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americanmachinist.

com JANUARY 2010 A Penton Media Publication


Firing Up for Oil / Gas Markets Page 18, 22, 28
UNCORKING
BETTER HOLES
MACHINING :
LINE-DRIVE HITS
Page 10
AUTOMATION:
ROBOTS GET TOUCHY
Page 26
SOFTWARE:
CAM DEVELOPERS
CAD COMPATIBLES
Page 30
Corkscrew machining goes a
step beyond orbital milling.
Page 14
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americanmachinist.com JANUARY 2010 A Penton Media Publication
Firing Up for Oil / Gas Markets Page 18, 22, 28
UNCORKING
BETTER HOLES
MACHINING :
LINE-DRIVE HITS
Page 10
AUTOMATION:
ROBOTS GET TOUCHY
Page 26
SOFTWARE:
CAM DEVELOPERS
CAD COMPATIBLES
Page 30
Corkscrew machining goes a
step beyond orbital milling.
Page 14
CONTENTS
DE PART ME NT S
F E A T U R E S
ON THE COVER
16 MACHINE TOOLS
Multi-tasking machines strike it big in oil.
22 TOOLING & FIXTURING
A fine collecting system.
26 AUTOMATION
Sensors make robots more sensitive.
28 SOFTWARE & CONTROLS
Automated QC in oil and gas work.
32 SHOP OPERATIONS
Wanted: Skilled machinists. Available: Advanced training.
V I E WP OI NT S
6 COMMENTARY
8 GOVERNMENT MATTERS
9 NTMA NOTES
48 CUTTING TOOL APPLICATIONS
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DRIVE TECHNOLOGY
Shop gains in accuracy, suface finishes and machine
longevity.
An Ingersoll Form-Master mill corkscrew
machines a large hole in solid stock.
2 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
E D I T O R I A L M I S S I O N :
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MACHINING TECHNIQUES
Faster large-hole making.
AMERICAN MACHINIST I Volume 154 I Number 1 I January 2010
14
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T
his year started out with a surprise for me: a
procurement exec with an important OEM
called out of the blue to seek my insights on
a plan that, if effected, would eventually restructure
that companys supply chain. Its a plan that would
benefit everyone involved, in the sense that only
the best-managed, most adaptive machine shops
and fabricators would have the opportunity to be
involved. But whos ready to respond? I wondered.
I cant predict whether this plan will take
shape or not, and I dont suspect that the future
of manufacturing depends on it. There are solid
indicators including increasing consumer
confidence; rising producer prices and industrial
production data during Q4 2009; and the U.S.
Commerce Dept.s studies showing continuing
economic expansion since last July that a
manufacturing recovery is already in progress.
Hearing the callers idea, I immediately recognized
it as something more. It is the sort of forward-
thinking strategy that has been missing from
manufacturing for a long time. The past year will
stand in our memories as one of decline, but to my
mind, the harder part of the recovery effort is to
overcome the intellectual stasis that has accompanied
the business recession.
A billboard I pass frequently offers this reminder:
Bill Gates started Microsoft in a recession. Its
meant to be encouraging, but it makes me wonder
where are the novel ideas that will spur our
turnaround?
Apart from the heated politics inherent to it, the
What-went-wrong What-can-we-do? discussion
of the past year has not led to any persuasive ideas
that address the interlocking problems that hound
the manufacturing sector: tepid
industrial demand, lack of
a skills/training,
unavailable financing,
and the availability of
affordable energy.
Theres nothing new
about these. Each one
has been apparent for
years, but in the anxiety
of the past year, they
are combined into the
justification for grand
plans. Weve tried
massive federal
stimulus, to no discernible effect, yet. Government
takeovers have stabilized some manufacturing
concerns, but arguably have weakened some others.
Tariffs on industrial goods are increasing.
Still, we have only talked about worker training
(and retraining), and available energy is unobtainable
because of political and regulatory obstacles. Because
we focus so intently on the big picture, we miss the
small improvements. We have no clarity about our
own circumstances.
Its clear to me that most of what has made
manufacturing so difficult, and indeed business in
general, has been the surplus of big ideas. Analysts,
consultants, academics and advocates have
surrounded us with clouds of solutions, adding
more to each individuals confusion than to general
understanding.
This lack of understanding transforms so easily
into anxiety, especially in the past year, that the
alternative should be obvious: avoid big ideas. The
problems remain, but they return to their proper
scale. They will respond to appropriate solutions.
For example, domestic industrial demand may
not rebound to suit every shops needs; there has to
be a global component to your production plan. If
skilled labor isnt available, dont lower the standard:
raise the level of opportunity. If project financing
isnt obtainable, redefine the objective. Or, seek new
equity partners.
The right approach for 2010 is to pursue your
own initiative, with confidence and preparedness,
regardless of experts advice.
If the past year has been devoted to figuring out
what has gone wrong in manufacturing, and what
can be salvaged, it would be good to start early
this year figuring out what we can do to return our
enterprises to growth. Perhaps more important,
we ought to restore ourselves to thinking about
progress, forward-thinking that views problems as
an invitation to try again, and accepts failure as the
opening to a different approach.
FROM THE E DI TOR
Forward, thinking
Robert Brooks
Editor-in-Chief
robert.brooks@penton.com
6 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANAURY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
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for the future...
he Copenhagen global
warming summit would
seem like just another
commitments made in Kyoto
by an overwhelming bipartisan
margin of 97 to 0. Even in
that boom year, because it was
believed that the health of the
U.S. economy was threatened,
the Senate was in no mood for
unilateral concessions on energy
usage. The consensus in the Senate
was that the Kyoto Agreement
would almost certainly lead to
U.S. job losses. Moreover, it was
feared that Kyoto would commit
the U.S. government to policies
that would cost trillions of dollars
over the coming decades.
The Copenhagen global
warming summit would entail
similar commitments. Although
no one knows how we could
accomplish it, the U.S. government
proposed to bring carbon
emissions down to 83 percent
below its 2005 levels by the year
2050. This is an impossible goal
with current technology. To
illustrate its futility: population
projections for that year indicate
that the U.S. will have 420 million
people living here. That means
that to reach that goal our carbon
footprint would have to be equal
to what we were emitting in 1875.
Do we really want to commit
ourselves to a goal that is either so
idealistic or so insincere?
By contrast, the Chinese
and Indian governments are
unwilling to commit themselves
to concrete numerical goals. The
Chinese promise only to reduce
their carbon intensity over the
coming years. That translates
into a commitment only to
reduce Chinas carbon emissions
per unit of production.
Under any conceivable scenario
of technological development,
we should expect the Chinese to
become more efficient in their
use of carbon. They are currently
three times less efficient than us in
the production of steel. Increasing
energy efficiency is something that
the Chinese would want to do even
if there were no climate summit and
no outside pressure to become more
efficient. It is not a concession.
Although we have heard
positive comments about the
Chinese and Indian carbon
promises out of some in the
environmental community and
even some Senators, certainly
the U.S. government is not so
foolish as to accept those pledges
as sufficient commitments. The
Chinese and the Indians offer the
excuse that they are developing
economies and should be given
more leeway. What the U.S.
government indeed the world
needs to hear from China and
India are specific pledges to
meet new carbon emission goals,
goals that would require them
to install expensive new carbon-
control technologies, or a switch
to new less carbon-emitting fuels
to reduce carbon output the
same difficult trade-offs that
the developed industrialized
countries are promising to make.
Otherwise, the Chinese and
Indian promises are empty, and
we are likely to be worse off than
if there were no Copenhagen
commitments at all, because
carbon intensive industries will
simply move to China and India.
Given the fact that the climate
change legislation is not likely
to pass the Senate during 2010
in its current form, and that
the Obama administration
is going to be under pressure
from the European Union and
the environmental wing of the
Presidents own party to do
something about climate change
and greenhouse gas emissions,
it is likely that we will be seeing
tough new carbon-restricting
regulations coming from the
Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) in the coming years.
Just as the Copenhagen
conference began, the EPA issued
an endangerment finding under
the authority of the Clean Air Act.
That finding was grounded in
the agencys own climate change
analysis. It allows the EPA to
regulate carbon-dioxide emissions
as harmful pollutants and enables
the Obama administration to
bypass the need for legislation
before imposing controls. Under
its legislative charter, the EPA
is not limited by the economic
impact of its regulations. Thus, we
seem to be about to embark on
a path to reach the Copenhagen
climate goals, no matter whether
the Indians and Chinese make
similar commitments and despite
what the U.S. Congress decides
that it wants to do or not to do.
GOVERNMENT MATTERS
You can help revitalize U.S. manufacturing! Send this page to your Congressman, local and state government leaders,
or your local newspaper editor. Add your own comments on the importance of manufacturing innovation to the health of
our economy. Your comments are also welcome at pfreedenberg@AMTonline.org
B Y D R . P A U L F R E E D E N B E R G
Climate Change Politics > >
Vice President-Government Relations, AMTThe Association For Manufacturing Technology
8 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
T
meaningless United Nations-
sponsored international forum
if its consequences were not so
deadly serious to the American
economy. As a historical note, the
last time such an event occurred
in Kyoto, Japan, in 1997 the
U.S. Senate reacted by passing
a resolution that renounced
any Clinton Administration
NTMA NOTES
B Y J A M E S R . G R O S M A N N
JAMES R. GROSMANN IS MARKETING DIRECTOR FOR THE NATIONAL TOOLING & MACHINING ASSOCIATION
ne of the difficulties of
writing a monthly column
about what is going on in
One thing that has not
changed in Washington is an
old adage: Watch what they
do and not what they say. The
government that is supposed
to answer to American voters
is now controlled by people
who dont want to hear other
opinions, not even from their
own party. They do and say
things in public that hide what
they do in closed meetings.
Ms. Pelosi and her cohort
are pressuring people in
their own party to not speak
against their plans. Several
Blue Dog Democrats that
have voted according to the
wills of their constituents, are
being forced out. Several have
announced that they wont run
for re-election. What kind of
intimidation is Pelosis gang
capable of mounting that chases
them from office?
Just think about this: The
House health-care bill had over
2,000 pages that no one had read
when the vote was called. Prior
to committee hearings, both the
Speaker and the Senate Majority
Leader said they wanted to pass
bills before anyone had time to
organize opposition. Their
rush to vote is a bad idea for any
law. What are they hiding?
It was the same for the
House climate-change bill. The
Speaker promised to get a bill
passed in time for the President
to brag about it at Decembers
global climate summit. That
didnt happen, but (as of this
writing) the President was able
to announce an agreement with
China and other countries to
spend $30 billion dollars on
climate measures. Of course,
the agreement is called non-
binding, so what good does
it do? It allows the President
to claim he did something. He
gets to pledge to spend more
tax dollars. He presided over
an equally pointless Jobs
Summit and a meaningless
Credit/Lending Forum. The
Administration didnt want
any input from anyone that
disagreed with it at the Jobs
Summit because they already
had their minds made up on
what they were going to do.
They bash banks in public over
lending practices, but federal
oversight continues to inhibit
bankers flexibility to lend.
We have federal czars
overseeing everything from
executive pay to manufacturing
policies, and anything in
between. These are people on the
federal payroll without so much
as a wink from Congress. Where
is the governments authority to
decide what civilians are paid?
Next, some Congressmen say
they intend to hold hearings
on how much NCAA football
coaches are paid! Some want
to legislate how the NCAA
should name the Division I
football champion. Why are they
spending their energies on this?
What are their priorities?
When, and if, a new health-
care program is enacted, federal
officials may be determining
when you get a physical, and
from whom. They may even
dictate it. The House version
would make it a felony for
individuals to not have health
insurance if they dont pay the
bill Uncle Sam sends them for
it. Apparently, they know whats
best for us! Theyre experts in
everything. Why arent they
willing to be covered by the same
health-care program theyre
developing for the rest of the
country? Members of Congress
have top-notch coverage, and
they dont have to abide by most
of the laws they pass.
Its the same with
Congressional pay: no debate,
just automatic passage. The
U.S. Congress is passing laws
without full disclosure or debate
on issues that will affect us
for decades to come. We cant
afford it, and we cannot allow
it to continue. Major media
help them conceal what theyre
really doing by not asking the
necessary questions that would
reveal any of this. In this New
Year, we must send a message to
Congress that this is our country,
and that we wont let them
destroy it. Many aspects of their
current agenda will decimate
U.S. manufacturing, and we are
the only ones that can stand up
and defend ourselves. We cant
wait for others to do it for us.
Will we take the actions needed?
Will we make the needed
changes? Watch what they do
and not what they say! <<
Contact James R. Grosmann at the
National Tooling & Machining
Assn., jgrosmann@ntma.org.
Watch what they do! > >
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 9
our industry is that I must make
sure that what I write will be
relevant once you read it. Thats
something I learned this past year
as things happened so rapidly
and changed constantly. By the
time this is published, we may
have a new health-care plan that
the federal government will be
running and well all be wondering
how were going to pay for it.
O
MACHI NI NG
T
he benefits of linear motor-driven machines often
far outweigh the advantages of ballscrew-driven
machines, especially when it comes to position-
ing accuracy, part surface finishes and machine
longevity. Thats the opinion of Kevin Hartsoe,
who calls these the must have machine-tool
qualities that keep his shop thriving and competitive.
Hartsoe is the president of Neu Dynamics Corp. (www.
neudynamics.com), a shop specializing in building en-
capsulation molds, optoelectronic and fiber-optic molds
and insert molds for the electronics and semiconductor
industries. But, the incorporation of linear motor-driven
machine tools also has helped Neu Dynamics expand into
other markets, like medical equipment and general con-
tract micro machining work.
According to Hartsoe, Neu Dynamics chose linear motor-
driven machines mainly because 90 percent of its jobs in-
volve extremely tight tolerances and lots of small, finely de-
tailed cavitation work. To illustrate, he cited one cavitation
mold that had 2,304 cavities and a top-to-bottom mismatch
tolerance of half a millionth of an inch. Parts for the mold
measured 1 m-sq by 2-m long, but the shops average parts
may be as small as 0.8-mm square.
Linear motor-driven machines at Neu Dynamics include
two sinker EDMs and a high-speed milling machine. The
EDMs are an AQ35L and AQ55L from Sodick (www.sod-
ick.com), and the mill is a HS430L, also from Sodick.
Many shops purchase linear motor-driven machines for
10 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
A
LINEAR
WAY
OF
THINKING
FOR ONE SUCCESSFUL SHOP,
HIGH ACCURACY,
EXCELLENT SURFACE FINISHES
AND MACHINE LONGEVITY ALL STEM
FROM LINEAR MOTORS.
By Charles Bates I senior editor
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 11
their incredible traverse speeds. However, Neu Dynamics
did so more for the positioning accuracy the machines pro-
vide and their reliability.
The shop pretty much runs machines non-stop, and be-
cause of that and the type of work being done, it needed
machines that would not exhibit any component wear or di-
minished accuracy after years of such punishing operation.
If youre going to keep a machine for a long time, up
around six years like we do, and youre doing a lot of high-
tolerance work, theres no worrying about losing accuracy
over time with a linear motor-driven machine. There are
also no issues with backlash, counter rotation on cutters or
tool offsets. The machines cut in any direction with the same
accuracy, so there is no threat of a cutter digging into and
Neu Dynamics hardmilled the surface finish on this H-13 54 Rc mold
tool (above) using its Sodick linear motor-driven mill.
The shop also machines EDM electrodes on the linear
motor-driven machine.
12 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
ruining a parts surface finish when the machine changes
directions, explained Hartsoe.
Since incorporating the linear motor EDMs into its man-
ufacturing processes, Neu Dynamics is able to burn mold
cavities right to size without preliminary roughing opera-
tions because of the machines accuracies. Eliminating the
roughing operation also gives the shop longer electrode life
and more even burns around entire cavities.
One of the Sodick EDMs at Neu Dynamics has linear
motors driving just its Z-axis motion, while the other ma-
chine has them driving the X, Y and Z axes. The main ad-
vantage of a linear motor-driven Z axis on a sinker EDM is
that electrodes can approach and retract from workpieces
extremely fast (1,440 ipm and 1.2 G acceleration).
Moving so quickly creates an even and natural flushing
action around the electrode that lets Neu Dynamics burn
deeper ribs and deeper wells. It also eliminates the need for
external flushing systems, which, in turn, allows Neu Dy-
namics to more easily run the machines unattended because
theres no need to have an operator standing by to set up
flush lines or to adjust flushing pressures.
The shop EDMs a large portion of molds, but it also hard-
mills them on the linear motor-driven high-speed mill. And,
Hartsoe said, the linear drives provide phenomenal finishes
and tolerances, again because of the absence of backlash.
We are really happy with the finishes the milling ma-
chine produces. Prior to purchasing the machine, we ran
some test parts and compared
the finishes done on the lin-
ear motor-driven mill to those
done on ballscrew-driven ma-
chines. The linear mills fin-
ishes met our requirements,
while only one ballscrew ma-
chine came close to achiev-
ing the needed finishes, said
Hartsoe.
He added that there was a
bit of a learning curve when
it came to hardmilling on the
Sodick machine. When we
purchased the mill, the team
here had limited experience
with hardmilling. At that
time, we estimated the learn-
ing curve would be between
8 and 10 months, so to use
the machi ne i n the mean
time, we opted for a vacuum
system for milling graphite
EDM electrodes.
One of the lessons Neu Dy-
namics learned as it strength-
ened its hardmilling knowledge was that the process generates
heat, especially when machining certain size mold cavities. So,
to be on the safe side, the shop keeps cutting tools a bit further
away than usual from the finished size when rough machining.
Then for the finishing process, it will creep up to the finished
size. Plus, the surface finishes are so good that there is no need
for manual benchwork to polish out tool marks.
Hartsoe added that the shop also learned a few things
about surface finishes, especially concerning the medical
jobs it does. Some of these components require a matte fin-
ish or light abrasive finish, which the shop would generate
in the mold using a secondary EDM operation. With the
HS430L linear mill, mold cavity surfaces are hardmilled
then simply glass-beaded to the required surface finish,
eliminating the secondary EDM step.
