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Safety eSSentialS

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CONTENTS introduction 04 Safety and Health at Leighton Contractors The Mining Safety Essentials The Essential

CONTENTS

introduction

04

Safety and Health at Leighton Contractors The Mining Safety Essentials The Essential Behaviours The Mining Safety Essentials at work

04

04

04

04

Mining Safety eSSentialS

06

1. Confined spaces

06

2. Cranes and lifting operations

08

3. Electrical safety

10

4. Explosives and blasting

12

5. Ground control

14

6. Mine traffic and roadways

16

7. Mining operations

18

8. Mobile assets

20

9. Plant safeguarding and isolation of energy

22

10. Tyres

24

11. Working at heights

26

INTRO

INTRODuCTION

Safety and health at leighton contractorS

Thinking and working safely is part of our culture. Our first and most important value is safety and health above all else, and through its guiding behaviours, we make it clear to our leaders and team members that:

ƒ we look after our workmates as if they are family

ƒ we take action when we see a safety risk.

The goal of our framework is Zero Harm—and our focus is on eliminating the potential for fatalities and permanent disabilities, while systematically reducing all other injuries.

the Mining Safety eSSentialS

Leighton Contractors’ Mining Safety Essentials are the minimum, non- negotiable requirements on how we manage critical risk in our business. They are the areas we have identified from our 30 years’ experience in contract mining that give rise to severe consequences if they are not clearly understood and applied.

They reinforce our systems and processes—they do not replace them. Nothing replaces the need for everyone to proactively manage risk every day, in every task they undertake.

It’s about realising a step change in our safety performance.

the eSSential BehaviourS

Every Mining Safety Essential has defined behavioural expectations for those directly involved in doing the work (Working Behaviours), and those who plan, coordinate, schedule or manage the critical risk activity.

You must be familiar with and adhere to the behaviours relevant to your role at all times.

For more information, please refer to your Essential Behaviours pocket guide, as well as consult regularly with your supervisor and SHE representatives.

04 | LEIGHTON CONTRACTORS

the Mining Safety eSSentialS at work

FRONTLINE LEADERSHIp

It is important to remember that we all need to show commitment and leadership when it comes to safety, and that we will all need to be the ambassadors and champions of the Mining Safety Essentials if we are to succeed.

In addition, critical risk activities require a higher level of supervision, and frontline leaders overseeing critical risk activities must ensure that, prior to any work commencing, their people and teams:

ƒ have been consulted

ƒ have been provided with an opportunity to comment on the proposed system of work

ƒ have received the work instructions and understand them

ƒ are trained and authorised to undertake the work

ƒ fully understand the risks and controls.

ACCOuNTAbILITY

AND COMpLIANCE

The Mining Safety Essentials requirements are non-negotiable, and all Leighton Contractors’ employees and subcontractors need to adhere to them at all times.

You are encouraged to discuss any issues of concern with your supervisor, and also bring forward your innovations and ideas, so that we can continuously improve.

You also have an obligation to report any breaches to your supervisor.

It is expected that while carrying out critical risk activities, you will comply with the Mining Safety Essentials and the relevant external and internal obligations, including Statutory Acts and Regulations, Australian Standards, Codes and Practices, our company business standards, and client requirements.

Where the expectations prescribed in these documents are exceeded by the Mining Safety Essentials, the Mining Safety Essentials requirements will take precedence.

Within the Mining Division, processes exist to assist with the implementation of the Mining Safety Essentials and the effective management of critical risk.

These processes need to be complied with. They include, but are not limited to, the:

ƒ exceptions process

ƒ permit to work process

ƒ change management processes (e.g. modify fixed or mobile plant processes).

IDENTIFICATION OF HAzARDS AND ASSESSMENT OF RISk

As defined in the Mining Safety Essentials, activities containing a critical risk will:

ƒ be supported by a risk assessment conducted by competent person(s)

ƒ be captured in Active Risk Manager (ARM) with a nominated Risk Owner

ƒ have a work instruction that describes the controls identified by the risk assessment to manage the critical risk(s)

ƒ have a monitoring and review schedule.

Prior to commencing any critical risk activity you must complete a risk assessment.

INNOvATION: uSING ENGINEERING TO HELp ELIMINATE RISk

Where Leighton Contractors is responsible or has the capacity to influence, all opportunities to design out critical risks should be fully explored.

This includes, but is not limited to:

ƒ designing out the need to access/ work at heights, or in confined spaces

ƒ designing adequate walkways and work platforms

ƒ ensuring that lockable isolation mechanisms and fail safe systems installed on plant and electrical installations are fitted

ƒ programming project schedules, sequencing and techniques to utilise in-situ permanent facilities, rather than relying on temporary measures (e.g. temporary access scaffolds)

ƒ managing vehicle interactions, as part of intersection and pit design.

TRAINING AND AuTHORISATION

Competencies required for persons involved in a critical risk activity must be documented. These include national competency units.

All persons undertaking critical risk activities, as defined in the Mining Safety Essentials, are required to undergo a verification process to confirm they have the required competencies to work safely before being authorised.

Authorisation is required from the project manager, project manager’s delegate, or a person detailed in the Safety and Health Management System.

Training that is outsourced should only be conducted by approved third party providers.

ExCEpTIONS (WITH ExECuTIvE AppROvAL ONLY)

In exceptional circumstances, where compliance to a Mining Safety Essential requirement is not possible, a written Essential Exception is required from the general manager who has line accountability for the project.

TECHNICAL SuppORT

If you require additional technical support, please contact the SHE advisors at your project, or email one of the nominated technical support contacts listed on Our Way.

Note: The term ‘process’ is used throughout this document in reference to any formal process or procedure that exists within Leighton Contractors, or its project management system, including (but not limited to) Our Way processes, standard operating procedures (SOPs), or Work Instructions and other procedures.

HIERARCHY OF CONTROL

When assessing the risks to determine controls, your first consideration should always be to eliminate the risks whenever possible.

IF THIS IS NOT pOSSIbLE: DEvELOp AND IMpLEMENT WORkING AbOvE THE LINE CONTROLS. IF THIS
IF THIS IS NOT pOSSIbLE:
DEvELOp AND IMpLEMENT WORkING
AbOvE THE LINE CONTROLS.
IF THIS IS NOT pOSSIbLE:
(AND AS A MINIMuM)
IMpLEMENT THE REquIREMENTS OF
THE MINING SAFETY ESSENTIALS.
IF THIS IS NOT pOSSIbLE:
IN ExCEpTIONAL CIRCuMSTANCES,
WHERE COMpLIANCE TO A MINING
SAFETY ESSENTIAL REquIREMENT IS
NOT pOSSIbLE, A WRITTEN ESSENTIAL
ExCEpTION IS REquIRED FROM THE
GENERAL MANAGER WHO HAS LINE
ACCOuNTAbILITY FOR THE pROjECT.

MINING SAFETY ESSENTIALS | 05

1. CONFINED SpACES

context and application

This Mining Safety Essential applies to all Mining Division projects, activities, subcontractors and visitors.

It describes minimum requirements and Above the Line principles associated with entering or working in confined spaces to prevent:

ƒ unsafe atmospheres or engulfment

ƒ increased risk of explosion

ƒ exacerbation of other risks due to access/area restrictions.

MiniMuM requireMentS

Note: Where the minimum requirements cannot be implemented, an Essential Exception Form shall be signed and approved by the general manager.

