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Monterey County Agricultural Competitiveness Institute Feasibility Study

FINAL REPORT

December 2002

This Report was Prepared under an Award from the U.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration EDA Award No.: 07 79 05059

Recipient: Environmental Resource Policy Division Office of Economic Development, County of Monterey 240 Church Street, West Wing, Room 301, Salinas, California 93901 Telephone: 831.755.5065

Authored and Submitted by: Agland Investment Services, Inc. 711 Grand Avenue, Suite 290, San Rafael, CA 94901 Telephone: 415-460-1352 Fax: 415-460-5368 Email: agland@aglandinvest.com Web: www.aglandinvest.com

Economic Competitiveness Group, Sausalito, CA (www.ecgroup.com) Gordon H. Chong & Partners, Architects, San Francisco, CA (www.ghcp.com)

Contributing Firms:

This publication was prepared by Agland Investment Services, Inc. The statements, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Economic Development Administration.

Final Report Monterey County, California

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MONTEREY AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVENESS INSTITUTE FEASIBILITY STUDY

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Preface 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................................................4 THE CHALLENGE ..........................................................................................................................4 LOCAL RESPONSE TO COMPETITIVE THREATS....................................................................5 ACTION TAKEN IN OTHER REGIONS AND COUNTRIES ......................................................5 PROJECT CONCEPT.......................................................................................................................6 RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT..............................................................................................6 STAGED APPROACH.....................................................................................................................7 Stage I-Public Outreach, Information Gathering and Evaluation ...................................................7 Stage II-Project Implementation & Formation of the Knowledge Center ......................................8 Stage III-Agriculture Competitiveness Institute Facility ................................................................8 FINANCIAL CHALLENGES AND MOBILIZATION ..................................................................8 LOOKING FORWARD....................................................................................................................9 CURRENT THREATS TO AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY .......................................................10 THE PROJECT VISION..................................................................................................................12 AN OPPORTUNITY FOR MONTEREY COUNTY ..................................................................................12 RESEARCHING THE CENTER CONCEPT............................................................................14 INTERVIEWS ....................................................................................................................................14 SURVEYS .........................................................................................................................................14 MEETINGS........................................................................................................................................14 AGLAND FINDINGS & DELIVERABLES ............................................................................................15 DEVELOPMENT OF AN ACI ........................................................................................................16 NEEDS AND INTERESTS VOICED BY INDUSTRY ...............................................................................16 THREE-STAGED APPROACH FOR DEVELOPMENT OF AN ACI.......................................18 STAGE I - PUBLIC OUTREACH, DATA GATHERING & DETAILED EVALUATION ...........................19 TASK 1: OBTAIN FUNDING FOR STAGE I & BEGIN PROJECT TASKS ..........................19 TASK 2: PREPARE SUMMARY PRESENTATION AND MARKETING BROCHURE .......19 TASK 3: CONDUCT INFORMATION MEETINGS & MARKET ACI CONCEPT................20 TASK 4: IDENTIFY PROJECT CHAMPIONS & LOCAL INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT .....21 TASK 5: IDENTIFY SPECIFIC PROJECTS FOR THE KNOWLEDGE CENTER .................21 TASK 6: BEGIN FORMING ADVISORY BOARD & ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE .23 TASK 7: OBTAIN FUNDING FOR STAGE II..........................................................................23 STAGE II - PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION & FORMATION OF THE KNOWLEDGE CENTER ...............24 TASK 1: DEVELOP ADVISORY BOARD ...............................................................................24 TASK 2: FUNDRAISE.................................................................................................................25 TASK 3: HIRE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER .......................................................................26 TASK 4: OBTAIN LOCATION FOR STAGE II TEAM ...........................................................26 TASK 5: BUILD STAGE II MANAGEMENT TEAM ..............................................................26 TASK 6: PLAN & IMPLEMENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES...........................................27 TASK 7: BUILD ORGANIZATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS .......................................................27 TASK 8: FINALIZE & MARKET ACI PROGRAM...................................................................29 TASK 9: IDENTIFY AND OBTAIN ACI LOCATION.............................................................29
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1.7 1.8 2.0 3.0 3.1 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 5.0 5.1 6.0 6.1