When it comes to programming the linear mill, Neu Dy-
namics discovered that the machine requires CAM software
with quite a bit of look-ahead capability. At present, the
shop is using MasterCam (www.mastercam.com) and has
had no problems with data starvation.
But, reliability is perhaps the most beneficial aspect of linear
motor-driven machines the shop has discovered. We have not
had one problem with any of the machines as far as the linear
drives are concerned, none of the problems that typically de-
velop over time with ballscrew machines, said Hartsoe.
Lights-out machining is a high priority at Neu Dynamics,
and on one of its linear motor-driven sinker EDMs, a 24- to
48-position toolchanger keeps the machine running for long pe-
riods of time. The other EDM has a standard 8-position changer
because the shop runs bigger electrodes on that machine.
For the linear motor mill, Neu Dynamics developed
fixturing for stacking multiple jobs. For example, when ma-

MA C H I N I N G
WHY EVERY WORKPIECE
FIXTURE, JIG, JAW & CLAMP
DESIGN SHOULD START AT THE
POINT OF CONTACT.
THAT POINT? FAIRLANE PRODUCTS.
Fairlane Products manufactures a wide
range of workholding and positioning
components, all designed to promote
higher productivity through faster
speeds and feeds and to extend the
life of expensive jigs, fixtures, jaws
and clamping mechanisms. Serrated,
low-profile edge, straight serration and
single-point grippers in a variety of
shapes and sizes, in inch and true
metric. As well as Swivots

swivel
action ball-unit assemblies for
positioning and holding irregular
contour surfaces. Get to the point.
Get to Fairlane Products.
Fairlane Products, lnc. 88792 Doreka Drive, Fraser, Nl 48O2G
(58Gj 294-G1OO FAX (58Gj 294-G822 8OO-548-2985 www.fairlaneproducts.com
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 13
chining electrodes on the mill, the shop uses four System 3R
(www.system3r.com) workholding units. Or when running
multiple parts, it uses dual vises.
According to Hartsoe, the linear motor-driven machines
have also opened up new markets/business for the shop. By
just having the machines, he indicated that work seems to
find Neu Dynamics.
The shop currently machines electrodes for other mold
building companies and does some hardmilling for them, too.
These are shops that have not yet made the investment in
either an electrode-milling or hardmilling machine. We also get
opportunities from these shops to do cavitation work that, in
the past, we never got, said Hartsoe.
He observed that in the mold industry a shop must either
innovate and diversify, or it will perish. Ten years ago, we
were primarily electronics-based. Now, 65 percent of our
work is medical. However, we are seeing a growing influx
of electronics work coming back from Asia and an increase
in low-volume custom work, mainly because overseas shops
dont even want to look at a part program unless it involves at
least 1 million parts per month, commented Hartsoe.
The linear motor-driven machine tools at Neu Dynamics help
the shop handle the 120 to 140 projects it gets per year. Not all
of this work is mold building, and it can vary from a $2,500
spare parts order to a multiple mold package costing $400,000.
Linear motor-driven Sodick sinker EDMs let Neu Dynamics burn deeper ribs and deeper wells without external flushing systems.
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MACHI NI NG
C
orkscrew milling involves
simultaneously feeding
on all three axes: advanc-
ing on the Z-axis while
simultaneously interpo-
lating on the X and Y axes to enlarge
the hole. The process, requiring a ma-
chine with interpolating capability,
is said to out-perform spade drilling,
progressive twist drilling, trepanning
and flame cutting. Proponents say it
often produces a finish good enough
to eliminate finish boring.
Because there is only a small contact
area between tool and workpiece at any
instant, cutting forces are lower than in
spade drilling, said Konrad Forman,
product manager at Ingersoll Cutting
Tools (www.ingersoll-imc.com). And,
gone is the friction between drill flutes,
chips and the sidewall of the hole."
Whereas orbital milling is basi-
cally a two-step process, plunge then
orbit, corkscrew milling is continuous.
The centerline of the mill advances
helically, resulting in a faster cut and
better finish with no lap lines. Hole
size depends on the program, not cut-
ter size. This reduces drill inventory
requirements because a drill for every
hole size is no longer needed.
Cutter characteristics
The tool of preference for cork-
screw milling at many shops is the
Ingersoll Hi-Pos+ indexable mill or
the Form-Master+ button face mill.
The former is recommended for shal-
lower holes and the latter for deeper
ones. Surface quality with the Hi-Pos+
is often good enough to eliminate
14 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
Uncork
Holemaking Productivity
PROGRESSIVE SHOPS ARE SPEEDING UP LARGE HOLEMAKING BY EIGHT-
TO-ONE OR MORE BY ADOPTING CORKSCREW MILLING
A STEP BEYOND ORBITAL MILLING
By Jim Benes I associate editor
Above: Deering Machine rough-mills
steel die parts at least five times faster
than before using Ingersoll Form-Master
high-speed high-feed mills. Feedrates
reach 127 ipm on annealed die steels.
Left: Logan Machine Works opens big
through-holes from solid stock using
corkscrew milling with an Ingersoll
Form-Master+ button face mill for a
cycle-time savings of 16 to 1.
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 15
finish boring, even on guidepin holes.
Both cutters work well for cork-
screw milling because the inserts
helical cutting edge geometry, when
following an interpolated corkscrew
path, leads to straight sidewalls and
a 90-degree bottom. By contrast,
conventional square inserts following
the same path cant create a square
corner at the bottom of a blind hole,
and cant avoid leaving lap lines in the
sidewalls, noted Forman.
The inserts helical cutting edge also
creates a gentler entry into the work,
much like scissors shearing paper. The
result is the kind of finish obtained
from a solid carbide endmill.
The main caution in any corkscrew
milling operation is to provide an in-
dependent source for chip clearance in
vertical holes opened from the solid,
Forman advised. Because there is no
provision for chip evacuation in the
insert geometry itself, gravity often
can do it in horizontal holemaking,
but youll probably need compressed
air on vertical holes.
Field experience at scores of mold
and die shops has shown corkscrew
milling also eliminates a lot of extra
setups and machine-to-machine trans-
fers, which are especially expensive on
large workpieces. With conventional
drilling, weve seen a lot of mold and
die makers forced to shuttle heavy
workpieces between heavy-duty drill
presses and jig borers because of the
horsepower required for the drilling
operation. With corkscrew milling, the
whole friction issue is eliminated and
you can open a bigger hole on a lower
horsepower machine. And, if finish
boring is needed, you can grab the part
once and do both operations on the
same machining center, said Forman.

Reports from the field
Heres a look at how some shops
have benefitted from the technique of
corkscrew milling.
Logan Machine Works, Phenix
City, AL, makes about sixty trun-
nion blocks a year, each with several
through holes of different sizes. Previ-
ously, Logan opened the larger holes
with a pilot drill, flame-cut it to leave
in. of stock, then bored it to final
size. Now, the shop opens four-inch
diameter holes in large machine com-
ponents in 30 minutes of machining,
down from eight hours of drilling or
occasional flame cutting. Moreover, it
mills and finish-bores the hole on the
same machine, eliminating two setups
and two part transfers.
Logan mills workpieces from sol-
ids with the Form Master+ at 800
sfpm and 85 ipm. For smaller holes
and thinner stock (up to in.), the
previous cycle was pilot drill, laser
cut and bore. Now, it corkscrew
mills with an Ingersoll Quad Drill+
at 650 sfpm and 8 ipm, reducing a
one-minute cycle to ten seconds and
eliminating all boring. In addition to
speeding up the operation, the Quad
Drill+ nearly doubled insert edge life.
The shop had toyed with another end
mill in an orbital milling process, but
without much success.
Deering Machine, a one-man shop
in rural Georgia, is saving 15 minutes
per hole in a variety of work involving
1- to 1.5-in.-diameter holes. Cork-
screw milling also requires less horse-
power than progressive twist drilling,
our previous standard process, said
president Steve Deering. The shops
previous standard practice was to
twist-drill, using progressively larger
diameters. Ingersolls John Spray rec-
ommended corkscrew milling, rela-
tively new at the time, and demon-
strated it penetrating solid stock. As
a result of the demo, he projected a
15-minute cycle time saving per hole.
I saw the demo but didnt believe
my eyes, said Deering. Who in their
right mind plunges a face mill into
solid stock, let alone runs it in like a
corkscrew?
Now corkscrew milling is standard
practice for all larger holes. Deering uses
0.625-in. Hi-Pos+ for holes up to 1.125
in. and a 0.75-in. mill for larger holes.
Feedrates in both cases are 61 ipm.
A large Texas forging plant cork-
screw mills all of its guidepin holes, cut-
ting an eight-hour job per dieset to just
1.5 hour. After spade drilling, its previ-
ous standard process, the holes needed
finish boring; however, by corkscrew
milling the finish boring operation was
eliminated, resulting in an expected an-
nual savings of more than $35,000 on
guidepin holes alone.
To compensate for thermal expan-
sion of the bottom die, which can
cause misalignment in the diesets
over the course of a day, the company
created a slot rather than a perfectly
round hole. The slot is about 0.005-
to 0.010-in. longer than it is wide.
Corkscrew milling enabled us to im-
prove the dieset design as well as save
time, said the manager. We couldnt
do that with a spade drill.
Vaughn Manufacturing Co. in
Nashville estimates it is saving $100
per dieset on stamping dies for appli-
ances and patio products. Holes aver-
age 2- to 3-in.-diameter by 2- to 3-in.
deep. Previously, the company relied on
spade drilling. Vaughn plant manager
Thomas Austin said, The bigger the
hole, the greater the saving. First, we
dont have to open up the hole in di-
ameter steps as we did with twist drills.
Second, material removal rate isnt
hobbled by machine horsepower, as
often happens when drilling big holes.
With corkscrew milling, the cutter
nibbles off a lot of tiny chips in rapid
succession rather than hogging out
essentially one heavy chip all at once,
explained Ingersolls Konrad Forman.
The new process takes a lot of the
friction out of large holemaking. By
contrast, spade drilling a large hole
can easily stall many modern low-
power CNC machining centers.
As a rule for hole-size-to-cutter di-
ameter, Vaughn standardizes on 2 to
1. For instance, for a 2.5-in. hole, the
choice is a 1.5-in. Hi-Pos+ cutter. Ac-
cording to Forman, This relationship
is a matter of shop preference, but 2
to 1 leaves plenty of room for chip
evacuation. Also, for straight sides
and square corners, be sure the inserts
have positive rake geometry axially
and radially.
In corkscrew milling, a cutter advances into the
work as it orbits, opening the hole much faster
than drilling, and reduces friction as well.
E D I T E D BY C H A R L E S B AT E S I S E N I O R E D I T O R
M A C H I N E T O O L S
16 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
P
recision Downhole Pumps,
a division of Cameron Inter-
national, manufactures and
markets subsurface sucker rod
pumps and other products for the oil
industry worldwide, including the U.S.,
Canada, Indonesia, Romania, Russia,
and South America. To go from bar-
stock to finished part, many of Preci-
sions pump components require up to
six different operations, each of which
means that machine operators have to
stop the process and change tooling or
reposition workpieces before proceed-
ing to the next operations.
To remedy these sorts of production
hold-ups, the shop incorporated two
twin-spindle, twin-turret turning
centers with Y-axis milling capabilities
that slashed the six separate
manufacturing operations down to
one continuous operation. The two
multi-tasking machines, a Puma
TT1800SY and a Puma TT2500SY,
are both from Doosan Infracore
(www.infracoremt.com). The
machines have created manufacturing
reductions of over 30 percent at
Precision and have significantly
improved quality and speed, largely
due to operators not having to handle
parts six different times.
The Doosan equipment has
reduced our labor costs, reduced
handling time and improved the
quality of our finished products. It is
amazing to see what this equipment
has meant to our productivity, said
Mark Burris, Precisions business
Turning Centers Gush Out
Oil Pump Parts
Randy Misenhelter (left) and Mike Layne, both of Precision Downhole Pumps, inspect components made in single setups on a Puma twin-
spindle, twin-turret machine.
O I L & N AT U R A L G A S
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 17
development specialist.
According to Randy Misenhelter,
operations manager at Precision, the
machines improved the shops ability
to deliver product to customers in a
timely manner. It used to take three
days to make a part. Now we get an
order and can ship the part the next
day because these two machines have
taken over the work of 10 lathes and
mills and we havent even pushed
the machines yet! When we do, we
will be able to increase the speed of
production even further as time goes
on, he explained.
In production, Precisions operators
set up the Doosan machines and an
inventory of barstock. They confirm
the programming for the specific
components and let the machines
do their work. Raw material exits
the machines as finished, precisely
manufactured parts.
Notably, the efficiencies created
by the Doosan machines has allowed
Precision to become competitive in
China, where oil production is a fast-
growing segment of the economy.
Plus, the shop is recognizing strong
growth in both its domestic and
other international business. Today,
it has sales that are five times its
2004 numbers. <<
S
evere machine
crashes seem to
be inevitable, but
now, when they happen,
shops can replace
only the damaged
segments of a vertical
machining centers
tool disk instead of the
whole carousel-type
disk. What makes this
possible is a retrofitted
CMI Segmented Tool
Disk from Clarklake
Machine Inc. (www.
clarklakemachine.com).
Often, after crashes
due to
accidents,
machine malfunctions,
operator errors or taper
locks caused by debris
or heat, operators must
replace a machines
entire one-piece stock
tool disk. The CMI tool
disk, made for Haas
VF-Series CAT-40 20-
tool machining centers,
incorporates individual
segments that are
attached to a base plate
and are replaceable.
The tool disk is made
of precision-machined
6061-T6 billet aluminum.
If the segmented disk
becomes damaged,
only the effected
segments are replaced.
Preassembled, the
21-piece unit has 20
segmented tool pockets
and one base plate.
This is also a green
technology that helps
reduce the overall carbon
footprint of high-tech
CNC equipment. <<
Lessen the Severity of
Carousel Crashes
CMI Segmented Tool
Disks feature removable
segments that allow
shops to replace only
damaged portions after
a machine crash.
M A C H I N E T O O L S
18 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
I
n oil-patch metalworking and
fabrication, I.D. finishing of orifice
meter tubes is one job that may
be just low-tech enough that its still
typically tackled using a die grinder
and some form of homemade hone.
These manual hones have dominated
in this application because they simply
do not demand the power, precision
and higher cost of an industrial
tube hone. However, this could be
changing with the introduction of
low-cost, automated tube hones that
can use legacy tooling.
Meter tubes, also called meter
runs, are critical parts of the orifice
meter, a device thats been used to
measure gas flows for more than a
century. More than a million orifice
meters are used in the United States,
often as custody transfer points to
determine billing amounts. For this
reason, theres an expectation of high
accuracy, and the meter tubes play an
important role.
Orifice meters have no moving
parts. They consist of specified
lengths of meter quality pipe on
either side of an orifice plate, which
may be several inches thick, with
a precisely sized round hole in it.
Gas flow through the pipeline is
restricted slightly by the size of the
orifice, and the pressure difference
on either side of the orifice,
measured by sensors in the meter
tube immediately upstream and
downstream, is used to
compute fluid flow.
Accuracy of the orifice meter
requires a laminar gas flow, which
the meter tube aids. The meter run
provides a length of straight pipe,
precisely sized and finished, so that
swirl or turbulence in the gas stream
smooths out, producing a laminar
flow before and after the orifice.
Often a flow conditioner is used
inside the meter run upstream from
the orifice to help create a laminar
flow within a shorter length of pipe.
The maximum and minimum surface
roughnesses on meter run I.D.s are
functions of the beta ratio and nominal
diameter of the tube. However, an
excessively smooth surface causes
turbulence in the gas stream.
The meter run itself is a fabrication
with welded flanges or fittings on both
ends, so manufacturers must eliminate
evidence of the weld bead and restore
a correct I.D. surface finish. In the first
phase of this multi-step process, the
pipe is chucked in a lathe to machine
out most of the weld bead, but often
the bead is ground down with a die
grinder and a burr tool on a long
rod. Then, finally, the pipe is honed,
typically with a manually stroked
homemade hone of some kind.
These homemade hones usually
consist of a drill motor with a shaft
several meters long that mounts
standard honing tools. The lack of
power stroking or automatic tool feed
make running these homemade rigs a
very physically demanding job.
Budget-priced automated tube
hones, such as the HTA tube hone
from Sunnen (www.sunnen.com),
are ideal for meter runs. The all-
electric, lighter-duty HTA machine
strokes automatically, is clutched and
thus safer, provides better accuracy,
and quickly pays for itself through
reduced cycle times and less operator
fatigue and workmans comp claims.
Additionally, users of the HTA
are able to mount ANR275-type
tooling, the most widely used tools on
manual hones. This system is aimed at
surfacing applications where stock
removal ranges around 0.030 in.
The machines base price is less than
$50,000 for a 12-ft-stroke model.
Included are high-end features such
as Siemens drives and PLC control
with touch screen HMI for setting all
machine parameters stroke reversal
point, spindle/stroking speeds, and
crosshatch angle calculation.
HTA models accommodate 6-ft
and 12-ft part lengths, bore I.D.s of
2.5 in. to 21 in., maximum part O.D.s
of 24 in., and part weights to 4,000
lb. An electronically controlled 3-hp
AC gear motor powers the machines
spindle from zero to 300 rpm, while a
servo-driven stroking system provides
a speed range of 0 to 90 fpm. <<
An HTA hone automates the job of I.D. finishing orifice meter tubes for measuring gas flows.
Sending Manual Honing Down the Tubes
By Dennis Westhoff I global business development manager at Sunnen Products
O I L & N AT U R A L G A S
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 19
H
arry Junger,
managing director
of Gildemeister
Drehmaschinen GmbH (www.
dmgamerica.com), sings
the praises of his companys
latest addition to its CTX
beta TC- and CTX gamma
TC series of machines. The
new CTX gamma 2000 TC
features a B-axis and high-
speed 12-station turret,
2-channel control and DMGs
MultiChannel programming
system with ShopTurn 3G
interface.