1.1 A confined space process shall be

developed, based on a risk assessment

that includes:

ƒ survey to identify confined spaces

ƒ confined space register

ƒ confined space permits

ƒ roles and responsibilities

ƒ response plan testing.

1.2 A site survey shall be undertaken

by an authorised person to identify all

confined spaces (e.g. fixed and mobile plant and equipment, work areas and infrastructure).

1.3 A confined space register shall

be developed and reviewed at least annually or when modifications or new plant and equipment are introduced. The register shall include:

ƒ photos of identified confined spaces

ƒ known hazards

ƒ rescue plans.

1.4 Confined spaces identified in the

register shall have visible confined space

entry signs with a unique identifier at or near the entrance.

1.5 The rescue plan shall be developed

for identified confined spaces and

include:

ƒ methods of communication between the worker, stand-by person and external support

ƒ special equipment

ƒ entry and exit strategies

ƒ response times.

1.6 All personnel who conduct confined

space activities shall be competent and

authorised.

1.7 A permit shall be completed for all

confined space activities and the permit issuer shall be authorised by the project manager. The permit shall consider:

ƒ risk management plan

ƒ ventilation plan

ƒ rescue plan

ƒ ongoing atmospheric testing

ƒ entry/exit log.

1.8 A stand-by person shall be dedicated

to a confined space activity and shall not:

ƒ leave the confined space area unattended

ƒ enter the confined space at any time.

1.9 Atmospheric testing equipment

shall be used, tested and calibrated in accordance with the manufacturer’s requirements.

aBove the line principleS

1

Above the Line controls are the most effective methods of control and should always be exhausted before implementing Below the Line controls. Some examples of Above the Line controls associated with entering or working in confined spaces are:

Above the Line ControlsBelow

Eliminate Get rid of Substitute Change Isolate Separate Engineering Engineered controls Administrative controls
Eliminate
Get rid of
Substitute
Change
Isolate
Separate
Engineering
Engineered controls
Administrative
controls
Instructions
and signs
PPE

Redesign confined space so that it would no longer be defined as one

Modify related work activities to eliminate the need to enter the space

Use cameras for inspections

Use high pressure or high volume hoses for cleaning

Scrape surfaces rather than using solvents

Use intrinsically safe equipment in potentially flammable atmospheres

Locked isolation points

Physical barriers at entry points

Purge the atmosphere of the confined space prior to entry

Continuous ventilation of confined space during entry and working

Confined space procedure Site survey Confined space register Rescue plan and stand-by person Confined space permit Atmospheric testing Trained and authorised personnel

the Line Controls

CONFINED SpACE:

Is defined by Australian Standard 2865:2009 as an enclosed or partially enclosed space that is not intended or designed primarily for human occupancy, and within which there is a risk of one or more of the following:

ƒ an oxygen concentration outside the safe oxygen range

ƒ a concentration of airborne contaminant that may cause impairment, loss of consciousness or asphyxiation

ƒ a concentration of flammable airborne contaminant that may cause injury from fire or explosion

ƒ engulfment in a stored free-flowing solid or a rising level of liquid that may cause suffocation or drowning.

STAND-bY pERSON:

A person who:

ƒ holds relevant and current competencies

ƒ is assigned to and remains on the outside of and in close proximity to the confined space

ƒ is capable of being in continuous communication with and, if practicable, able to observe persons inside the confined space

ƒ is capable of operating monitoring equipment used to ensure safety during entry to and work in the confined space

ƒ is capable of initiating emergency processes (including rescue processes) if necessary.

2. CRANES AND LIFTING OpERATIONS

context and application

This Mining Safety Essential applies to all Mining Division projects, activities, subcontractors and visitors.

It describes minimum requirements and Above the Line principles to ensure all lifting operations are conducted safely and to prevent:

ƒ personnel being struck by a crane or load

ƒ cranes over-turning or collapsing

ƒ cranes or loads contacting other structures

ƒ uncontrolled fall of a load.

MiniMuM requireMentS

Note: Where the minimum requirements cannot be implemented, an Essential Exception Form shall be signed and approved by the general manager.

2.1 There shall be a process for all

lifting operations on site to ensure lifting

operations are conducted safely.

2.2 A pre-lift assessment shall be

conducted by a competent person for all lifting operations to assess lift risks, determine controls and plan the lift.

2.3 Cranes shall not lift above 85 per

cent of the rated capacity of the crane at any time or radius.

Note: This requirement does not apply to overhead travelling cranes, portal cranes or tower cranes.

2.4 High Risk Lifts shall have a Lift Plan

and a risk assessment that is approved

by a person authorised by the project manager.

2.5 For High Risk Lifts, the accuracy of

load indicators shall be verified prior to commencing the lift activity or when the crane configuration is modified.

Note: Verification shall be undertaken by performing a test lift with a suitable known weight, or by using a verification process endorsed by the crane manufacturer.

2.6 Crane operators, dogmen and

riggers shall hold the relevant licence and be authorised.

2.7 For pick and carry activities,

the operator shall assess the entire route to ensure the crane remains within its capacity at all times.

2.8 Loads shall be adequately secured

to prevent personal damage or loss of load.

2.9 Loads shall not be suspended or

lifted over personnel unless they are in

a protected area or where controls are established to prevent personnel being struck.

2.10 Cranes shall be fitted with a

physical locking system that disables and isolates its free-fall capability.

2.11 Cranes shall only travel, set up

and perform lifts on ground where the ground conditions are adequate to support the crane. Where the crane operator determines the ground may be unsuitable a formal assessment of the ground bearing capacity shall be made.

2.12 Outriggers shall be packed and

supported as per the manufacturer’s and/or engineer’s recommendations.

2.13 Physical barriers shall be used

to protect outriggers if a risk of vehicle or plant striking the crane cannot be adequately controlled.

2.14 Slings, chains, spreader bars and

other lifting gear shall only be used if they:

ƒ comply with applicable Australian Standards

ƒ have clearly marked the rated capacity that is suitable for use on the specific crane

ƒ have been inspected and for non- consumable items, tagged and certified for use by a competent person.

2.15 Personnel shall not attach a load to

lifting equipment unless authorised.

2.16 Vehicle loading cranes shall have

engineering controls to protect the operator from crush injury during lifting operations.

2.17 Earth moving equipment and other

ancillary plant shall not be used as lifting equipment unless they:

ƒ are marked with a Safe Working Load (SWL) and/or Working Load Limit (WLL) on the lifting attachment/point

ƒ have a load chart displayed in the cabin

ƒ are fitted with load lock valves.

aBove the line principleS

Above the Line controls are the most effective methods of control and should always be exhausted before implementing Below the Line controls. Some examples of Above the Line controls associated with cranes and lifting operations are:

2

Above the Line ControlsBelow

Eliminate Get rid of Substitute Change Isolate Separate Engineering Engineered controls
Eliminate
Get rid of
Substitute
Change
Isolate
Separate
Engineering
Engineered controls

Plan work to reduce the number of lifts

Use of technology to remove operator from lifting zone

Use of specialised jacking equipment

Physical barriers preventing access to operating cranes and lifting zones

Overhead protective structures

Crane isolator and free fall lockouts

Certified lifting lugs and equipment

Engineered crane operation pads

Administrative controls Instructions and signs PPE
Administrative
controls
Instructions
and signs
PPE

Lifting procedure Pre-lift assessment Approved Lift Plan Ground condition assessment Safe working load signs Inspections Trained and authorised personnel

the Line Controls

pRE-LIFT ASSESSMENT:

Identification and assessment of potential hazards/risks associated with a lifting operation or sequence of lifts.

