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17 State Street Cafe • Amesbury Sports Park • Anchor Stone Deck Pizza • Antiques at Edgerly Farm • Cash for

17 State Street Cafe • Amesbury Sports Park • Anchor Stone Deck Pizza • Antiques at Edgerly Farm • Cash for

Gold • Castaways Seafood & Grille • The Artist Bar • Cornerstone Family Practice • The Law office of Elaine M.

Gold • Castaways Seafood & Grille • The Artist Bar • Cornerstone Family Practice • The Law office of Elaine M.

Cornerstone Family Practice • The Law office of Elaine M. Dalton • DoodyCalls • Elder Law

Dalton • DoodyCalls • Elder Law Solutions • Elizabeth Calsey House • Elm Park Floor • Family’s Chinese

Dalton • DoodyCalls • Elder Law Solutions • Elizabeth Calsey House • Elm Park Floor • Family’s Chinese

Restaurant & Bar • Law Offices of Donald J. Fournier & Associates • American Marine & Boat Sales • Get in

Restaurant & Bar • Law Offices of Donald J. Fournier & Associates • American Marine & Boat Sales • Get in

Shape for Women • Greater Newburyport Chamber of Commerce & Industry • Leeward Industries • Massage

Shape for Women • Greater Newburyport Chamber of Commerce & Industry • Leeward Industries • Massage

Only • MK Benatti Jewelers • Oregano Pizzeria & Ristorante • Ould Newbury Golf Club • Pickwick Driver

Only • MK Benatti Jewelers • Oregano Pizzeria & Ristorante • Ould Newbury Golf Club • Pickwick Driver

Education • Portside Family Dental • Dr. Laura Anne Potvin • The Provident Bank • ReNew Revolution • Rocas

Education • Portside Family Dental • Dr. Laura Anne Potvin • The Provident Bank • ReNew Revolution • Rocas

Deck Pizza • Antiques at Edgerly Farm • Cash for Gold • Castaways Seafood & Grille • The Artist Bar •

Deck Pizza • Antiques at Edgerly Farm • Cash for Gold • Castaways Seafood & Grille • The Artist Bar •

Smith Motor Sales • Smitten • Sparhawk School • 17 State Street Cafe • Amesbury Sports Park • Anchor Stone

Smith Motor Sales • Smitten • Sparhawk School • 17 State Street Cafe • Amesbury Sports Park • Anchor Stone

Cornerstone Family Practice • The Law office of Elaine M. Dalton • DoodyCalls • Elder Law Solutions • Elizabeth

Cornerstone Family Practice • The Law office of Elaine M. Dalton • DoodyCalls • Elder Law Solutions • Elizabeth

Dalton • DoodyCalls • Elder Law Solutions • Elizabeth Calsey House • Elm Park Floor •

Calsey House • Elm Park Floor • Family’s Chinese Restaurant & Bar • Law Offices of Donald J. Fournier &

Calsey House • Elm Park Floor • Family’s Chinese Restaurant & Bar • Law Offices of Donald J. Fournier &

Associates • American Marine & Boat Sales • Get in Shape for Women • Greater Newburyport Chamber of

Associates • American Marine & Boat Sales • Get in Shape for Women • Greater Newburyport Chamber of

Commerce & Industry • Leeward Industries • Massage Only • MK Benatti Jewelers • Oregano Pizzeria &

Commerce & Industry • Leeward Industries • Massage Only • MK Benatti Jewelers • Oregano Pizzeria &

Ristorante • Ould Newbury Golf Club • Pickwick Driver Education • Portside Family Dental • Dr. Laura Anne

Ristorante • Ould Newbury Golf Club • Pickwick Driver Education • Portside Family Dental • Dr. Laura Anne

Potvin • The Provident Bank • ReNew Revolution • Rocas • Smith Motor Sales • Smitten • Sparhawk School • 17

Potvin • The Provident Bank • ReNew Revolution • Rocas • Smith Motor Sales • Smitten • Sparhawk School • 17

State Street Cafe • Amesbury Sports Park • Anchor Stone Deck Pizza • Antiques at Edgerly Farm • Cash for Gold

State Street Cafe • Amesbury Sports Park • Anchor Stone Deck Pizza • Antiques at Edgerly Farm • Cash for Gold

Bar • Law Offices of Donald J. Fournier & Associates • American Marine & Boat Sales • Get in Shape for Women

Bar • Law Offices of Donald J. Fournier & Associates • American Marine & Boat Sales • Get in Shape for Women

DoodyCalls • Elder Law Solutions • Elizabeth Calsey House • Elm Park Floor • Family’s Chinese Restaurant &

DoodyCalls • Elder Law Solutions • Elizabeth Calsey House • Elm Park Floor • Family’s Chinese Restaurant &

• Elm Park Floor • Family’s Chinese Restaurant & • • Jewelers • Oregano Pizzeria &

Jewelers • Oregano Pizzeria & Ristorante • Ould Newbury Golf Club • Pickwick Driver Education • Portside

Jewelers • Oregano Pizzeria & Ristorante • Ould Newbury Golf Club • Pickwick Driver Education • Portside

Family Dental • Dr. Laura Anne Potvin • The Provident Bank • ReNew Revolution • Rocas • Smith Motor Sales

Family Dental • Dr. Laura Anne Potvin • The Provident Bank • ReNew Revolution • Rocas • Smith Motor Sales

at Edgerly Farm • Cash for Gold • Castaways Seafood & Grille • The Artist Bar • Cornerstone Family Practice •

at Edgerly Farm • Cash for Gold • Castaways Seafood & Grille • The Artist Bar • Cornerstone Family Practice •

The Law office of Elaine M. Dalton • DoodyCalls • Elder Law Solutions • Elizabeth Calsey House • Elm Park

The Law office of Elaine M. Dalton • DoodyCalls • Elder Law Solutions • Elizabeth Calsey House • Elm Park

Floor • Family’s Chinese Restaurant & Bar • Law Offices of Donald J. Fournier & Associates • American Marine

Floor • Family’s Chinese Restaurant & Bar • Law Offices of Donald J. Fournier & Associates • American Marine

&

&

Boat Sales • Get in Shape for Women • Greater Newburyport Chamber of Commerce & Industry • Leeward

Boat Sales • Get in Shape for Women • Greater Newburyport Chamber of Commerce & Industry • Leeward

Industries • Massage Only • MK Benatti Jewelers • Oregano Pizzeria & Ristorante • Ould Newbury Golf Club •

Industries • Massage Only • MK Benatti Jewelers • Oregano Pizzeria & Ristorante • Ould Newbury Golf Club •

Newburyport

2013

Pickwick Driver Education • Portside Family Dental • Dr. Laura Anne Potvin • The Provident Bank • ReNew

Pickwick Driver Education • Portside Family Dental • Dr. Laura Anne Potvin • The Provident Bank • ReNew

Revolution • Rocas • Smith Motor Sales • Smitten • Sparhawk School • 17 State Street Cafe • Amesbury Sports

Revolution • Rocas • Smith Motor Sales • Smitten • Sparhawk School • 17 State Street Cafe • Amesbury Sports

Park • Anchor Stone Deck Pizza • Antiques at Edgerly Farm • Cash for Gold • Castaways Seafood & Grille • The

Park • Anchor Stone Deck Pizza • Antiques at Edgerly Farm • Cash for Gold • Castaways Seafood & Grille • The

Artist Bar • Cornerstone Family Practice • The Law office of Elaine M. Dalton • DoodyCalls • Elder Law Solutions

Artist Bar • Cornerstone Family Practice • The Law office of Elaine M. Dalton • DoodyCalls • Elder Law Solutions

Fournier & Associates • American Marine & Boat Sales • Get in Shape for Women • Greater Newburyport

Fournier & Associates • American Marine & Boat Sales • Get in Shape for Women • Greater Newburyport

Elizabeth Calsey House • Elm Park Floor • Family’s Chinese Restaurant & Bar • Law Offices of Donald J.

Elizabeth Calsey House • Elm Park Floor • Family’s Chinese Restaurant & Bar • Law Offices of Donald J.

Chamber of Commerce & Industry • Leeward Industries • Massage Only • MK Benatti Jewelers • Oregano Pizzeria

Chamber of Commerce & Industry • Leeward Industries • Massage Only • MK Benatti Jewelers • Oregano Pizzeria

& &

Potvin • The Provident Bank • ReNew Revolution • Rocas • Smith Motor Sales • Smitten • Sparhawk School

Potvin • The Provident Bank • ReNew Revolution • Rocas • Smith Motor Sales • Smitten • Sparhawk School

Ristorante • Ould Newbury Golf Club • Pickwick Driver Education • Portside Family Dental • Dr. Laura Anne

Ristorante • Ould Newbury Golf Club • Pickwick Driver Education • Portside Family Dental • Dr. Laura Anne

S2

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

S2 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 Elaine Dalton, Esq. Setting power of attorney

Elaine Dalton, Esq.

Setting power of attorney a small task with big impact

If something happened to you, who would you want to have access to your bank account or make your health care decisions? All too often, people don’t get that choice. Elaine Dalton, a Groveland attorney who specializes in estate planning and elder care law, is banging the drum to get individuals and their families to secure durable power of attorney, because she’s seen what happens when people don’t. Recently, one of her clients, in his 60s, suffered a stroke and became unable to communicate. He and his wife had about $2

million in assets, but had done no estate planning. The wife, already in crisis, had to pay an attorney thousands of dollars and go to court so she could have the right to make medical and financial decisions for her husband. Dalton, who has practiced elder care law for over 15 years, can prevent those kinds of situations with a short meeting over the phone. The impact is immediate — the designation of a durable power of attorney takes effect as soon as the document is signed. “Durable power of attorney is so important, because it enables

someone to step into your shoes for all financial matters,” Dalton said. “That person can also take control or become your guardian or conservator if you need one.” Dalton said it’s of utmost importance to choose someone you trust completely to be your designee. “Make it someone you trust because that person can literally sell your house from underneath you,” Dalton said. “If they have it in hand, they have access to everything you have access to.” Many designate a durable power of attorney when they plan their estate and create a will,

health care proxy and, potentially, a trust. “Wills are really important, and trusts are important in certain situations, but power of attorney is worth its weight in gold,” she said. “It’s not an expensive docu- ment, and it can save you thou- sands of dollars.” And it’s not just for older people, she said. She told of another client whose sister had a massive stroke at 35 and had no documents, adding to the crisis. Dalton said she was even going to draw up the documents for her 18-year-old daughter. “All it takes is a phone call,”

she said. “I ask a couple of ques- tions and can have it done for you

that day. And it’s affordable. It’s

a small investment that can save

a lot.” Dalton helps people from all over the Merrimack Valley and

North Shore, and she even makes housecalls. She can help with all types of estate planning, includ- ing trusts. Her office is located at 3 Fed- eral Way in Groveland. She can be reached by phone at 978- 373-1120 and her email address

is elainedalton@comcast.net.

For more information, see her website at www.elainedalton.com.

S3 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 Law Office Of eLaine M. DaLtOn
S3
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
Law Office Of eLaine M. DaLtOn
Wills, Trusts, Probate
Ve terans Benefits fo r Assisted Living
Elder Law
Medicaid Applications
Pet Trusts
978-373-1120
www.elainedaltonlaw.com
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 S4
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
S4

Courtesy photo

June Pastman and Alanna Pastman of Smitten, winners of Best of Boston in the North Shore Magazine two years in a row.

At Smitten, find the look you want

Owner June Pastman of Smitten helps cater to the needs of customers and cli- ents sharing her passion for the clothing industry that began from a young age. Instinctual knowledge of pur- chasing, dressing, and fash- ion consulting for women of work, leisure, and play speaks in volumes as you enter the doors of Smitten. Clothing and accessories change with the four seasons of New England highlighting the ever adapting color pallet of now a day func- tion and formal wears. With a giving heart, June

over the years has raised money for various charities and enjoys tight relationships with her customers, treating those as family upon your first visit. Her passion for dressing women continues in creating displays and having great people working as an expe- rienced designer team that will meet all needs of new and current clients as well as giving advice in fashion. Let them become your personal consultant Daughter and business partner Alanna Pastman,

who was born in Florida and brought up in New England, graduated from UNH with a Bachelors Degree in Child and Family Studies. Alanna has worked in the Childcare industry and Fitness Indus- try in Management positions since then. Through the years Alanna has worked with mother and co-owner June in clothing boutiques and par- ticipated in several of June’s fashion benefit shows. “My love and passion for the fashion industry continues with the simple glow that hap- pens when a woman leaves

Smitten feeling beautiful it is simply rewarding,” she says. In their second year of being in business in Newburyport, Smitten has won the Voters Choice Award “Best of the North Shore” for woman’s casual clothing store two years in a row, 2012 and 2013. They have also been awarded The Best Bets Award for “Best Women’s Clothing Store in Newburyport” two years in a row from The Daily News of Newburyport in 2012 and 2013. Their most recent achieve- ment, Smitten has been voted

“Best Casual Clothing Store” in the Newburyport Guide

2013.

This dynamic duo continues to be a shining star in our city of Newburyport. It has been said that, “Smitten cer- tainly rivals the boutiques on Newbury Street in Boston and frankly, the boutiques in Italy. Smitten is a hidden jewel and shouldn’t be missed.” So many styles and patterns are found within the walls of Smitten, come in today and welcome yourself to the world of fash- ion and look fabulous at a rea- sonable price!