DMG engineers optimized
every inch of the machines
space to integrate its
additional turret for up to
12 fixed or driven VDI-40
tools. The innovative design
allows for 4-axis machining
on one spindle or parallel
machining on the main and
counter spindles.
For example, shops can
use a turret-head steady rest
to support shaft parts with
diameters up to 5.9 in. on the
CTX gamma 2000 TC. Then,
center points can be fitted
into the machines counter
spindle or directly used from
the turret. Pick-up devices
for storing finished parts and
an insertion aid for difficult-
to-feed workpieces enhance
the machines ergonomics
and facilitate the machine
operators work.
The machines generously
dimensioned work envelope
allows components to
remain on the turret and for
swiveling in when necessary.
Both toolholders operate
independently of each
other and are unrestricted
in movement, making it
possible for shops to handle
a wide range of different
workpieces and turn part
lengths to 78.7 in. and
diameters to 24.8 in.
Given the complex tasks
the CTX gamma 2000 TC
performs, the machine sets
up quickly and is easy to
operate. Such shop floor-
oriented attributes derive
mainly from the machines
multi-channel Siemens
840D Solutionline control
and, more specifically, the
integrated ShopTurn 3G
software for MultiChannel
programming.
This control system
stems from decades of close
development cooperation
between DMG and Siemens
(www.automation.siemens.
com). It gives users the
choice of DIN or WOP
programming for generating
the most demanding contour
programs in dialogue.
With the innovative
symbiosis of 2-channel
controls and MultiChannel
programming, we can now
offer shops the best of both
worlds, said Junger. The
system allows graphical 3D
shop-floor programming
directly on the machine,
together with process
simulation and convenient
cycles via the ShopTurn 3G
user interface, which is the
same for the B axis and the
turret. It also offers time-
optimized programming of
demanding milling contours
and integration of customer
cycles, externally generated
program modules and
additional technologies via
DIN code. Shops can even
combine ShopTurn cycles
with DIN functionality. <<
Two-Channel Turn-Mill
The CTX gamma 2000 TC turn-mill center features a 2-channel control.
T
he Terrain
Follower
accessory from
Omax Corp.
(www.omax.
com) makes
it possible to
cut parts from
materials with
irregular or
warped surfaces,
automatically
and accurately,
without the
need for special
programming.
The accessory
features simple
setup and
operation, and
attaches directly
to the motorized
Z axis of
Omax waterjet
JetMachining
Centers.
Immediately
detecting
changes in
a materials
height, the
Terrain
Follower allows
the machine
nozzle to make
required height
adjustments
automatically,
and accurately
maintain the
required cutting
stand off of 0.06
in., without
reducing
Z-axis travel.
This ability
to adjust to
uneven surfaces
also eliminates
the need for
additional
programming.
Extremely
versatile and
water-resistant,
the accessory
can be turned
on and off for
each piece thats
cut. Further,
it remembers
stand-off heights
between power-
offs and allows
independent
operation
of stand off
and collision
detection. Users
are able to
follow along a
material with
the collision-
detection turned
off. <<
Waterjet Automatically Follows
Part Terrain
M A C H I N E T O O L S
20 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
E
ntrust Tool & Design
Co. Inc. (www.
entrusttool.com), a
manufacturer of Unisig and
Davis & Thompson machine
tools, needed a particular
arrangement of components
for the cutting mechanism
on its new USC50, a
7-axis, 2-spindle deep-hole
machining center for heavy-
duty mold and diemaking.
Because this large-capacity
machine tool was intended
for four-sided machining
and deep-hole drilling on
workpieces measuring up
to 40 in. by 120 in. on a
25-ton CNC rotary table,
an extremely high degree of
accuracy and rigidity was
required, especially at full
extension of the tool tip.
The machine had to be
highly productive as well as
extremely precise, even at the
maximum speeds of 394 ipm.
And, with a 6.30-in. quill
and 19.7-in. travel, an ANSI
85.50 CAT 50 spindle was
designed into the machine
to handle the substantial
torque, so a power drawbar
was essential for the machine.
Also, a nearly backlash-free
worm gear assembly would
accommodate the load and
provide the stability and
repositioning for satisfying
the accuracy specification.
After surveying available
suppliers, Entrust Tool &
Design sought out a longtime
associate, Advance Machine
& Engineering (www.ame.
com) to assist with these
critical components.
For the precision power
drawbar, Entrust Tool &
Design preferred a standard
product that featured bolt-on
reliability, through-spindle
coolant, steep taper air blast
at stand still for blow off,
and standard integral sensors
for feedback. All the features
had to be configurable to
customer needs.
Based on previous
automotive experience,
Entrust Tool & Design
selected an OTT-Jakob power
drawbar with rotary union
and steep taper gripper. This
modular ES Series drawbar
provided the design flexibility
for matching to customer
applications and the rigidity
for quality part finishes.
The drawbar delivered an
optimal connection between
the toolholder and the spindle
toolholding tolerances on
the USC50 were targeted at
0.0002 in. This, combined
with a speed capability of
36,000 rpm, a high pull force,
and rotary union options for
programmable coolant and
lubricant delivery, solidified
Entrust Tool & Designs
decision to spec the OTT-
Jakob power drawbar and
related components.
Entrust Tool & Design
turned to Advance Machine
& Engineering again for
the worm gear assembly.
The decision was made to
go with an OTT worm gear
High-Precision Components Mean High-Accuracy Deep Holes
For the Unisig USC50 7-axis, 2-spindle deep-hole drilling machining
center, Entrust Tool & Design relied on Advanced Machine &
Engineering for critical design component assistance.
P
resented as the first high-
precision 3D waterjet
cutting technology of its
kind, the Dynamic Waterjet
XD from Flow International
Corp. (www.flowcorp.com)
improves part cycle times
and provides accuracies that
are two to four times better
than standard non-Dynamic
systems. The company also
said Dynamic Waterjet XD
is 30-percent faster than its
original Dynamic technology.
Dynamic Waterjet XDs
versatility enables shops to
cut a wider variety of intricate
designs, allowing them to
tap into new markets. With
3D cutting and complex
beveling, these shops can cut
elaborate parts previously
unattainable using standard
non-Dynamic waterjets.
These 3D advancements
have been integrated with
the core benefits of Flows
original Dynamic Waterjet
technology, which eliminates
taper and other errors found
on waterjet-cut parts.
In other Flow news,
the company has formed a
strategic alliance with
The Flow Dynamic Waterjet XDs 3D capabilities and versatility
enable shops to cut a wider variety of intricate part designs.
Waterjet in 3D
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 21
Kuka Robot Group (www.
kuka-robotics.com).
This alliance will help
assure we address the
important production and
advanced segments of our
marketplace, said Charley
Brown, president and CEO
of Flow. This expands
our process and robotic
applications.
Stuart Shepherd, president
of Kuka, said that his
company was honored to be
selected by Flow to provide
high-accuracy robotic
technology for the future
growth of robotic waterjet
cutting applications. <<
design with programmable
backlash setting.
Advanced Machine &
Engineering, after testing,
supplied Class 2 worm gears
at no additional charge to the
customer, even though a DIN
standard Class 3 set of worm
gears fulfilled application
requirements. Dan Lapp, a
vice president at Advanced
Machine & Engineering, said
that a conventional solution
would not work and that a
double worm gear set was more
applicable in this situation.
He explained that typical
machine tool worm gears on
the market often have split
shafts and are spring-loaded
to compensate the stick slip
conditions.
In the OTT design, he
noted that backlash can be
virtually eliminated or program-
controlled as a variable value
within one operation cycle.
By the positioning of the shaft
worm and hollow, the backlash
can be changed. The OTT-Matic
feature of the OTT worm gear
allows a definable minimum or
maximum backlash, depending
on the process operation, and
can be set alternatively while the
gear is working. <<
K
en Emerick believes that, in spite of a
difficult economy, manufacturers are
wise to invest in technology that reduces
cycle times, and consequently will lower per-
piece production cost. Emericks shop, Emerick
Machine Products (www.emerickmachine.
com) in Burton, Oh., which specializes in
precision machined parts in steel, brass,
aluminum and other materials for customers
in aerospace, mechanical fittings and precision
part industries, did
just that. The shop not
only shaves costs now,
but is ready for when
incoming orders pick up.
As part of his
technology-investment
plan, Emerick installed
a 65-mm bar capacity
C200 mill-turn machine
from Index Corp.
(www.index-usa.com)
that is already paying
dividends. Thanks to
faster travels, three
independent turrets, and
two Y axes, the C200
reduces cycle times up to 90 percent for one
of the parts the shop produces. In addition,
these faster cycle times will let Emerick replace
several older machines with the one C200.
Not only that, prior to purchasing the
machine, Emerick had Index prove its
performance on one of the shops tougher
parts. It was a 2.5-in.-diameter steel bar, which
required a 1.75-in.-diameter through hole,
bores at each end and grooves in those bores
for retaining a bearing. The machine handled
the part with no problems.
With two Y axes, I can machine the top
and bottom (180 degrees opposite) of a part
simultaneously, saving cycle time. This can
easily save us 50 percent with circular milling,
slotting, porting, tapping or off-set drilling, and
other machining operations, said Emerick.
He added that Index showed him how
capable the C200 is not only for hogging-
out material, but also for holding tight
concentricity tolerances. The company then
demonstrated how what used to take Emerick
60 minutes to machine could be done in 6
minutes, and he quickly realized the machine
could easily pay for itself.
The C200 comes with 5,000-rpm spindles
and runs parts to 7.87-in. long. Three 14-position
tool turrets, a 6.30-in. chuck size, and identical
liquid-cooled main and counter spindles make
for fast, cost-competitive production of medium
complexity parts turned from barstock. The
machines 42 tools, each of which can be driven,
help Emerick produce difficult parts in single
setups and with minimum cycle times.
Tools lock with only one screw and
feature Indexs W-serration at the base of the
toolholder, and an Index-specific improved
VDI interface ensures
repetitive accuracies of
+/- 8 microns up to 3.94
in. from the mounting
surface.
Tools are held
rigidly and do not
move, making setups
faster because we dont
have to align the holder
anymore, said Emerick.
Also, the W-serration
in the toolholders has
increased tool life
by 20 to 50 percent,
depending on the
material being cut.
Another key to reducing cycle times is the
option of dividing machining operations through
simultaneous machining. This is done with the
C200s two Y axes, one at the main spindle and
one shared between the main spindle and the
counter spindle. Each has a travel of 2.76 in.
Emerick pointed out that with such a capable
counterspindle and three turrets, the simultaneous
machining operations he can now program his
machining time way down for every part hes
programmed. And, the two Y axes allow him to
work on both sides of a part at one time, as well
as perform simultaneous off-center machining.
Three tools can be at work simultaneously
driven or fixed including backworking, and
the counterspindle with a driven Z axis can
be synchronized with travel of turret number
three. Counterspindle pick-up from the main
spindle happens in 1.5 seconds.
C200 turret slides move in the X-axis and
Z-axis directions on an Index SingleSlide plate
slide system. This system permits rapids up to
2,362.20 ipm and accelerations of 1G with
maximum rigidity. The plate-type guideway of
the turret slides also means turrets glide directly
on the machines bed for high stiffness and
dampening, and thus longer tool life and better
surface finishes.
Shop Invests in Reduced Cycle Times
Faster travels, three independent turrets,
and two Y axes, on an Index C200 help
reduce cycle times up to 90 percent at
Emerick Machine Products.
22 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
P
aul Precision Machine
Inc., a Tulsa machine
shop, specializes at
machining ductile
iron cylinder castings, steeple
cylinders and crosshead guides
for natural gas compressors.
High-pressure coolant flushing
is required, as the Paul machin-
ing centers accommodate large
work envelopes. The shop had
a recurring and costly problem
resulting from such heavy-duty
machining. Coolant nozzle clog-
ging that followed filters clogged
with cast iron fines created im-
mediate problems in coolant de-
livery to the large workpieces.
Machining cast iron produces
a large volume of small particles,
known as fines. These particles
are often in the 25-to100-micron
range, well below a typical
machine tool filter systems
capabilities. This causes sludge to
accumulate in the chip conveyors
coolant tank and the filter
vessel. When clogging occurs,
the machine requires substantial
downtime and loss of production,
as the sludge is literally shoveled
out of the system.
Every 80 to 100 hours, our
big machining centers were
going down, explained Chuck
Paul, company founder and
president. We had to stop
production, completely break
down the system, clean and
replace parts, reassemble and get
back to business. This process
usually took from eight to 12
hours, resulting in a substantial
loss of revenue, in addition to
pushing back our production
schedule every two weeks or so.
While attending a machine-
tool show, Chucks son Kevin
found a magnetic chip disc
filtration system manufactured
by Hennig Inc. (www.hennig-
inc.com) designed to handle
fines from cast iron machining.
After 60 days of conversation
and drawing exchanges, the
decision was made and the first
Hennig Cast Iron CDF Filtration
System (CICDF) was installed
on one of Pauls 600-mm
Okuma machining centers.
Installing the Hennig CICDF
was a relatively low-impact
process for Paul, as the system
uses the machine tool controls,
interconnected to a manual
auto-switch, so it runs whenever
the machine tool is in operation.
Through the first four months of
operation, no machining-center
downtime occurred as a result
of canister filter clogging. Paul
notes the Hennig CICDF system
performs equally well on all
materials, even non-ferrous.
On the Hennig CICDF, the
dirty coolant is channeled to
the conveyor where the big
chips and larger particles are
conveyed up an incline and
discharged into the chip hopper.
Then, smaller cast-iron fines
are collected by a magnetic
drum that rotates across a
stainless steel scraper blade.
As the sludge accumulates on
the scraper blade, it drops the
fines onto the conveyor incline
with the chip load for delivery
to the chip hopper. Finally, the
smallest particles that escape
the magnetic field of the drum
migrate to a disc filter media
made from a micronic weave
System Collects Clogging Cast-Iron Fines
E D I T E D BY J I M B E N E S I A S S O C I AT E E D I T O R
T O O L I N G & F I X T U R I N G
Kevin Paul,
daughter Lisa
Davis and
Chuck Paul of
Paul Precision
with two of
the cast iron
cylinders the
company
machines.
CASE STUDYs
O I L & N AT U R A L G A S
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 23
of stainless steel mesh that
intercepts particles as small
as 25 microns. A continuous
backwash of coolant blasts the
particles collected on the disc
back to the magnetic drum,
where they are scraped off as
sludge, eventually dropping
onto the conveyor incline and
carried out with the chip load.
The disc filter is sealed with an
inverted lip seal on the clean
side of the conveyor wall, where
the fines and contaminants
cannot interfere with sealing,
so a consistently tight seal and
long seal life is assured. Paul
also reports longer coolant
life and less heat build-up as
other benefits of the system.
Only clean coolant returns to
the reservoir for continuing
duty on the machine tool, or it
is diverted to the systems self-
cleaning spray nozzles.
Paul admits he experienced
some sticker shock at the
cost of the first system, until he
calculated the payback time to be
14 to 16 months on a machining
center running one 10-hour
shift per work day. And, that
calculation accounted only for
the machine tools billing rate.
With the additional uptime
and better predictability on his
work schedule, Paul was able to
improve turnaround time on jobs
and not have to make the almost
bi-weekly adjustments caused by
the former system. As a result,
an additional Hennig CICDF
has been installed and a third is
scheduled. Compared with the
alternatives of a vacuum cleaning
system or the changeover and
hazmat disposal problems of
conventional paper media, there
are substantial cost and other
benefits to the Hennig magnetic
drum system, said Paul. <<
R
ush Machinery Inc.
(www.rushmachinery.
com) has introduced the
Model FC-2000 and Model
FC-5000 Polycrystalline
Tool Grinders that allow
for manufacturing and
regrinding of PCO, CVO,
PCBN, carbide and HSS
tools. These machines
grind angles and radii
on standard and special
turning and milling inserts,
boring tools, milling
cutters, grooving tools,
reamers and other special
tools. The rigid construction
with a 3-hp variable-speed
grinding spindle allows
vibration-free grinding and
fast stock removal.
Both the Model FC-2000
and the Model FC-5000
feature a video optical
system with 15x to120x
(zoom) magnification and
a black-and-white video
monitor. The company said
this system provides a
higher magnification and/
or a larger field of view than
most machine-mounted
optical comparator
systems. In addition, the
video camera moves with
the worktable for easy
set-up and for inspection
during and after grinding.
The Model FC-5000 is
a larger, more versatile
machine than the FC-2000.
In addition to all of the
capabilities of the Model
FC-2000, the Model
FC-5000 features vertical
grinding spindle travel, a
wheel travel range of 500
mm and an oscillation
stroke of 70 mm. The
Model FC-5000 is designed
also for grinding reamers,
drills, end mills, and multi-
step form tools. <<
Polycrystalline Tool Grinders
Tool Presetter and Measuring Devices
T
he new TRISet optical
tool presetting and
measuring device from
Schunk Inc. (www.schunk.
com) allows users to
measure, check and
adjust tools before using
them. With the system,
tools can be clamped,
measured and adjusted
outside the machine
while the CNC machine
carries on producing
without any downtime.
TRISet is suitable for
all conventional tool-
clamping systems.
The setting devices are
available in two measuring
ranges: With a range of
measurement of Z=400
mm and D=400 mm, and a
measuring range of Z=600
mm and D=400 mm.
An integrated TRIBOS
clamping device allows
tools to be clamped in
seconds. In contrast to
other toolholding systems,
with TRIBOS polygonal
clamping technology
no axial displacement
occurs because clamping
occurs only in the radial
direction. The company
said the system increases
productivity because the
use of preset tools helps to
increase machine-running
times and prevents rejects.