RATED CApACITY:

Based on the Australian Standard compliant load chart, and where a crane is de-rated (i.e. multi-crane lifts, crane articulation), the 85 per cent SWL applies to the re-rated capacity.

HIGH RISk LIFTS:

ƒ any lift where a mobile crane would be operating at >75 per cent of its safe working load; or

ƒ any lift where a tower crane would be operating at >85 per cent of its safe working load; or

ƒ multiple crane lifting; or

ƒ suspending personnel in a man cage/box; or

ƒ where defined as a High Risk Lift by the project.

pROTECTED AREA:

An area where there are physical controls in place to prevent persons being struck/crushed by a falling load.

LICENCE:

A permit issued from an official external authority that is current and carried on the person at all times.

3. ELECTRICAL SAFETY

context and application

This Mining Safety Essential applies to all Mining Division projects, activities, subcontractors and visitors.

It describes minimum requirements and Above the Line principles to prevent:

ƒ personnel contacting concealed electrical services

ƒ contact with live electrical equipment or exposed electrical conductors

ƒ arcing or explosions from faulty or poorly maintained equipment

ƒ contact with overhead electrical cables.

This Mining Safety Essential does not apply to extra low voltage work.

MiniMuM requireMentS

Note: Where the minimum requirements cannot be implemented, an Essential Exception Form shall be signed and approved by the general manager.

3.1 Electrical work shall only be

conducted by appropriately licensed and authorised electricians, who also

hold a current certificate in:

ƒ low voltage rescue

ƒ senior first aid.

3.2 With the exception of fault finding and

performance testing, live work on electrical

equipment shall not be carried out.

3.3 Fault finding or performance

testing on electrical equipment shall not be carried out in an energised state unless all reasonable alternative means of carrying out the work have been exhausted.

3.4 Before fault finding or performance

testing on electrical equipment can be undertaken in an energised state, a process for the specific task shall be developed, based on a risk assessment that includes:

ƒ identification of suitable tools, testing equipment and personal protective equipment

ƒ presence of an observer trained in CPR and the rescue plan

ƒ insulation of energised conductors where necessary to prevent inadvertent contact or flashovers

ƒ use of physical barriers to isolate the area to prevent unauthorised personnel from entering

ƒ use of tags indicating live testing is in progress.

For the purpose of this requirement, a test to re-energise (test for dead) to confirm that equipment is de-energised or isolated is not considered live work.

3.5 Electrical equipment and earthing

systems shall be inspected and maintained in accordance with relevant Australian Standards and original equipment manufacturer requirements.

3.6 Earth leakage protection shall be

installed on all circuits where there is a

potential to contact live conductors.

3.7 Electrostatic earthing shall be

provided for all situations or structures

where static discharge presents a hazard.

3.8 All electrical supply shall be

provided with a means of positive isolation and be clearly labelled.

3.9 Enclosures with exposed conductive

parts shall only be accessible with the use of a key or tool.

3.10 A test to re-energise (test for

dead) shall be conducted to confirm the

equipment is isolated.

3.11 A permit to work is required for

carrying out:

ƒ high voltage activities

ƒ work within the vicinity of overhead power lines and concealed power cables.

3.12 A prescribed sequential switching

of high voltage equipment shall be controlled through a switching program.

3.13 A survey of all overhead power

lines shall be conducted and recorded in a register.

3.14 Where overhead power lines

cross surface roads, they should be relocated, buried or elevated to a safe height. Where this is not practical, clearance heights shall be recorded in the site register, pre-warning clearance indicators shall be fitted and regular surveys conducted to monitor clearance heights.

3.15 Warning signs and where

applicable pre-warning clearance indicators shall be installed at locations where there is potential to contact overhead power lines and concealed power cables.

3.16 Electrical equipment and electrical

testing equipment shall be inspected and recorded in a register.

3.17 Electrical equipment that can be

plugged into a power outlet shall be tested and tagged.

3.18 Electrical cables used as trailing/

reeling cables on mobile equipment or

any other equipment where the supply cable may be exposed to the risk of damage due to tension must be fitted with Earth continuity protection.

aBove the line principleS

Above the Line controls are the most effective methods of control and should always be exhausted before implementing Below the Line controls. Some examples of Above the Line controls associated with working safely with electricity (including electrical equipment) are:

Above the Line ControlsBelow

Eliminate Get rid of Substitute Change Isolate Separate Engineering Engineered controls Administrative controls
Eliminate
Get rid of
Substitute
Change
Isolate
Separate
Engineering
Engineered controls
Administrative
controls
Instructions
and signs
PPE

Relocate overhead high voltage electrical cables underground

Redesign low voltage control systems to extra low voltage systems

Fence or secure high voltage installations and sub-stations

Lockable isolation points on electrical equipment

Surge arrestors

Earth leakage protection

Earthing equipment

Installation of shrouds on exposed electrical components

Testing and tagging of portable electrical equipment Test to re-energise (test for dead) Isolation procedure Permit to work—high voltage and for work near overhead power lines Warning signs and indicators for overhead power lines Sequential switching of high voltage equipment Trained and authorised personnel

the Line Controls

ExTRA LOW vOLTAGE:

LICENCE:

Voltage less than 50V AC or 120V DC,

A

permit issued from an official external

unless otherwise prescribed in the

authority that is current and carried on the

relevant legislation.

person at all times.

LOW vOLTAGE:

LIvE WORk:

Voltage of at least 50V AC or 120V DC, but not more than 1000V AC or 1500V DC, unless otherwise prescribed in the relevant legislation.

HIGH vOLTAGE:

Voltage greater than 1000V AC or 1500V DC, unless otherwise prescribed in the relevant legislation.

Work on electrical equipment that is energised at normal operating potential.

pOSITIvE ISOLATION:

A method of isolation where there is zero

potential of energy at the workplace and:

ƒ all dangerous energy has been identified

ƒ all dangerous energy is isolated at the source

ƒ residual energy has been eliminated or controls are in place to prevent uncontrolled energy release.

SAFE HEIGHT:

A ground clearance that would

permit vehicles on site or using the

roadway to travel under the overhead conductor without encroaching within the relevant exclusion zones (subject to conductor voltage, environmental conditions and equipment).

REELING CAbLE:

A cable specifically designed to be

frequently reeled on and off a cable drum or reeler on mobile apparatus.

TRAILING CAbLE:

A cable specifically designed to be

moved in conjunction with mobile apparatus.

3

4. ExpLOSIvES AND bLASTING

context and application

This Mining Safety Essential applies to all Mining Division projects, activities, subcontractors and visitors.

It describes minimum requirements and Above the Line principles to prevent:

ƒ unauthorised access by personnel into security sensitive ammonium nitrate (SSAN) storage, loading and blasting areas

ƒ unplanned initiation or misfires of explosives

ƒ damage caused by flying debris.

MiniMuM requireMentS

Note: Where the minimum requirements cannot be implemented, an Essential Exception Form shall be signed and approved by the general manager.