S5 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 An extraordinary boutique like no other
S5
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
An extraordinary boutique like no other
SWEATERS
LEGGINGS
VESTS
DRESSES
ACCESSORIES
and so much more
Come see what all
the talk is about
23 INN STREET • NEWBURYPORT, MA • 978-499-7912 • WWW.SOSMITTEN.NET
Your local Island getaway FALL & WINTER HOURS At “Castaways Seafood and Grille” our guests
Your local Island getaway
FALL & WINTER HOURS
At “Castaways Seafood and Grille” our guests wave
goodbye to the real world and escape to paradise.
We combine the freshest high quality ingredients in
all of our recipes. Whether inside or on our two large
decks known as “The Views” you will see the best
sunset on the Northern Seacoast.
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY – 4:00 P.M. TO CLOSE
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY – 11:30 A.M. TO CLOSE
COME VISIT US DURING THE FALL AND WINTER
(ALONG WITH OUR REGULAR MENU)
Great View! Great Food!
Let’s HaVe a Great FaLL
and winter!!!
Book your Holiday Parties now!
(603) 760-7500
HAPPY HOUR 4:00 P.M. TO 7:00 P.M.
DRINK AND APPETIZERS SPECIALS
THURSDAY – ITALIAN NIGHT
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SATURDAY NIGHT – PRIME RIB DINNER
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209 Ocean Blvd., Seabrook, NH 03874 (603) 760-7500
www.castawaysseafoodandgrille.com
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
S6

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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

S7 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 Castaways Seafood Grille at Seabrook Beach. Bryan

Castaways Seafood Grille at Seabrook Beach.

Bryan eaton/staff photo

Vacation dining without leaving home at Castaways Seafood & Grille

By Ulrika G. Gerth

CorrespoNDeNT

Call it honoring the locals. For the first time, Cast- aways Seafood & Grille in Seabrook will stay open past Columbus Day, giving area residents a chance to take in the panoramic har- bor views and have a great dining experience outside of the tourist season. “We want to give back to our locals what the tourists

experience during the summer season,” said Ted Mountzuris, co-owner of Castaways with John Dussi. “Waiting in line can be a challenging experience, so by being open in the fall and winter, it gives our local patrons an opportu- nity to relax.” In its fifth season, Castaways’ new hours on Thursdays through Sundays are a first step toward turning the res- taurant from a seasonal

business into a destina- tion, Mountzuris said. Facing the inlet on Ocean Boulevard, Route 1A, it is marketed as “your local island getaway,” with scenery that Mount- zuris said is reminiscent of a fishing village in the Greek islands than Seabrook. Two large decks, known as “The Views,” will remain open as long as people desire to enjoy their meal outside in the comfort of

several heaters. And so will the fire pits, burning only steps away from the water. “Bring a sweater, toast marshmallows, watch the sunset and enjoy the stars,” Mountzuris said. “There’s no rush after you eat.” The fall and winter menu features a string of crowd pleasers such as crab cakes, calamari, broiled scallops, seafood risotto and shrimp Florentine. Guests can also choose from salads, soups, sandwiches and comfort

food. “And, of course, we offer fried seafood; it all depends on what you’re in the mood for,” Mountzuris said. “We are everything, from exqui- site cuisine to a great piece of fried fish.” Each day brings its own special in addition to the regular menu. Italian Night means it is Thursday, all- you-can-eat fish and chips equals Fridays, prime rib deals occur on Saturdays, and Sundays are all about

NFL treats. Several new TVs have been purchased to draw football fans. The owners envision end- ing the year with a New Year’s party before closing for the winter. “I’m excited about it,” Mountzuris said about the new focus. “Why drive to Boston when you have a destination like Castaways in the Seacoast where you can have a great meal, good music and a beautiful view right here and relax.’”

S8

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Antiques at

Edgerly Farm

• Friday, September 27, 2013 Antiques at Edgerly Farm Shoppers Village • 87 Lafayette Road (Rt.

Shoppers Village • 87 Lafayette Road (Rt. 1) • Hampton Falls, NH 03844

603-926-1971

Open Year Round 7 Days a Week - 10 AM - 5 PM

603-926-1971 Open Year Round 7 Days a Week - 10 AM - 5 PM ✦ Located

Open Year Round 7 Days a Week - 10 AM - 5 PM ✦ Located in
Open Year Round 7 Days a Week - 10 AM - 5 PM ✦ Located in
Open Year Round 7 Days a Week - 10 AM - 5 PM ✦ Located in

Located in the Shoppers Village plaza at 87 Lafayette Road in Hampton Falls, New Hampshire, David O’Bara

and Keith Thompson are the new owners of Antiques

at Edgerly Farm.

A

David O’Bara has over 32 years of antique experience behind him. As an avid col- lector, David always has over 70 pieces of art pottery on hand for sale. David also specializes in fine furniture, country, primitives, mahogany and formal pieces. At times, Da- vid also has choice antique medical equipment on hand for sale.

Newburyport native,

medical equipment on hand for sale. Newburyport native, ✦ Originally from Louisiana, Keith Thompson, a retired

Originally from Louisiana, Keith Thompson, a retired Chief from the U.S. Coast Guard, offers a wide variety of military and uniform service items for sale. Keith also specializes in ar- chitectural and industrial pieces.

Joining David and Keith at Antiques at Edgerly Farm are 20+ dealers, offering a wide variety of antiques and collectibles from which to choose.

Antiques at Edgerly Farm are 20+ dealers, offering a wide variety of antiques and collectibles from

S9

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

S9 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 Edgerly Farm offers wide variety of antiques

Edgerly Farm offers wide variety of antiques

By Jim SUllivan

CorrespoNDeNT

Possessed with a passion for antiques, co-owners of Hampton Falls’ newest antique shop, Antiques at Edgerly Farm, Keith Thompson and David O’Bara, both 49, are weathering their first year in business together and it seems to be a thing of beauty. “Things are going pretty well,” said Thompson. “Just about every two or four weeks is when I do the checks and we’ve been growing, not by leaps and bounds, but we are increasing.

We’re seeing that foot traffic has definitely been up. And things seem to be really working out well. We’re not setting the world on fire yet, but as long as I see improvement every month, that will help even more.” A Newburyport native, O’Bara, whose father owned Pearson’s Florist for many years, has been working with antiques since he was 9 years old. O’Bara was involved in some group shops in the past but this is his first shop. A Louisiana native, Thompson spent 22 years in the Coast Guard and worked with O’Bara in his

cleanout business. Now the two are partners. “I do most of the business and those kinds of things, military, architectural kinds of things,” said Thompson. “(O’Bara) deals with all the other things, the fur- niture and the look of the shop. He’s also a china and glassware appraiser, so that’s his expertise.” The fact that the two biggest seasons in the antiques business, summer and fall, were directly on the horizon when they opened up their shop, certainly helped the duo off to a good start. “Canadians and a lot of the

New Yorkers and people from Connecticut come during the sum- mer,” said Thompson. “(But in the fall) people start thinking about the holidays and also big furniture pieces. In the summer and in the spring, people are thinking about cleaning out and they don’t have room for big pieces. Then around the fall time, the holidays come around they start bringing people in. They start having family, and they start entertaining. They start thinking about having maybe a buffet or some bigger pieces. And that’s also the time when a lot of people start buying houses or

start fixing up their houses and they want to switch things out.” As the leaves begin turning colors and the peepers follow, Thompson and O’Bara will have their work cut out for them. “We’re happy,” said Thompson. “At first we wondered what the hell did we do? But we’re glad we did it. Right now we’re trying to get in all the furniture because this is the season for it. We have some really nice drop-leaf dining sets. We’re trying to get a couple of our nice dressers and those kind of things. That’s what we’re trying to do because this is the season for it.”

S10

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Residence Hall: 5-acre lakefront estate

Sparhawk School: Honoring children and celebrating ideas for 20 years

Sparhawk is a private,

pre-K-through-grade-12

day and boarding school with two campuses located in Amesbury. This year marks Sparhawk’s 20th anniversary. Respect for children and trust in their inherent enthusiasm for learning are central to the design of Sparhawk School’s educational processes and objectives. Our purpose is to provide a foundation of academic strength, to facili- tate critical and creative thinking, and to nurture qualities of character in our

students that will sustain them throughout their life- times, whatever challenges and adventures may come. What differentiates Spar- hawk’s curriculum from that of many other schools is its emphasis on a bal- ance among what we call academic, intellectual and humanistic curriculum. Ours is a program that hon- ors children, values inquiry, encourages exploration, fosters innovation and celebrates ideas. Children in our school gain skills that allow them to be self- initiating, self-directing

learners, as well as joyful, responsible and indepen- dent beings. Above all, this is the measure of success. This year, Sparhawk has expanded its offerings in several ways, including the integration of iPads in classrooms at all age lev- els (each Sparhawk High School student receives a personal iPad). The foreign language department has expanded to include a Man- darin Chinese program for its pre-K-through-grade-12 students. Sparhawk has also added a boarding com- ponent this fall, in which

American students live and learn alongside interna- tional students. Sparhawk is excited to announce that the eighth-graders have joined the high school campus, as part of the new LEAP Program. Features of this program include high school readiness classes; access to more than 20 extracurricular activities; team-building activities; choice of one of five languages (Mandarin Chinese, Spanish, French, Latin and Italian); access to Sparhawk High School’s guidance department; and

many off-campus field trips. We are preparing stu- dents to enter the world as creative and critical thinkers who will thrive in academic, professional and personal spheres. We are educating people who are able to advocate for them- selves and others. To nur- ture only the intellect of a child is a disservice. That is why, at Sparhawk, sustain- ing a culture of kindness is of essential value to us all. We have an extensive community life and are committed to a wide variety

of community experiences for our students, and it does not end at the boundaries of our campus. During Com- munity Service Week, Win- terim, after-school clubs and student-run organiza- tions, students have been involved in bettering our local and global community and themselves. A Spar- hawk student understands that an important part of their education is learning to be a good citizen of the world. Sparhawk is a wonderful place to grow up. Come see for yourself.

S11

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

PreK-Grade
PreK-Grade

Discover

Sparhawk

• World language program:

Mandarin Chinese, Spanish, French, Latin and Italian

• Thematic curriculum with diverse electives

• Small class sizes

• Daily opportunities to speak with your child’s teachers

• Frequent progress assessments and formal conferences

• New high school readiness program for 8th graders: L.E.A.P.

• 100 percent college acceptance

• Visual and performing arts classes and productions

• Expanded athletic offerings

• And time for reflection and wonder

Fall 2013 Open House Dates

Wed. October 9th

6:00-8:00 pm

Sat. October 19th

9:00 am-12:00 pm

Sat. November 16th

9:00 am-12:00 pm

WWW.SPARHAWKSCHOOL.COM

S12

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

The Greater Newburyport Chamber of Commerce & Industry IS the Greatest!

The Greater Newburyport Chamber of Commerce & Industry is a very active and well-respected force of nearly 800 members. As one of the largest in the state, it has a reputation for being one of the

most dynamic chambers in the area. Operating like a well-oiled machine, six funny, feisty, intel- ligent women work to serve and support their members on a daily basis, and then some, including lots of evenings and weekends. There are four full- time and two part-time staff who work tirelessly to promote their members and the commu- nity as a whole and a committed board of directors who oversee the workings of this nonprofit organization. They also have many office volunteers who greet hundreds of visitors and field phone calls every day in the office. We sat down with the staff recently for a Q&A.

Q. What is the membership composed of?

A. Our members span the scope

of sole proprietors, nonprofits, manufacturers, trades folk, professional service providers, restaurants, retailers and more. Several members are located out- side of Newburyport because they understand the value of being plugged into a vast network of like-minded business owners with whom they can connect, network, learn, discover needed resources and offer support.

Q. What are the benefits of

membership?

A. We have several monthly

networking opportunities, edu- cational seminars, free business counseling, website presence and advertising, free Web postings for jobs, commercial real estate and events and member referrals. We also plan and coordinate a Women’s Leadership Luncheon, a bridal expo, business expo, volun- teer fair and more! We continually advocate for sound planning and economic development initiatives.

for sound planning and economic development initiatives. Bryan eaton/staff photo Ann Ormond, Chamber President, Terry

Bryan eaton/staff photo

Ann Ormond, Chamber President, Terry Thompson, Finance and Information Systems Manager, Julie Malone, Marketing Coordinator, Anne Wilt, Membership Associate, Brianne Records, Special Events and Tourism Coordinator and Patty St. John, Vice President of Membership Development.

Q. Which of the many wonderful year-

long events in town does the Chamber

produce?

A. A few of the many include

our upcoming Oktoberfest this Saturday, the Riverfront Festival,

the summer outdoor Movie Nights, the Great Pumpkin Lighting and Witches Night Out, the Spring Fest, Fall Harvest Festival and Scarecrow Competition, Invitation Nights, and Santa’s Workshop. By default, the Chamber serves as the tourism “arm” of the city. We spend marketing dollars on

print, radio, video, social media,

etc

to play, shop and dine. FYI, the

Chamber does not produce Yankee

to bring people into this city

Homecoming as many people think. They are a separate non- profit run by throngs of volunteers.

Q. Newburyport is a beautiful place to live and the envy of the country. What role does the Chamber play in that impressive distinction? A. The Chamber is responsible for the floral hanging baskets, cornstalks and pumpkins in Mar- ket Square, the tree and greenery around the lampposts at holiday time. These beautification efforts attract thousands of visitors from all over the world all four seasons of the year! The Chamber is proud to say we were the 2004 and 2005 Champions of the Amer- ica in Bloom’s national contest for

the most beautiful city.

Q. How does the Chamber work with

the city?

A. The Chamber is not affiliated

with the city, but we do have a wonderful working relationship

with them. We partner on many initiatives including current efforts to be designated an official Cultural District, the green com- munity initiative and the recently earned designation as an Official Coast Guard City.

Q. Why should someone join the

Chamber?

A. Well, of course, we believe

every organization should join and be a member of the Chamber — just like The Daily News is! A few

of the many reasons include net-

working and building professional and personal connections, increas-

ing visibility for your business, referrals, marketing opportunities, information and updates on impor- tant local issues, easy access to our elected officials. Equally important, by joining the Chamber, it is a show of support and appreciation for the beauty and vitality of our fair city, the city in which many have chosen to work and live.

Finally, our Chamber is only as strong as our members. We exist

to serve the needs of our mem- bers, our community. And we do it every single day with enthusi- asm and great pride!

S13

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Greater Newburyport Chamber of Commerce and Industry

JOIN & CONNECT WITH THE

COMMUNITY

Marketing & Advertising

Website Advertising Email Advertising Ribbon Cuttings Weekly Email Newsletter Business Referrals Directory Listing on Website Free Job & Event Postings Free Commercial Real Estate Listings Sponsorship Opportunities Newburyport Gift Card & Guide Book Contacts, Contacts, Contacts!