The system features
menu operation via the
knob/push button that
enables quick and easy
use. Length and diameter
as well as cutting edge
angle and cutting edge
radius are detected
within seconds due to
ImageController1 image
processing. <<
24 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
A C C E S S O R I E S
A
compact version of GFMesstechniks
MikroCAD measuring system, available
from PAT Gauge Inc. (www.patgauge.com),
performs a variety of precise 3D-inspection
tasks, including measuring both tool height and
edge quality in one task. The ability to measure
cutting edge radii, form defects and tool height
in less than two seconds makes the MikroCAD
Pico a must-have for all tool presetters, Steve
Duffy, president of PAT Gauge, said.
Edge radii are determined by over 100
automatically aligned, sectional planes through a
3D profile data set. This comprehensive evaluation
includes single radii, averages, distributions
and chipping parameters important for
manufacturing high-quality surfaces.
The system also optimizes cutting speed and
minimizes wear and the risk of edge chipping
and fractures. This allows for fast machining
and low rejection rates, resulting in high
efficiency and substantial savings.
The MikroCAD Pico series projects synthetic
fringes for a phase-accurate triangulation
of the entire measuring field. This method
accommodates a large height range at high
resolution in a single pass. Also, micro mirror
display projection (DLP) and dedicated LED
light sources result in precision and stability for
all measuring tasks. <<
CUTTING EDGE 3D
INSPECTION SYSTEM
C U T T I N G P R O D U C T S
I
scar Metals (www.
iscarmetals.com) expanded its
Chatterfree solid-carbide four-
flute endmill family with the
addition of smaller (0.125-in.,
0.157-in. and 0.188-in.) and
larger (1.00-in.) diameters
for roughing and finishing
operations. Due to their
variable pitch they feature good
chatter-dampening ability.
The endmills maximize
stock removal rate and reduce
cycle time in most milling
operations. Their ground
geometry provides good surface
finish and long tool life, while
machining at high material-
removal rates.
The endmills work well
with low-power machines
with ISO40, BT40 or CAT40
adaptations to improve their
material removal rate while
eliminating vibration. They can
be used for full slot machining
of up to two times diameter.
Cutting conditions for rough
machining of alloy steel include:
cutting speed: 590 to 720 SFM;
feed: 0.001-in. to 0.002-in.
IPT; depth of cut: two times
diameter; width of cut: full slot;
flushing method: air, keep the
air tube in the direction opposite
of the tools motion.
Cutting conditions for rough
machining of stainless steel
include: cutting speed: 328 to
390 SFM; feed: 0.001-in. to
0.002-in. IPT; depth of cut:
1.5 - 2 times diameter; width of
cut: full slot; flushing method:
emulsion/air. <<
Endmills for Low-Power Machines
T O O L I N G & F I X T U R I N G
T O O L I N G & W O R K H O L D I N G
A
dvanced Machine & Engineering
(www.ame.com) said its new Triag
5axesClamp overcomes the frequent
difficulty for 5-axis machine spindles to
reach all areas of a complex part using
conventional workholding technology.
Triags compactClamp family of modular workholding minimizes
interference, so machine spindles have full access to workpieces, even
in high-density applications. Access is even better for 5-axis machines,
for which the Triag 5axesClamp was designed. Both small and large
workpieces can be clamped with ease. <<
Modular 5-Axis Clamps
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 25
A
lso new from Iscar
Metals (www.
iscarmetals.com) are the
companys Tangmill ID5 PCD
wiper inserts and Helimill
inserts tipped with IB85
PCBN for machining cast
iron and a range of difficult-
to-machine materials at
high cutting rates. The LNAR
1106PN-R-S-W ID5 PCD-
tipped wiper inserts have
a large frontal radius and
sharp cutting edge. They
provide a uniform clean-
cut edge and good surface
finish of less than Ra 0.3 m.
The inserts can be used on
standard face mills or the
new axially adjustable face
mills with one or two wiper
inserts.
Helimill inserts ADKW
1505 PDER IB85 have
an IB85 PCBN brazed
tip and can be used on
90-degree milling cutters
for semi-finishing and
finish machining on cast
iron. The inserts feature
a 0.031-in. corner radius
and a honed cutting edge
(0.001 in.). They can be used
on standard F90AD...-SFR
or the E90AD ...-HSK63-S
axially adjustable milling
cutters. By adjusting the
axial position of the inserts,
it is possible to obtain a 0.3-
to 0.7-m surface finish.
IB85 is a fine-grain
polycrystalline cubic boron
nitride grade with a small
grain size that makes it
possible to grind a sharp
cutting edge and achieve
high surface quality, which
provides long tool life.
The IB85 grade,
containing 85% PCBN with
Al Co and W binder, is a
strong and tough material
that can be used for heavy
roughing and interrupted
cuts. The range of materials
covered by IB85 includes
hardened and cast steel
of over 45 HRc, gray and
ductile cast iron, powder
compacted and sintered
metals and heat-resistant
alloys. <<
PCD/PCB-tipped Milling Inserts
G
reenleaf Corp. (www.greenleaf.com) said its new line
of Excelerator Ball Nose Mills is the only complete
line of ball-nose cutters designed to use both ceramic and
carbide inserts in the same qualified cutter bodies. The
company also said the cutter geometry combined with
ceramic or carbide inserts offers higher performance,
longer tool life and better cutting action over competitors
mills across a wider spectrum of materials.
The ball nose insert geometry prevents excess tool
pressure at high metal-removal rates and has the edge
strength to shear material without smearing. Greenleafs
WG- 600 ceramic and G-925 carbide inserts maximize tool
life when machining a wide variety of difficult materials
including nickel- and cobalt-based super alloys, hard steels,
soft steels, stainless steels, titanium and more. The cutter line
is available in standard- and extended-length versions.
Ball Nose Mills for
Difficult-to-Cut Materials
S
ensors at their wrists measure
forces and torque to give
robots a sense of touch, and
thanks to a coordinated effort
by ATI Industrial Automation (www.
ati-ia.com) and Staubli Robotics (www.
staubli.us), ATIs Networkable Force/
Torque Sensor System (Net F/T) is now
fully compatible with Staubli robots to
allow them a sense of touch.
The joint effort provides true plug-
and-play connectivity via Ethernet
to Staubli CS8 robot controllers. The
Net F/T transducer, with Net Box,
interfaces to the robot controller via
a TCP/IP socket and optional VAL3
library, which reads force values to
enhance manufacturing automation.
Together, the cost-effective robot
and sensor let shops automate difficult
assembly, machining and finishing tasks
that previously required skilled personnel
or complex assembly machines.
Net F/T Sensor systems measure
six components of force and torque
(Fx, Fy, Fz, Tx, Ty and Tz) and are
available on any of ATIs Force/Torque
transducers, and help optimize end-user
robotic applications. ATIs Six-Axis
Force/Torque sensors work with a
variety of robots.
In addition to providing an Ethernet
and a CAN bus communication
interface, the Net F/T sensor systems
EtherNet/IP interface is fully ODVA-
compliant. Either Power over Ethernet
(PoE) or an external power supply
(11VDC or 24VDC) drives the Net
F/T system. Its interface (Net Box) is
sealed to IP65 (water splash proof),
and its transducer and cable can be
sealed to IP68 (submersible in fresh
water to 10 m). Multiple transducer
calibrations can be permanently stored
in the system for user selection.
Advantages of the Net F/T system
over conventional systems include cable-
break detection, multiple interfaces,
LAN connectivity, high-speed output,
Web-based configuration and demo, pro-
grammable thresholding and more. <<
E D I T E D BY C H A R L E S B AT E S I S E N I O R E D I T O R
A U T O M A T I O N
26 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
ATI Industrial Automations Net
F/T sensor system gives Staubli
robots a sense of touch.
ROBOTS
GET A SENSE
OF TOUCH
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 27
A
utomated,
pollution-free, low-
temperature black
oxide finishing systems
from Birchwood Casey
(www.birchwoodcasey.
com) are reducing finishing
costs by as much as 75
percent for two of the
companys customers. One
Tru Temp CNC automated
system is being used for
finishing motion control
and power transmission
components, while a
second Tru Temp system
is finishing firearm-
related components.
Both systems employ
the latest automated
finish technology for
environmentally friendly,
fast part finishing without
the addition of labor.
Manufacturers are
striving to improve quality
and lower costs without
using polluting processes,
and one primary area
of interest is in metal
finishing, reported Mark
Ruhland, vice president of
Birchwood Casey. The
latest automated CNC Tru
Temp system incorporates
a programmable hoist that
moves components through
the 200-degree F. black oxide
process in a 28-minute cycle
from start to finish.
He added that the
safe and simple process
contains no EPA-regulated
compounds and usually
requires no waste treatment
of process rinse waters. The
CNC-controlled process
line produces consistently
high-quality, black oxide
finishes with minimal
labor input, to streamline
workflow patterns and
smoothly mesh with ISO
and JIT programs. Capital
costs are modest, with fast
payback schedules. <<
An automated Tru Temp black oxide finishing system can potentially
reduce part finishing costs up to 75 percent.
AUTOMATED FINISHING SYSTEM
FINISHES FIRST
S
hops can expand
the automation-
ready Sirius Plus
flying optics laser-cutting
system with the addition
of various components to
form an automated load/
unload system. With an
optional compact tower
system, the Sirius Plus
becomes a productive,
flexible manufacturing cell
that operates in lights-
out applications. The
tower system, working in
concert with a material
handling unit, provides
full capabilities for loading
and unloading and can
include a shelving unit for
storing raw material and
finished parts.
Sirius laser-cutting
systems, from LVD Strippit
Inc. (www.lvdgroup.com),
also come in a standard
version, besides the Plus
model. The machines
deliver quick positioning
with axis speeds to 120 m/
min and, as a standard
unit, feature 3 m by 1.5-m
integrated shuttle tables
that allow one table to be
loaded while the machine
is cutting on the other
table. Table changes take
25 seconds.
As with all LVD Strippit
laser cutting systems, the
Sirius machines employ
GE Fanuc RF-excited, fast
axial flow CO2 lasers and
are available in 2.5-kW
or 4-kW CO2 versions.
And lasers, CNCs, drives
and motors are fully
integrated for processing
speed, reliability and
low operating and
maintenance costs.
Integrated GE Fanuc
PC-based controls
reproduce programmed
part contours perfectly,
as well as acute angles at
high speeds. Laser power
is matched to the vectorial
speeds for constant cut
widths and small heat-
affected zones.
For a comprehensive
laser-cutting CAM
package, LVD Strippit
offers its CADMAN-L 3D
offline programming
software, which includes
an integrated 3D design
and unfolding module for
easy importing of 2D and
3D designs, automatic
unfolding, and generation
of flat patterns from 2D
or 3D files. The software
also has fully automatic,
semi-automatic or manual
nesting, and optimizes
cutting and machine
parameters to maximize
sheet utilization.
LIGHTS-OUT
LASER CUTTING
The automation-ready Sirius Plus flying optics laser cutting system.
E DI T E D BY R OB E R T B R OOK S I E D I T O R
T
hroughout the past lean year,
energy markets have remained
steady for their suppliers
including oil and natural gas
exploration, refining, and distribution.
MIC Group is one of those suppliers.
The Texas-based shop produces high-
alloy components, mainly for energy
markets, and with concurrent engineer-
ing and integrated manufacturing,
it develops new products and offers
capabilities like investment casting and
electron-beam welding, in addition to
multiple CNC machining and precision
grinding capabilities.
Energy isnt the only market
where MIC is active. Aerospace and
defense suppliers also make the call
for contract manufacturing of quick-
turnaround prototypes and full-scale
production runs. But, no matter the
market conditions, finished product
quality is critical to MICs reputation
and long-term success.
To automate its First Article
Inspection (FAI) documentation,
MIC Group selected InspectionXpert
2010 (www.inspectionexpert.
com), developed by Extensible
CAD Technologies. It is the latest
installment for a quality-control
platform used to generate inspection
report forms and ballooned
inspection drawings, quickly and
accurately, from CAD programs.
FAI is a necessary task for
manufacturers to compare a physical
sample with the specifications upon
which it was produced (e.g., a CAD
version of the component). Each
specific dimension is measured on
the physical part and compared with
the standard, and a list is compiled
of the dimensions that have been (or
have not been) met.
InspectionXpert inspects
components and compares them to
versions it draws from CAD programs
including SolidWorks, AutoCAD, Solid
Edge, Pro/ENGINEER, and CATIA, or
from 2D drawings (e.g., PDFs or TIFs
among many other formats).
MIC Groups customers require
the inspection data sheets with
comprehensive and reliable measured
dimensions for every part shipped.
Its components average 300 different
dimensions to be verified, often with
up to 1,800 elements. Among the tasks
it performs with InspectionXpert First-
Article 2010 are:
1) Applying sequentially numbered
balloons to the face of the CAD
drawings to track the inspectable
dimensions;
2) Creating an inspection sheet,
including the reference numbers and
actual dimensions that travel with the
components to be filled out by the
machinists and inspectors throughout
the process; and
3) Comparing drawing revisions
to evaluate the impact on the
manufacturing process.
According to Nathan Byman, MIC
Group general manager, The most
powerful advantage of InspectionXpert
is that it completes these three tasks
simultaneously, and in less time than
any one of them could be performed
using any other familiar method.
Recently, MIC Group indicated
that since adopting InspectionXpert
it is achieving average time savings of
80%. We currently have one person
working full-time doing this job
function. Without InspectionXpert,
we would need at least four more to
keep up with the current workload,
according to Byman.
When you look at collapsing these
functions, you arent just looking
at an improvement in one area, he
detailed: You are looking at a total
process that, in our experience, is five
times faster. <<
28 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
Inspecting for Quality
FAI is critical to performance for a contract manufacturer.
The InspectionXpert First-Article user interface shows sequentially numbered balloons that
are automatically added to a print each time a user highlights an element.
O I L & N AT U R A L G A S
S O F T WA R E & C O N T R O L S
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 29
C
NC controls developer NUM
Corp. (www.num.com) recently
introduced a three-dimensional
simulation program that unifies
workpiece simulation with collision
monitoring. True 3D, as its called,
makes it possible for machine builders
to introduce advanced optimization
capabilities, which machine shops may
use to increase throughput.
NUM claimed True 3D is one of
the first commercial CNC software
simulation tools to combine workpiece
simulation with collision-monitoring
facilities. Machine shops will be able
to prototype and optimize the entire
machine production process in virtual
mode, which, along with better machine
productivity, should reduce tool wear.
3D simulation is among the latest
results of dramatic improvements
in PC processor performance over
the past several years. Aside from
simulating complex machining
processes, NUM reported that
the software visualizes tools, the
machines kinematic properties, and
the workpiece blank as 3D volumes.
Even the complex interpolated
engagements that take place between
the tool and the workpiece in five-axis
CNC machines can be depicted.
The 3D simulation calculates the
entire process chain of a machine
tool, from the ISO standard CNC
program and its CNC processing, to
the machining process, according
to the developer. Thus, collisions
are detected, too, meaning potential
collisions between tools and the
workpiece, as well as between the
tools and machine elements (e.g.,
motor housings, sensors).
The simulator includes an abrasion-
analysis module that calculates
the material removal rate in cubic
millimeters-per-second at every point
of the machining cycle, as well as the
specific material removal rate on the
tool surface in cubic millimeters-per-
second-per-millimeter.
Programmers using True 3D watch
color animation of the specific removal
rate on the tool surface, gaining a visual
confirmation that the machine is using
the best cutting feed. Removal rates
are shown as percentage gradations, so
the optimum manufacturing time can
be identified according to the best tool-
wear results. <<
Detect Collisions and Simulate Workpieces
Above: A True 3D simulation
of a 5-axis tool grinder .
Right: True 3D simulates a grinding wheel,
with localized overstraining
highlighted in red .
V
ersion 2.0 of
BobCOST software
(www.bobcost.com)
has been released, allowing
users of the BobCAD-CAM
suite to develop accurate and
ready-to-deliver quotes easily.
BobCAD-CAM (www.
bobcad.com), which calls
itself the world leader
in affordable CAD-
CAM software, offers
programming for milling
and profiling, lathes and
turning, wire EDM, and art
conversion and nesting jobs.
Free demos of all the
companys programs are
available for download.
BobCOST is the latest
addition to the portfolio. It
was developed in partnership
with Micro Estimating
Systems Inc.
BobCOST features
an intuitive software
interface that calculates all
manufacturing costs for
most CAD/CAM products,
and it contains libraries for
materials, machine tools,
contacts, labor, currency and
inter-departmental databases,
among others. Formulas
and built-in calculators are
included to make quoting
simple and fast.
Shops quoting jobs by
hand will immediately reap
benefits from switching to
BobCOST, stated BobCAD-
CAMs executive director
Larry Pendleton, and the
many shops using homemade
Excel-based solutions will
see improvements in quoting
efficiency from the first quote
they generate. <<
UPDATED
JOB-COST
ESTIMATING
SOFTWARE
30 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
S O F T W A R E & C O N T R O L S
SolidWorks 2010 Debuts
A
mong this months notable
events for precision
manufacturers will be
SolidWorks World 2010 a
conference and expo for users of
the Windows-based CAD program
developed by Dassault Systmes
(www.solidworks.com), as well as
SolidWorks program and component
partners. The new product,
SolidWorks 2010, reportedly is
focused on optimizing core design
functions, so users can speed up
their design work, intelligently. It
also reportedly includes hundreds of
customer-specified enhancements.
SolidWorks World 2010 begins
January 31 in Anaheim, Calif., with a
program that lists over 150 technical
presentations by SolidWorks users
and industry experts.
Delcam for SolidWorks
Among the new product
introductions there will be Delcam
for SolidWorks, Delcam plcs (www.
delcam.com) new integrated CAM
system for the CAD platform. Delcam
said the initial version of Delcam for
SolidWorks will include its modules
for drilling and two- through five-
axis milling; subsequent versions will
include turning, mill-turn and wire
EDM modules.
