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Get Wet!

What else is summer good for if you can't have a little fun with some water? Getting wet and having some fun doesn't mean the learning has to be put on hold. With homemade bubbles, water story cards, and a water relay your child will soak up the summer with a week's worth of wet activities that keep the learning flowing.

Table of Contents
Week 8: Get Wet! Play Water Freeze Tag Homemade Fizzy Water Make a Water Well An Ice Experiment with THE CAT IN THE HAT Water Balloon Tag Homemade Slip and Slide Arthur's Water Experiment One Fish, Two Fish, Cast and Go Fish! Build Writing Muscles with a Water Relay Homemade Bubbles Water Story Cards Fish Maze Reading Activities for Bath Time! More to Explore!

What else is summer good for if you can't have a little fun with some water? But getting wet and having a little fun doesn't mean the learning has to be put on hold. With homemade bubbles, water story cards, and a water relay, your child will soak up the summer with a week's worth of wet activities that keep the learning owing.

Play Water Freeze Tag Homemade Fizzy Water Make a Water Well Water Balloon Tag Homemade Slip and Slide One Fish, Two Fish, Cast and Go Fish! Ice Observation Build Writing Muscles with a Water Relay Homemade Bubbles Water Story Cards Fish Maze Reading Activities for Bath Time!

Bowl 4 tbsp of Joy liquid dishwashing soap 2 tbsp of corn syrup or glycerin Paper Pencil Colorful pipe cleaners Spray bottles Play clothes that can get wet 5 or more players Timer (optional) 2-3 lemons Water teaspoon baking soda 1+ teaspoon sugar Ice cubes Paring knife Glass Cardboard toilet paper tube Large, empty coffee can Gravel, such as from a sh or pet store Sand Bucket, tub, or large plastic container

Water balloons A large piece of slick plastic or a few large plastic garbage bags, cut open Liquid dishwashing detergent A hose or sprinkler Copy of "One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish" by Dr. Seuss Large paperclips Foam sheets in various colors Scissors Thick tape (something that will hold up in water) Permanent marker Bathtub Stick Thread 2 medium sized plastic containers similar in size 2 sponges Lots and lots of water!

The PBS KIDS logo is a registered mark of the Public Broadcasting Service and is used with permission. All Rights Reserved.

Play Water Freeze Tag


If you don't have a pool for your child and her friends to play in, this game is a fun summer substitute. Encourage the participants to dress in clothes that can get wet, and to carry a trusty squirt gun or spray bottle. This fun, summery twist on a classic game of freeze tag spells entertainment for the whole family!

What You Need:


Spray bottles Water Play clothes that can get wet 5 or more players Timer (optional)

What You Do:


1. Every player gets a spray bottle full of water. 2. Choose one player to be it. 3. Designate boundaries for the playing field. Make sure you take note of potential hazards and remove them if possible. 4. Discuss rules with the player who's "it." You can only tag a person and get him to freeze by spraying him with water, and then the players can only unfreeze their teammates by spraying them with water. If the person who's it can freeze everyone at the same time, she wins and the game can start over. 5. Begin the game! Think about setting a timer that will reset the game and ensure that different players get a chance to be it. Have fun! Copyright 2006-2012 Education.com All Rights Reserved.

Homemade Fizzy Water


Turn regular water into a fizzing, tasty treat perfect on a hot summers day! Your child will learn more about chemical reactions, and how ingredients interact together, with interesting and tasty results!

What You Need:


2-3 lemons Water teaspoon baking soda 1+ teaspoon sugar Ice cubes Paring knife Glass

What You Do:


1. Invite your child to help slice the lemons in half using a paring knife. Learning how to use a knife, with adult supervision, is an important skill and great for honing hand-eye coordination! 2. Now she can get out a glass and juice the sliced lemons into the glass, making sure the juice is free of any seeds. 3. Brainstorm with your child how she could add carbonation to her lemon juice. Lemon juice is an acid, which reacts when paired with a base, causing bubbly results! 4. Invite your child to add the baking soda to the lemon juice and see what happens! She might be pretty surprised with the results! 5. Now your child can add water to the glass, filling it three-fourths full and then add sugar to taste. 6. She can finish her lemony, fizzy water with ice cubes and enjoy! Copyright 2006-2012 Education.com All Rights Reserved.