4.1 There shall be a management

plan for explosives based on a risk assessment that addresses the:

ƒ transport of explosives

ƒ use of explosives

ƒ security of explosives.

4.2 Explosives areas shall be

demarcated and access restricted to authorised personnel.

4.3 Each site shall prescribe minimum

distances for the placement of fencing, bunding and signage around blast holes to restrict plant and prevent unauthorised access.

4.4 Minimum blast exclusion zones

(including operational information such as firing times and locations) shall be defined and communicated to all personnel on site, and there shall be a verification process to ensure exclusion zones are clear prior to firing.

4.5 Personnel transporting, storing and

using explosives and SSAN shall be

licensed and authorised.

4.6 The drill and blast planning process

shall include approved:

ƒ drill plans

ƒ blast designs

ƒ development breakthrough plans for underground operations.

4.7 The blasting process shall include:

ƒ establishment of exclusion zones

ƒ blast guard plan

ƒ communication of firing times and locations

ƒ requirement to verify that exclusion zones are clear of personnel

ƒ firing line hook up.

4.8 For blasting activities undertaken

on surface operations, there shall be a lightning detection device and associated process.

4.9 Barricading and signage shall be

erected to prevent access to underground break through areas, including production, raise bore, diamond and development drill holes.

4.10 There shall be a process to manage misfires that includes:

ƒ barricading and signage in place

ƒ communication to all affected personnel

ƒ rectification by a competent and authorised person

ƒ documenting misfires in a misfire record.

4.11 There shall be a decontamination

process for equipment used for the transport, storage and use of explosives prior to any hot work being conducted.

4.12 There shall be a specific process

for inspecting and maintaining all equipment used with explosives.

4.13 Vehicles carrying explosives

shall only park in designated areas. Designated areas shall not include:

ƒ administration areas

ƒ maintenance workshops

ƒ accommodation areas.

4.14 There shall be a process for re-

entry into underground work areas after blasting that includes:

ƒ atmospheric testing for harmful gases

ƒ respirable dust is cleared

ƒ ventilation integrity

ƒ ground conditions are stable

ƒ inspection for misfires.

4.15 There shall be a process for the

management of fumes for surface

operations that includes:

ƒ selection of product

ƒ blast design

ƒ loading techniques

ƒ fume plume exclusion zones.

aBove the line principleS

Above the Line controls are the most effective methods of control and should always be exhausted before implementing Below the Line controls. Some examples

of Above the Line controls associated with explosives and blasting activities are:

Above the Line ControlsBelow

Eliminate Get rid of Substitute Change Isolate Separate Engineering Engineered controls Administrative controls
Eliminate
Get rid of
Substitute
Change
Isolate
Separate
Engineering
Engineered controls
Administrative
controls
Instructions
and signs
PPE

Non explosive mining techniques

Use of alternative blast products

Secured explosive storage areas

Segregated park up areas for vehicles carrying explosives

Physical barriers for drill patterns and loading areas

Blast guards to prevent access to blast areas

Barricading of misfires

Explosives handling and loading equipment

Lightning arrestors and detection devices

Remote detonation

Explosives management plan and related procedures

Drill and blast design

Inspection and maintenance of equipment used with explosives

Hot work permit for maintaining explosive vehicles and equipment

Trained and authorised personnel

the Line Controls

ExCLuSION zONE:

A zone to protect personnel and plant

from entering the blasting area.

LICENCE:

A permit issued from an official external

authority that is current and carried on the person at all times.

bLAST GuARD:

Authorised and competent person located

at the appropriate position to prevent

entry to the blast exclusion zone.

ExpLOSIvES AREA:

An area where explosives are located.

HOT WORk:

ƒ grinding

ƒ welding

ƒ thermal or oxygen cutting or heating

ƒ other related heat-producing or spark- producing operations.

4

5. GROuND CONTROL

context and application

This Mining Safety Essential applies to all Mining Division projects, activities, subcontractors and visitors.

It describes minimum requirements and Above the Line principles for underground and surface operations to prevent:

ƒ wall failures, slumping and rock falls

ƒ engulfment of personnel or plant

ƒ personnel falling into voids or old workings

ƒ rock bursts

ƒ failure of ground support

ƒ personnel being struck by falling material.

MiniMuM requireMentS

Note: Where the minimum requirements cannot be implemented, an Essential Exception Form shall be signed and approved by the general manager.

5.1 A geotechnical engineer shall

establish the geotechnical parameters

for the mine design.

5.2 There shall be a management

plan for ground control based on a risk assessment that addresses:

ƒ geotechnical designs and factors

ƒ ground control methods and support standards

ƒ the interaction of surface and underground activities

ƒ old workings

ƒ seismic activity

ƒ environmental factors

ƒ operational parameters

ƒ the monitoring and analysis of ground condition data and excavation stability.

14 | LEIGHTON CONTRACTORS

5.3 The ground control management

plan shall be:

ƒ developed in conjunction with geotechnical personnel

ƒ authorised by appointed persons

ƒ reviewed by third party geotechnical personnel annually

ƒ reviewed by geotechnical personnel after a significant ground failure

ƒ aligned with the mine design and mining activities

ƒ readily available and communicated to all personnel.

5.4 There shall be a process to

ensure personnel are not exposed to unsupported ground or where there is potential to be affected by fall of ground.

5.5 Personnel installing ground support

shall understand ground control methods and/or support standards.

5.6 There shall be a process to prevent

personnel from entering exclusion zones

at the toe of high walls and dumps and open faces of excavations.

5.7 Designated personnel shall be

trained to visually inspect the ground

conditions of their work area.

5.8 There shall be a process to manage

loose rock that has the potential to cause

harm.

5.9 There shall be a preventative

maintenance and calibration process to ensure all ground control equipment is calibrated, maintained and in a serviceable condition.

5.10 Changes to mine design or operational practices shall follow the change management process which includes:

ƒ authorisation by competent personnel

ƒ updating of site plans

ƒ communicating to affected personnel.

aBove the line principleS

Above the Line controls are the most effective methods of control and should always be exhausted before implementing Below the Line controls. Some examples of Above the Line controls associated with underground and surface ground control are:

Above the Line ControlsBelow

Eliminate Get rid of Substitute Change Isolate Separate Engineering Engineered controls Administrative controls
Eliminate
Get rid of
Substitute
Change
Isolate
Separate
Engineering
Engineered controls
Administrative
controls
Instructions
and signs
PPE

Use of remote technology for operational tasks

Use of alternative/improved standard of ground control

Ramps or roads not located adjacent to high walls

Physical barriers to prevent entry to high risk areas

Physical barriers to prevent materials from entering work areas

Slope (angles) of walls

Height and width of dumps and benches

Remote monitoring of wall movements

Falling object protective structures (FOPS) for mobile equipment

Mine design

Ground control management plan

Monitoring and inspection of ground control

Trained and authorised personnel

the Line Controls

AppOINTED pERSON:

As determined by the project manager.

MINING SAFETY ESSENTIALS | 15

5

6. MINE TRAFFIC AND ROADWAYS

context and application

This Mining Safety Essential applies to all Mining Division projects, activities, subcontractors and visitors.

It describes minimum requirements and Above the Line principles that promote the safe operation of vehicles on site, and to ensure that mine roadways are designed and maintained to prevent:

ƒ collisions between mobile equipment and/or light vehicles travelling on mine roadways

ƒ loss of control of vehicles

ƒ vehicles travelling over unprotected edges

ƒ vehicles striking overhead hazards/ structures

ƒ personnel being struck by vehicles.

