw human faces and bodies with correct proportions.) D.) Unity 7. A line divided into two parts so that the smaller line has the same proportion, or ratio to the larger line as the larger line has to the whole line. A.) Proportion B.) Symmetry C.) Golden Mean (Explain and recognize the Golden Mean and describe the relationship it has to the human body.) D.) Horizon 8. To shorten an object to make it look as if it extends backward into space. A.) B.) C.) D.) Foreshortening (Understand how artists use proportion and distortion to create meaning, and participate in a class critique that discusses the use of proportion. Effectively measure and draw human faces and bodies with correct proportions.) 9. Size measured against a standard reference. A.) Scale (Understand how artists use proportion and distortion to create meaning, and participate in a class critique that discusses the use of proportion. Effectively measure and draw human faces and bodies with correct proportions.) B.) Informal scale C.) Asymmetry D.) Golden Mean 10. The principle of art concerned with difference or contrast. A.) Value B.) Unity C.) Harmony D.) Variety (Identify and describe variety, emphasis, and harmony in works of art.) 11. The principle of art that makes one part of a work dominant over the other parts.

A.) Focal point B.) Color C.) Emphasis (Compare and contrast the use of emphasis in artworks.) D.) Balance 12. The principle of art that creates unity by stressing the similarities of separate but related parts. A.) Variety B.) Rhythm C.) Harmony (Identify the principle of unity in artworks and compare how artists achieve unity in artworks.) D.) Symmetry The quality of wholeness that is achieved through the effective use of the elements and principles of art. A.) Pattern B.) Proportion C.) Unity (Identify the principle of unity in artworks and compare how artists achieve unity in artworks.) D.) Emphasis Open Response: After learning about the principles of art (rhythm, pattern, movement, balance, proportion, variety, emphasis, and harmony) thoughtfully explain how they all come together to create the last principle - unity. You will reference at least two of the four provided artworks directly from the unit to further explain this combination. Rufino Tamayo. Fruit Vendors. 1952. Oil on canvas. Jan van Eyck. The Arnolfini Wedding. 1434. Oil on panel. Michelangelo. David. 1501-1504. Marble. Pablo Picasso. The Old Guitarist. 1903. Oil on panel. * This open response addresses all of the objectives in that the student has to apply each principle to a bigger picture to define unity. Each objective directly leads to the understanding of each principle, and this assignment will be the final step in exploring their obtained information regarding the overall unit based on the principles of art.

CATEGORY 4
Thoughtful Composition

The response The response The response The response had was thoughtfully had obvious had little thought no thought put composed. thought, but put into it. into it. didn't go into detail. Mentions all The response The response The response The response Principles mentions mentions most mentions some hardly mentions rhythm, pattern, of the art of the art any of the art movement, principles. principles. principles, or no balance, mention of them. proportion, variety, emphasis, and harmony. Discusses Unity The response The response The response The response discusses how mentions unity lightly talks doesn't discuss unity is a in relation to the about unity, but unity. derivative of all principles, but fails to relate it principles. now how they to the art work together to principles. form unity. Reference The response The response The response The response has Artwork references two references one of references one of no references. of the provided the provided the provided artworks and artworks and artworks, but explains how explains how it fails to explain they achieved achieved unity. how it achieved unity. unity. Performance Assessment: You will create a design that demonstrates the idea of up-cycling. You will receive an old worn, functional object and up-cycle it into a work of art by painting it with a variety of images and designs typical of a particular culture (past or present). Research your chosen culture and study it in print resources, your schools media center, and the internet. Make both visual and verbal notes in your sketchbook of the images, designs, and colors that are distinctive of that culture. And finally, you will need to demonstrate your understanding of the art principles in your art piece.

CATEGORY Culture

4 3 Student has Student has reliable unreliable research on a sources, but culture and somewhat conveys variety conveys a of images and variety of designs typical images and of a particular designs typical culture. of a particular culture

2 Student didnt research at all but conveys the believed variety of images and designs typical of a particular culture

1 Student has no research and fails to have imagery typical of a particular culture.

Shows Student Student Student Student fails to Understanding effectively uses effectively uses effectively uses demonstrate a the art some of the art very little of the thoughtful use principles in principles in art principles in of any art their up-cycled their up-cycled their up-cycled principle in their artwork. artwork. artwork. up-cycled artwork.

References Kentucky Department of Education, (2006, August) Core Content for Visual Arts High School. Kentucky Department of Education, website: http://www.education.ky.gov/kde/instructional+resources/curriculum+documents+and+re sources/teaching+tools/combined+curriculum+documents/ Ragans, Rosalind. (2005). Art Talk. Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

Instructional Unit Analysis and Realignment Plan for EDF 311 *001 Learning Theories for Teachers Spring 2012

Maria Lind Blevins