Make a Water Well!


Water is a vital resource; most living things depend on it for survival. But where does our water come from? Most kids might say it comes from the tap, but how does it get there in the first place? With water wells, of course! Throughout history, humans have been using wells to draw up the water naturally present in the earth into our homes. Give your child the chance to see how a well works by constructing your own! In this activity, make your own well and plot of land with a cardboard tube, sand, and gravel. This is a great kindergarten activity that provides an excellent visual to help kids understand the process behind water wells.

What You Need:


Cardboard toilet paper tube Large, empty coffee can Gravel, such as from a fish or pet store Sand Water

What to Do:
1. Place the cardboard toilet paper tube upright in the bottom of the coffee can. This tube will represent your well. 2. Hold the tube steady and pour a layer of the gravel around the bottom outside edge. Make the gravel layer about 2" deep. Remember not to pour any gravel inside the tube, only outside! 3. Pour sand on top of the gravel to form a second layer. Some of the sand will fill gaps in the gravel; the rest will build up to make another layer, which should be about 1" deep. Again, make sure that no sand gets inside the tube. After pouring, about " of the cardboard tube should still be sticking up above the sand and gravel. Involve your child in the process by asking her what she thinks the sand and gravel layers are supposed to represent. (These layers are the earth's soil.) 4. Now that the well is constructed, it's time to see how wells get our water. Ask your child what she thinks will happen when you add water to the sand and gravel. 5. Pour water onto the sand and gravel, continuing until the water level reaches the very top of the sand layer. 6. Observe the tubewhat happens? (Water should begin to rise in the tube.) 7. Discuss with your child what she thinks is going on. Some questions you can ask: Where is the water in the well coming from? How does the water get inside the well? How is this miniature well related to real-life wells? Why is it important to be aware of what we put in our soil? What's Going On? In this activity, you have built a water well where the cardboard tube represents the well while the sand and gravel around it represent the soil in the earth. When you pour water into the sand and gravel, the water level in the tube should begin to rise. Why does this happen? In nature, after a rain, the resulting groundwater is absorbed into the earth and is "stored" in the soil. Eventually, enough water is absorbed into the soil so that water pressure builds up in this underground "storage." When we dig a well, this intense pressure forces water into the well, which allows us to reach the water and use it. Knowing where our water comes from is important to understanding why keeping our soil clean is a

major concern. Because some of our water is extracted from the earth's soil, it's our responsibility to see that we keep our earth free of as many chemicals and toxins as possible so that our water will also be safe to drink and use in the future. Copyright 2006-2012 Education.com All Rights Reserved.

My Ice Observation
Explore vocabulary and science with your child by observing changeable states using ice!

Directions:
1. First, make some colored ice by freezing some water colored with a drop or two of food coloring. 2. Once the ice is frozen, take it out and put it on a small plate. 3. Have your child look at the cube and draw a picture of the ice in this FROZEN state in the first column. 4. Leave the ice cube out for 15-30 minutes or until the cube is partially thawed. 5. Have your child draw a picture of her second observation in the second column. 6. Talk to your child about the changes she sees. Work with her on comparision words: is the cube bigger/smaller? wetter/dryer? Is there more/less water on the plate? 7. Repeat again in another 15-30 minutes or until the cube is mostly thawed.

Observation #1

Observation #2

Observation #3

Find more games and activities at pbskids.org/read.


The PBS KIDS logo is a registered mark of the PBS and is used with permission. TM & 2012 Dr. Seuss Enterprises, LP. All Rights Reserved. The Cat in the Hat Knows A Lot About That! airs daily on PBS KIDS with corporate funding from Pottery Barn . Pottery Barn Kids is a registered trademark of Williams-Sonoma, Inc. FOR PROMOTIONAL USE ONLY.