Note: Requirements for the management of specific risks associated with mobile equipment in active mine areas are addressed in Mining Safety Essential 7. Mining operations.

MiniMuM requireMentS

Note: Where the minimum requirements cannot be implemented, an Essential Exception Form shall be signed and approved by the general manager.

6.1 There shall be a management plan

for traffic and mine roads based on a

risk assessment that addresses:

ƒ road design and construction

ƒ traffic rules

ƒ maintenance and watering of roads

ƒ traffic control plans.

6.2 The road design and construction

process shall provide for:

ƒ separation of light vehicles and heavy mobile equipment, where practicable

ƒ the use of bunds, adequate shoulder gradients or other controls to prevent a vehicle accidently leaving the road

ƒ maximisation of intersection sight distances

16 | LEIGHTON CONTRACTORS

ƒ stop signs or signals used for managing right of way at intersections

ƒ intersections designed to terminate at 90° (± 5°)

ƒ establishing minimum road widths, and when this is unable to be achieved, speed restrictions and/ or other controls shall be used to manage right of way

ƒ ensuring established maximum road gradients are not being exceeded

ƒ ensuring superelevation is appropriate for speed and radius of corners.

6.3 A permit system shall restrict and

control light vehicle access to work areas.

6.4 Within active mining areas on

surface mines, light vehicles shall only park in designated, bunded locations.

6.5 Vehicles shall be parked in a

fundamentally stable manner.

6.6 Haul trucks shall not reverse without

the use of a spotter, except when receiving and discharging loads or in other prescribed reversing areas.

6.7 An overtaking process shall

be established that includes the requirement for positive two-way communication and locations where overtaking shall not occur.

6.8 Controls shall be established to

prevent uncontrolled movement of

broken down vehicles.

6.9 A risk assessment shall be

conducted prior to recovering and

towing heavy mobile equipment.

6.10 Warning signs and where

applicable pre-warning clearance indicators shall be installed at locations where overhead structures cross surface roads.

6.11 Vehicle height stickers shall be

affixed inside the cabins of mobile equipment.

6.12 Road maintenance activities shall

not be undertaken without controls in place to protect the road maintainers and other road users.

6.13 Only water trucks incorporating

a regulated (smart) watering system approved by the Plant Department shall be used to regulate the application of water on haul truck roadways.

6.14 A risk assessment shall be

conducted to establish Traffic Control Plan layouts for identified high traffic volume/high hazard areas. These areas may include (but are not limited to):

ƒ run of mine

ƒ heavy mobile equipment go-lines

ƒ service and refuelling areas

ƒ workshops

ƒ infrastructure areas

ƒ complex intersections

ƒ intersections with public roads.

The risk assessment shall include the interaction of mobile equipment, light vehicles and pedestrians, while giving priority to their physical separation (i.e. solid barriers, bunding or exclusion zones).

6.15 Traffic management and/or road

design changes shall be communicated to all affected personnel.

6.16 Road inspections shall be

undertaken on a regular basis to confirm that road design and construction criteria are maintained.

aBove the line principleS

Above the Line controls are the most effective methods of control and should always be exhausted before implementing Below the Line controls. Some examples of Above the Line controls associated with mine traffic and roadways are:

Above the Line ControlsBelow

Eliminate Get rid of Substitute Change Isolate Separate Engineering Engineered controls Administrative controls
Eliminate
Get rid of
Substitute
Change
Isolate
Separate
Engineering
Engineered controls
Administrative
controls
Instructions
and signs
PPE

Road and intersection design

Segregation of light vehicles from active operating areas

Designated walkways

Bunds and physical barriers

Regulated spray bars on water trucks

Traffic and road management plan Road design and construction procedure Traffic control plans Overtaking procedure Warning signs and clearance indicators Vehicle height stickers Road inspection and maintenance program

the Line Controls

FuNDAMENTALLY STAbLE:

A light vehicle is fundamentally stable

when it can be left unattended without the

possibility of it moving under the influence

of gravity. In addition the vehicle engine

must be turned off, the transmission must

be engaged in park or first gear and the park brake applied.

Mobile equipment is fundamentally stable when it can be left unattended without the possibility of it moving under the influence of gravity by applying the park brake, placing the transmission in park (if applicable) and one or more of the following controls:

ƒ wheels in a V drain or over a hump

ƒ Ground engaging tools (GETs) lowered

ƒ wheels turned in against a suitable bund

ƒ wheels suitably chocked (except for on grade situations)

ƒ for rubber tyred mobile equipment on grade, a suitable bund established downgrade of and against the wheels.

For underground operations mobile equipment must be angled toward the tunnel walls.

For maintenance activities that require the vehicle engine to be running, potential movement must be controlled in accordance with the Live Testing process.

pRESCRIbED REvERSING AREAS:

Reversing areas as identified in site processes (e.g. heavy mobile equipment go-lines or workshops).

ACTIvE MINING AREAS:

The area of influence for heavy mobile equipment (self propelled, off highway mining and earthmoving equipment) actively performing mining work, including:

ƒ excavation areas

ƒ dumping areas

ƒ production dozing areas

ƒ scraper circuits

ƒ other mining areas nominated by the project manager.

MINING SAFETY ESSENTIALS | 17

6

7. MINING OpERATIONS

context and application

This Mining Safety Essential applies to all Mining Division projects, activities, subcontractors and visitors.

It describes minimum requirements and Above the Line principles for underground and surface operations to prevent:

ƒ collisions between plant and/or light vehicles, and/or pedestrians in active mining areas

ƒ engulfment of personnel or plant

ƒ plant falling into voids, over pit walls or dumps

ƒ failure of dumps

ƒ personnel, plant or light vehicles being struck by falling material.

MiniMuM requireMentS

7.1 There shall be a process for

performing excavator operations that includes:

ƒ the bucket being stationary and either engaged or grounded while ancillary plant is within an excavator’s swing radius

ƒ positive communication being utilised for ancillary plant working in an excavator’s swing radius

ƒ an excavator not slewing its bucket over the cabin of other equipment.

7.2 There shall be a process for

performing front end loader operations

that includes:

ƒ excavation faces being no higher than the maximum bucket reach of the front end loader

ƒ a front end loader not passing its bucket over the cabin of other equipment

ƒ when reclaiming from the base of an excavation face, dump or stockpile, physically restricting access of rubber tyred plant and vehicles to the area above.

18 | LEIGHTON CONTRACTORS

7.3 There shall be a process for

performing truck dumping operations that includes:

ƒ prohibiting the practice of jump dumping

ƒ on approach, truck operators observing dumps for signs of cracking, slumping and inappropriate bundwall heights. If observed, loads shall be dumped short and the supervisor notified

ƒ truck operators reversing square to the bundwall and not using the bundwall as a brake

ƒ dump dozer operators constructing and maintaining bundwalls on tip- heads with sufficient integrity and to the required height dimensions (minimum half wheel height of the largest truck using the dump)

ƒ physically restricting access below dumping operations

ƒ conducting a JSEA that considers geotechnical risks and involves appropriately authorised personnel prior to:

- dumping into a body of water

- dumping over or near pit wall crests (note: a pit wall must not be ‘directly’ dumped over, material must always be dumped short and pushed over a pit wall).