Networking & Education

Member Mixers Educational Seminars Free Business Counseling Informational Breakfast Meetings Involvement on Committees Volunteer Opportunities Networking Eye Openers Access to Professional Services & Business Resources Certificates of Origin Access to Knowledgeable Staff With Over 60 Years of Combined Experience Contacts, Contacts, Contacts!

Advocacy & Economic Development

Collective Advocate for Local Businesses Promote Sound Planning&Economic Development Efforts Strong Relationships with City & State Elected Officials Workforce Training Programs Ongoing City Beautification Efforts Staying in the Know with Community & Political Happenings Contacts, Contacts, Contacts!

750 MEMBERS STRONG

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE October 21 - 25 Extra Special Savings

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE October 21 - 25 Extra Special Savings 38R Merrimac Street, Newburyport, MA 01950 978.462.6680

38R Merrimac Street, Newburyport, MA 01950 978.462.6680 info@newburyportchamber.org

www.newburyportchamber.org

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 S14
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Paint Clothes and Party Shoes

By taylor mccarthy

New England’s finest traveling art studio The Artist Bar, is holding local painting parties around the north shore. These painting parties offer a genuine art experi- ence to each participant during his or her personal process of creating tasteful, sub- ject matter within a casual setting. Creat- ing one’s very own painting while sipping on a cocktail and conversing with friends is an inspiring way to spend an evening. No art experience is necessary in helping The Artist Bar “share the love, share the art.” You will find The Artist Bar twice monthly at The Grog in Newburyport, Sea- glass in Salisbury, Flatbread in Amesbury, Keon’s at Black Swan Country Club in Georgetown, Ponte Vecchio in Danvers, as well as many other nearby locations. In January and March of 2013, The Art- ist Bar was featured on TV’s Chronicle, Channel 5 WCVB. The Artist Bar was also written about in the Boston Business Jour- nal and many local newspapers, and will be featured in the November issue of the North Shore Magazine. Artist owned and operated, The Artist Bar is the vision of professional artist Jennifer Clement. Clement has more than 30 years experience creating and teach- ing art, as well as selling her paintings in major galleries around New England. Her art mission, almost hard but extremely unnecessary to distinct from a spiritual mission, is “to make art accessible to all, and to help people create and explore their inner artist through an authentic process rather than the trending paint by number approach.” Clement believes this approach helps participants really “have fun, let loose, and just relax,” allowing their inner artist to surface. She truly believes “art will make a positive differ- ence in every persons life,” that “art is good for the soul.” She is a genuine artist who lives a genuine artist life. Clement’s enlightening approach of teaching art allows each participant to dig deep within his or her soul and touch the inner artist that may have been hiding dor- mant within. Once leaving The Artist Bar’s painting party, a feeling of accomplishment and confidence arises from each partici- pant as they have accepted their inner art- ist and created a piece of artwork. The Artist Bar holds a unique level of sophistication by delivering a college-style approach to its participants—not only through the delivery of educated, talented, professional instructors, but also through

talented, professional instructors, but also through Tami O’Brien, Jennifer Clement, and Patty St. John. the

Tami O’Brien, Jennifer Clement, and Patty St. John.

the utilization of philosophy and teaching styles throughout the instructor’s delivery in hopes to expose each participant to the artistic process of art rather than a paint- by-number approach. Both day and night The Artist Bar is available for private events. Private events can differ from birthday parties to cor- porate team building events. However, more interestingly, the party venue can,

uniquely, vary from a restaurant to a coun- try club or even to the side of a lovely little pond—you name it. Basically, parties can be hosted anywhere at anytime for any purpose. The cost is $45 and includes a lesson and everything needed to create and go home with your very own masterpiece. The Art- ist Bar will set up and clean up! The paints are water base acrylic and the canvas size

is 16x20. Reservations are taken with payment. To reserve your seat online, go to The Artist Bar website’s calendar page at: http://www. theartistbar.com. To request a monthly calendar via email or to inquire about a private party contact: paint@theartistbar. com. To stay in the loop, “like” The Artist Bar on Facebook at: https://www.facebook. com/TheArtistBar.

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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

S17 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 No need to compromise with Anchor Stone

No need to compromise with Anchor Stone Deck Pizza

27, 2013 No need to compromise with Anchor Stone Deck Pizza Each morning at the Anchor

Each morning at the Anchor begins the same way. At 8 a.m., a 50-pound bag of flour is poured into the 60-quart Hobart mixer — a 900-pound behemoth. The massive dough hook starts its rhythmic churn, and the morning is offi- cially underway. At 8:30 a.m., the produce delivery arrives, bringing cases of fresh mushrooms, summer squash and tomatoes, along with bunches of fresh basil and scallions. More than 100 pounds of tomato filets and diced tomatoes are set

Anchor Anna Jaques Pizza is among the offerings at Anchor Stone Deck Pizza in Newburyport.

aside to make the signature Anchor pizza sauce. By 9:30 a.m., the dough is starting to rise, 20 heads of Romaine have been washed and cut, and the basil “chiffonade parade” begins. “We take a lot of pride in what we do and how we do it,” says Mark Tramontana, the owner of Anchor Stone Deck Pizza. “It’s very labor- intensive. We could have cut corners — used frozen dough balls, or a sauce that’s pre-made in a factory somewhere. But our goal is to make the best pizza we

possibly can, and it starts with your ingredients. As they say, you can’t make good wine from bad grapes.” Anchor’s “from scratch” kitchen ensures that its food is being made the same way you would do it at home (if we pretend that you’re cutting Chinese egg- plant on a bias at 8 a.m.). At a time when the public is focusing more and more attention on the quality and integrity of the food they purchase for their own kitchens, Tramontana is encouraging folks to cast

a similar eye toward their choices when dining out or ordering out. “Fresh ingredients and scratch cooking make a world of difference,” Tra- montana notes. “A fresh pepper received this morn- ing and cut today tastes 10 times better than one that’s been sliced, sealed, shipped and stored for days. Folks should know what’s going into their food, and ordering out shouldn’t mean that you compromise on quality.” After terminating its relationship with the

beleaguered Upper Crust chain, the Anchor had to change all of its recipes — and the Anchor staff embraced the opportunity. The new sauce and dough recipes, which debuted in April, have been very well-received. The new Anchor menu includes spe- cialty pizzas named after Newburyport landmarks and the Tramontanas’ three boys. It also used the changeover as an opportu- nity to lower many of the pre-Anchor prices, on every- thing from drinks and salads

to pizzas and toppings. Despite the fact that many of the recipe upgrades led to higher-cost ingredients, Tramontana felt that it was simply the right thing to do. “There are a dozen pizza places in Newburyport. With the change to Anchor, we made a commitment to focus on quality and freshness. Lowering prices was basi- cally a ‘thank you’ to folks for standing by us through some challenging times,” Tramon- tana notes. “As long as that big old Hobart keeps mixing, we’re in good shape.”

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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

At age 97, Ould Newbury better than ever

Having just celebrated its 97th anniversary, Ould Newbury Golf Club (ONGC) is an ageless wonder, in more than one way. Not only has the course become better with age, but it also has no limits on the age of its members. ONGC offers a welcom- ing atmosphere and caters to the young and seasoned golfer alike. If you pass through Ould Newbury’s clubhouse on any day, you will see some of the same faces that were there 40 or 50 years ago as well as a slew of junior players. No matter what your playing ability, you will fit right in with this friendly membership. ONGC stands apart from other facilities because it is a golf club, not a country club. The mem- bers come from all walks of life but have two things in common — a love of golf and the desire to have fun.

A glimpse inside Ould Newbury — meet some members

George Ayles

George drove over to Ould Newbury with a cou- ple of pals from his neigh- borhood when he heard that they needed caddies. At that time there were no carts at the club, so caddies were in demand and ONGC had a stable of about 20 caddies waiting for players. He didn’t really know much about what a caddy did, but he needed to work and needed the money. His friends introduced him to John McDonald, who was the pro at Ould Newbury in 1957. John, a kindly gentleman, took George out to one of the holes and taught him the basics of caddying: how to carry a bag, where all the clubs belonged in the bag, where to stand while his player was driving the ball and where to watch for the balls.

was driving the ball and where to watch for the balls. Ould Newbury’s 6th hole Later

Ould Newbury’s 6th hole

Later that day George

who never played before,

friends at ONGC. In addi-

enjoying ONGC the second

took on his first customer, Mr. Al Ash. George was 17 at the time and quite small

came out. He said, “I fig- ured I took about a 19 on my first hole and maybe a

tion, Leea also found her husband at Ould Newbury. Leea married Jim Trussell,

time around, Leea said, “I love it here. Belonging here is inexpensive and it gives me a

and slight, probably about 4

21

on my second. I played

whose entire family were

chance to play competitively

feet 8 inches and 70 pounds.

72

holes that first day and

golfers at Ould Newbury.

at so many other wonderful

George recalls, “Mr. Ash took one look at me and turned on his heels back into the locker room and came back out with a push cart with wheels. He prob- ably thought I would never get his clubs around the

haven’t stopped since. I loved it.” George not only loves the game, he loves Ould Newbury and the home feeling and interaction with the members. It is his home away from home.

“I wanted to get married on the 9th green and wear white linen knickers,” said Leea with a smile. That didn’t work out but, at one time, the Trussell family held the most club cham- pionships in one family on

courses. This is my home and wouldn’t have gone anywhere else. Plus, Jimmy Hilton, our pro, has taught me so much. He knows every- one’s game and is right there to help out all the time.”

course without help.”

the North Shore.

Ron Margeson

After his first weekend of caddying, his friends asked George if he was coming out the next day. “Is there much call for a caddy on a Monday?” asked George. “No,” answered his pal, “Monday is caddy’s day and we can play for free.” John McDonald pulled together a ragtag bunch of clubs for his new caddy and George,

Leea Osborne Trussell

Leea Osborne Trussell’s parents were members at Ould Newbury. While Leea played occasionally grow- ing up, tennis took up most of her time. However, when her mother invited her to play in a member-guest one time, the competitive juices started to flow and she got hooked. Leea found fun and

Leea left the game for a time while her daughter showed Morgan horses. But after her daughter left the horse circuit and entered nursing school, Leea came back when a friend asked her to teach her how to play golf. Leea said, “I brought Judy out for 9 holes and got hooked all over again!” When asked how she is

When Ron started play- ing at Ould Newbury in 2006, his handicap index was around a 9; today it is 2. It is clear that Ron takes his golf seriously. In fact, he is on his way to becoming a PGA teaching professional. He credits his progress to playing and practicing at Ould Newbury with like players in a fairly

competitive setting. Ron noted, “If you can play well here, you can play anywhere. The course has particularly small greens, many which are raised, that call for accurate approach shots. Recently I played at two wonderful venues, Ves- per and Brae Burn. Com- pared to Ould Newbury the greens were huge, which made hitting them a lot eas- ier. From playing at Ould Newbury, my iron game has become more accurate.” “When I am not playing serious golf, I love to come and play in the Grub and Grogs, where my wife and I get to play together in a fun setting,” said Ron. Grub and Grogs are monthly scramble tournaments where all levels of players play together, with fun as the main goal. Nine holes of golf are followed by a nice dinner, all for a bar- gain price (and guests are always welcome).

“I have played a lot of

places and love this place best of all,” says Ron. “My wife has become a good golfer and loves it too. Whether you have a 0 or a 30 handicap, there is always someone to play with and have a good time.” Ron recently passed the Playing Ability Test (PAT), one step towards his goal of becoming a PGA teaching professional. Not only did he win low gross for the two round playing test, he also passed it on his first try.

About Ould Newbury

A scenic nine-hole semi-

private club located on Route 1, ONGC overlooks the Newbury marshes and the Parker River. ONGC offers a variety of mem- bership options (see ad on opposite page) for all levels of players and is open for public play during the week. Tee times are not required but some are available to book online at www.ouldnewbury.com.

S19

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Ould Newbury Golf Club

Do You Want to Golf for Free?

Ould Newbury Golf Club Do You Want to Golf for Free? Simply pay 50% of the

Simply pay 50% of the cost of your selected 2014 Membership Level now, and your membership will start immediately - meaning free golf for September, October and November!

And this offer may be combined with the Under 40 and Twosome Specials. Whatadeal!!

Not ready to commit? Try us on for size with the Fairway Freedom Pass!

Get all the benefits of Full Membership at half the cost.

The Fairway Freedom pass is a $700 pre-paid debit card that never expires – carry over the balance to the following year if you do not use entire amount in t he current yea r. If yo u d ecide to join before the card is depleted, the entire $700 will be put towards the membership cost. Visit our website at www.ouldnewbury.com for details.

cost. Visit our website at www.ouldnewbury.com for details.   2014 Membership Levels Full: Golf any�me on
 

2014 Membership Levels

Full: Golf any�me on weekdays, weekends and holidays.

Ac�ve: Golf any �me on weekdays and a�er noon on weekends and holidays.

Family: Consists of one Full Member and one Ac�ve Member.

Weekday: Unlimited play Monday through Friday except holidays.

Student: Open to students in a preparatory school, university, or college.

Junior: Any person between the ages of

13

– 18. Play is restricted to Monday

through Fridays and a�er 3 pm on

weekends and holidays.

Special New Member Deals

Special New Member Deals

Twosome Special: If two new members sign up together, each will receive 25% off first

Twosome Special: If two new members sign up together, each will receive 25% off first year dues!

Under 40 Special: New members under

Under 40 Special: New members under

40

years of age may take advantage of

our reduced fees!

our reduced fees!

Please visit www.ouldnewbury.com or call us at 978.465.9888 for more information and prices

info@ouldnewbury.com

319 Newburyport Turnpike, Newbury, MA 01951

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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

S20 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 Dining room at the Elizabeth Calsey House

Dining room at the Elizabeth Calsey House in Amesbury.