It will be a new programming
concept for Delcam, which has
usually supplied its machining
software as stand-alone programs for
linking to any CAD program. Delcam
for SolidWorks marks a new direction
for Delcam. Tom McCollough,
Delcams vice president for
FeatureCAM development, said the
group was responding to numerous
customer requests to be able to
conduct CAM programming from
within the SolidWorks environment.
The developer said Delcam for
SolidWorks combines the benefits
of its PowerMILL and FeatureCAM
CAM systems, using machining
algorithms already used effectively
by over 30,000 machining operations
worldwide. Examples of this are
its toolpath calculation speed and
advanced high-speed machining
capabilities.
Delcam for SolidWorks will be
fully integrated into the SolidWorks
environment, appearing and
functioning like the CAD program,
with full associativity so that changes
in the CAD model will automatically
be interpreted in the toolpaths.
However, this associativity will be
more intelligent than that offered in
many other integrated CAM systems,
according to the software group.
Delcam for SolidWorks will not
simply modify the existing toolpaths
but also will review the choice of
cutting tools and machining strategies,
and change them if necessary.
Toolpaths generated with Delcam
for SolidWorks may be checked by
the integrated simulation module
before they are passed to the machine
tool. A complete range of Delcam
post-processors are included, for
fast and accurate data transfer to the
machine tool or auxiliaries.
Mastercam X4 for SolidWorks
Also this month, CNC Software
Inc. will introduce a SolidWorks-
compatible CAM program
Mastercam X4 for SolidWorks
(www.mastercamforsolidworks.com)
which it calls a fully integrated,
seamless application that will let
The first version of Delcam for SolidWorks will include modules for drilling and two- through
five-axis milling; subsequent versions will include turning, mill-turn and wire EDM modules.
Mastercam for SolidWorks presents users
with a number of capabilities that allow
them to program their parts directly within
SolidWorks using Mastercam toolpaths and
machining capabilities.
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 31
users program their parts directly
within SolidWorks using Mastercam
toolpaths and machining capabilities.
Mastercam for SolidWorks presents
a suite of cutting strategies, including
Feature Based Machining (FBM) and
3D High Speed Machining (HSM)
toolpaths. It also delivers automated
cleanup toolpaths meant to let
machinists complete parts faster and
with little or no handwork, according
to the developer.
Benefits are expected both on the
CAD and CAM sides of the program.
Mastercam for SolidWorks reportedly
relies on familiar parameter screens
and processes, and presents a
machining tree that provides quick
access to any point in the production
process.
Conventional 2D programming,
e.g., pocketing or contouring, will
gain a range of high-power functions,
according to CNC, including:
r%ZOBNJD.JMMJOHBNFUIPEGPS
constant toolpath adaptation, so
cutting conditions remain consistent
and machinists can use the entire
length of the tool flute.
r)JHI4QFFE.BDIJOJOHBGVODUJPO
for speeding up production and
maintaining superior finish.
r1FFM.JMMJOHXIJDIFOTVSFT
efficient constant climb milling
between two chosen contours or
along a single contour. When cutting
hardened material, the peel mill
toolpath allows you to use the full
flute depth of the cutter and avoid
taking many shallow cuts, according
to the developer.
NCG CAM for SolidWorks
NCG CAM will support SolidWorks
2010, its developer NCG CAM
Solutions Ltd. (www.ncgcam.com)
reported. NCG CAM HSM CAM is
described as an easy-to-use stand-
alone system that integrates with
existing CAD and CAM systems, e.g.
SolidWorks. NCG CAM allows users
to open SolidWorks parts directly,
and when it detects a SolidWorks file
has been changed, allows the user
to update toolpaths that have been
generated in NCG CAM.
Engineers dont have time to worry
about software complexity or the
problem of integrating data between
separate applications, explained
Nick Iwaskow, SolidWorks Manager,
Alliances. Combining NCG CAMs
CAM capability with SolidWorks 2010
3D CAD enables engineers to focus on
innovation, quality, and productivity
instead of how to use the software.
NCG CAM has a user-friendly
interface with a short learning curve.
It creates optimized, smooth cutting
motions for 3D HSM and aids in
extending tool life, minimizing wear
on the machine tool, and producing
parts with good surface finishes.
(A demonstration version of
NCG CAM software is available
for download: www.ncgcam.com/
demorequest.html)
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32 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
B Y P E T E R B . A L P E R N I AS S OCI AT E E DI T OR
O P E R A T I O N S
N
eed a machinist?
So do a lot of other
companies. The
problem is finding
available, qualified machinists.
Even under the current
economic downturn, the
demand for engineers,
machinists and machine
operators remains high. Those
three professions have made
Manpower Inc.s Annual 10
Hardest Jobs to Fill list in each
of the past four years.
But, that concern is not
as acute in the Los Angeles
area as a result of a series
of training centers operated
by the National Tooling and
Machining Assn. (NTMA).
Since the facilities opened in
1968, over 15,000 machinists
and operators have used the
centers to learn their trade.
NTMAs training centers
are split into two campuses in
Southern California, in Norwalk
and Ontario. At Ontario, there
are over 80 computers, with
shops featuring 53 manual
machines, two wire EDMs and
19 CNC machine tools.
The training
centers partner
with machine-tool
manufacturer Haas
Automation (www.
haascnc.com) for
its Haas Technical
Education Centers
(HTEC). The
Ontario campus
uses seven Haas
vertical machining
centers (VF-0, VF-
2SS, three Mini
Mills and two
TM-1 Toolroom
Mills) and eight
Haas CNC lathes
(TL-1 Toolroom
Lathe, SL-10,
three SL-20s, three
Mini Lathes).
Additionally, there
are six Haas CNC
control simulators
for classroom instruction.
The instructors, facilities
and technology offer students
the chance to learn advanced
skills on highly sophisticated
machinery.
Some of the students have
never been in a shop before, and
this is all new to them, said Jim
Ragaisis, director of training for
the NTMA Training Centers
Ontario campus. In module
one, we teach students with
no knowledge of machining
that this is a mill, this is a
lathe. When they finish all five
modules which is 725 hours
theyre well prepared to start
their careers.
In addition to instruction in
NTMA training
centers in California
partnered with
machine-tool
manufacturer Haas
Automation to
teach advanced
machining skills
to students, using
sophisticated
machinery.
A New Generation of Machinists
>> on 46
TO ADVERTISE IN THE USED EQUIPMENT DIRECTORY CONTACT: BOB SCOFIELD AT 973-400-1790 OR BOB.SCOFIELD@PENTON.COM
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 33
USED EQUI PMENT DI RECTORY
Machinery, Inc.
O-M VC-6NR, CNC Vertical Boring Mill, 31 Swing,
(2) 24 4-Jaw Chucks, Pallet Changer, 1,000RPM,
12ATC, 40HP, Fanuc 21T, 1998, Ref. # 51203
Phone: 516-922-7977 Fax: 516-922-9691
Email: sales@primemach.com
Contact Steve Brenner
MORI SEIKI NL2500/700, New 2004, 10 Chuck,
36 Swing, 28 Turning Length, 4,000RPM,
MSX 850 Control with Mapps, Ref. # 48450
OKK VM5 II, 40X, 20Y, 20Z, CAT 50, 13,000RPM,
20ATC, 40HP, Neomatic 635, New 2000, Ref. # 51087
MORI SEIKI SL-75, Fanuc 16, 20"Chk, 6.3" Bore,
36" Swing, 68"CC, 1,010 RPM, 50 HP, Ref. # 52352
4.3 TOSHIBA BTD-11ER16, Tosnuc 777,
1994, 79X, 59Y, 60 ATC, 2,500 RPM, CTS,
Rotary Table, Ref. # 49004
60 WEBSTER & BENNET, Fanuc 0, 64 Swing, 127RPM,
16ATC, 75HP, 60 4-Jaw Chuck, Chip Conv, Ref. # 51301
KITAMURA MYCENTER H400, 24X, 20Y, 20Z,
(2) 15.75 Pallets, Full 4th, 100 Position ATC,
Probe, 10,000 RPM, Fanuc 15MB, Ref. # 52054
RAVENSBURG KH-100 CNC, 70" Faceplate, 79" Swing,
90 HP, 300 RPM, 78" Z -Axis Travel, 57" X-Axis Travel,
Seimens 810T CNC Control, (2 Avail.), Ref. # 50544
HYUNDAI-KIA SKT-250MS, Fanuc 18IT,
10" Chuck Main, 8" Sub, Live Miling, Sub
Spindle, C-AXIS, 2006, Ref. # 52283
72 WEBSTER BENNET EH, 84 Swing, 48 Under
Rail, Turret, 83 RPM, 72 4-Jaw, 1961, Ref. # 51734
North Cove Plaza, Unit 10 Oyster Bay, NY 11771
Visit us on the web:
www.primemach.com
O-M CNC Vertical Boring Mill, Live Milling, Fanuc 15
CNC Control, C-Axis Table, Scale Feedback, 48"
3-Jaw Chuck, 63" Swing, ATC, Ref. # 50678
CALL FOR MORE DETAILS AND SEE UNDER POWER
TOSHIBA TX-16, 63 Table with 4-Jaws, Turret, DRO,
79 Swing, 59 Height Under Rail, 160 RPM, Ref. # 52186
Just
In!
Visit Our
Website
primemach.com
For More
Machines
Call Us
For Details
on Our Many
Machines
For Sale
TO ADVERTISE IN THE USED EQUIPMENT DIRECTORY CONTACT: BOB SCOFIELD AT 973-400-1790 OR BOB.SCOFIELD@PENTON.COM
USED EQUI PMENT DI RECTORY
34 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
Grinders Clearing House Has Many Remanufactured Machines in Stock
Ready for Immediate Delivery!
18 x 72 Model DE Universal Cylindrical
Remanufactured 2001
Excellent Machine
I NTERNAL GRINDERS
Bryant Heald Parker Majestic
Many Remanufactured in Stock
SURFACE GRINDERS
Horizontal - Rotary
Blanchard Thompson Mattison
G&L Parker Reid Brown &Sharpe
TOOL &CUTTER
Brown & Sharpe K. O. Lee
Cincinnati Makino
Call or Fax for our New 2010
Brochure with color Photos
of Many Different Machines
ALWAYS BUYING (1) ONE MACHINE OR ENTIRE PLANTS!
#220-8 Cincinnati Centerless
Remanufactured 2001
Ready for immedi ate service
10 x 36 Norton CTU Plain Cylindr ical
Remanufactured 2001-Warranty
BEARING GRINDERS
Inner-Outer Races Bore
CENTERLESS GRINDERS
Bryant Cincinnati Koyo
Many Remanufactured in Stock
DISC GRINDERS
Gardner Besley Koyo
CYLINDRICAL
(PLAIN & UNIVERSAL)
ANGLE HEAD
Cincinnati Landis Norton
Parker Brown & Sharpe
Much More!
WORLDS LARGEST STOCKING DEALER OF GRINDERS
Over 1200
Machines in Stock
Call On Our Exchange Program
For All Types of Grinders
Many Other Models of Machinery
Available. Call Our Experienced Staff to
Answer All Your Questions
Visit Our Web Page for Our Up-To-Date Inventory
FROM A SINGLE TOOL TO AN ENTIRE PLANT BOUGHT, SOLD, APPRAISED AND LIQUIDATED
TOOLROOM PRODUCTION GRINDERS
Only 30 Minutes from Detroits Metro Airport or 5 Minutes from City Airport
#171 Heald Si zematic Internal
Remanufactured 2001
18-36 Rotary Surface
Remanufactured 2001
#13 Brown & Sharpe Tool & Cutter
Excellent Tool!
13301 E. Eight Mile Rd., Warren, Michigan 48089-3238 (586) 771-1500 Fax (586)771-5958
www.grindersclearinghouse.com email: gch1@voyager.net
TO ADVERTISE IN THE USED EQUIPMENT DIRECTORY CONTACT: BOB SCOFIELD AT 973-400-1790 OR BOB.SCOFIELD@PENTON.COM
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 35
USED EQUI PMENT DI RECTORY
DANILUK REMANUFACTURING
The Daniluk Corporation stocks used Cincinnati Milacron MO Series Cinturn lathes
ready for remanufacture to your specifications. These lathes are available with 15,
18, and 24 chucks and center distances ranging from 60 to 120. Our
remanufacture package includes delivery and installation, operator and
maintenance training, and a full one-year parts and labor warranty.
888-745-6647 sales@daniluk.com
www.daniluk.com
OKLAHOMA CITY OKLAHOMA
Regrinding of Ways
Replacement of Ballscrews
New Automatic Lube System
Replacement of Hydraulic System
New Chip Conveyor
Re-Engineered Axis Drive System
New Controls and Axis Drives
New Spindle Drive
Rebuild of Tool Turrets
Rebuild of Chuck and Chuck Actuator
REMANUFACTURES INCLUDE:
REMANUFACTURED
CINCINNATI
CINTURN
LEASE/PURCHASE
THESE MACHINES
AS LOW AS
$5000
PER MONTH
TO ADVERTISE IN THE USED EQUIPMENT DIRECTORY CONTACT: BOB SCOFIELD AT 973-400-1790 OR BOB.SCOFIELD@PENTON.COM
USED EQUI PMENT DI RECTORY
36 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
REX SUPPLY CO.
WORKHOLDING PRODUCTS
CALL TODAY FOR YOUR COPY OF THE
REX SUPPLY CATALOG !
1-800-369-0669
ASK FOR EDDIE LAYTON
WORKHOLDING MANAGER
COMPLETE REPAIR, SERVICE
AND INSTALLATION
SPECIAL APPLICATIONS CAPABILITIES
NEW, USED AND SURPLUS
WORKHOLDING PRODUCTS
(WE BUY SURPLUS !)
WE REPRESENT THE FOLLOWING LINES:
ATS
Collect Chucks
AUTOBLOK
Power Chucks and
Accessories
BERGMANS
Face Plate and
Boring Mill Jaws
BISON
3 & 4 Jaw Manual
Chucks
BUCK
Adjust - Tru Chucks
CUSHMAN INDUSTRIES
DUNHAM TOOL
CO.
Collect Chucks
FAIRLANE
Carbide Grippers
FORKARDT, INC.
Power and Index
Chucks
GAMET
Power Chucks
H&R
Hard & Soft Top Jaws
HEINRICH
Power Vises
HOWA
Power chucks
HURON
Top Jaws
KITAGAWA
Power Chucks
LNS AMERICAN
Bar Feeds and
Accessories
LOGANSPORT
High Speed Power
Chucks
MATSUMOTO (MMK)
Power Chucks
MAXI-GRIP
Power and Special
Design Chucks
MICO-CENTRIC
Precision Chucks
MID-STATE
Tombstones
Angle Plates and
Fixtures
NIKKEN
Rotary Tables
NOBEL
Manual Chucks
Face Plate and
Boring Mill Jaws
POWERHOLD
Power Chucks
PLATT BURNERD
PRODUCTION DYNAMICS
Self-Contained Collet
Chucks
QU-CO
Quick Change Fixture
Plates
RANSOME
REX HAS I T !
ROHM
Power Chucks
(Self Contained &
Manual)
ROYAL PRODUCTS
CNC Collet Chucks
SCA
3 & 4 Jaw Manual
Chucks
SHEFFER
Special Design Chucks
THE SP MFG CORP
Power Chucks
S.M.W.
SYSTEMS, INC.
SPEED GRIP
Rotating Chucks
Stationary Chucks
STACE ALLEN
Chucks
SUPERIOR CINCINNATI
Collets
TROYKE
Rotary and Index
Tables
TSUDAKOMA
CNC Rotary Tables
WALKER
Magnetic Chucks
YUASA
Super Spacers
Rotary and Index
Tables
New Used
Remanufactured
Production
Broaching
Parts Service
Tooling
25180 SEELEY RD.
NOVI, MI 48375-2044
e VV rtical, Surface, (Dual Ram)
6 Ton, 54 Str, U.S. Broach, Tilt Tables
15 Ton, 66 Str, Colonial
15 Ton, 90 Str, Colonial, Tilt Ta TT bles, Exc.
25 Ton, 66 Str, Detroit, Excellent
25 Ton, 90 Str, Detroit, Tilt
25 Ton, 120 Str, Detroit
30 Ton, 110 Str, Detroit
Ve VV rtical, Surface (Single Ram)
10 Ton, 66 Str, Detroit, Will Tool TT
10 Ton, 78 Str, LaPointe, Tilt Ta TT ble, Exc.
15 Ton, 90 Str, Colonial, Exc.
20 Ton, 100 Str, LaPointe
30 Ton, 90 Str, Colonial, Exc., Will Tool TT
Ve VV rtical, Table-Up TT
6 Ton, 42 Str, Detroit, (2) 1995
10 Ton, 48 Str, American, 1998
15 Ton, 54 Str. BMS Cell-Mate, 1996
Ve VV rtical, Tri- TT Way
6 Ton, 24 Str, American
10 Ton, 36 Str, American, Will Tool TT
15 Ton, 36 American
Grinders, Broach
36 Colonial, Round Grinder
48 Colonial, Flat Grinder
72 Colonial, Combination Grinder
84 Colonial Univ., For Round & Flat Broaches
100 LaPointe, Comb., Round & Flat Sharpening
Ve VV rtical, Hi-Speed
3 Ton, 24 Str, Miles, 1985
6 Ton, 36 Str, Cruiser, Hi-Speed, 90 FPM, New
12 Ton, 48 Str, Miles, 1982
Continuous Chain
36 to 180, 40 in stock
Horizontal
2.5 Ton, 30 Str, LaPointe
4 Ton, 30 Str, American
7.5 Ton, 60 Str, LaPointe
10 Ton, 54 Str, Oilgear
20 Ton, 100 Str, LaPointe, Will Tool TT
25 Ton, 90 Str, Colonial, W/ Retriever, Late
35 Ton, 100 Str, Detroit W/Power Retriever
60 Ton x 72 American
100 Ton x 120 Colonial
Horizontal, Surface
180 Str, Detroit, tooled for Discs.
180 Colonial, Two Way (2)
180 LaPointe, Tooled for Discs
Ve VV rtical, Pull Down
5 Ton, 30 Str, Detroit # VP-5-30, Will Tool TT (6)
10 Ton, 42 Str, Detroit, Pull Down, In Stock
10 Ton, 54 Str, Colonial, Retriever, Will Tool TT
10 Ton, 66 Str, Detroit
15 Ton, 72 Str, Colonial
25 Ton, 66 Str, Detroit
25 Ton, 90 Str, Detroit
50 Ton, 72 Str, Colonial, SD-50-72
50 Ton, 90 Str, Detroit, Excellent Cond.
60 Ton, 102 Str, U.S. Broach, Oilgear Power
Ve VV rtical, Pull Up
8 Ton, 24 Str, American
20 Ton, 48 Str, Colonial, Pull-Up, Will Tool TT
Website: www.BroachingMachine.com
Phone: 248-471-4500 Toll-Free: 800-229-4666 Fax: 248-471-0745
Emai l : bms@broachi ngmachi ne. com
See inventories for these dealers
and many more
in this months issue of
Used Equipment Directory
at www.ued-ed.com
Sign up
to receive
U
ED
m
onthly
via em
ail!