7.4 There shall be a process to prohibit

trucks being driven down a ramp when

overloaded.

7.5 There shall be a process for

performing stockpile operations that prohibits equipment from operating over a valve draw cone.

7.6 Dumping hoppers must have an

adequate physical barrier (e.g. stop block) designed to prevent equipment contacting or entering the hopper when discharging loads.

7.7 Processes must be established

that consider the following general requirements:

ƒ rubber tyred dozers must not be used to ‘directly’ push over pit walls

ƒ appropriate bundwalls or physical restrictions must be established along exposed or open excavation edges where drills, rubber tired plant and vehicles can access these areas

ƒ when pedestrians and light vehicles enter active mining areas, giving consideration to positive communication requirements and the ceasing of mining activities while they remain in the area

ƒ operators must remain in the cabin of trucks during the physical process of loading

ƒ access to areas below any bench edge or wall must be physically restricted where operations above may result in material falling over that bench edge or wall.

7.8 There shall be a process for

performing underground operations

that includes:

ƒ installation of fire suppression systems on all plant and equipment with an engine output >125kW

ƒ storage and/or disposal of flammable materials

ƒ provision of a healthy breathable atmosphere

ƒ adequate water inrush flood mitigation design considerations for working entrances

ƒ identification of natural or manmade voids that may contain noxious atmospheres or water

ƒ treating tailings materials used for backfill to prevent liquefaction and have engineered designed bulkheads for containment

ƒ barricading areas that could be exposed to unplanned drilling breakthrough

ƒ physically restricting access to exposed edges, shafts and holes

ƒ access to areas below any shaft or hole must be physically restricted where operations above may result in material falling down or over that shaft or hole.

aBove the line principleS

Above the Line controls are the most effective methods of control and should always be exhausted before implementing Below the Line controls. Some examples of Above the Line controls associated with mining operations are:

Above the Line ControlsBelow

Eliminate Get rid of Substitute Change Isolate Separate Engineering Engineered controls
Eliminate
Get rid of
Substitute
Change
Isolate
Separate
Engineering
Engineered controls

Modify activities—eliminate the need for personnel to interact with operating mobile plant

Segregation of light vehicles from active operating areas with bunding

Establishment of exclusion zones and physical barriers to prevent unauthorised pedestrian access

Design areas to drive in and drive out to eliminate reversing

Designated light vehicle parking areas

Collision avoidance systems to slow/start plant movement

Maximise operator visibility (i.e. hazard detection systems and/or use of cameras or mirrors to provide operator with 360 degree visibility)

Administrative controls Instructions and signs PPE
Administrative
controls
Instructions
and signs
PPE

Traffic control plan

Plant shutdown procedure

Inspection and maintenance program

Communication protocol when entering operational areas

Mobile Equipment Recovery Permit

Limited reversing of haul trucks

Trained and authorised personnel

the Line Controls

ACTIvE MINING AREAS:

The area of influence for heavy mobile equipment (self propelled, off highway mining and earthmoving equipment) actively performing mining work, including:

ƒ excavation areas

ƒ dumping areas

ƒ production dozing areas

ƒ scraper circuits

ƒ other mining areas nominated by the project manager.

juMp DuMpING:

Is a truck operating technique that involves reversing, jumping on the brakes hard while raising the hoist lever such that the rocking motion of the truck assists the hoist system in lifting an overload. This is an extremely dangerous technique that must not be used.

pIT WALL:

An individual wall section that is steeper than the repose or natural rill angle of the material.

OvERLOADED TRuCk:

A haul truck is overloaded when the payload weight for a truck is greater than 120 per cent of the truck’s rated payload weight.

MINING SAFETY ESSENTIALS | 19

7

8. MObILE ASSETS

context and application

This Mining Safety Essential applies to all Mining Division projects, activities, subcontractors and visitors.

It describes minimum requirements and Above the Line principles to prevent:

ƒ mobile assets being:

— configured incorrectly before use on each shift

— not fit for purpose

— inadequately maintained

ƒ uncontrolled movement of loads when transporting or towing.

Within this Safety Essential, the term mobile assets refers to mobile plant and light vehicles.

MiniMuM requireMentS

Note: Where the minimum requirements cannot be implemented, an Essential Exception Form shall be signed and approved by the general manager.

8.1 Prior to acceptance into the

business, a risk assessment shall be conducted on all mobile asset types to ensure they are fit for purpose and comply with:

ƒ relevant legislation

ƒ Leighton Contractors and client requirements.

8.2 Prior to acceptance of new mobile

asset types onto site, a risk assessment shall be conducted to determine the operational application of those assets which includes:

ƒ mobile asset suitability for site road design and construction

ƒ mobile asset suitability for maintenance facilities

ƒ operator visibility and blind spots

ƒ position and delineation of power lines, overhead structures and other hazards within plant operating areas

ƒ servicing and maintenance requirements.

20 | LEIGHTON CONTRACTORS

8.3 Light vehicle selection shall be

based on a risk assessment taking into account vehicle use and application, environment, client requirements, and the Australian New Car Assessment Program (ANCAP) rating.

The following minimum requirements apply to all new light vehicle purchases:

ƒ Four wheel drive vehicles should only be purchased when off-road capability is required

ƒ Vehicles should be selected to be suitable for the purpose they are intended for, with an aim to purchase suitable vehicles offering the highest ANCAP rating and maximise the number of ANCAP 5 rated vehicles purchased/used

ƒ The following types of vehicles must be ANCAP 5 rated:

- light utility vehicles with ladder type chassis construction (e.g. Toyota Hilux, Ford Ranger, Isuzu DMAX)

- vehicles of monocoque construction (e.g. Holden Commodore, Ford Falcon and similar including utility variants)

- four wheel drive station wagon type vehicles with ladder type chassis construction (e.g. Toyota Prado, Nissan Patrol).

ƒ Heavy utility vehicles with ladder type chassis construction (e.g. Toyota Landcruiser 76 series, Nissan Patrol utilities) may have an ANCAP 3 rating.

8.4 Vehicles transporting goods shall

have their loads secured to prevent personal damage or loss of load. Lever type load binders (chain dogs) shall not be used.

8.5 There shall be a system in place to

ensure all towing operations are carried out safely that includes:

ƒ all trailers designed and inspected according to Australian Design Rules

62/01

ƒ that rated safety chains are mechanically attached between the tow vehicle and the trailer

ƒ an independent braking system if the trailer is over 750kg gross vehicle mass (GVM)

ƒ authorisation of personnel carrying out towing operations

ƒ that tow vehicles do not tow beyond their rated capacity.

8.6 There shall be a maintenance

management plan for the maintenance, inspection and testing of mobile assets that includes:

ƒ

pre-start inspections

ƒ

scheduled servicing

ƒ

condition monitoring programs

ƒ

testing programs

ƒ

critical control systems.

8.7 Light vehicle pre-start inspections

shall be undertaken for:

ƒ vehicles in operational areas

— before use on each shift

ƒ vehicles not used in operational areas

— at least weekly.

8.8 Defects that may affect the safe

operation of the vehicle shall be

identified, reported and the vehicle

tagged out of service until the defects are rectified.

8.9 Modifications to mobile assets shall

be subject to the modify fixed or mobile asset process (change management process).

8.10 Remote controlled and autonomous

mobile assets shall have controls in place to safeguard the operator and other personnel in the vicinity of the work activity.