Bryan eaton/staff photo

An assisted living community with the comforts of home

It’s morning and the resi- dents of 15 Elizabeth Street in Amesbury awaken and make their ways to the din- ing room for a home-cooked breakfast, still dressed in their pajamas, slippers and bathrobes. It’s a typical family scene, played out each morning in households everywhere — including the Elizabeth Calsey House, an assisted- living facility in Amesbury. The 15 residents enjoy numerous amenities for an affordable monthly rent, including home- cooked meals individually

prepared, — for which all are encouraged to share personal recipes,— while getting the special care and assistance they need. Owner Deb Dastoli opened the Elizabeth Calsey House in 1995, and was a pioneer in the assisted living field, working with the state to develop regulations for such facilities. After spend- ing more than a decade as a dispatcher at the Salis- bury Fire Department, she was prompted to enter the assisted living field after she and her husband were

forced to enter her father- in-law into a nursing home as caring for him at home became too difficult. Designing and building the homes, Dastoli worked closely with the architects to ensure each would embody a warm and invit- ing environment to allow for aging in place with the aid of a well-trained staff. The houses offer porches for residents to use, as well as gardens, a full-service kitchen, and common areas for group activities. At its opening, the home offered eight rooms and

Dastoli did all of the food shopping, cooking and resident care by herself. Over the years, the Dasto- lis were able to add onto the building, while also opening a second location on Lions Mouth Road in Amesbury in 2002. That location offers 26 bed- rooms. At both homes, each resident has a private bathroom. “The people that live in this house are certainly a family,” Dastoli said. “My philosophy is that it’s the residents’ home.” It may also help that the

facilities are operated by a family. Several of Dastoli’s relatives, including her granddaughter and her two brothers, work at the homes. She also employs a nursing student, as well as several students at Whittier Vocational Technical High School who are studying to become certified nursing assistants. Over the years, the regulations have been more complex and the paperwork load is greater, Dastoli said. “I couldn’t do it all by myself now,” she said. The monthly rent for

each resident ranges from $4,000 to $4,300, depend- ing on the size of his or her room, and the care he or she requires. That rent includes services for which other assisted living facili- ties will charge additional fees, Dastoli said, such as cable television or extra laundry services or show- ers. The Elizabeth Calsey House does not charge a community fee. To learn more about the Elizabeth Calsey House or the Elizabeth Calsey House at Lion’s Mouth Road, call 978-388-0293.

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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Everyone who enters our home is a part of the Elizabeth Calsey Family. The Elizabeth
Everyone who enters our home is a
part of the Elizabeth Calsey Family.
The Elizabeth Calsey House ~ Philosophy of Assisted Living
• Offers cost effective quality care that is
personalized for the individual’s needs
• Promotes the individuality of each
resident
Allows each resident the choice of care and
life-style
• Fosters the independence for each
resident
• Protects each resident’s right to privacy
• Treats each resident with dignity and
respect
• Involves the family and friends with
in-care planning and implementation
• Nurtures the spirit of each resident
• Provides a safe residential environment
• Makes the Assisted Living residence a
valuable community asset.

E E lizabeth lizabeth C C alsey alsey

HOUSE

Assisted Living

RResidenceesidence

www.elizabethcalseyhouse.com

Living RResidenceesidence www.elizabethcalseyhouse.com 286 Lions Mouth Road Amesbury, MA 01913 978-388-3752 15

286 Lions Mouth Road Amesbury, MA 01913

978-388-3752

15 Elizabeth Street Amesbury, MA 01913

978-388-0293

Whether your dental needs include a complete exam and cleaning, a full-mouth restoration, or anything
Whether your dental needs include a complete
exam and cleaning, a full-mouth restoration, or
anything in between, we promise to provide you
with exceptional and compassionate care every
step of the way. Paying attention to each patient’s
specific needs and preferences is just part of what
distinguishes our practice. It is our goal to make
your visit with us an extremely pleasant one.
Some of the services that we provide include:
• Complete dental examinations
• A full array of preventive and hygiene therapies
• The latest in porcelain restorations
• Dental implants
• Tooth whitening
• Porcelain veneers and the latest cosmetic
restorative materials
At Portside Family Dental our dental team is
dedicated to brightening the smiles of our
patients. Our gentle, caring staff welcomes
patients of all ages and guarantees the comfort of
every member of your family.
• Extractions
• Invisalign
• Pediatric dental care
• Root canal therapy
Portside Family dental
7 Brown Square Newburyport, MA 01950
tel: 978-462-4590 portsidefamilydental.com
Dr. DaviD rosania &
Dr. sam merabi
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

S23 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 Portside Family Dental. Jim Vaiknoras/staff Photo Smiles

Portside Family Dental.

Jim Vaiknoras/staff Photo

Smiles abound at Portside Family Dental

By Jim Sullivan CorreSpondent

Although he grew up all over the state of Massachusetts, Dr. Sam Merabi could think of no better place to open his first dental practice than in Newburyport. “I have been everywhere else in Massachusetts, basi- cally,” laughed Merabi. “I did an internship in Western Mass. I lived in Central Mass. I lived in MetroWest and the south shore as well as Boston, proper. But when I came up here, there was nothing but good experiences for me.” Merabi not only took over the Brown Square practice from Dr. Ronald Davitt in June of 2012, he moved himself and his two dogs upstairs, as well as installed solar panels on the roof as part of the Solarize Newburyport program. “I always wanted to live in sort of a green town,” Merabi said. “(I wanted) walkability and the consciousness of a community. So, that’s what I found attractive about Newburyport in particular.” Once moved in, the Iranian native brought in periodon- tist Dr. David Rosania and, as opposed to just having one person’s name above the door, changed the practice’s name to Portside Dental to denote the office’s team-effort approach. “We tried to mostly keep the practice just as Dr. Davitt had it,” Merabi said. “There has been a dental office there for over 50 years, starting with his father. We’ve been updating the technology, little by little, and networking as much as possible in the community. Almost all of the staff stayed.” Taking over a long-standing practice can be a bless- ing and a challenge at times, but Merabi, who studied at Brandeis, Tufts and Harvard said the community has wel- comed him with open arms. “The town has been pretty friendly and pretty welcom- ing,” Merabi. “There was a little bit of sadness because Dr. Davitt was sick at the time. But he is in full remission now so that is okay.” Merabi said most of Davitt’s clients have remained with the practice. “It’s a machine that we kept running and everyone is get- ting the same coverage as before,” he said.

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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

For Dr. Laura Anne Potvin, eye care has been a lifelong passion

By Jim Sullivan

CorrespoNDeNT

If you find yourself in the

Groveland area and see someone

holding your gaze much too long, have no fear, it’s probably Dr. Laura Anne Potvin of Dr. Laura Anne Potvin, P.C.-Optometrists.

“I remember being in Jordan

Marsh when I was little and there was a woman who had cataract lenses,” said Dr. Potvin. “They magnified her eyes so much that

I was just mesmerized by them.

She looked at me and said, ‘What are you looking at?’ And I was like, ‘Oops!’” Eyes and the care of them have been the family business as far back as Dr. Potvin can remember.

“It’s something I saw my father doing all of his life and I grew up in his back room and in his lab when he used to examine patients,” remembered Dr. Potvin. “So, when

I was in school, I said I was going

to give it a try and I did. And I ended up loving it.”

A graduate of the New England

College of Optometry, Dr. Potvin took over her father, Dr. Bernard S. Potvin’s, Main Street practice in 1988. Things have gone well enough over the years to neces- sitate a move to new offices on Salem Street this past August. “We definitely outgrew the space we had,” Dr. Potvin said. “And we definitely needed bet- ter parking. Now we have bet- ter parking and we have a lot more space that accommodates all our different interests for the care that we offer. We only had to close for two days, the office was completely moved and we opened like we never closed our doors. It’s kind of cool.” With four other eye doctors in the office, Dr. Potvin said Dr. Laura Anne Potvin, P.C.- Optom- etrists has been offering compre- hensive care for the entire family

has been offering compre- hensive care for the entire family Dr. Laura Anne Potvin since 1947.

Dr. Laura Anne Potvin

since 1947. “We have just about everything you need,” Dr. Potvin said. “I have doctors specializing in pediatric and geriatric patients, Vision Therapy, medically necessary contact lenses, and specialized contact lenses. We (also) have what is basically a new set-up in our dispensary, offering an incredible range of eyewear.” An advocate of preventive care, Dr. Potvin recommends people have their eyes checked every two years. These days, visual therapy is one way Dr. Potvin and company are keeping ahead of problems

that may arise. “We offer Wellness Care in our efforts in prevention,” Dr. Potvin said. “Vision therapy is one form of wellness care as are screening visual fields, retinal photos, map- ping of the optic nerve or retinal nerves. Even if you have 20/20 vision, you spend your day on the computer and find yourself with awful sore eyes at the end of the day. Your eyes are burning or you’re having trouble staying focused, then yes, vision therapy would certainly be something that you would want to look into. It’s essentially what I would call

wellness care.” Like any business, Dr. Potvin’s practice has its busy months with the start of the school year being the most hectic. The tail end of the calendar year is also busy and the practice also sees a spike during tax season when people’s returns come in. Dr. Laura Anne Potvin, P.C.- Optometrists also offers an after- hours service that will return calls within 20 minutes. “If you have any- thing that you have a concern about, you should have answers for it,” Dr. Potvin said. “So if somebody has either redeye or flash and floaters,

or their eyes are painful, those are all pretty significant emergencies. and a lot of times people just have questions about contacts that they are really concerned about and we will address those too.” Dr. Potvin says she sometimes finds that she can never truly leave her work at the office. “There have been many times when I have been sitting across the table from somebody, eating supper and I reach over for their glasses to fix them,” Dr. Potvin said. “It will just be driving me nuts and I will just have to take care of it.”

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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

M.K. Benatti Jewelers — An Unforgettable Experience

Let’s get started on that piece of jewelry that you’ve always wanted! In their state-of-the-art jew- elry design center in downtown Newburyport, M.K. Benatti Jewel- ers crafts heirloom quality rings, earrings and pendants using the finest diamonds, gemstones, plati- num and gold. M.K. Benatti Jewelers ability to create both meaningful and exquisite jewelry in-house is the vision of owner, Matt Khatib. As a master jeweler who also specializes in CAD/CAM Design, he has the ability to create the most timeless and individual jewelry beginning with a con- versation with his clients. From engagement and wedding rings to anniversary and special life celebrations, Matt encompasses your vision, and delivers a price- less memento to cherish for gen- erations to come. From simple repairs to intricate creations, M.K. Benatti Jewel- ers provides service and quality unsurpassed by any jeweler on the north shore. The owners, Matt and Karyn Khatib, met in 2001 in the jewelry industry. It became their dream to have their own fine jewelry store. They started as a jewelry repair and design center in Cambridge before they were introduced to Newburyport. They immediately fell in love with the area and decided to open on State Street. Their business has since grown exponentially. M.K. Benatti Jewel- ers has become a destination for fine jewelry with a great local clientele, as well as many clients from Boston, the south shore, Connecticut, New York and all over the world. Matt is incredibly busy year round producing these beautiful and individual works of art. “It is wonderful to design and make something that you know the recipient is going to cherish

something that you know the recipient is going to cherish Karyn and Matt Khatib of MK

Karyn and Matt Khatib of MK Benatti.

for their lifetime,” Matt Khatib said. M.K. Benatti Jewelers believes strongly in giving back to the local community. Matt spends hours custom designing beautiful jewelry each year to be auctioned for NEF (Newburyport Education Foundation),the Immaculate Conception School,and the Jeanne Geiger Crisis Center,

as well as donating beautiful jewelry for both Pentucket and Newbury Elementary. This year they have sponsored a soccer team for the NYSA: Go Benatti Bulldogs! M.K. Benatti Jewelers annual blood drive for Boston Children’s Hospital is always a great success. Matt enjoys rallying everyone up, providing them snacks and healthy drinks and then sending

them onto the Blood Mobile parked in front of the store to donate blood. Matt and his wife, Karyn, do a drawing for a $1,000 gift certificate each year. Those that donate blood to the blood drive that day are entered to win. This year will be M.K. Benatti Jewelers fifth annual Toy Drive for Toys for Tots. Last year every- one who donated a toy at their drop off location was entered into

Bryan Eaton/staff Photo

a raffle for an iPad! M.K Benatti Jewelers is look- ing forward to another exciting holiday season. Matt is busy designing new pieces every day to ensure a great selection during the holidays. As authorized retailers for Michele, Gucci and Tissot watches, you can find a great selection of timepieces at M.K. Benatti Jewelers.

S27 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 An Unforgettable Experience. Fine Jewelry and
S27
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
An Unforgettable Experience.
Fine Jewelry and Watches
GIA CERTIFIED DIAMONDS
ENGAGEMENT RINGS • WEDDING BANDS
PENDANTS • EARRINGS
On-Site Jewelry Repair & Custom Design
Owners, Karyn & Matt Khatib
No Interest if paid within 12 months. Min. purchase & monthly payment required.
11 State St. Newburyport, MA | 978.462.2768 | www.MKBenattijewelers.com

S28

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

At Pickwick Driver Education, decisions are based on students needs

With 16 years of being a driver instructor for

a local driving school, Mr. Pickwick was nego- tiating the purchase an existing school when the sellers back out. His daughter stepped up

to help him accomplish his dream, and together they opened Pickwick Driver Education. Two years later, their school is growing with two full time instructors, one instructor-in-training and

a technologies advisor. They run two vehicles

for road lessons and a simulator for additional

help in the classroom. Mr. Pickwick knows the value of good edu- cation having been a teacher for 35 years and holding his masters degree in special education. He uses his teaching experience to continually enrich and enhance the curricu- lum. His daughter, Alison, has an accounting degree that she uses to continually advance the business side of the school. The instruc- tors challenge themselves to improve the overall education of their students and stay one step ahead of the changing environment of the open road. The entire team believes that there are bet- ter methods to instill good driving habits in students than to use shock images of collision carnage and death in the classroom to scare students into driving safely. As a result of these challenges and beliefs, the program now includes an open, comfortable classroom set-

ting, with guest speakers, hands-on activities,

a driving simulator, and example videos that

continue to produce a curriculum that remains above the standards of the RMV. Their dedication to the students extends beyond the classroom with various assistance to school sports, drama, and yearbook clubs. For convenience, they offer online scheduling, payment and registration options. They also pick up students for lessons from home or at school. Through hard work and flexibility they have earned a reputation in the community of excellence, with a dedication to safety that they continue to pass on to their students. “Students should come first. Everything we do here is to build a company worthy of endur- ing, but at the end of the day our decisions are based on our students needs – not the other way around. We focus on communicating and understanding the best way to provide our stu- dents a lifetime of memorable, safe and enjoy- able car rides,” Alison Pickwick said. Ready, Set: Let’s Drive! Pickwick Driver Education is located at 19 Macy St., Amesbury. You can contact them at 978 792-5235 or visit their website www.Lets- Drive.us

them at 978 792-5235 or visit their website www.Lets- Drive.us Pickwick Driver Education in Amesbury. Courtesy

Pickwick Driver Education in Amesbury.