TO ADVERTISE IN THE USED EQUIPMENT DIRECTORY CONTACT: BOB SCOFIELD AT 973-400-1790 OR BOB.SCOFIELD@PENTON.COM
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 37
USED EQUI PMENT DI RECTORY
Vertical, Pull Down
3 Ton x 24 Detroit VP-3-24, 1969
10 Ton x 42 Colonial SD-10-42, 1965
10 Ton x 54 Detroit VP-10-54
15 Ton x 42 Detroit VP-15-42, 1958
15 Ton x 48 Colonial SD-15-48, RB 1993
15 Ton x 54 Broach VP-15-54, 1997
20 Ton x 42 US Broach VP-20-42, 1995
25 Ton x 66 Colonial SD-25-66, 1979
25 Ton x 72 Detroit VP-25-72, 1968
30 Ton x 66 US VP-30-66, 1979
35 Ton x 72 Detroit VPD-35-72, 1981
35 Ton x 78 Federal VPD-35-78, 1995
Vertical, Table, Up
20 Ton x 48 Federal Broach VRT-20-48, 1995
35 Ton x 78 Detroit VTU-35-78, 2002
Vertical, Surface, Single Ram
10 Ton x 36 Colonial UV-10-36, 1978
10 Ton x 54 Detroit VS-10-54, 1956
10 Ton x 66 Detroit VS-10-66, 1973 (2)
15 Ton x 54 Detroit VS-15-54, 1957
15 Ton x 78 Detroit VS-15-78
15 Ton x 110 Detroit VS-15-110, 1965
25 Ton x 90 Detroit VST-25-90, 1964
25 Ton x 100 Detroit VST-25-100
Vertical, Surface, Dual Ram
5 Ton x 54 Detroit VTT-5-54, 1974
10 Ton x 66 Detroit VT-10-66 (3)
10 Ton x 66 U.S. Broach TS-10-66, 65, 1986
10 Ton x 90 Ferderal Broach, VT-10-90, 2000
15 Ton x 42 U.S. Broach TS-15-42, 1978
15 Ton x 54 Detroit VT-15-54, 1965
15 Ton x 66 Detroit VT-15-66, 1977 (5)
15 Ton x 90 Colonial RVT-15-90 (2) RB 1996
25 Ton x 120 Colonial RVT-25-120, 1974
25 Ton x 130 VT-25-130 Detroit New 1984
Pot Broach
25 Ton x 54 Federal DVPU-25-54, 1998
40 Ton x 72 General DPUP-40-72, 1989
MACHINE-R-E-SALES INC.
21020 Coolidge Hwy., Oak Park, MI 48237
Call Ed Egrin 248-541-0733 FAX 248-541-6929
E-Mail: broachnow@sbcglobal.net
Horizontal, Pull
6 Ton x 54 Colonial HAS-6-54
7-1/2 Ton x 48 Detroit Model H-7.5 x 48, 1975
10 Ton x 48 American, 4-10-48
10 Ton x 56 Detroit, H-10-56, 1968
16 Ton x 64 Oilglenn, XL-32-64
20 Ton x 72 LaPointe HP-40 w/Ret, 1969
37 1/2 Ton x 72 LaPointe, HP-75
50 Ton x 72 Detroit H-50-72 Hyd. Ret.
Horizontal, Surface
15 Ton x 120 Colonial HR-15-120
Press Broach
6 Ton x 24 Colonial Pbh-6-24
6 Ton x 36 Colonial PB-6-36
Broach Sharpener
10 x 36 LaPointe BS-36
Triway
4 Ton x 24 American T-4-24
6 Ton x 24 American T-6-24
Chain Broaches
CH-25-144 Detroit, New 1970
CH-35-200 Detroit, 1972
Hi-Speed Broach
3 Ton x 36 Ty-Miles MB-6-36-90, 1974
4 Ton x 24 Ty-Miles (1)
3 Ton x 24 Astro (1)
3 Ton x 24 Ohio (1)
2-5 Ton & 1-8 Ton x 36 Ty-Miles (3)
5 Ton x 36 Ohio VSHD-5-36, 1990 (2)
4-6 Ton & 1-4 Ton x 36 Astro (5)
5 Ton x 48 Ohio (2)
6 Ton x 54 Ohio VSHD-5-36, 1986
8 Ton x 48 TyMiles MBLD 16-48-60, 2003
DANILUK REMANUFACTURING
As one of the largest machine tool remanufacturers in
the U.S., The Daniluk Corporation stocks machines for
sale, as-is, and for remanufacture. We will even
remanufacture a machine from our extensive stock
and exchange it for your machine in order to eliminate
down time and the cost of new foundations and tooling.
DANILUK
888-745-6647 FAX: 405-745-6646
OKLAHOMA CITY www.daniluk.com OKLAHOMA
BLAST CLEANING EQUIPMENT
USED, REBUILT & CUSTOM DESIGN
METALWORKING
MACHINERY
COMPANY
The Blast Cleaning Specialists with 50 Years Experience
700 Constitution Blvd., New Kensington, PA 15068
724/335-1155 FAX 724/335-1621
Web Site: www.blastcleaningequipment.com
E-Mail: mwm.co@verizon.net
TUMBLASTS AND BARRELS
3 Wheelabrator TBR 1-1/2 Rubber
1 Goff 1-1/2 BB, Rebuilt, New Belt
3 Wheelabrator 20x27 Tumblasts
1 Wheelabrator 3 cube rubber belt, low hrs,
new 07, Like New
2 Pangborn 3GNR - rubber belt
1 Wheelabrator 27x36 Rubber Belt Tumblast
1 Wheelabrator TBR6 rubber belt, new 95
1 Wheelabrator 36x42 Rubber Belt, Rebuilt
1 Goff 12 cu. ft rubber belt & loader
1 Pangborn 6GNR rubber
1 Wheelabrator TBR12, rubber belt
2 Wheelabrator 7 Super, Rebuilt
1 Wheelabrator 14 Super, Rubber Belt
1 Wheelabrator 14 Super, manganese flights
1 Wheelabrator 14 Super II, manganese
flights, rebuilt
1 Wheelabrator 22 Super II, manganese flights,
good cond. (1) rebuilt
1 Wheelabrator 28 Super Tumblast,
mang. flights
1 Wheelabrator 34 Super II, manganese
flights
1 Wheelabrator 34 Super III (2) 50 HP DD whls,
new 96, Reconditioned Like New
1 Wheelabrator 50 Super Tumblast-mang. flights
1 Pangborn 12GN, mang. belt
1 Pangborn 15GN4, manganese flights, 1 Yr.
Warranty
1 Pangborn 34 GN, manganese flights
1 Pangborn 34GN2 (2) 40 HP DD
wheels, manganese flights
TABLES
3 Wheelabrator #1 Multi-tables, 12 & 18
tables, new 98
2 Wheelabrator #1A Multi-table, 22 & 26 tables
1 Wheelabrator #1A Multi-table w/side mount
whls, new 1988
1 Wheelabrator #2 Multi-table, seven 30 tables
1 Wheelabrator 2-wh 72 Swing Table Rebuilt
1 Wheelabrator 96 Swing Table - 64 wk. ht.
10 dia. swing
1 Pangborn 8LK (2) New 30 HP DDRK Whls,
remfd
SPECIALS
1 Goff 4-wh 36x72 Carousel, New 01, w/new
mach. warranty
1 Goff 2-Wheel 12 x 44L Carousel Spinner
Hanger
1 Wheelabrator Carousel Spinner Hanger, 24
dia. x 40 L opening
1 Wheelabrator 2-wh. LE-750 Spinner Hanger,
30 dia. x 48 H
1 Wheelabrator/BCP 2-wh. 30 HP Spinner
Hanger, 48 dia. X 72 H, 2,096 total hrs.
1 Guysom 2-Wh 15HP Downblast Belt
Conveyor
1 Wheelabrator 2-wheel Downblast Belt
Conveyor, 15HP, 18H x 26W, New 2000
1 Pangborn 8-wh. DD Wh. pass-thru Roll
Conveyor Beam Cleaner, passes 6H x 3W,
mint. cond.
1 Pangborn 4-wh Pass-thru 24H x 36 W
opening, (4) 15 HP DD whls, new cond.
Save UP to 55%
New Machine
Warranty
TO ADVERTISE IN THE USED EQUIPMENT DIRECTORY CONTACT: BOB SCOFIELD AT 973-400-1790 OR BOB.SCOFIELD@PENTON.COM
USED EQUI PMENT DI RECTORY
38 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
SALE/RENT
wabash
444 Carpenter Avenue, Wheeling, IL 60090
POWER
EQUIPMENT CO
BOILERS & DIESEL GENERATORS
Immediate Delivery-On Call
24 Hours 800-704-2002
Package Boilers
10 HP to
300,000 #/HR
Mobile Boilers
300 HP to 75,000 #/HR
Diesel Generators
50 KW to 2750 KW
WE ALSO STOCK A LARGE SELECTION OF:
ECONOMIZERS DEAERATORS WATER TREATMENT &
FEED SYSTEMS PUMP MOTORS TURBINES FUEL
HANDLING SYSTEMS INSTRUMENTS & CONTROLS
VALVES COMPRESSORS PULVERIZERS DIESEL &
TURBINE GENERATORS RENTAL MOBILE BOILERS &
DIESEL GENERATING PLANTS
TEL: 847-541-5600 FAX: 847-541-1279
E-mail: info@wabashpower.com WEB SITE: www.wabashpower.com
Centerless Grinder Repair
Complete line of parts and machines in stock
Dressers, feed wheel heads & spindlers available on an
exchange basis
Assist in designing or retooling our machine or one of ours
Provide in-plant operating instructions
Train inexperienced help to set up/grind
Purchase leases available
Ask for Bill Magee or Jason Magee
Email: elise.cgr@gmail.com
www.CenterlessGrinderRpr.com
28300 Groesbeck Hwy. Roseville, Michigan 48066
Phone: (586) 774-4660 Fax: (586) 774-3051
We Buy, Sell, Trade & Completely Rebuild
Cincinnati Centerless Grinders (No. 2, No. 3 & 200-300 Series)
Repairmen on Call 24 Hours a Day
50 Grinders Under Power in Plant
LUCAS MACHINERY COMPANY, INC.
J.
L.
Mailing address: P.O. Box 4220
Waterbury, CT 06704-4220 429 Brookside Rd. Waterbury, CT 06708
Tel: (203) 597-1300 - Fax: (203) 597-8268
WHEN THE SPECIALISTS LET YOU DOWN-
COME SEE THE DISC GRINDING EXPERTS
MDNA
For All Your Disc Grinding Applications:
Double or Single Horizontal or Vertical
GARDNER BESLY LUCAS/GARDNER
Large Inventory - 12 Dia and Up
Thru Feed - Rotary - Gunfeed - Special Fixturing Available
And For All Your Disc Grinder Parts:
LUCAS DISC GRINDER PARTS & SALES CO., LLC
P.O. Box 4219 Waterbury, CT 06704-4219
Tel: (203) 753-DISC (3472) - Fax: (203) 591-9043
BESLY & GARDNER PARTS
Disc Grinder Replacement Parts
Thrufeed, Rotary & Gunfeed Attachments
Rebuilt Spindle Assembly Exchange Program
Large Inventory - All Components Available - Seals to Spindles
Visit us on the web
http://www.jllucas.com - email info@jllucas.com
NDUCTION
ORPORAT RR ION
ECHNOLOGY
INDUCTION
MELTING and HEATING
Since 1979
EQUIPMENT
G
800) 828 97 88 88 88 88 88 8800) 828 9799 99 99 9 800) 828-979 2 800) 828 2222 9999 99 228-9799 88 88 8800 88 88 88 00 000 (800) 828-9799 ) 828-9799 (800) (800 (800) 828- 8 99 00 88 99 8822 99 ( 0) 0) (( 828-9799 828-9799 (800 (800 (800) 828-9799 CALL with your equipment requirements!
www.inductiontech.com
WE BUY USED INDUCTION MELTING AND HEATING EQUIPMEN AA T
9 9 2 4 Ra n c h o Rd , Ad e l a n t o CA 9 2 3 0 1
Above can be supplied with furnaces, heating coils and water systems
as needed to suit specic requirements.
WE MANUFACTURE FF , REPAIR PP , AND REBUILD INDUCTION POWER
SUPPLIES, INDUCTION FURNACES, HEATING AA COILS, WA WW TER AA COOLED
POWER CABLES AND WA WW TER AA COOLING AND RE-CIRCULATING AA SYSTEMS.
WE SERVICE RR WHAT AA WE SELL.
POWER SUPPLIES
Box Furnaces up to 4000 lb. Capacity
FURNACES
Steel Shell Furnaces from 2000 lb. to 6 Ton TT
Inductotherm 75Kw, 3KHz VIP Power Trak TT
Inductotherm 30Kw, 4.2KHz Integral M.G. Power
Inductotherm 75Kw, 9.6KHz VIP Power P Trak TT
AND MUCH MORE!
Inductotherm 125Kw & 175Kw, 3KHz VIP Power P Trak TT
Supply
TO ADVERTISE IN THE USED EQUIPMENT DIRECTORY CONTACT: BOB SCOFIELD AT 973-400-1790 OR BOB.SCOFIELD@PENTON.COM
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 39
USED EQUI PMENT DI RECTORY
Why should I buy Used Equipment?
Where can I find Used Equipment?
Used equipment is often less expensive
Used equipment is usually available immediately
The best dealers list their available equipment
in Used Equipment Directory, the
leader in the field since 1949. Browse dealer
inventories in this months issue at:
www.ued-ed.com
Sign up to receive UED monthly via email!
DANILUK REMANUFACTURING
As one of the largest machine tool remanufacturers in
the U.S., The Daniluk Corporation stocks machines for
sale, as-is, and for remanufacture. We will even
remanufacture a machine from our extensive stock
and exchange it for your machine in order to eliminate
down time and the cost of new foundations and tooling.
DANILUK
888-745-6647 FAX: 405-745-6646
OKLAHOMA CITY www.daniluk.com OKLAHOMA
WALK IN OVENS
Partial Listing of Available Equipment
Walk In Ovens
30W 42L 72H NEW ENGLAND 650F
36 36 75 NEW ENGLAND 650F
36 72 72 LYDON 200F
39 66 96 GRIEVE 200F
48 36 63 DESPATCH 350F
48 48 72 JPW 500F
48 48 72 PRECISION QUINCY 1000F
48 48 72 GRIEVE 1200F
48 52 60 POLL. CONTROL BURN OFF
48 72 48 STEELMAN 450F
48 72 72 JENSEN 750F
54 68 66 DESPATCH 500F
60 70 96 LANLY 450F
60 96 75 GRIEVE 650F
60 120 72 STEELMAN 450F
72 72 96 BINKS (WISCONSIN) 500F
72 120 84 BINKS (WISCONSIN) 500F
72 180 72 GRIEVE 450F
78 124 80 DESPATCH 850F
7 7 7 POLL. CONTROL BURN OFF
7 14 10 EJ CALLAHAN 500F
8 8 8 BINKS (WISCONSIN) 500F
8 10 9 ACE BURN OFF
8 20 8 NEW ENGLAND 500F
8 42 7 WISCONSIN 400F
10 20 9 EJ CALLAHAN 500F
11 13 8 GEHNRICH 500F
BELT AND CABI NET OVENS ALSO I N STOCK
Call Us With Your Needs
FURNACE BROKERS I NC.
40 Industrial Park Rd. East Tolland, CT 06084
(860) 875-3712 Fax (860) 875-1393
WWW. FURNACEBROKERS. COM
TO ADVERTISE IN THE USED EQUIPMENT DIRECTORY CONTACT: BOB SCOFIELD AT 973-400-1790 OR BOB.SCOFIELD@PENTON.COM
USED EQUI PMENT DI RECTORY
40 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
847.541.8300 / 800.446.3325
info@indeck-power.com
www.indeck.com
Call to inquire on our extensive line of Industrial Power Plant Equipment available!
RENT
LEASE
SELL
BOILERS GENERATORS CHILLERS
Mobile Boilers
(10HP - 250,000PPH)
Rental Diesel Generators
(125KW - 2200KW)
Chillers
(Water Cooled: 75-1000 tons
Air Cooled: 75-400 tons)
Boilers (various sizes & styles)
Boiler Parts & Accessories
Burner Management Systems
Chillers
Combustion Control Systems
Construction Services
Deaerators
Design & Build
Diesel Generators
Economizers
Engineering
Fuel Systems
Pumps
Water Treatment Systems
FAST!