6.2

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TASK 10: REFINE ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM ..................................................................30 STAGE III AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVENESS INSTITUTE FACILITY...........................................31 TASK 1: BUILD STAGE III TEAM............................................................................................31 TASK 2: CONTINUE FUNDRAISING......................................................................................32 TASK 3: BUILD ACI & BEGIN OPERATIONS .......................................................................32 FUNDRAISING.................................................................................................................................33 PUBLIC SOURCES .............................................................................................................................33 FOUNDATION SOURCES ...................................................................................................................33 PRIVATE SECTOR FUNDING .............................................................................................................34 POTENTIAL REVENUE STREAMS......................................................................................................35 CONCULSION ..................................................................................................................................35

7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 8.0

ANNEX Annex A: Newspaper and Periodical Articles Annex B: Phase I Project Deliverables Project Work Summary County Resource Guide Product & Service Mapping Needs Assessment & Surveys Questionnaire Sample Annex C: Preliminary Architecture Concepts Annex D: Advisory Board Description Annex E: Foundation Information

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Preface This report was commissioned and managed by Mary Claypool of Monterey Countys Environmental Resource Policy Division, Office of Economic Development, under an award from the U.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration, to research the opportunity of developing an agricultural center to encourage ongoing competitiveness of Monterey Countys agricultural industry. Darby Marshall, Associate Administrative Analyst for the Office of Environmental Resources, assisted with project management. This report relies on information obtained through a series of interviews, meetings and surveys with representatives from a wide range of agricultural businesses as well as public, academic and nonprofit organizations in Monterey County. The report was prepared by Agland Investment Services, Inc. (Agland), a rural development and agribusiness consulting firm located in San Rafael, California. The firm has been involved in a range of private and public sector projects in agriculture and agriculture related industries, both domestically and internationally, for over 25 years. Other firms that contributed to the report include the Economic Consulting Group (ECG) located in Sausalito, CA and Gordon H. Chong & Partners, LLC (GHCP), an architecture firm based in San Francisco, CA. William Mott, Agland President, and Carrie McAlister, Agland Director of Strategic Planning managed Phase I and II of this project. Agland Consultants John Inman and David Hutton provided valuable input into the project. Alec Hansen, ECG President, Karen Engel, ECG Senior Consultant, and Rob Ness, ECG Consultant provided research assistance and meeting support. Charles Higueras, GHCP Associate Partner, Kyle Elliot, GHCP Associate developed architectural concepts for the program. Agland would like to thank all of the individuals and organizations that participated in this study, with a special thanks to members of the Task Force and the project Executive Committee, as well as the Agricultural Commissioners Office and the Grower-Shippers Association for use of their facilities.

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1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1.1 THE CHALLENGE The parallel trends of increasing consumer demand for value-added and convenience oriented food products, coupled with the rapid creation of a global food market, are creating new food industry challenges. Monterey County farmers are loosing market share to international competitors in domestic markets and in markets abroad. Competitors such as China, have already taken sizable pieces of the Asian market for traditionally high-value crops, including California fruit and vegetables. The loss of market share has been attributed to inadequate investment in innovative products and technology on the behalf of U.S. farmers as well as more liberalized trade agreements, improved transportation and logistics, packing improvements, and quality enhancements on behalf of competing countries1. Furthermore, the cost advantages of countries like China, coupled with significant improvements in the quality and safety of their products, pose a real threat to agriculture in higher cost countries. Unless the industry takes steps to improve its competitive positioning, Western agriculture will shrink and profitability will continue to erode. In the words of George Tanimura, co-founder of Tanimura & Antle, We cant just cry about it, weve got to do something.

How will Monterey Countys agricultural industry compete with these competitive forces? The agricultural industry has three options: 1. Play the low cost, commodity provider game against low cost providers like China 2. Continue with business as usual while profits and market-share slowly erode away 3. Develop unique, value added products and new approaches that demand higher prices and a higher return We suggest that option C, is the only solution that will contribute to Montereys competitiveness and the viability of the agricultural industry in the long term. Clearly, some individuals will independently find a way to compete successfully in this new environment. However, to maintain the competitiveness of the greater industry, broad-based adjustment must be made to adapt to the new business environment and global competitive pressures.