Courtesy Photo

S29 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 978-792-5235 Complete Course: $ 715 No
S29
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
978-792-5235
Complete Course: $ 715
No Hidden Fees, Comfortable Classroom,
Home Pickup, Weekend Lessons, Referral Program,
Family Operated & Client Oriented
Next Weekend Class Starts October 5 th 8am-3pm
Next Night Class Starts September 30 th 6pm-8pm
And a Parent Class on October 23 rd
www.LetsDrive.us
19 Macy Street, Amesbury, MA
ReNew Revolution ReNew Revolution is Newburyport’s finest upscale consignment boutique. We resell high-end designer
ReNew Revolution
ReNew Revolution is Newburyport’s finest upscale consignment boutique. We resell high-end designer
clothing, accessories and jewelry. We love classic eternal design as much as we enjoy fresh, trendy and
sometimes vintage pieces. We strive to satisfy every customer with our wide range of freshly picked inventory
that can suit any age and style. Experience consignment shopping like no other at our fine boutique.
Some labels we
always have in stock,
• Michael Stars
• Burberry
• Elie Ta hari
• Sevens for all Mankind
• To ry Burch
• Michael Kors
• Kate Spade
• Ralph Lauren
• Gaouette Farm Body Products
• Seaport Style by A&O
• Rae of Light Healing Sprays
• and many more!
8 Market Square (bottom of State Street) Newburyport, MA 01950
(bottom of State Street) Newburyport, MA 01950
978-465-7800 • renewrevolution.com
Shop Hours: Monday-Friday 11-4 • Saturday 11-6 • Sunday 11-5 Hours may vary by season
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
S30

S31

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Find something you’ll love at ReNew Revolution

27, 2013 Find something you’ll love at ReNew Revolution Renew Revolution in downtown Newburyport. CourtEsy Photo

Renew Revolution in downtown Newburyport.

CourtEsy Photo

You may have already had the plea- sure of visiting ReNew Revolution, the upscale consignment boutique situated in the heart of Newburyport’s historic

downtown, but if you have not, it is well worth your trip. Sisters Phaedra and Natasha Gaou- ette strive to bring you the finest selection of the most coveted designer clothing and accessories and over the past two years have proven that they have taken consignment to a whole new level. ReNew Revolution first opened its doors in May 2011 shortly after their favorite consignment shop, Déjà vu, closed in March 2011. “We thought, this is our chance to do what we have always wanted to. We needed to do it, and we are so glad we took the chance,” says Natasha. Since opening two years ago, the sisters are overwhelmed by the success of the small business. The sisters, who are from a family of six children, grew up in Newburyport in their younger years and later moved to North Andover. “Growing up, with six children, was

a struggle for my parents. They never bought anything new because they couldn’t; everything we had was used.

It was from a thrift or consignment

store or yard sale or even the Good- will,” says Phaedra. And in turn, selling what they no longer used was their only source of income. The sisters’ parents, Susan and Victor Gaouette, had been antiques dealers at Todd Farm for more than 35 years. “Every Sunday, we would all pack up the car with antiques and small furni- ture my father refinished. We all had our job either unpacking, displaying jewelry, putting together any furniture we were all a part of it,” says Pha- edra. Even after their father passed away in 2008, their mother still sets up every Sunday. “We grew up around buying and selling used, it’s all we knew,” says Natasha. At a young age, the sisters quickly realized they could find the same designer names their friends were

wearing at a fraction of the price. On the weekends, they’d venture out with their mom and two other sisters to any and every consignment store. The sis- ters always knew they’d own their very own shop someday, and exactly where they wanted it to be. “Newburyport means a lot to our family. It’s where our parents grew up, it’s where they met, and it’s where we were all born, it’s where we laid my father to rest, it’s where our hearts are,” says Phaedra. So it goes without saying that this was the ideal place they would live out the dream of owning their own con- signment shop. “The day the lease was signed, we had two weeks to renovate the entire inside,” says Phaedra. But all on their own, they did it. From painting to carpeting to window treatments, building dressing rooms and creating re-inventive ways to dis- play clothing and accessories all on a budget. And here they are today, just over two years since opening day, and the sisters are very pleased with the outcome and overwhelmed by all the positive feedback from customers and consigners. “We were nervous we would not be able to get consigners right away, but it’s crazy how quickly word-of-mouth

spreads. Before we knew it, we were worried we would not be able to fit any- more, which is a problem we are more than happy to have,” said Natasha, laughing. Consignment has proven to be a steady business in this tough economy. Whether you are a buyer or a seller, it’s a win-win business. It is a great way to make extra money on things you are no longer using and in turn it’s a great way for shoppers to find designer pieces while keeping the budget intact. In this day age of going green, recycling, restoring, reusing is the new way of life. “We wanted to continue this life- style, we wanted to create a move-

ment

Revolution.”

we wanted to create a ReNew

S32

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

S32 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 19 Elm Park Groveland, Ma. 01834 978-372-0050
S32 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 19 Elm Park Groveland, Ma. 01834 978-372-0050
S32 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 19 Elm Park Groveland, Ma. 01834 978-372-0050
S32 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 19 Elm Park Groveland, Ma. 01834 978-372-0050
S32 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 19 Elm Park Groveland, Ma. 01834 978-372-0050

19 Elm Park Groveland, Ma. 01834

978-372-0050

27, 2013 19 Elm Park Groveland, Ma. 01834 978-372-0050 www.ElmParkFlooring.com Residential & Commercial ~ Sales

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Haverhill, MA

S33

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

When picking carpets, specialty stores are a good choice

Mark Foglietta fell in love with carpet at the age of 13. “I was helping a family friend do some work, and I saw a car- pet seam disappear. I’ve been obsessed with doing it right ever since,” he said, surrounded by carpet, tile and wood floor samples in his well-appointed Groveland shop, Elm Park Floor- ing, which he owns with business partner and girlfriend, Julie Schuck. “Julie and I have 30 years of experience each and dreamed of opening our own store,” Foglietta said. “One day we were driving over the Groveland Bridge from Haverhill just after the Mother’s Day flood, and Julie said she’d like us to open our own store, but it would have to be in a unique house-like building. As soon as she said that, we looked up and saw the “for rent” sign here. The next day we wrote a check, and seven years later, we’re still thriving.” Personalized service and edu- cating consumers is the goal of Foglietta and Schuck, which is why they take the time to do a complete inventory of a custom- er’s needs, then travel to homes with samples in order to give people exactly what will work for each individual lifestyle. “I ask customers several ques- tions before we even start,” Schuck said. “How is a certain room used? How many people and pets live in the house? What do you have now, and how is it working for you? What colors do you like?’ After the interview Schuck and Foglietta work together to come up with a variety of options to bring to people for their perusal. “People can shop at home for what they want,” said Foglietta, who encourages customers to keep samples for a couple of days to see what the colors will look like in different light and to take any pressure off of the decision- making process.

to take any pressure off of the decision- making process. Mark Foglietta, left, and Julie Schuck

Mark Foglietta, left, and Julie Schuck own Elm Park Flooring.

A misconception many people have is that local businesses are more expensive that “big box” stores or large chains that adver- tise on television. “Our prices are actually very reasonable,” Schuck said. “We did a job recently where we gave a customer a higher quality pad and carpet for less than she was quoted at a big box store. The cus- tomer was thrilled that she was able to support a local business while still saving money.” Elm Park Flooring also offers free consults, measuring, fur- niture moving and upstairs installation. Another misconception is that

the job will take a longer amount of time to complete. “We can do next-day installa- tion of flooring. A more custom order could take a week or so, but we have a quick turn-around and deliveries coming twice a week,” said Foglietta, who has the dis- tinction of being the only carpet installer from New York to Maine with the Natural Fiber Installa- tion Certification. Foglietta and Schuck carry a huge inventory of flooring choices, including all sorts of carpeting, stair runners, area rugs, bamboo/cork/pine/laminate wood flooring, ceramic and Dura Ceramic tiles, Marmoleum and

vinyl. “We also carry more floor pad styles,” Foglietta said, “the big box stores only offer two.” Their expertise is not lim- ited to homes. “We have done boats, vacation houses, librar- ies, retirement homes and churches,” Foglietta said. “I love a challenge.” Foglietta repairs damaged car- pet and can re-stretch ripples out of installed carpet. After installation, Foglietta gives customers a tutorial on how to care for their new flooring. “I come to the house and show them how to clean the floor and keep it lasting a long time,” he said.

Bryan Eaton/staff Photo

The key to his success, Foglietta said, is trust of the customer. “The secret is honesty and educa- tion. I want people to be happy, not to price gouge them, and they know that,” he said. The flooring experts at Elm Park Flooring can help you cus- tomize a gorgeous plan for your home by bringing samples to you to see in the natural light of your own surroundings. The goal is to have a happy customer and prove the motto, “Flooring is a Walk in the Park.” Elm Park Flooring is located at 19 Elm Park in Groveland. Foglietta and Schuck can be reached at 978-372-0050.

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 S34
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
S34

Rosemary Silva, owner of Rocas, with Handsome.

Bryan Eaton/staff Photo

Rocas offers unique clothing and accessories

Rocas specializes in style. Whether you’re after

a statement piece to add

to your wardrobe or a

unique gift for a friend or relative, this Newburyport boutique has what you’re looking for. Owner Rosemary Silva says her best compliment

is when customers tell her

how many compliments they get whenever they wear something pur- chased from her store. “I enjoy making people

look good,” says Rose- mary, who opened the store nine years ago

on Liberty Street. She recently moved to Unit 8 at Merrimac Landing, which boasts “a beautiful view of the Merrimack River,” she says. In this boutique, which is geared toward women

30 and older, Rosemary chooses pieces that range from “nice-casual to cock- tail” at a variety of price points. The clothing is definitely

stylish, so you have to be somewhat of an adventur- ous soul. Limited qualities are purchased to ensure that everyone is not walking around with the same thing. When customers walk into the shop, they are greeted by either Rose- mary or one of her two employees, Lynn Hutchin- son and Ellen Hart. “Somebody is always on hand to help you pick something out,” says Rosemary, who adds that we love it when a woman

is open to new possibili- ties. If they are open to play- ing and if they’re willing to experiment and try on, we can definitely get them in what looks the best on them. Some of the boutique’s biggest sellers include one-of-a-kind silk and wool shawls from Poland and jeans from Canadian designer Margaret M that are designed to eliminate “muffin top.” Rocas also makes a

point of offering pieces from local designers, including scarves from Newburyport resident Ashley Conchieri. In addition to clothing, Rocas offers a range of accessories, from jewelry and handbags to scarves and belts, and decorative items like pillows, mobiles and candlestick holders. One line from Couture Planet, a Boston-based, women-owned business, features bags made out of newspapers. “They’re

very unique,” Rosemary says. The store is open from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday through Wednesday, 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Saturday. Appointments are avail- able at other hours, and customers can also book private shopping parties, where they can shop with their friends and enjoy wine and appetizers. For more information, call 978-463-9111 or visit www. rocasboutique.net.

S35 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 A Boutique filled with the latest
S35
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
A Boutique filled with the latest fashion forward clothing & accessories
22 Liberty Street Newburyport, MA 978-463-9111

S36

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

At 17 State St. Cafe, menu is good food and hospitality

By ulrika G. Gerth

CorrespoNDeNT

Three key ingredients make 17 State Street Cafe hop on Friday and Saturday nights: burgers, beers and live music. Owner Cathy Moulton says it is an unbeatable combination to create that feeling of a home away from home right in the heart of downtown Newburyport. Featuring breakfast, lunch, dinner and a full liquor license, 17 State Street Cafe occupies a clas- sic address, a place where locals for decades have gathered for coffee and more. These days everything is homemade, from the French toast on the breakfast menu to the roasted turkey on the Thanksgiving sandwich to the cornmeal pancake with molasses butter. The latter left Mario Cantone, a star on the TV series “Sex and the City” so satisfied that he tweeted about it. “Cathy is the queen of food,” said Paterson, the general manager who likes to greet customers. “She can create anything from scratch and everybody goes crazy.” The regulars never even look at the menu. A year after the grand opening of the casual restaurant, they treat it as their second home — just like Moulton and Paterson envisioned. By now, the duo know many customers by name. Lou never strays from blueberry pancakes with fresh fruit or a vegetable omelet with feta cheese.

Dave is hooked on the English muffin. And a slew of people have made cin- namon sticks their guilty pleasure.