NEW & USED UNITS AVAILABLE
All major credit cards accepted
Flexible leasing plans available
IN STOCK - READY TO SHIP
5 YEAR COMPRESSOR WARRANTY
NEW PORTABLES - AIR COOLED
(FOB Houston, Texas)
NEW STATIONARY / CENTRAL
(Includes shipping)
2-TON . . . . . . . . .$5,805
3-TON . . . . . . . . .$6,925
5-TON . . . . . . . . .$7,540
7.5-TON. . . . . . .$10,135
10-TON . . . . . . .$12,019
15-TON . . . . . . .$19,233
Other Sizes Available
15-TON . . . . . . . $15,801.00
18-TON . . . . . . . $17,056.00
22-TON . . . . . . . $20,491.00
30-TON . . . . . . . $22,677.00
40-TON . . . . . . . $27,693.00
50-TON . . . . . . . $31,960.00
60-TON . . . . . . . $37,940.00
80-TON . . . . . . . $46,393.00
100-TON . . . . . . $55,296.00
Other Sizes Available
COLD SHOT CHILLERS
800-473-9178 281-227-8400
FAX: 281-227-8404
Website: waterchillers.com
Email: mmarrone@waterchillers.com
http://www.highlandmachinery.com
Highland Machinery & Crane
1170 Cornerstone Place Benton Harbor MI 49022
Ph: 877-921-9600 F: 269-926-9601
E-mail: sales@highlandmachinery.com
WANTED: Used Bridge
& Overhead Cranes
Highland Machinery & Crane
is looking to buy all types
and sizes of bridge cranes:
1 - 100 Tons 0 - 120 Span
Crane Only or Full System
We buy and remove NATIONWIDE!
For Complete Specifications and Pricing
Visit Our Web Site:
http://www.whkay.com
e-mail: sales@whkay.com
30925 Aurora Rd. Cleveland, OH 44139
Phone: 440-519-3800 Fax: 440-519-1455
The W. H. Kay Company
Since 1936
The Elder Statesman of
Used Ovens & Heat Treating Furnaces
Over 150 in Stock
Ready for Inspection & Delivery
We Buy/Sell/Trade Furnaces, such as:
Walk-In Ovens Box Pit Type Belt Atmosphere Generators
Box Type Draw Internal Quench Vacuum Combustion Air Blowers
GENERATORS SAL E/ RENT
wabash
444 Carpenter Avenue, Wheeling, IL 60090
POWER
EQUIPMENT CO
IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT
90kw - 2,865kw
SKID or ENCLOSED
125kw - 2,200kw
TRAILER MOUNTED
www.wabashpower.com
AVAILABLE VOLTAGES:
120/208/1/60, 240/480/2400/4160/(11.5/13.8KV)
FEATURES:
LOW EMISSIONS AUTOMATIC PARALLELING AND SYNCHRONIZATION
SOUND ATTENUATED TRAILER UTILITY GRADE
CALL: TOLL FREE 1- 800- 704- 2002
PHONE 1-847-541-5600 FAX 1-847-541-1279 info@wabashpower.com
SEE OUR WEBSITE FOR ADDITIONAL IN-STOCK EQUIPMENT LISTINGS
TO ADVERTISE IN THE USED EQUIPMENT DIRECTORY CONTACT: BOB SCOFIELD AT 973-400-1790 OR BOB.SCOFIELD@PENTON.COM
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 41
USED EQUI PMENT DI RECTORY
Disc Grinder Headquarters
C & B Giustina Besly Gardner Mattison Blanchard
Vertical - Horizontal, Single - Double
Thrufeed, Rotary, Swing Arm, Special Fixtures
Spindle - Rebuilt or Exchange
Replacement Parts & Service
OEM - Rebuild / Remanufacture Service
Retool - Control Retrofits
21css Field Conversion for Beslys (see web for full description)
C & B Machinery Co.
12001 Globe, Livonia MI 48150
www.cbmachinery.com see our complete inventory
Call (734) 462-0600 or Fax (734) 462-0604
Email: main@cbmachinery.com
TRANSFORMERS
NEW SURPLUS RENEWED & GURANTEED
ALL TYPES - ALL SIZES - ALL VOLTAGES
Buck & Boost - Isolation - Drive Isolation K Factor-etc.
Bruce Electric can ship immediately from its stock of tens
of thousands of transformers from .250 to 2500 KVA,
all voltage combinations.
Generators Circuit Breakers Switches
Rectifiers Fuses Power Line Conditioners Etc...
Call, Write or Fax For Our Low Prices!!!
BRUCE ELECTRIC EQUIPMENT CORP.
131 AKRON ST. P.O. BOX 558 LINDENHURST, NY 11757
Toll Free: 800-262-2204
631-226-2424
FAX 631-226-8772
E-Mail: bee@brucelectric.com
www.brucelectric.com
CHILLERS
Water Cooled: (75 - 1000 Tons) Air Cooled: (75 - 400 Tons)
Call to ask about our extensive line of Industrial Power Plant Equipment Available!
ph: 847.541.8300 / 800.446.3325
fax: 847.541.9984 email: info@indeck-power.com www.indeck.com
NATIONAL
MACHINERY
EXCHANGE, INC.
If its machinery, we have it
sm
158 PARIS STREET NEWARK NJ 07105
TELEPHONE: 973-344-6100
FAX: 973-589-0944
WEBSITE: WWW.NATIONALMACHY.COM
E-MAIL: SALES@NATIONALMACHY.COM
LARGE SELECTION
OF PRESSES
OBI / GAP / SS / HYD
FORGING / KJ
EXTRUSION
EYELET-TRANSFER
TRY-OUT
COIL PROCESSING
EQUIPMENT
SLITTING LINES / C-T-L
ROLL FORMERS
STRAIGHTENERS
LEVELLERS
UNCOILERS
TUBE & PIPE MILLS
MACHINERY
MILLS / END FINISHERS
STRAIGHTENERS
CUT-OFFS
DEBURRERS
BENDERS
Steel Processing Systems & Equipment
We carry a complete inventory of new and remanufactured Cut-To-Length
Lines Slitting Lines Terminal Lines Plate Lines Pay-Off Reels Press
Feed Lines. We build and remanufacture to your specifications with new
electricals and hydraulics. We maintain the flexibility to provide machinery
tailored to maximize the profits of each production situation. Over 45 years
of Quality, Service and Value.
3171 N. Republic Blvd.
Toledo, Ohio 43615-1515
Phone (419) 843-7262
Fax (419) 843-7229
www.cauffiel.com
Looking for Used Equipment?
See it all at www.usedequip.com
Choose from over 2700 lathes, 1500 machining
centers, or 1800 grinders. Need punching/
shearing equipment? We have over 1100 listed.
With over 33,000 metalworking listings alone,
UEN is the place to go for used equipment!
Were not just metalworking either: we have
over 9,000 pieces of electrical equipment, too,
as well as construction, ships, airplanes, and
more! New listings added daily, and most have
pictures and detailed specifications!
TO ADVERTISE IN THE USED EQUIPMENT DIRECTORY CONTACT: BOB SCOFIELD AT 973-400-1790 OR BOB.SCOFIELD@PENTON.COM
USED EQUI PMENT DI RECTORY
42 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
ALL PARTS, INC.
Specializing in Quality
COMPRESSORS & PARTS
BUY / SELL NEW & USED COMPRESSORS
P.O. Box 4025 Wheaton, IL 60189
630-653-5678 Fax 630-653-5680
E-Mail: CompressorsAir@aol.com
Worlds Largest Stock of
Balancing Equipment
Specializing in:
Schenck Hofmann IRD CEMB
Used & Rebuilt, Parts & Service for All Makes
E-T BALANCING INC.
12823 Athens Way, Los Angeles, CA 90061
Tel: 310-538-9738 Fax: 310-538-8273
E-Mail: etbalance@earthlink.net
GENERATORS
125KW - 2200KW *IN STOCK!*
Call to ask about our extensive line of Industrial Power Plant Equipment Available!
ph: 847.541.8300 / 800.446.3325
fax: 847.541.9984 email: info@indeck-power.com www.indeck.com
BULLARD V.T.L. SPECIALISTS
REPLACEMENT PARTS & TOOLING FOR ALL
TYPES OF BULLARD V.T.L.S
REBUILDING & RETROFITTING
Compl ete Assembl i es i n Stock
OVER 100 BULLARD V.T.L.S IN STOCK
OCONNELL MACHINERY COMPANY, INC.
175 GREAT ARROW AVE BUFFALO, NEW YORK 14207
(716) 877-3666 FAX (716) 877-1136
www.oconnellmachinery.com
e-mail: sales@oconnellmachinery.com
OPTI CAL COMPARATORS
Specializing in Used & Reconditioned Jones & Lamson Optical Comparators
OPTICAL GAGING PRODUCTS (OGP) Top Bench 14; 20X; 8 x 6 Tvls;
Computational DRO- 1999
OGP Avant AV400 Smartscope Video Measuring Machine; 18 x 18 x 8 Tvls;
3-Axis Joystick; Computer & Software-Updated 2002
SCHERR-TUMICO Mdl. 22-2500; 30; 12 x 9 Power Tvls; Surf. Illum; 10X, 20X,
450X Lens; S/T DRO- 1981
STARRETT Model HCS800; 31.5; CNC; 20 x 10 Power Tvls; Surf. Illum; Quadra
Chek 4205 Controls w/ Edge Detect- 1997
PIEDMONT MACHINERY of Charlotte Inc.
2218 N. Brevard St. P.O. Box 4264 Charlotte, NC 28299
(704) 334-4609 Fax (704) 375-3874
www.piedmontmachinery.com E-Mail: machines@piedmontmachinery.com
Cold Rolling Mill Equipment & Systems
3171 N. Republic Blvd.
Toledo, Ohio 43615-1515
Phone (419) 843-7262
Fax (419) 843-7229
www.cauffiel.com
New, Used & Remanufactured
Over 100 machines to choose from.
We sell what you want
2-High, 4-High, Z-Mill & Sendzimir
We own and operate a cold rolling plant.
MACHINES TOOLING
RIGGING
BUY SELL TRADE
800-535-8331
SPECIALISTS IN BARBER-COLMAN MACHINE TOOLS
Repair Parts, Inc.
Contact: Terry McDonald
2415 Kishwaukee St., Rockford, IL 61104
PHONE: 815-968-4499 FAX: 815-968-4694
Service Training Reconditioning Sales
Factory Trained Personnel
We Also Will Buy Your Surplus B-C Equipment
www.repair-parts-inc.com e-mail: rpi@repair-parts-inc.com
HI-HEAT CO. INC.
32 GLENDALE RD., SOUTH WINDSOR, CT 06074
INDUSTRIAL OVENS - HEAT TREATING FURNACES
Walk-in Ovens - Cabinet Ovens - Box Furnaces - Vacuum Furnaces, Etc.
Please visit our website: www.hi-heat.com
CALL: 860-528-9315 FAX: 860-528-0421 EMAIL: sales@hi-heat.com
Visit our warehouse to inspect our large inventory
SPECIAL BUY!
DC MOTORS
AT DEEP, DEEP DISCOUNTS
DUTCH ELECTRIC CORP
TEL 610-582-2870 FAX 610-582-6942
EMAIL: DLINEDRIVE@AOL.COM
BUY A BARGAIN WHILE THEY LAST!
13855 W. Polo Trail Dr. Ph: 847/918-9797
Lake Forest, IL 60045 Fax: 847/918-9733
VICTORY
MACHINERY
EXCHANGE, INC.
WE BUY, SELL & APPRAISE USED MACHINERY
I f y o u d o n t c a l l u s w e b o t h l o s e mo n e y .
WE REBUILD FOUR SLIDES
Your Supermarket For Spring &
Wire Forming Machinery
sales@victorymachinery.com
FOUR SLIDES IN STOCK
Nilson - #S-00, S-2, S-3, S-4, S-0F,
S-1F, S-2F, S-3F, S-320, S-436, 752
Baird - #00, #1, #2, #3, #5,
#104, #28, #33, #35, RW1, 3-24, 4-30
TORIN - V81, V82 Vert. Slide
S-5 Nilson
8Z0 Baird
NEW US INDUSTRIAL SHEARS
10 X 1/4 10 X 3/8 12 X 1/4 IN STOCK !
NEW EQUI PMENT
UNBELIEVABLE PRICE
Call Before You Buy Used
Machinery Sales Company
P.O. Box 2098 Memphis, TN 38101
Phone: 901-527-8671 Fax: 901-526-2339
TO ADVERTISE IN THE USED EQUIPMENT DIRECTORY CONTACT: BOB SCOFIELD AT 973-400-1790 OR BOB.SCOFIELD@PENTON.COM
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 43
USED EQUI PMENT DI RECTORY
NATIONAL
MACHINERY
EXCHANGE, INC.
If its machinery, we have it
sm
158 PARIS STREET NEWARK NJ 07105
TELEPHONE: 973-344-6100
FAX: 973-589-0944
WEBSITE: WWW.NATIONALMACHY.COM
E-MAIL: SALES@NATIONALMACHY.COM
60 x .135 x 55,000# BRANER TURRET HEAD SLITTING LINE
New 1990
IN PLANT, available for inspection
Contact us for technical specifications and/or quote
USED & NEW
FURNACES
& OVENS
1-336-784-4800 Fax: 336-784-0634 E-Mail: sales@thermcraftinc.com
P.O. Box 12037 3950 Overdale Rd. Winston-Salem, NC 27117-2037
SEE COMPLETE LISTING OF EQUIPMENT ON OUR WEBSITE AT:
www.thermcraftinc.com
New: Live E-bay Auctions
Direct Link on home page
See Website for Pictures!
All used equipment sold with 30 day warranty
http://www.highlandmachinery.com
HIGHLAND MACHINERY & CRANE
1170 Cornerstone Place, Benton Harbor, MI 49022
e: sales@highlandmachinery.com ph: 877.921.9600 fax: 269.926.9601
Large Selection of Cranes Available!!! All Taken Down!
40/10T x773 DESHAZO, 1999, 27' Lift, VFD Bridge/Trly, 300'(x2) Rail/Run
25/25T x 71 KONE, 2001, Dual Trlys, VFD Br/Tr, 320(x2) Rail/Run/Cols
20T x 26 STAHL, 2004, 26 Lift, VFD Br/Tr, 520(x2) Rail/Run, 2 AVAIL
18T x 43 KONE, 2001, 33' Lift, 2 Spd All, 180(x2) Rail/Run, 2 AVAIL.
15T x 71 KONE, 2001, VFD Bridge/Trly, Radio, 250 Rail/Run/Cols
10T x 44 STAHL, 1999, 20 Lift, 108(x2) Rail/Run/Cols
2T - 5T x 38 KONE, 90s, 20 Lift, 1200(x2) Rail/Run, 5 AVAIL
PETER FLESCH, INC.
146 MEADOW STREET
GARDEN CITY, NEW YORK 11530-6600
TEL (516) 741-7835
FAX (516) 747-1272
PETERFLESCH@MSN.COM
*22'XVHG0DFKLQH7RROV
GIBSON Parts & Equipment, Inc.
New & Used
Abrasive Blast Equipment
Tables, Tumblers, Spinner Hangers
Toll Free 888-867-1619
Fax (317) 758-6775 www.Gibson-Parts.com
E-mail: sales@Gibson-Parts.com
WWW.GIBBSMACHINERY.COM
21500 Hoover Rd. Warren MI (Detroit Suburb)
Phone: 586-755-5353 Fax: 586-755-0304
18x96 Lees Bradner Spline Hobber
16-36 Barber Colman C Frame Collet - 1947-1978 (4)
Liebherr L301 & L252 Crowning - 1973 & 1979
PE 200 & 150 Pfauter CNC 15M Fanuc (3)
175HC Gleason CNC Spiral-Gear Generator, 1994
10-4 & 10-2 Fellows CNC Shapers Factory Rebuilt - 1997
USED ---- BLAST EQUIPMENT ---- REBUILT
BUY WHEELABRATOR + PANGBORN + GOFF + BCP SELL
SHOTBLAST AMERICA
412 BAYBERRY DR., CHAPEL HILL NC 27517
PHONE: 919-928-0071 FAX: 919-928-0179
web site: www.shotblastamerica.com
email: ptrainor@nc.rr.com
WARNER & SWASEY AC, AB & SC
4661 Jaycox Rd. Avon, OH 44011
440-937-6241 www.pmr4ws.com
INC.
Remanufacture Electrical Retrofit
Parts Tooling Service
Used Machines
RIVETERS
THINK AARONS
The Nations No. 1 Source for Rebuilt - Retooled Riveters
CHICAGO MILFORD NATIONAL TRS ORBITALS
ADTECH TOMKINS-JOHNSON J.L. THOMAS
AARONS MACHINERY CORP.
170 N. Halsted St,. Chicago, IL 60661
312-421-2334 FAX 312-421-7035
CNC Swiss, Turning & Machining Centers
Ci t i zen St ar Tsugami Tor nos Nomur a
Hanwha Gi l demei st er NexTur n KSI Mai er
Bar f eeds ( New & Used) CNC Tur ni ng & Machi ni ng Cent er s
800-543-7666 Fax: 303-651-6556
www.automatics.com
steve@automatics.com sue@automatics.com
PARK THERMAL (1996)
INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION
New / Reconditioned Ovens
Furnaces - Quenching OIls -
Heat Treating Salts -
Comonent Parts -- Stainless
Steel Foil -- Refractory Products
62 Todd Road
Georgetown ON L7G 4R7
Tel: (905) 877-5254
Fax: (905) 877-6205
Toll Free: (877) 843-HEAT (4328)
Web Site: www.parkthermal.com
E-Mail: jmistry@parkthermal.com
S & G S & G
PRESS & MACHINERY SALES
P.O. Box 537, Fraser, MI 48026
800 Ton Verson S4-800-168-84, 20 Str., 48 SH., 15-40 VSPM, 58 Windows, Rolling Bolster, 1995
600 Ton Verson S2-600-168-60, 14 Str., 44 S.H., 15-30VSPM, 38" Windows, New 1990
400 Ton Minster E2-400-96-48, 12 Str., 34 S.H.. 0-70VSPM, 32" Windows, 1990
200 Ton Minster P2-200-72, 6 Str., 24 SH., 45-90 RSPM, 23 Windows, FIR-STD
Phone: (586) 563-5000 Fax: (586) 563-5005
e-mail: info@sandgpress.com http://www.sandgpress.com
TO ADVERTISE IN THE USED EQUIPMENT DIRECTORY CONTACT: BOB SCOFIELD AT 973-400-1790 OR BOB.SCOFIELD@PENTON.COM
USED EQUI PMENT DI RECTORY
44 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
NATIONAL
MACHINERY
EXCHANGE, INC.