8.11 The operational and maintenance

manuals shall be available on site.

8.12 For plant operating on coal

stockpiles, fire suppression systems

must be installed.

When those stockpiles contain a draw valve the plant must be fitted with:

ƒ strengthened safety glass

ƒ an external emergency shutdown positioned on the ripper box

ƒ a self rescuer and torch located within the plant cab.

aBove the line principleS

Above the Line controls are the most effective methods of control and should always be exhausted before implementing Below the Line controls. Some examples of Above the Line controls associated with safety when driving are:

Above the Line ControlsBelow

Eliminate Get rid of Substitute Change Isolate Separate Engineering Engineered controls Administrative controls
Eliminate
Get rid of
Substitute
Change
Isolate
Separate
Engineering
Engineered controls
Administrative
controls
Instructions
and signs
PPE

Alternative means for travel in remote areas

Alternative means for travel for extended road journeys

Use of teleconference facilities

Fit for purpose vehicles

Cargo barriers

Vehicle specifications

Australian design rule compliant vehicles

Air bags and roll over protection

Use of in vehicle management system (IVMS) technology

Fatigue management business standard Journey management plan

Modify fixed or mobile plant process (change management process) Pre-start inspections Gross vehicle mass (GVM) and load carrying capacity signage Trained and authorised personnel

the Line Controls

LIGHT vEHICLE:

ƒ can be registered for use on a public road

ƒ has four or more wheels

ƒ seats a maximum of 12 adults (including the driver)

ƒ where registered, could be legally driven on a public roadway by a driver issued with a standard (basic level), public road driver’s licence

ƒ does not exceed 4.5 tonnes gross vehicle mass (GVM).

MObILE pLANT:

A machine that is trackless, self propelled and controlled by an operator.

HEAvY MObILE pLANT:

Typically refers to a trackless mobile machine with a mass of greater than 32 tonnes.

8

MINING SAFETY ESSENTIALS | 21

9. pLANT SAFEGuARDING AND ISOLATION OF ENERGY

context and application

This Mining Safety Essential applies to all Mining Division projects, activities, subcontractors and visitors.

It describes minimum requirements and Above the Line principles to prevent:

ƒ inadequate safeguarding of plant

ƒ personnel contacting moving plant after safeguarding has been removed

ƒ plant being re-energised while work is in progress

ƒ uncontrolled release of energy.

MiniMuM requireMentS

Note: Where the minimum requirements cannot be implemented, an Essential Exception Form shall be signed and approved by the general manager.

9.1 Prior to acceptance of plant, an asset

inspection shall be conducted to ensure

that:

ƒ dangerous energies associated with the operation and maintenance of plant are identified

ƒ safeguarding is in place and is serviceable

ƒ positive isolation can be achieved.

9.2 Internally designed, modified or

fabricated safeguarding shall:

ƒ involve operations and maintenance personnel during the design and implementation stages

ƒ follow the modify fixed or mobile plant process (change management process).

9.3 Safeguarding shall only be removed

if the plant is isolated. If work must be undertaken on energised plant while safeguarding is removed, the live testing process shall be followed.

22 | LEIGHTON CONTRACTORS

9.4 Manually operated rotating

equipment shall be fitted with a fail to safe switch.

9.5 When safeguarding and or interlock

systems are removed, access to that plant shall be restricted (e.g. using laser barricading, bunding, exclusion zones or spotters).

9.6 Falling object protection shall be

in place under conveyor systems at designated vehicle and pedestrian travel ways.

9.7 Scheduled inspections shall be

in place to ensure the presence and integrity of safeguarding.

9.8 An isolation process shall be

developed based on a risk assessment that includes:

ƒ live testing

ƒ all sources of dangerous energy

ƒ multiple isolation points and tasks

ƒ selection, inspection and maintenance of isolation equipment

ƒ details of plant types that require positive isolation.

9.9 Isolation shall provide personal

protection and shall be achieved by the use of locking devices or:

ƒ the establishment of a physical barrier

ƒ the depletion of stored energy, where necessary.

9.10

An isolation permit shall be used

for:

ƒ group isolations

ƒ any isolation that is not a personal isolation, and requires transfer between shifts or different workgroups.

9.11 A test to re-energise (test for dead)

shall be conducted to confirm the plant is

isolated.

aBove the line principleS

Above the Line controls are the most effective methods of control and should always be exhausted before implementing Below the Line controls. Some examples of Above the Line controls associated with plant safeguarding and isolation of energy are:

Above the Line ControlsBelow

Eliminate Get rid of Substitute Change Isolate Separate Engineering Engineered controls
Eliminate
Get rid of
Substitute
Change
Isolate
Separate
Engineering
Engineered controls

Redesign equipment so safeguarding is not needed

Redesign plant/equipment to limit the need to isolate for routine tasks

Modify equipment so tasks can be conducted without removing guards

Physical barriers at areas that are energised or cannot be guarded

Interlocks and shutdown systems

Fail safe switches

Locking pins or mechanical stops where stored energy is present

Administrative controls Instructions and signs PPE
Administrative
controls
Instructions
and signs
PPE

Isolation and Live Work procedure and permit system

Inspection and maintenance program

Modify fixed or mobile plant process (change management) Signage and tags

Test to re-energise (test for dead) Trained and authorised personnel

the Line Controls

pOSITIvE ISOLATION:

A method of isolation where there is zero potential of energy at the workplace and:

ƒ all dangerous energy has been identified

ƒ all dangerous energies are isolated at the source

ƒ residual energy has been eliminated or controls are in place to prevent uncontrolled energy release.

ENERGISED pLANT (LIvE pLANT):

Equipment is energised at normal operating potential or energised to a potential from a source of supply not being its normal source of supply (e.g. a test instrument, generator or back feed).

MANuALLY OpERATED ROTATING EquIpMENT:

For example saws, lathes and drill presses.

9

MINING SAFETY ESSENTIALS | 23

10. TYRES

context and application

This Mining Safety Essential applies to all Mining Division projects, activities, subcontractors and visitors.

It describes minimum requirements and Above the Line principles to prevent:

ƒ personnel being struck by a falling tyre or rim

ƒ personnel being struck by tyre handling equipment

ƒ catastrophic tyre/rim failure or blow out

ƒ loss of wheel while vehicle is operating.

MiniMuM requireMentS

Note: Where the minimum requirements cannot be implemented, an Essential Exception Form shall be signed and approved by the general manager.

10.1 Personnel engaged in tyre

changing activities shall be authorised,

or working under the direct supervision of an authorised person.

10.2 All emergency response team

members shall have participated in tyre and rim awareness training.

10.3 Risk assessments shall be

conducted for all tyre management

activities that include:

ƒ assembling and changing tyres

ƒ suspected lightning or overhead power line strikes.

10.4 The removal and fitting of tyres

and/or the rim assemblies process shall

incorporate:

ƒ hard standing and lighting

ƒ jacking and stands

ƒ deflation

ƒ tooling

ƒ inflation.

24 | LEIGHTON CONTRACTORS

10.5 There shall be a tyre management

plan and a tyre and rim register that is current and readily available on site.

10.6 Hot work shall not be conducted

on rims while tyres are inflated.

10.7 A hose with a minimum length of

three metres shall be used to monitor and control tyre inflation. The gauge and shut off valve shall be positioned to enable the fitter to stand away from the hazard area.