Even the waitresses Jes- sica Kolodziej and Kerri Fowler, or “Bubbly Jess” and “Bubbly Kerri,” as they are often called, have gained their own following. Moulton is also the brain behind the salads and soups that, alongside pas- tries and breads, made her previous venture, Cathy’s Country Kitchen in Rowley,

a destination. She brought her specials to 17 State

Street Cafe in addition to

a red bar stool, nicknamed

“Ike,” that used to belong to her grandfather, Issac Webster, and his establish- ment, Webster’s Along the Merrimac. Her mother, Kay Moulton, 82, still runs Surfland Bait and Tackle on Plum Island. Previous generations, however, were never intro-

duced to the Ooey Gooey, the double-stacked king of the burger menu, which includes 17 meat and veg-

etarian varieties. At the end of the week, local musicians set the tone as customers show up for “Beats, Burg- ers & Brews” to pair their favorite burger with their favorite pint. The calendar

is listed online. The day after may call for

a #17 Bloody Mary, another

signature item with a secret ingredient. Said Moulton, “I want people to leave with a happy stomach.”

ingredient. Said Moulton, “I want people to leave with a happy stomach.” 17 State Street. Jim

17 State Street.

Jim Vaiknoras/staff Photo

S37

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Beats,

Beats, 17 Burgers paired with the right brews you just found your new favorite dinner spot

17 Burgers paired with the right brews

you

just found your new favorite dinner spot

Burgers and Brews Available 11:30 til Closing Friday & Saturday Nights

& Enjoy Live Music from 7-9pm

17 State Street Café in the Heart of Downtown Newburyport

www.17statestreetcafe.com

& Enjoy Live Music from 7-9pm 17 State Street Café in the Heart of Downtown Newburyport

S38

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

The Best in Therapeutic and Relaxation Massage Therapeutic Massages Hot Stone Massage Rejuvenating Citrus Foot

The Best in Therapeutic and Relaxation Massage

Therapeutic Massages Hot Stone Massage Rejuvenating Citrus Foot Treatment Pre and Post Natal Massage Couples Massage Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy Reflexology

We have 4 Massage Rooms- Come relax with friends or your spouse!

We believe that pain and stress are optional find relief for yourself at Massage Only

Established in 1985 32 Water Street, Newburyport, MA 01950 (978) 465-8398 www.massageonly.com

1985 32 Water Street, Newburyport, MA 01950 (978) 465-8398 www.massageonly.com 9 Y e a r s

9 Years Running

S39

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

S39 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 At Massage Only, clients come first B

At Massage Only, clients come first

By katie lovett

StaFF Writer

The moment that clients at Massage Only in Newburyport walk through the door of the Water Street business, they notice something different: the absence of hustle-and-bustle. After all, the quiet massage clinic lives up to its name: There aren’t hairdresser chairs, or manicure and pedicure stations that custom- ers may see at other facilities. Instead, the goal of co-owners Jen- nifer LeSage and Melissa O’Brien is to offer a peaceful environment that focuses solely on massage treat- ments, offered by eight massage therapists. The clinic offers hot stone mas- sage, reflexology, rejuvenating citrus reflexology treatment, pre- and postnatal massage, couples massage, and Ashiatsu, or barefoot deep tissue massage. Through Ashiatsu, massage therapist Sarah Hebb applies deep pressure to a customer’s hips and muscles supporting and surround- ing the spine by using gliding strokes as she works barefoot along his or her back, holding on for bal- ance to bars hanging from the ceil- ing. With her size 9 foot, she has a broad instrument, she added. “It feels much like a regular mas- sage, but just on a deeper level,” Hebb said. “The majority of clients who have tried it love it. Ath- letes tend to like it a lot, runners especially.” Open seven days a week, the clinic doesn’t follow set hours or demand a membership fee — appointments are booked accord- ing to a customer’s schedule. The owners feel customers also appreciate the longevity of the business in Newburyport. It has been open since 1985. Over time, massage therapy has grown in popularity as cli- ents now incorporate it into their health care regime, O’Brien said, and consider it a good alternative to going to the doctor. It appeals

it a good alternative to going to the doctor. It appeals Bryan Eaton/staff Photos Through Ashiatsu,

Bryan Eaton/staff Photos

Through Ashiatsu, massage therapist Sarah Hebb applies deep pressure to a customer’s hips and muscles supporting and surrounding the spine by using gliding strokes as she works barefoot along his or her back at Massage Only in Newburyport.

to men and women of all ages, from athletes to businesspeople, she added. Annual vacationers to Newburyport book a visit to Mas- sage Only as part of their trips, O’Brien said. “It’s good for every single system in your body, and touch is vital. Everybody needs it,” she said. Additionally, massage can help reduce stress and treat chronic pain and discomfort in a nonin- vasive way, O’Brien and LeSage explained. “We are always getting referrals from chiropractors, physical ther- apists and M.D.s,” O’Brien said. Massage Only is located at 32 Water St., Newburyport. For more information, visit www.massa- geonly.com or call 978-465-8398. The business also offers self-service gift certificates that can be purchased through its website. Self-service gift certificates are also available at the office.

S40

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

S40 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 • Estate Planning • Long-term Care Planning

Estate Planning

Long-term Care Planning

Medicaid Eligibility and Application Assistance

GuardianshipGuardianshipGuardianship andandand ConservatorshipConservatorshipConservatorship

ProbateProbateProbate andandand EstateEstateEstate AdministrationAdministrationAdministration

“If you Don’t Plan Your Estate, The State will plan it for you.” “If you
“If you Don’t Plan Your Estate, The State will plan it for you.”
“If you Don’t Plan Your Estate, T
he State will plan it for you.”
Margot G. Birke, Attorney at Law
Named Massachusetts NAELA Chapter Member of the year.
978.465.5407
Elder Law Solutions
Admitted in MA and NY

One Harris Street • Newburyport www.elderlaw-solutions.com

978.465.5407 Elder Law Solutions Admitted in MA and NY One Harris Street • Newburyport www.elderlaw-solutions.com
978.465.5407 Elder Law Solutions Admitted in MA and NY One Harris Street • Newburyport www.elderlaw-solutions.com
978.465.5407 Elder Law Solutions Admitted in MA and NY One Harris Street • Newburyport www.elderlaw-solutions.com

S41

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

How Elder Law Solutions began

My Dad circa World War II

My Dad circa World War II

By marGot G. Birke, eSq.

On Memorial Day 1994, my father unexpectedly (isn’t that the way it always happens) suffered a massive stroke. At the time he was living in Wash- ington, D.C., and I was in New York City.

As soon as I got word that he had fallen ill, I drove down to D.C. and into a situation that would alter my life forever. Although I was an attorney, I was entirely ignorant of the world I was about to enter.

world of hospitals, care giving, Medicare, nurs-

ing homes and Medicaid. Fortunately for my father and me, an attorney friend of his insisted that he execute a durable power of attorney for finances and health care while he was in the hospital. My father couldn’t

write very well, but luckily he was aware of what

happening and the importance of the docu-

ment he was signing. Without his ability to sign

the power of attorney, I would not have been able to arrange my father’s affairs without resorting to the court system and seeking a guardianship.

the days that followed, I arranged for my

father to be transferred to a hospital in New York, terminated his lease in D.C., closed his bank accounts, opened new ones, and began a journey of investigation and discovery into to the whys and wherefores of long-term care. It was not easy to get the information I needed. I got little information from his doctors, and what information I did get, I didn’t understand. And in

three months my father spend in the hospital, I

never spoke to a social worker! After three months of recovery and rehabilita- tion, my father came home to live with me. I had

idea what this was going to mean in my life.

I knew no one who could help explain things and guide me through the process. I remember visiting a nursing home and inquiring as to the

monthly charges. I was told $10,000 a month — and that was in 1994!

I was not aware of the existence of elder law attorneys nor that one could assist me with

the legal aspects, or geriatric care manag- ers to help me navigate the medical maze. I had to attend to it all myself — and it wasn’t easy. So many details to attend to, options to investigate and decisions to make. That’s when I decided to switch my area of practice to Elder Law. I realized that

I wanted to help people find their way

through the maze of health care, legal docu- ments and public benefits systems, and share the knowledge I gained. At Elder Law Solutions we look at the

big picture.

I am proud to say that we

take a holistic approach to our clients’ problems

— not just concentrating on the legal require- ments, but assisting at every step of the way in order to ease the decision-making process based on knowledge and an understanding of the available options.

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 S42
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
S42

Serving residential, commercial and municipal properties, DoodyCalls’ year-round dog and cat pet waste removal service takes care of the most time- consuming and least pleasant part of pet ownership.

DoodyCalls takes care of the less pleasant aspects of pet ownership

On any given day, Doody- Calls technicians hear the same comments: “How’s business?” (answer: “pick- ing up”); “What’s new” (“same stuff, different day”). Joking aside, the one question they take seriously is: “Why would anyone have someone else clean up after their pet?” “We offer a service for busy people who love their pets,” answers DoodyCalls pet waste removal ser- vice owner/operator Joe Gliottone, a Newburyport

resident. “People employ businesses to clean their homes, shovel their drive- ways and mow their lawns so they can spend qual- ity time with family and friends. So why not hire a local company to take care of the most time-consuming and least pleasant part of pet ownership?” Providing year-round dog and cat pet waste removal services throughout Essex County, DoodyCalls offers cleanup services to home- owners, and pet waste

stations and pickup to multi-dwelling residential properties and municipal parks. Armed with rakes, shovels and bags, Doody- Calls technicians meticu- lously crisscross yards and other outdoor spaces to pick up what pets leave behind. DoodyCalls also offers a popular complete litter box service for cats. Fresh, clean and covered litter boxes are exchanged as needed, and the DoodyCalls technician never needs to enter the home.

DoodyCalls’ residential rates are based on number of dogs and size of yard, or number of litter boxes, and frequency of visits, rang- ing from weekly, biweekly, monthly or one-time clean- ups. Additional services include cleaning, disinfect- ing and deodorizing decks, patios, dog runs and ken- nels. Technicians are fully insured, dress in uniforms and drive clearly identified vehicles. Scooping tools are disinfected between each client visit to eliminate the

possibility of spreading diseases found in dog waste, a source of E. coli bacteria. Complete satisfaction is guaranteed. With winter approaching, Gliottone comments that pets don’t stop going when the weather gets bad. “We are just as busy in wintertime as in spring and summer when people spend more time outdoors,” he says. “Another important DoodyCalls customer are elderly folks who are not able to get outside to walk

or clean up after their pets, especially during inclement weather. It’s nice to know we may make it easier for pet owners to care for their four-legged companions.” A locally owned and oper- ated franchise, DoodyCalls is part of the nation’s larg- est full-service pet waste removal franchise. For more information or a free esti- mate, visit www.DoodyCalls. com or call 800-DoodyCalls (366-3922). Holiday, house- warming and birthday gift certificates are available.

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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

S43 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
S43 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
S43 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

S44

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Thrift store donations feed the needy at Leeward

For the past several years, Leeward Industries has successfully carried out its goal of recycling donated clothing and other used items and turning them into food for the needy. Through the sales of donated items at its thrift shops in Salisbury and York, Maine, Leeward Industries has donated $350,000 in cash and $150,000 in merchandise to local charities. Donations to the stores begin to grow as the holidays approach, and the best way to help Lee- ward continue its mis- sion of “Recycle, Reuse and Renew for Charity” is through donations of items ready for the store floor rather than the washing machine. The donations are sorted, inspected and displayed as merchandise by the Lee- ward Light volunteers and employees. Donations that are wrinkled, unclean or with smells can end up in the trash bin rather than helping people in need. Low-priced leftovers from yard sales with price stick- ers attached often require more labor to clean them than the item is worth. “The conditions of donations is critical,” Rob Werner, president of Leeward Light, said. “The cost of handling, storing and removing items that are not sellable actually has a negative impact on our charitable donations.”Another com- mon issue is that people want to bring Christmas items in July. Because the store can’t store a lot of items, they ask that

the store can’t store a lot of items, they ask that Christmas donations come in November.

Christmas donations come in November. About 85 percent of all donations are recycled in some way, and the good donations have gone a long way to helping those in need. The Leeward Light Thrift Store in Salis- bury is filled with an array of clothing, fur- niture, housewares, decorations, electronics

and much more. The proceeds from store operations are donated to local food pantries, including The Petten- gill House in Salisbury, Our Neighbors’ Table in Amesbury and Com- munity Services of Newburyport. “The real idea is to keep it local,” Werner said. “The big guys, like the Sal- vation Army, have become

such big corporations, they don’t have as much of a local focus.” Along with the cash donations, Leeward Light has a voucher system set up with food pantries around the region that allows charities to send people in for free clothing and other items. The thrift store accepts all types of clothing, as well as handbags, books,

tapes, DVDs, games, paintings, pottery, dishes, pots and pans, furniture, tools, sheets and more. It can’t accept items like mattresses, box springs, computers, small TVs, large appliances, flam- mable liquids or other hazardous items. Prospective donors can visit the store’s website at www.leewardlight.org for more information about

donating. The store at 126 Bridge Road (Route 1) in Salisbury accepts donations accepts donations Tues - Sat 9 a.m. to 3 p.m and Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Since starting the thrift stores, Werner has been blown away by the recep- tion of people in the area. “The most rewarding thing is there are so many generous people out there who want to help,” he said.

S45

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Over other to local Thanks $125,000 charities food to pantries last you! donated year &

Thank For Support! Your You

donated y e a r & Thank For Support! Your You Leeward Light ~ charitable ~
donated y e a r & Thank For Support! Your You Leeward Light ~ charitable ~
donated y e a r & Thank For Support! Your You Leeward Light ~ charitable ~

Leeward Light

~ charitable ~

Thrift Store

Recycle, Re-use and Renew for Charity

Brand name clothes, furniture and household items at a fraction of their retail prices.

Tues.-Sat. 9am - 5pm Sunday 10am - 4pm Closed Mondays

We accept donations of gently used clothes and household items! Call to have furniture donations picked up. Donations accepted Tues-Sat 9am-3pm Sundays 10am-2pm

up. Donations accepted Tues-Sat 9am-3pm Sundays 10am-2pm 126 Bridge Rd., Salisbur y, MA 978.465.1141
up. Donations accepted Tues-Sat 9am-3pm Sundays 10am-2pm 126 Bridge Rd., Salisbur y, MA 978.465.1141

126 Bridge Rd., Salisbur y, MA

978.465.1141

www.leewardindustries.org

Year Round Fun at the Winter Experience the thrill of riding on the steepest snow
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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
S46
S47 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Outdoor Gravity Orb (OGO) at Amesbury Sports Park.