Water Balloon Tag


What do you get when you mix hot potato, water balloons, and freeze tag? A super fun summer game! The person who's "it" is decided by a game of hot potato, then players scurry away until "it" shouts for players to freeze. The first person to get hit by a water balloon is "it" next!. If you can't make it to the pool this summer, this is a fun substitute to cool you down while keeping active.

What You Need:


Bucket, tub, or large plastic container Water balloons At least three kids

What to Do:
1. Fill a bucket full of water balloons. 2. Set boundaries for the players. If you're playing at a park, make the woods or playground off limits. If you're playing in your backyard, make the side of the house and indoors off limits. 3. Have all players stand in a circle, and hand one player a water balloon. 4. Choose one player (or parent) to be the caller. 5. The caller shouts, "Go!" and players begin passing the water balloon in a circle. When he feels like it, the caller shouts, "Stop!" and the last person holding the balloon is "it". The caller should turn his back to the players so he doesn't know which player will end up with the balloon. 6. Once players know who's "it", they scurry away within the boundaries. Then the caller yells, "Freeze!" and all players, even "it", must freeze where they are. 7. Without moving his legs, "it" must throw the balloon at another player. If he misses, the caller brings another balloon to "it" until he hits someone. If the water balloon hits the other player, she's now "it" and must get another balloon from the bucket. 8. Players are free to run around once more as the next person who's "it" grabs a balloon and rejoins the game. The caller yells, "Freeze!" again, and so on. 9. Play until every person has been tagged, or stop short and have yourself a good old-fashioned water balloon fight! Adapted with permission from "101 Cool Pool Games for Children: Fun and Fitness for Swimmers of All Levels" by Kim Rodomista, illustrated by Robin Patterson. Hunter House Publishers (2006). Downloaded from Education.com

Make a Homemade Slip and Slide


Looking for hot weather fun? Cool the kids down with a homemade slip and slide! You can create your own water park atmosphere for just a few bucks!

What You Need:


A large piece of slick plastic or a few large plastic garbage bags, cut open Liquid dishwashing detergent A hose or sprinkler

What You Do:


1. Clear a patch of grass, removing all stones, debris, or anything else sharp. 2. Lay down the plastic and squirt some dishwashing liquid over it. 3. Turn the hose or sprinkler on and let your kids have at it! Simple? Yes. Cheap? Yes. Plenty of fun on a hot day? Guaranteed! Copyright 2006-2012 Education.com All Rights Reserved.

Arthur's Water Experiment


Here's your chance to get wet! Learn about water displacement with this activity from PBS KIDS' Arthur based on the Aesop's fable, "The Crow and the Pitcher." Click here to get started. Copyright 2006-2012 Education.com All Rights Reserved.

One Fish, Two Fish, Cast and Go Fish!


Ever had the itch to go fishing after reading One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish? Now you can: in this wacky fishing game, you can turn your bathtub into your very own fishing hole! Celebrate Read Across America Day with this energetic reading game for some good old-fashioned Seussstyle fun.

What You Need:


Copy of "One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish" by Dr. Seuss Large paperclips Foam sheets in various colors Scissors Thick tape (something that will hold up in water) Permanent marker Bathtub Pencil Paper Stick Thread

What You Do:


1. Start by reading "One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish" with your child. Since your foam fish are going to be modeled after the fish that appear in the book, make sure to take notes during the reading so you can remember the different kinds of fish. 2. Now it's time to make the fish. Help your child cut fish shapes about the size of an adult hand out of the foam sheets. Larger fish will float better in the bathtub. 3. Have your child label each fish similar to how they're described in the book with the permanent marker. 4. Turn the fish over and tape one paperclip to each one right over the "mouth" so that half the paperclip is hanging over the edge of the foam. 5. Now make a fishing rod. Cut an arms length of thread and tie it to one end of the stick. Tie a paperclip on the other end of the thread. Bend the paperclip open slightly so that it forms a hooklike shape. 6. Fill your bathtub about half full with water. 7. Place all the fish (word-side up) into the bathtub and begin fishing! Try to catch the fish in the same order that the fish appear in the book and have your child read the fish as he catches them. Copyright 2006-2012 Education.com All Rights Reserved.