10.8 While a tyre is supported by the

tyre handler, the operator shall remain in the cab of the plant at all times.

10.9 During tyre inflation, the tyre

handler shall be positioned to act as a barrier to mitigate the effects of a sudden energy release, and the operator shall not be in the cabin of the tyre handler.

10.10 When assembling a tyre off the

machine, the tyre shall be kept in a horizontal orientation where possible.

10.11 There shall be a process to

reduce the likelihood of hot tyres.

10.12 The process for tyre emergencies

such as lightning strikes, contacting overhead power lines or hot tyres shall include their segregation for a minimum of 24 hours.

10.13 There shall be a process for the

inspections of rims and rim components.

10.14 Where components are unfit for

service, they shall be tagged and removed from service, and either repaired or scrapped in such a way that they cannot be reused.

10.15 There shall be a process to

inspect and re-inflate under-inflated tyres when they are found to be more than 20 per cent under their normal inflation pressure.

10.16 Tyre handling attachments and

manipulators shall have a maintenance, testing and inspection plan and a specific pre-start checklist.

10.17 Tyre handling attachments shall

be fitted with:

ƒ a fallback stop on the lift arm

ƒ an over-pressurisation alarm/relief valve

ƒ a clearly marked maximum rated capacity.

10.18 Tyre handlers shall have an

engraved label with the maximum safe workload of the attachment and load chart displayed in the cabin.

10.19 Truck mounted tyre manipulators

shall have a load chart that clearly displays the maximum rated capacity.

10.20 Multi-piece rims, less than 24

inches in diameter, shall be inflated in a cage.

10.21 There shall be a process for

ensuring the correct tension is applied when wheel nuts are fitted.

aBove the line principleS

Above the Line controls are the most effective methods of control and should always be exhausted before implementing Below the Line controls. Some examples of Above the Line controls associated with the management of tyres are:

Above the Line ControlsBelow

Eliminate Get rid of Substitute Change Isolate Separate Engineering Engineered controls Administrative controls
Eliminate
Get rid of
Substitute
Change
Isolate
Separate
Engineering
Engineered controls
Administrative
controls
Instructions
and signs
PPE

Replace rim assemblies with wheels

Segregation of hot tyres

Segregation of tyres suspected of electrical contact or lightning

Physical barriers to prevent access to tyre handling work areas

Tyre handling equipment

Fallback protection on tyre handling arms

Over-pressurisation alarm

Equipment support stands

3 metre hose and shut off valve for inflation

Cage for inflation

Locking system for wheel nuts

Tyre management plan and related procedures Tyre and rim register Inspection and maintenance program with tyres and rims

Certification of handling equipment

Label for safe work loads and maximum rated capacity Trained and authorised personnel

the Line Controls

HOT WORk:

ƒ grinding

ƒ welding

ƒ thermal or oxygen cutting or heating

ƒ other related heat-producing or spark- producing operations.

10

MINING SAFETY ESSENTIALS | 25

11. WORk ING AT HEIGHTS

context and application

This Mining Safety Essential applies to all Mining Division projects, activities, subcontractors and visitors when:

ƒ

there is the potential to fall from one level to another

ƒ

an object has the potential to fall and cause injury.

It

describes minimum requirements and

Above the Line principles to prevent:

ƒ persons falling from heights

ƒ persons being struck by falling objects.

This Safety Essential does not apply to rope rescue performed by competent emergency response team members.

MiniMuM requireMentS

Note: Where the minimum requirements cannot be implemented, an Essential Exception Form shall be signed and approved by the general manager.

11.1 Work shall not be conducted above

a height of two metres and/or within two

metres of an unprotected edge, opening or fragile surface where there is potential to fall more than two metres without one or more of the following controls in place:

ƒ temporary hand rails

ƒ

ƒ working platforms and access equipment (e.g. elevated work platforms, baskets, mancages and scaffolding); or, as a last resort

ƒ personal fall protection equipment, provided the setup prevents a free fall (fall restraint system).

hard barriers

Personal fall arrest systems (e.g. that permit the user to free fall) cannot be used as a primary control.

26 | LEIGHTON CONTRACTORS

11.2 Where a personal fall arrest system

is required, a full body harness and self rescue leg strap shall be worn.

11.3 A working at heights process shall

be developed based on a risk assessment identifying the working at heights activities conducted on site.

11.4 A Work at Heights permit is

required where there is potential to fall two metres or more from or through a surface, and:

ƒ there is no compliant fixed edge protection; and/or

ƒ edge protection must be removed as part of the activity; and/or

ƒ a fall restraint system is used as the primary control.

11.5 The Working at Heights permit

shall include a rescue plan.

11.6 There shall be an inspection and

maintenance process to ensure the structural integrity of:

ƒ working at heights equipment

ƒ anchor points

ƒ access equipment

ƒ permanent access ways

ƒ hand rails on and for mobile and fixed plant.

11.7 All working at heights equipment

shall be:

ƒ registered, inspected and tagged quarterly by a certified body

ƒ stored and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s requirements

ƒ inspected before and after use.

11.8 Personnel working in elevated

work platforms or suspended work baskets (excluding scissor lifts) shall wear fall arrest equipment attached to certified anchor points.

11.9 During working at heights activities,

elevated work platforms shall be protected from collision with barricading and not be operated outside their design parameters.

11.10 Exclusion zones shall be

established using signage and barricades to identify areas where objects could fall and restrict access. If a total exclusion zone cannot be achieved then overhead protective structures shall be implemented.

11.11 Scaffold exceeding four metres in

height shall:

ƒ be designed and erected by a licensed scaffolder

ƒ have completed scaffold tags attached

ƒ be inspected at least every 30 days.

11.12 All personnel who conduct

or approve work at height shall be authorised appropriately for their role.

11.13 Portable ladders (other than

platform step ladders) shall only be used

for access and not as work platforms.

aBove the line principleS

Above the Line controls are the most effective methods of control and should always be exhausted before implementing Below the Line controls. Some examples of Above the Line controls associated with working at heights are:

Above the Line ControlsBelow

Eliminate Get rid of Substitute Change Isolate Separate Engineering Engineered controls Administrative controls
Eliminate
Get rid of
Substitute
Change
Isolate
Separate
Engineering
Engineered controls
Administrative
controls
Instructions
and signs
PPE

Modify tasks to bring the job to the ground

Fixed walkways and access platforms

Scaffolding

Elevated work platforms (EWPs)

Suspended work baskets

Permanent/temporary handrails or fencing

Overhead protective structures (i.e. for travel ways under conveyors)

Physical barriers to restrict entry into exclusion zones

Kick boards

Lanyards for tools

Working at Heights procedure and permit

Equipment register

Inspection and testing of equipment

Personal fall protection/arrest system (with approved anchor points)

Trained and authorised personnel

the Line Controls

pERSONAL FALL pROTECTION EquIpMENT INCLuDES:

ƒ fall restraint systems

ƒ fall arrest systems.

LICENCE:

A permit issued from an official external authority that is current and carried on the person at all times.

ExAMpLES OF AN AppROpRIATE WORkING pLATFORM:

ƒ platform ladder

ƒ mobile scaffold.

MINING SAFETY ESSENTIALS | 27

11

For more information contact your site safety team.

00 | LEIGHTON CONTRACTORS

© Leighton Contractors Pty Limited July 2013