Bryan Eaton/Staff photo

Amesbury Sports Park offers activities for all seasons

The Amesbury Sports Park is a place like no other. The park boasts the steepest and fastest snow tubing hill in New England and offers up to 12 lanes for snow tubing. There are currently nearly 1,000 tubes that can be operated when the park is at full capacity. Two lifts service the hill – a conveyor belt lift that guests stand on and an old-fashioned handle tow lift that allows riders to sit in their tube as they are pulled up to the top of the hill.

Once at the top of the hill, guests are permitted to link up in groups and slide down together or ride solo. There is an onsite pub, which offers traditional pub fare including pizza, burgers, salads, appetizers, hot choc- olate, cold beer and more. In warmer months, the Amesbury Sports Park is home to extreme obstacle course races such as the Warrior Dash, Spartan Race, Dirty Girl Mud Run and more. The Annual Brew Fest in September features more than 100

beers, live bands and BBQ and draws upwards of 7,000 people to the event. Large festival concerts are also on the docket, with dates and details coming soon. The park is also home to Zorb riding, the sport of rolling down a large hill in an 11 foot inflatable sphere. There are two different types of Zorbs – water and harness. Up to 3 people can enter the water Zorb with 10 gallons of water. When the ball is rolled down the hill, guests slosh around like they are in a self-contained

water slide. The har- ness ball allows guests to remain dry as they strap themselves into a 7-point harness. When the har- ness Zorb is rolled down the hill, guests tumble head over heels all the way to the bottom. It is truly an experi- ence you will never forget! Summer tubing is also offered in warm weather months. It’s just like snow tubing but without the snow. Guests ride up the conveyor belt lift, then sit on the hard bottomed tube and ride down 3 Neveplast

(artificial ski surface) lanes. People will get slightly wet as intermittent mist is used to keep the tracks lubricated and fast. The park features arti- ficial turf fields which can be used for soccer, rugby, lacrosse, football, field hockey, and cricket. There is a full service function hall onsite that fea- tures cuisine by renowned chef Kevin Jacques. The private function room can accommodate up to 150 guests, or the entire facil- ity itself can be rented for

private outings. Relay races and obstacle course pack- ages are available for team building outings, and snow/ summer tubing birthday party packages are offered for kids. Offsite catering is available to fit any budget. Monthly wine dinners are well attended and typically sell out weeks in advance. Reservations are required for the 4-course gourmet meals perfectly paired with sommelier-selected wines. The Amesbury Sports Park is truly your one stop for fun in any season!

Newburyport Clients are Getting in Shape! "I am much more toned and I have a
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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
S48

S49

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Find success at

Get In Shape for Women

September 27, 2013 Find success at Get In Shape for Women Donna Attenborough, Ali Scarry, Kelly

Donna Attenborough, Ali Scarry, Kelly Shafer, Ella Becton

Courtesy photo

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S50

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Oregano Pizzeria refuses to skimp on quality

By Jim Sullivan

CorrespoNDeNT

Sometimes, you just have to stick it out. When Claude Elias started up Oregano Piz- zeria & Ristorante in downtown Newburyport in May 2008, he was hoping

for some luck. But luck, as

it turns out, wasn’t on his

side. “We had a three-month honeymoon, then the stock market crashed in Sep- tember of that year,” Elias said. “Then, in the winter of 2009, we had over 140 inches of snow or some- thing like that. So, it was a

disaster. I said to myself, ‘I don’t know, I think I made

a mistake.’ The economy

tanked. The weather (stunk), and when people went out, they went out to the places they knew.” Scary stuff. A less expe- rienced businessman might have panicked, but Elias, who has also owned Seabrook’s Medical Laser Technologies for the past 20 years, had the capital and the guts to stick it out. “I had that business sense,” Elias said. “And rather than sticking my head in my shell like a turtle, I basically stuck my neck out further and said, ‘If we are to survive 2009, this is what we need to do.’ You don’t panic, and you don’t cut corners. You stay true to your convictions. And we did it. We kept enough staff so that when people showed up, we had enough. When you are short-staffed, people get turned off.”

Another place where Elias and company refused

to cut corners was in the

product itself. Oregano kept

importing its mozzarella

di bufala straight from

Italy and refused to skimp.

Slowly but surely, the busi- ness began turning around, eventually growing from 15 to 17 percent every year

since. “It’s been an amazing, amazing turnaround,” Elias said. “Even this year, we’re beating 2012 by 17 percent. I’m actu- ally surprised myself. I thought we would grow in single digits, but we are still showing double-digit growth. Business is phe- nomenal. This summer,

the town was super-busy, and the fall-into-winter season is our second-busi- est season.” A resident of Newburyport himself, the Lebanese-born Elias said the menu reflects his heritage, with such non-Italian dishes as Lebanese falafel and lamb kebabs, as well as the Sicilian roots of his wife, Laura Messina-Elias. “The No. 1 pasta dish in the restaurant is, surprise, surprise, the chicken par- migiana,” Elias said. “We make it all from scratch, and people love it. We have customers who eat with us twice a week.” Oregano’s pizza is not to

be ignored either, recently

winning Northshore maga- zine’s Editor’s Choice for

Best Gourmet Pizza. But perhaps Elias’ proudest accomplishment to come from what he calls his

proudest accomplishment to come from what he calls his Oregano’s Pizzeria and Ristorante. first and last

Oregano’s Pizzeria and Ristorante.

first and last restaurant is the inclusion of al fresco dining on the side of Inn Street, something that has caught on quite well in the

downtown area. “We fought for it; we were the pioneers,” Elias said. “And once we got it, everyone else was granted

permission to put chairs and tables on town prop- erty. And I’ll tell you, noth- ing puts a smile on my face more than walking around

Jim VaiknoraS/Staff Photo

downtown and seeing all the people eating outdoors. I think that has added such a layer of depth to the town.”

S51

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Located in theHeart of HistoricDowntown Newburyport Let’s Go To Oregano! Oregano… An award-winning establishment since

Located in theHeart of HistoricDowntown Newburyport

Let’s Go To Oregano!
Let’s Go To Oregano!

Oregano…An award-winning establishment since 2008

Oregano Pizzeria and Ristorante offers authentic hand stretched gourmet pizza made with san marzano tomatoes topped with the freshest ingredients and finished in our signature brick oven imported from Genoa, Italy. Al dente pasta, Italian and Mediterranean entrees, fresh salads, paninis and house made desserts will leave you wanting for more! Oregano now offers 30 wines, by the glass - the largest selection of Italian wines from the premier regions of Italy. We also have 8 beers on tap, each week we feature a different local microbrew! Enjoy it all either in our warm and cozy dining room, or on our beautiful patio located on Inn Street.

room, or on our beautiful patio located on Inn Street. Voted Best of North Shore Pizza

Voted Best of North Shore Pizza for 2013 by North Shore Magazine!

16 Pleasant Street • Newburyport, MA 978-462-5013 • www.oreganopizzeria.com

S52

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Fostering better attorney-client relationships:

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

By DonalD J. Fournier, eSq.

QUESTION 1:

After a prolonged illness, you’re diagnosed with a rare form of

lymphoma. Left untreated, your life expectancy is less than a year. At the time of diagnosis, chemo- therapy is the treatment of choice but is effective in producing a temporary remission in less than half of all patients. The disease has otherwise advanced rapidly and impacted your decision mak- ing ability. Lacking competency

– the ability to understand and

appreciate the nature and con- sequences of your decisions — who then decides your outcome and what is the basis for those

decisions? Should the collective sentiment of family and friends prevail? Your best interests as determined by the medical com- munity? A court of law? What

if any of these actions best safe-

guards your interests?

QUESTION 2:

While taking daily medications prescribed by your doctor, you’re out driving and encounter a ran- dom traffic stop. Sensing signs

of impairment, the police officer asks you to step out of your vehicle and voluntarily submit to

a field sobriety test. What should

you do? If you’re unsure as to how you would respond to the situations described above, chances are you’re not as well prepared for all of today’s legal challenges as you could be. These are but two of the many legal issues that can affect each of us at any moment. Its there- fore important to be prepared and relying on a web-based boil- erplate or similar solution can fall short of the protection that can be obtained when working with your attorney to tailor a solution specific to your needs. Whether it’s then the day-to-day considerations like those detailed above, or less frequent events like buying a home or planning your

estate, the best way to ensure all your needs are anticipated and

the best way to ensure all your needs are anticipated and Donald J. Fournier and Associates.

Donald J. Fournier and Associates.

protected is to establish a rela- tionship with your attorney. The goal of our office as example, is to establish relation- ships with our clients so that

just as with their doctor, they feel comfortable approaching us concerning their legal needs, throughout their lives, and as the need arises. It’s also important whenever possible to engage legal counsel before, not after, a legal issue arises. I can’t tell you the number of calls I receive from recent home buyers who, having not retained an attorney to assist with their purchase, are instead now seeking assistance with issues that will cost thou- sands to resolve, and which could have been addressed by a simple review of their P&S. So getting back to our ques- tions, how did you do? Substituted judgment with respect to medical treatment is a legal doctrine whereby patients, unable to make deci- sions for themselves, have

their medical decisions made for them. The standard for substituted judgment is not the substitution of one’s own judgment for that of someone else’s. It’s instead a process of attempting to arrive at the same decision that would be made by the affected individual, if that individual were able to make the decision on their own. To a large extent, up until as recently as 1977, physicians would often routinely make care decisions based on what they believed to be in the best interests of their patients. Indeed, based on their education and training, wasn’t the patient’s doctor in the best position to determine their treatment plan. Today however, with continuous advances in healthcare and technology, the determination as to how and when life should be prolonged has become more complex. Having an advance healthcare directive (or sometimes known as a living will) is a critical element in ensuring

CourtESy Photo

that your interests are met. A healthcare directive defines in advance, during a time when you are competent, what treatment options should be pursued and when life-prolonging measures are to be stopped, taking into consideration the duration and quality of life that might result. It is but one of many legal con- siderations that can and should be addressed sooner rather than later with your attorney. And for our prescription medi- cated driver? A driver’s blood alcohol level is but one indication of impairment and therefore pass- ing this test, but failing a field sobriety test, can still lead to your arrest. This is true even if there is no alcohol in your system. More importantly, you don’t even need to be driving. In some instances, simply being behind the driver’s wheel of a parked vehicle has been conclusive of driving while impaired. Know the effects of your medications on your system before you drive. If you start a

new medication, be sure you know whether it’s likely to make you tired or impair your judgment. If

it does, don’t drive – just as you

wouldn’t had you been drinking.

If instead you make the mistake of driving and are then stopped, whether or not you should submit to a field sobriety test unfortu- nately is not a simple “yes” or “no” answer. It will depend on a number of factors, including your prior driving record and other factors unique to your personal history. Under Massachusetts law, you are not required to submit to

a field sobriety test nor is your

refusal admissible against you. If you instead voluntarily submit, the test allows police to gather evidence against you which is admissible. However, as a conse- quence of not submitting to the test, and to rightfully eliminate any risk of an impaired driver being on the road, you will be placed under arrest and charged with operating under the influ- ence (OUI). In this case there will be no evidence to prove the charges beyond the possibility of witnesses who had observed you driving or the arresting officer’s testimony – hence the value of the sobriety test to obtain evidence against you. There’s also a host of other factors, especially for repeat OUI offenders that could have sig- nificant implications. Therefore the best answer to this question will depend on your unique situ- ation and result from a consulta- tion with your attorney. Again, if you’re unsure as to your preparedness to the ques- tions above, or whether or not in general all of your legal needs are met, please consult with an attor- ney. Use this opportunity to then start developing a relationship with your attorney so that they might better anticipate your needs. The Law offices of Donald J. Fournier & Associates is located at 33 West Main Street, George- town, MA 01833, and can be reached at (978)769-5383. Or visit our website at: www.westmainla-

woffice.com.

S53

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Professional. - Bankruptcy Responsible. - Business Law Accessible. - Contracts - Elder Law - General
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We Pay CASH for Gold Jewelry, Silver and Coins 158 Bridge Rd., Salisbury, MA •
We Pay CASH for
Gold Jewelry, Silver and Coins
158 Bridge Rd., Salisbury, MA • (508) 633-9696
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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
S54

S55

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Great service, top prices at Cash for Gold Seacoast

Gold prices are back near their all-time high, making it a great time to cash in on unused or bro- ken jewelry that can be easily turned into cash in your pocket. But while the businesses may look alike, not all Cash for Gold shops are the same. At his Cash for Gold Seacoast shop on Route 1 in Salisbury, just over the Newburyport bridge, owner Charlie Stevens believes his customers keep coming back because he puts them at ease and gives them con- fidence they are getting the best deal. “I try to personalize the transaction,” he said. “Instead of going into a pawn shop atmosphere, you are going into a place where we’re very friendly and trying to accommodate individual needs.” Stevens has traded gold in the commodities mar- ket since 1980 and has plenty of experience with other Cash for Gold and pawn shops, where people feel pressured or intimi- dated over selling their jewelry, some of which may have sentimental value as well. For people thinking about selling some jew- elry, he said they should go through and find bro- ken jewelry or pieces they haven’t used in years that they won’t miss. Some people are in need of cash quickly and sell some things that have more sentimental value to them. Stevens listens to their situ- ations and does whatever he can to help people. Stevens stresses that

does whatever he can to help people. Stevens stresses that Cash for Gold in Salisbury people

Cash for Gold in Salisbury

people going into a Cash for Gold shop should feel no pressure to sell. Instead, they should find a person willing to help you figure out what is worth selling. “I’m glad to evaluate

everything you bring in,” he said. “Sometimes I tell people to hold on to it.” Customers can even come into his business for free appraisals. He knows every Cash for Gold business says they offer the best prices,

but Stevens said he pays significantly more than the competition in most transactions. And almost all of his customers are repeat customers. Gold prices are updated

in real-time at the shop, allowing him to max out what he can pay to poten- tial sellers. And he pays cash for all transactions. His business has been successful, he said, because he has a lot of satisfied

customers who trust they’ve gotten a good value for their gold. “A lot of times people are pleasantly surprised,” Stevens said. “You’d be surprised how much some things are worth.”