If its machinery, we have it
sm
158 PARIS STREET NEWARK NJ 07105
TELEPHONE: 973-344-6100
FAX: 973-589-0944
WEBSITE: WWW.NATIONALMACHY.COM
E-MAIL: SALES@NATIONALMACHY.COM
Recently purchased:
36 X .250 X 30,000# LOOPCO SLITTING LINE
16 X 18 X 16 UNITED 4-HI, 1 WAY COLD MILL
60 X .195 X 50,000# CINCINNATI SLITTING LINE
Contact us for technical specifications and/or quote
TRANSFORMERS
MANY SIZES IN STOCK!
Call to ask about our extensive line of Industrial Power Plant Equipment Available!
ph: 847.541.8300 / 800.446.3325
fax: 847.541.9984 email: info@indeck-power.com www.indeck.com
REBUILT 3-PHASE RESISTANCE WELDERS
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA
800-331-2805
phone: 954-581-1418 fax: 954-792-7766

FOR INVENTORY LISTINGS & PICTURES GO TO:
www.alphatronindustries.com
PRESS USERS
BOLSTER PLATES -- PARALLELS -- RISERS
Hundreds to choose from, many Bolsters are T-slotted and Drilled
J.I.C., also Bull Rings and Riser Plates
Huge inventory, standard 9 wide, up to
36 high and 96 long
T-Slotted Floor Plates, Surface Plates, Cast Iron and Granite,
Angle Plates, Fixture Plates, Machine Base Plates
Bolster
Plates
Risers and
Parallels
Also
Call us for a complete list of current inventory
We Buy, Sell and Appraise Stamping Plant Machinery
HARON
METALS & EQUIPMENT CO.
3901 Christoper
(313) 923-4241
Hamtramck, MI 48211
FAX (313) 923-4287
Appraiser on Staff
10,000 HP INDUCTION MOTOR. 715 RPM,
13,200 VOLTS WPII ENCLOSURE.
ROLLER BEARINGS, TOP MOUNTED
COOLER. SEND FOR PIX AND DETAILS !!
DUTCH ELECTRIC CORP
TEL 610-582-2870 FAX 610-582-6942
EMAIL: DLINEDRIVE@AOL.COM
13855 W. Polo Trail Dr. Ph: 847/918-9797
Lake Forest, IL 60045 Fax: 847/918-9733
VICTORY
MACHINERY
EXCHANGE, INC.
WE BUY, SELL & APPRAISE USED MACHINERY
If you dont call us we both lose money.
WE REBUILD SPRING COILERS
Your Supermarket For Spring &
Wire Forming Machinery
sales@victorymachinery.com
TORIN SPRING COILERS
IN STOCK
W100A, W10A, W11, W11A, W115A
W12, W12A, W125, W125A,
W125S, W125SA, W13, W13A
W22, W225, W23, W24
100 CNC, 115 CNC, 775 Ring Coiler
See inventories for these dealers
and many more
in this months issue of
Used Equipment Directory
at www.ued-ed.com
Sign up
to receive
U
ED
m
onthly
via em
ail!
T. J. SNOW CO., INC.
6207 Jim Snow Way, POB 22847, Chattanooga, TN 37421
1-800-NOW SNOW ( 24 hours 800-669-7669 )
PH: (423) 894-6234 FX: (423) 892-3889
Home Page: www.tjsnow.com
Email: welders@tjsnow.com
Resistance Welding Equipment & Supplies
Snow SlimLine Welders Snow Heavy Duty Spot &
Projection Welders New, Used, Rebuilt, Special Design Welders
Robots & Automatic Arc Welders Service, Consulting & Seminars
WELDING SO WELDING SOLLUTIONS UTIONS
WELD PLUS

New and Used New and Used WWelding Machinery elding Machinery
WWelding Positioners, Manipulators, elding Positioners, Manipulators, TTurning Rolls urning Rolls
TTurntables, Headstocks, urntables, Headstocks, TTailstocks, ailstocks, TTTT
WWelding Lathes, Seam elding Lathes, Seam WWelders, elders,
Orbital Orbital WWelders, MIG & elders, MIG & TIG TIG WWelders. elders.
ww wwww.weldplus.com .weldplus.com 800-288-9414 800-288-9414
Sell - Recondition - Rental - Repair Sell - Recondition - Rental - Repair
REQUEST A BROCHURE
sales@weldplus.com
Steel Processing Systems & Equipment
We carry a complete inventory of new and remanufactured Cut-To-Length
Lines Slitting Lines Terminal Lines Plate Lines Pay-Off Reels Press
Feed Lines. We build and remanufacture to your specifications with new
electricals and hydraulics. We maintain the flexibility to provide machinery
tailored to maximize the profits of each production situation. Over 45 years
of Quality, Service and Value.
3171 N. Republic Blvd.
Toledo, Ohio 43615-1515
Phone (419) 843-7262
Fax (419) 843-7229
www.cauffiel.com
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 45
MACHINE COMPONENTS
Tramp Oil Skimmers!
F|ve types
Peooh 5-24
Cog/F|ot Po|y
SS be|ts, too
1 t or 1 Gph
Pr|oe Cho|oes
A|| |n stook
www.wayneproducts.com
info@wayneproducts.com
WIRELESS SCANNER
Find qualified candidates by placing your job posting ad in the
Marketplace section of American Machinist
contact:
Kathy Savage 508.238.6970 kathy.savage@penton.com
OlL MlST & SMOKE
lN YOUR SHOP?
www.misIcollecIors.com
Tel: 1-800-645-4174
EQUIPMENT
SCRAP CARBIDE WANTED
FOR OVER 30 YEARS!
800-321-6914
www.stalloy.com
WE BUY
SCRAP CARBIDE
Dont miss your chance to be
included in the next AM Product Express.
Reserve your space today!
Contact Kathy Savage
P: 205-669-7161
kathy.savage@penton.com
F: 205-669-7165
Feature your companys products
with your ad in the
AM Product Express...
THE PLACE to be seen!
MANUFACTURERS REPS NEEDED
A nancially secure, 100 year old, family owned, Iron Foundry
is looking for Representation in the following areas:
We pour all grades of Grey and Ductile Iron from ounces
to 250 lbs. We have a complete in-house CNC Pattern
shop along with an in-house CNC Machine shop. We are
currently looking for established Reps with minimum 5
years experience selling Castings, Patterns, and Machining
services to OEMs. This is a fantastic opportunity with a
chance to add to your line and solidify your future in these
tough times with a Foundry that prides itself on Service,
Delivery, Quality and Longevity.
States available: TX, OK, MO, AR, LA, MI, MS, AL, FL,
GA, SC, NC, TN, KY, VA, WV, IN, MI, OH, PA, NY, NJ
Please contact us at:
timc@senecafoundry.com or call 515-360-1178
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
EQUIPMENT
46 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
O P E R A T I O N S
manual and CNC machining,
programming, software design and
inspection, NTMA Training Center
classes also place a heavy emphasis on
math and blueprint reading.
Right from the start, we emphasize
application mathematics, says
Ragaisis. We tell students were going
to use a lot of math and trigonometry.
That scares them a little, but they can
get past that. We bring it to life for
them. We show them the academic
math, bring it into a technical arena,
then take them into the shop and
demonstrate how to apply the math
and make it work for them.
Personal projects are encouraged.
If a student would like to experiment
beyond the confines of the
curriculum, instructors usually will
approve it, as long as a detailed
blueprint is provided.
The blueprint is extremely
important, says Ragaisis. Its the
bridge from the idea to the project.
We want to make sure they can
produce a blueprint, read a blueprint
and apply a blueprint, especially
working with and understanding
tolerances and dimensions.
According to Lilly Ford, Ontario
campus director, the training centers
are fully accredited, so students may
apply for financial aid, such as Pell
Grants. Moreover, the 725-hour
program qualifies as a years credit
at El Camino Community College
in nearby Torrance, Calif., and
additional state programs are
available for qualified shops that
enroll workers to enhance their skills.
The training centers now have over
700 combined students, including an
increasing number of female students.
We specialize in machining,
says Ragaisis. We have no other
subjects. Our instructors have many
years of experience in the industry.
They all come from the field and
teach practical, useful knowledge
and application. Some instructors
have their own shops or consult for
industry, and some have European
experience. We bring all that
experience and knowledge to our
students. Thats what we do best. <<
>> from 32
A
fter leasing 500,000
sq-ft of the old,
1.2 million-sq-ft
Dunlop Tire manufacturing
plant in Huntsville, Ala., the
U.S. Dept. of Defense supplier
Science and Engineering Ser-
vices Inc. (SES) (www.ses-i.
com) needed a big gantry-
type coordinate measuring
machine. So, like many other
shops, SES searched online and
discovered Xspect Solutions
(www.xpectsolutions.com), a
company that sells new CMMs
but often locates pre-owned
models that are much less ex-
pensive compared to new ones.
SES had recently secured
a significant number of
new hardware and services
contracts from the D.o.D.
Reincarnated CMM
Xspect Solutions remanufactured a very large DEA Lmabda 5509 gantry CMM to like-new conditions for
U.S. Dept. of Defense supplier Science and Engineering Services Inc.
M
achinery Finance Resources LLC (www.
mfresources.com) offers its equipment
refinancing programs to all U.S. manufacturers,
and unlike traditional lenders, the company provides
financing to manufacturing entities. Its lack of exposure
to real-estate investment risk has allowed Machinery
Finance Resources to continue extending credit, and
offer refinancing, to this select group of borrowers.
Manufacturers have an opportunity now to take
advantage of historically low interest rates. Lowered
monthly payments, consolidated loans and extended
lease terms are also benefits of refinancing.
Since its inception in 2004, Machinery Finance
Resources has worked with all major builders of
machine tools and related products, financing more than
$300 million of new equipment purchases. The company
offers credit-only programs up to $350,000. <<
Nows the Time to Refinance
ADVERTISER PAGE
American Machinist .................................................................................7
American Machinist .............................................................................. BC
2L Inc. .....................................................................................................17
Fairlane Products, Inc. ...........................................................................12
Haas Automation, Inc. .............................................................................3
Mastercam, CNC Software, Inc. ............................................................31
Omega Engineering Inc. .........................................................................1
Rockford Ettco Procunier .........................................................................5
Sandvik Coromant Co. . ...................................................................... IBC
Sentry Insurance .................................................................................. IFC
SME .........................................................................................................13
This index and reader service numbers are a service to
readers. Every effort is made to maintain accuracy,
but AMERICAN MACHINIST cannot assume responsibility
for errors or omissions.
AM PRODUCT EXPRESS ADVERTISING
Page 45
Send all AM PRODUCT EXPRESS advertisements to:
CLASSIFIED DEPT., Penton Media, Inc., 1300 E. 9th Street, Cleveland, OH
44114-1503.
AD I NDEX
americanmachinist.com I JANUARY 2010 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I 47
and related OEMs,
which required more
manufacturing floorspace
to accommodate military
equipment like tank
components (turrets)
and helicopters. For the
helicopters, the work was
modifying, upgrading,
rebuilding and painting.
To fulfill these new
contracts, SES installed a
large milling machine and
a large waterjet cutting
machine with a 13-sq-ft bed
capable of cutting up to 8-in.-
thick armor plate. But, the
one thing the shop lacked was
a CMM that could inspect
big airframes effectively.
It wasnt very difficult
to find a pre-owned gantry
CMM of the size that SES
required because there are
only six of them here in the
United States, explained
Xspect Solutions president
Keith Mills. We were
able to purchase an older
DEA Lambda 5509 gantry
machine that was originally
owned by Caterpillar.
This was a huge CMM,
standing 300-in. high with
a work envelope of 320 in.
of travel in X, 128 in. in
Y, and 100 in. in Z.
Xspect Solutions went
over all the machines
mechanics thoroughly,
rescaled it, replaced all
original cables, retrofitted
a new Wenzel CNC, and
upgraded the software
to OpenDMIS (www.
opendmis.com). When
complete, the company
furnished SES with a like-
new CMM at 70 percent of
the cost of a new machine.
Xspect Solutions has since
purchased two other large
pre-owned gantry CMMs
that await new customer
commitments.
According to Millard
Jernigan, vice president
for special projects for
the Huntsville operations
of SES, Xspect Solutions
explained how, in some
cases, older CMM
frames were originally
manufactured to more
exacting standards than
some of the newer machines
and, with the right level
of remanufacture, can
effectively operate for 15
to 20 more years.
Xspect Solutions
provided us with a turnkey
program for this project.
We consulted with them
on the specifications
for the isolation pad
that was required and
the modifications to the
building that we needed.
We actually had to raise
the roof of the building
11 ft to get the CMM in,
and ultimately provided a
new ceiling for the CMM
area that was 11-ft higher
than was originally there,
explained Jernigan.
We currently have
our CMM technicians
being trained on using the
OpenDMIS software and
creating the inspection
programs we now need.
Weve used CMMs for
a number of years, but
nothing like the size of
this gantry machine. This
machine now allows us to
accurately inspect products
like 9-ft-diameter tank
turrets and helicopter
frames. The installation of
the CMM provides SES the
additional opportunity of
offering quality measure-
ment services to other
commercial or government
organizations.
Savings
48 I AMERICAN MACHINIST I JANUARY 2010 I americanmachinist.com
T
urning is a metal-cutting process
used to generate cylindrical sur-
faces. Typically the workpiece is
rotated on a spindle and the tool is fed
into it radially, axially or both ways
simultaneously to give the required
surface. Turning generally refers
to the generation of any cylindrical
surface with a single point tool. More
specifically, it is often applied just to the
generation of external cylindrical sur-
faces oriented primarily parallel to the
workpiece axis. The generation of sur-
faces oriented primarily perpendicular
to the workpiece axis are called facing.
In turning, the direction of the feeding
motion is predominantly axial with re-
spect to the machine spindle. In facing,
a radial feed is dominant. Tapered and
contoured surfaces require both modes
of tool feed at the same time, often re-
ferred to as profiling.
The cutting characteristics of
most turning applications are
similar. For a given surface only one
cutting tool is used. This tool must
overhang its holder to some extent
to enable the holder to clear the
rotating workpiece. Once the cut
starts, the tool and the workpiece are
usually in contact until the surface
is completely generated. Cutting
speed and cut dimensions will be
constant when a cylindrical surface
is being turned. In the case of facing
operations, the cutting speed is
proportional to the work diameter,
the speed decreasing as the center of
the piece is approached. Sometimes
a spindle-speed changing mechanism
is provided to increase the rotating
speed of the workpiece as the tool
moves to the center of the part.
In general, turning is characterized
by steady conditions of metal cutting.
Except at the beginning and end of the
cut, the forces on the cutting tool and
the tool tip temperature are essentially
constant. For facing, the varying
cutting speed will affect the tool tip
temperature. Higher temperatures will
be encountered at the larger diameters
on the workpiece. However, since
cutting speed has only a small effect on
cutting forces, the forces acting on a
facing tool may be expected to remain
almost constant during the cut.
A variety of other machining
operations can be performed on a
lathe, including:
Chamfering, in which the tool cuts
an angle on the comer of a cylinder.
Parting, in which the tool is fed
radially into rotating work at a
specific location along its length to
cut off the end of a part.
Threading, in which a pointed
tool is fed linearly across the outside
or inside surface of rotating parts to
produce external or internal threads.
Boring involves enlarging a hole
made by a previous process. A single-
point tool is fed linearly and parallel
to the axis of rotation.
Drilling produces a hole by feeding
the drill into the rotating work
along its axis. Reaming or boring to
improve accuracy and surface finish
may follow drilling.
Knurling produces a regular cross-
hatched pattern in work surfaces.
The ANSI numbering system for
turning toolholders assigns letters to
specific geometries in terms of lead
angle and end-cutting edge angle:
A Style: Straight shank with 0
side-cutting edge angle, for turning
operations.
B Style: Straight shank with 15
side-cutting edge angle, for turning
operations.
C Style: Straight shank with 0
end-cutting edge angle, for cutoff and
grooving operations.
D Style: Straight shank with 45
side-cutting edge angle, for turning
operations.
E Style: Straight shank with 30
side-cutting edge angle, for threading
operations.
F Style: Offset shank with 0
end-cutting edge angle, for facing
operations.
G Style: Offset shank with 0 side-
cutting edge angle; this tool is an A
style tool with additional clearance
built in for turning operations close to
the lathe chuck.
Indexable turning inserts are
manufactured in various shapes, sizes
and thicknesses, with straight holes,
with countersunk holes, without
holes, with chipbreakers on one
side, with chipbreakers on two sides,
or without chipbreakers. Selecting
the appropriate turning toolholder
geometry, accompanied by the
correct insert shape and chipbreaker
geometry, will have a significant
impact on the productivity and tool
life of a specific turning operation.
BY G E O R G E S C H N E I D E R J R . I C M f g E , C M f g T, L S M E
C U T T I N G T O O L A P P L I C AT I O N S
Chapter 4: Tools and Operations
Each month American Machinist
presents an abstract of Cutting Tool
Aplications, George Schneiders essential
handbook to machine tool materials,
principles, and designs. For a complete
summary of each chapter, visit
www.americanmachinist.com
Presented by
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