Build Writing Muscles with a Water Relay


Does your child have trouble holding a pencil? Is writing his name an excruciating task? For many young writers, it is. While your first instinct may be to have him sit down and practice writing more letters, it's weak muscles, as much as practice, that's causing the problem. Children who have difficulty with letter formation often choose not to write because it's just too tiresome. Giving your child lots of opportunities to build muscle control will make it easier on him when it's time to put pencil to paper. Looking for a fun way to make it interesting? This water relay helps build the hand muscles necessary for good penmanship. And it's pure hot-weather fun!

What You Need:


2 medium sized plastic containers similar in size 2 sponges Pitcher of water

What To Do:
1. Set Up Outside: Each player needs a plastic container and a sponge. Place a pitcher full of water between the two players. You can use regular tap water, or add a few drops of food coloring, for a splash of color. 2. Demonstrate: Show your child how to immerse the sponge in the pitcher of water, then run to his container, place the sponge over it, and squeeze until all the water is out. Explain that the point of the game is to run back and forth between pitcher and container, filling up the sponge and then squeezing it out, so you can fill your container to the top before your opponent does. 3. Go! It's time to play. Get all players to their marks and shout for them to begin. The person who fills their container first is the winner! This activity may seem like pure hot weather fun, but it gives your child the opportunity to work on what teachers call "fine motor skills"-- the small muscles in the hands that make writing possible. Plus, it's just plain fun! Copyright 2006-2012 Education.com All Rights Reserved.

Homemade Bubbles!
On a glorious sunny day, take advantage of the weather and blow bubbles! Your child will do a little kitchen chemistry when making the bubble solution and will get to practice making bubble-wand shapes. Throw in a little counting and motor skills in the fresh air and you're got a lovely day of learning ahead of you. Note: Its best to make the solution ahead of time and allow it to set for nice, strong bubbles. Bubbles do especially well in areas with high humidity.

What You Need:


Bowl 1 cup of water 4 tbsp of Joy liquid dishwashing soap 2 tbsp of corn syrup or glycerin Paper Pencil Colorful pipe cleaners What You Do: 1. Have your child help you combine the water, soap, and corn syrup or glycerin in a bowl. Let it sit overnight for the best bubbles! 2. Have your child name some shapes, and help him draw them on a piece of paper. 3. Now, let your child bend pipe cleaners to form the shapes! These will be the bubble wands. Make sure to leave a handle (or make one by attaching another pipe cleaner). 4. When your child has made a nice assortment of different-shaped bubble wands, it's time to go outside and blow bubbles! 5. While your child blows bubbles, stimulate his thinking: How many bubbles can he blow? Can he count the bubbles? How many bubbles will there be if he pops one? Which wand shape makes the best bubbles? Save your wands and the bubble solution recipe for the next glorious sunny day! Copyright 2006-2012 Education.com All Rights Reserved.

r r a o y d c t S

Cut out each card along the dotted lines. Make a story by drawing a card and adding how you think it fits.

POLE

HOOK

FISH

TENTACLE

BOAT

BOY

r r a o y d c t S

Cut out each card along the dotted lines. Make a story by drawing a card and adding how you think it fits.

POOL

DIVE

SURPRISE

SEA HORSE

OCTOPUS

CHEST

Can you help the fisherman reach the fish?

Copyright 2010-2011 2011-2012 by Education.com

More worksheets at www.education.com/worksheets

Reading Activities for Bath Time!


Next time, make bath time learning time with these literacy building tips from PBS Parents. Click here for ideas. Copyright 2006-2012 Education.com All Rights Reserved.

More to Explore!
You and your kids can Go! Go! Go! on an adventure anytime with PBS KIDS The Cat in the Hat Knows A Lot About That! Image Credit: Courtesy of Series copyright 2013, CITH Productions, Inc. and Red Hat Animation, Limited. Underlying characters copyright 1957, 1985 Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L.P. Copyright 2006-2012 Education.com All Rights Reserved.