S56

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

DR. GEORGE J PAPANICOLAOU
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S57 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 Jim VaiknoraS/Staff Photo Cornerstone Family practice.
S57
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
Jim VaiknoraS/Staff Photo
Cornerstone Family practice.
Dr. Papanicolaou wants his
patients tell him they feel great!
Dr. George Papanicolau is
the kind of doctor who listens
well, prescribes health and
practices traditional medicine
while respecting and employ-
ing alternative approaches to
HealthCare.
“OneLife LiveWell” is Dr.
Papanicolaou’s battle cry and
it defines his unique approach
to WHOLE LIFE HEALTH. At
your annual wellness visit,
unusual calls to health from Dr.
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Dr. George will discuss your
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supplements, exercise, diet and
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you LiveWell and Live Better!
To that end, Cornerstone has
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Live Well Nutrition is designed
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Health Care today should and
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that connection, but in Rowley,
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Dr. Papanicolaou has been
practicing in the Greater
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and has been a family practice
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Like us on Facebook at Cor-
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or call the office to schedule
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The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 S58
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
S58

Smith Motors in Haverhill

Smith Motors caters to a variety of customers

By Jim Sullivan

CorrespoNDeNT

In a world of conglomera-

tions, it’s good to know the little guy can get it done. “It’s unusual to have a business that is owned 75 years by the same family,” said Jim Buckley, general manager of Smith Motor

Salesr. “In this day and age of Group 1 and AutoNation and all these big dealer groups, it’s good to have one store owned by a father and a son. That’s pretty unusual.”

A throwback to a

different time, the

Haverhill-based Mercedes- Benz dealership started out in the Studebaker business three-quarters of a century ago and is now one of the five oldest Mercedes dealer- ships in the country, pulling customers from such towns as Andover, North Andover, Newburyport, Westford, Wilmington and across southern New Hampshire. “The economy seems to be pretty solid right now,” Buckley said. “Certainly for kids coming out of college, it’s not, but our bread-and- butter cars are moving as

well as they ever have.” With the company for the

last 19 years, Buckley has seen his ups and downs. “Business has been very steady for the last three years,” Buckley said. “We’ve increased anywhere from 5 to 7 percent each year. It’s pretty much been the same. 2008 and 2009 were not banner years. When the demand is low, production decreases. So it’s not like they are going to keep build- ing cars, and we have got to find a place to put them. We kind of just weathered the storm. Sales went down. We kind of tightened up every- where, and then they started coming back in 2010 a little

bit, and then ’11 and ’12 were pretty good years and ’13 is following suit, as well.” Buckley said that busi- ness picks up for Smith Motors in the fall going into early winter. “Our best months of the year without question are October, November and December,” Buckley said. “That and a combination of Mercedes programs get- ting stronger and people, especially for businesses that had a pretty good year, it may not be a bad time to dump some cash or get some expenses off the books.”

A high-end product like

a Mercedes might seem to

preclude certain types from buying, but Buckley said he has seen them all. “At one time, it was 45- to 65-year-old men,” Buck- ley said of Smith Motors’ clientele. “Now, it has completely changed, and

we are right there when kids get out of college to the grave. And that is both men and women, 50-50 now.

I think that by having more

models, we are appealing to

more customers.” The new models are exactly what Buckley and company are looking

forward to showing off

as their busy season gets going. “This year, we are look- ing at a big fourth quarter,” Buckley said. “We have a couple of pretty important selections in the brand. We have a new CLA com- ing out, which has a base price of $29,900. That is positioned below our least expensive model right now, which is the C Class, so that

should get people into the brand that much quicker. We also have our high-line S Class, which is about $100,000.00. That is getting completely redone.”

S59

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

S59 The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 We Make Dreams Come True of Haverhill,

We Make Dreams Come True

of Haverhill, Inc.

420 River Street Haverhill, MA 01832

978-372-2552

www.onlymercedes.com

of Haverhill, Inc. 420 River Street Haverhill, MA 01832 978-372-2552 www.onlymercedes.com

Smith Motor Sales

Smith Motor Sales

Introducing The All New 2014 E-Class
Introducing The All New 2014 E-Class
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013 S60
The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013
S60

Nick Katsoulis of American Marine and Boat Sales.

Bryan Eaton/Staff Photo

It’s smooth sailing at American Marine & Boat Sales

By ulrika G. Gerth

CorrespoNDeNT

In a market rife with competi- tors, American Marine & Boat Sales has risen to the top. Owner Nick Katsoulis credits the com- pany’s unwavering focus on integ- rity to explain why customers keep coming back. American Marine is the largest

brokerage firm north of Boston and in southern New Hampshire, specializing in boats 18 feet to 65 feet. Founded in 1996, American Marine & Boat Sales has bro- kered the purchase and sale of thousands of preowned power boats. The company occupies an office at The Winward Yacht Yard located at 58R Merrimac

St. nestled between Michael’s Harborside and Plum Island Cof- fee Roasters. American Marine’s corporate Web site can be found at www.usedpowerboats.com, where the entire inventory is available. The company also lists all of its inventory on an MLS System, and various other websites. American Marine and Boat

Sales boat yard is located just over the bridge in Salisbury, right on Route 1. Many boats are on display at all times. Nick also owns Gary Voller Yacht Sales and Brokerage with offices in Falmouth and Danvers. Customers come from all over the Eastern Seaboard, mostly New England and Florida. But the Web site also attracts

customers from across the world. Katsoulis has shipped power boats as far as Australia, England and South America. And thanks to repeat referrals, he has sold many boats multiple times. If you are thinking of buying or selling a power boat, call Nick Katsoulis American Marine & Boat Sales 978-462-2323.

S61

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Live the good life… 46’ Post 46 II Year: 1991 Current Price: US$ 199,995 Located
Live the good life…
46’ Post 46 II
Year: 1991
Current Price: US$ 199,995
Located in Salisbury, MA
Hull Material: Fiberglass
Engine/Fuel Type: Twin diesel
YW# 1857-2474644
See more info online at
www.AmericanSellsBoats.com
40’ Mainship 400
Trawler
- PRICED TO SELL!
Year: 2004
Current Price: US$ 218,900
Located in Newburyport, MA
Hull Material: Fiberglass
Engine/Fuel Type: Single diesel
YW# 1857-2512180
See more info online at
www.AmericanSellsBoats.com
38’ Sea Ray 380 Aft
Cabin - PRICE JUST REDUCED!
Year: 2001
Current Price: US$ 129,900
Located in Newburyport, MA
Hull Material: Fiberglass
Engine/Fuel Type: Twin gas
YW# 1857-2564468
See more info online at
www.AmericanSellsBoats.com
30’ Robalo 305
Walkaround
Year: 2008
Current Price: US$ 148,500
Located in Salisbury, MA
Hull Material: Fiberglass
Engine/Fuel Type: Twin gas
YW# 1857-2633452
See more info online at
www.AmericanSellsBoats.com
See our full selection of pre-owned boats for sale at www.AmericanSellsBoats.com

Since 1996 New England’s Largest Pre-Owned Power Boat Broker

1996 New England’s Largest Pre-Owned Power Boat Broker Located at Winward Yacht Yard 978-462-2323

Located at Winward Yacht Yard

978-462-2323

www.AmericanSellsBoats.com

Office located at 58R Merrimac Street, Newburyport, MA

American Marine & Boat Sales

The Power Boat Specialists

S62

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

from ideas to R eality With sophisticated fashions and intrinsic value in mind, Donna Michaels
from ideas to R eality With sophisticated fashions and intrinsic value in mind, Donna Michaels

from ideas to

R eality

With sophisticated fashions and intrinsic value in mind, Donna Michaels is proud to offer hundreds of residential and commercial broadloom, roll runners and area rugs that uniquely address today’s emerging home decor trends.

Let us assist you in our showroom and take the time to learn your needs for the perfect floor that best fits your lifestyle and budget.

We also offer custom binding and quality carpet rems at

50 to 70% off

in our Binding Shop.

carpet • hardwood • vinyl • tile

Donna Michaels Ltd

The Carpet & Flooring Store

149 State Street, Newburyport, MA 01950 978.463.4200 • 978.463.4201 (fax) • www.donnamichaels.com

S63

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

More than meets the eye at Donna Michaels

With 20 years in the flooring business, Donna Michaels Car- pet and Flooring owner Michael Souza had a clear vision for his new location at 149 State St. in Newburyport. Rather than just tell people his

flooring store was different than the rest, he wanted to show them by creating an inviting atmo- sphere where customers could browse and ask questions without

a heavy sales pitch. “People come in and comment, ‘You have the most attractive store,’” Souza said. “We want to have a more casual, relaxed type of environment.”

Souza opened the new location on State Street last year. Not only did he want the new store to have

a more upscale, calm feel, he also

wanted to make sure the product reflected the demands of the diverse Greater Newburyport community. Having a connection with that customer base is something Souza stresses in his business, he said. He and his staff are all local, and Souza makes a point of giving back to the community, whether it be through donations of product or a check to sponsor a charitable effort. Because the Newburyport area has a wide range of tastes and incomes, he tries to offer a little of everything in the store, from the high-end to the more affordable brands. So while he carries the luxuri- ous Louis A. Dabberi flooring line, which is difficult to find at most other stores, he also sells more practical rugs and flooring solu- tions for people with a smaller budget. On Friday and Saturday mornings, the staff open a bind- ing shop where they sell carpet remnants of all sizes. The store is also affiliated with the International Designers Guild, enabling employees to give expert design advice and innova- tive products.

to give expert design advice and innova- tive products. Michael Souza of Donna Michaels on State

Michael Souza of Donna Michaels on State Street in Newburyport.

“Because we are part of the design guild, it enables us to be at the cutting edge of style,” Souza said. “People come to my store and they are blown away by what we have here.” What Souza wants all custom- ers to experience is friendly ser- vice and advice. Souza will even come to customers’ homes and

give them a free estimate. His staff is also trained to answer almost every flooring question. Dana Sands specializes in staging, space planning and color coordination. Casey Delibac, the store man- ager, recently went to Mohawk Flooring University to further his knowledge of all the latest

flooring trends. “We’re not here to make a com- mission, we’re here to work with the customers,” Souza said. That approach has earned Souza a legion of repeat custom- ers over the 14 years he’s owned the store. It even introduces him to some new ones. When a recent customer to the

store showed him what he wanted to do, Souza gave him an honest answer — it was not going to work the way the person had hoped. Instead, he referred the customer to a floor refinisher, losing the sale but gaining a future customer. “He called me, and said, ‘Mike, that’s exactly the look I wanted,’” Souza said.

S64

The Daily News • Friday, September 27, 2013

Excellent food, reasonable prices bring customers back to Family’s

By Jim Sullivan CorreSponDent

They call it Family’s because that’s what it is. “The Chin Chin Res- taurant is under new ownership,” said Ben Li, the manager of Family’s Chinese Restaurant in Salisbury. “The new name is Family’s Restaurant and the food is better than it ever was.” In the restaurant busi- ness for 28 years, Li’s father and Family’s owner, Shun Feng had been looking for a larger location and sold his 13-year Seabrook res- taurant when he heard that Salisbury’s Chin Chin was closing. “It’s such a big restau- rant,” Li said. “We had to hire a lot of people (upfront) but in the back, it’s all family. We are fam- ily-owned and operated, so we are very, very stable and

committed.”

Hailing from Malden, the

Li family does all of the

cooking. Li’s sister, Qing is behind the bar, his brother- in-law, Joe makes all of the deliveries, his mother, Yun takes the phone orders, and Shun Feng is the main chef.

In business for the past five

months, showing the kind

of commitment only a fam-

ily can and it has made an impression. “Whoever comes here keeps coming back,” Li said

“They now know that this is a family restaurant.” When they arrived, the

Li family painted the build-

ing both inside and outside, repaved the entire parking lot and installed a brand- new, enclosed, full-service bar. “We enclosed the bar because we want to leave the dining room for the families,” Li said. Keeping the menu similar

room for the families,” Li said. Keeping the menu similar Family’s Chinese Restaurant. to Chin Chin’s,

Family’s Chinese Restaurant.

to Chin Chin’s, Shun Feng only modified most of the recipes, adding just four Pad Thai dishes along the way. “We’ve only added a few things and we took a few

things out,” Li said. We also changed the price. We want to make everything reasonable.” The Hawaiian Pineapple Chicken is a popular dish and the Pu Pu Platter for

Jim VaiknoraS/Staff Photo

two features seven items under $20. The lunch com- bos are popular as well, running under $7 a piece and all the dinner entrees are available in two sizes. “People tell us the food is

excellent, outstanding. And they are definitely coming back,” Li said. “And they have kept their promise. They all come back. We have customers that are coming in four times a week. It’s been getting better and better.” Family’s also covers a large delivery area includ- ing, Amesbury, Salisbury, Seabrook, Newburyport and its Newbury border area. Li said that sales have risen an estimated 5 to 10 percent a month since Family’s April debut and a lot of their new customers are coming in based on word-of-mouth. “We hope to see the busi- ness stabilize,” he said. “We hope to keep providing better service, better food. Right now, we’re still in the transition process. But the food should be the same because everybody that works here is dedicated. We are confident in our product.”

works here is dedicated. We are confident in our product.” New Ownership F o r m

New Ownership

dedicated. We are confident in our product.” New Ownership F o r m e r l

Formerly Chin Chin

Lunch Specials Dine in or Take Out Delivery Available Open 7 Days A Week

www.familysalisbury.com

139 Elm St. Salisbur y, Ma • 978-463-4332

in or Take Out Delivery Available Open 7 Days A Week www.familysalisbury.com 139 Elm St. Salisbur
in or Take Out Delivery Available Open 7 Days A Week www.familysalisbury.com 139 Elm St. Salisbur
in or Take Out Delivery Available Open 7 Days A Week www.familysalisbury.com 139 Elm St. Salisbur
in or Take Out Delivery Available Open 7 Days A Week www.familysalisbury.com 139 Elm St. Salisbur