Wells Fargo Agribusiness Presentation to the Deans Advisory Council, UC Davis, April 17, 2002. 4

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1.2 LOCAL RESPONSE TO COMPETITIVE THREATS In response to competitive threats to the local agricultural industry, the County of Monterey asked Agland Investment Services, a consulting firm based in San Rafael, California, to evaluate the opportunity and need for a locally based research and competitiveness center focused on the agriculture and food industry in the greater Monterey region. Questions included: 1. Are there service and research functions, not currently provided in the County, which will support the continued growth and innovation of an already large and successful agricultural economy? 2. If so, how can these programs and services work to insure the continued growth and innovation in an increasingly competitive, global economy? > What are the specific services and facilities that the agriculture industry needs to remain competitive? Agland asked these and other questions to a broad section of growers and agribusiness firms, as well as agricultural research institutions, educators and business service providers in the County. The research centered around three themes research and technology, education and training, and business support services. Business Support Svcs Technology & Research
Concept

Education & Training

The research investigated the concept of an agriculture processing, development and marketing center for industry - not structured as a government or university activity, but as a hybrid, freestanding, industry driven institution, working within the interface of research and the private sector. 1.3 ACTION TAKEN IN OTHER REGIONS AND COUNTRIES A number of other regional governments and industry leaders are taking innovative steps, moving away from reliance on existing institutions or business structures, to insure a prosperous and growing local economy. A number of regions have developed centers or institutes focused on encouraging regional competitiveness. Below are two examples. 1. One Center that has been particularly successful in stimulating agricultural development and industry competitiveness is Fundacin Chile. Located in Santiago, Fundacin Chile has become a center for technological innovation in the agriculture industry, helping to create businesses in new industries ranging from a multi-million dollar seafood industry to making profitable improvements in the quality of fruit, vegetable and livestock production for export.
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2. A relatively new center is the Food Innovation, Research, and Extension Center, in New Jersey. Rutgers University established this 32,000 sq. ft, Center to assist both small and large firms in further developing value-added food products. Specific services include quality assurance, food safety assistance, processing and analytical testing, marketing information, and post-harvest testing. In addition, a number of business incubators, many focused on biotechnology, have been established in the U.S. to service and provide an engine of growth for specific regions. Each of these centers offers a unique suite of services and programs to meet the needs of its agricultural community. These centers have been designed and built to spur smart growth and industry competitiveness for their regions and countries. Michael Porter, a professor at Harvard Business School and one of the worlds leading authorities on competitive strategy and international competitiveness points to the benefits of coordinating information and interrelationships to improve industry competitiveness. These industry centers facilitate the coordination of information and the development of industry relationships. At issue is whether the Monterey County agricultural community can work together to attack industry challenges and pursue opportunities for mutual benefit. Through extensive research, and numerous surveys and working groups, the Agland Team found that, while there are dozens of organizations and businesses providing services to the agricultural industry in Monterey County, currently, there is no central location or organization that acts to collect, analyze and/or disseminate relevant information for the agricultural industry. In fact, the team found there to be a notable lack of communication and coordination between resources operating in the County. 1.4 PROJECT CONCEPT The development of an Agricultural Competitiveness Institute for the region can prove a valuable tool for facilitating and encouraging interaction among local industry participants in a way that improves long-term competitiveness. The vision is to create an ACI that can service specific research, business and training to meet the needs of a diverse and expanding agricultural based industry, and ensure continued competitiveness and innovation. Most importantly, create a knowledge center, or hub of information, for the industry that can work to improve future competitiveness of the industry and the County. 1.5 RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Agland explored the concept of an Agricultural Competitiveness Institute with members of the Monterey County agriculture community. Through needs assessment research, the Agland Team hosted multiple one-on-one interviews and small group meetings with representatives from over 30 businesses in a wide-range of industries including the wine, vegetable, berry, finance, seed, chemical and agricultural technology industries. The findings show a strong interest in the idea of developing a center focused on improving the ongoing competitiveness of the Monterey agriculture industry.
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Once it was understood that there is a community interest in the concept of an Agriculture Competitiveness Institute, an Executive Committee, consisting of business leaders from various agricultural industry sectors, was formed. The Committee participated in a series of meetings focused on developing the concept and suggested a staged approach to the development of the Institute. The Executive Committee agreed that there is a need for improved coordination of information and knowledge resources within the County. Many programs and services related to knowledge and information sharing can be provided virtually via partnerships with existing organizations. More research needs to be done to determine these virtual programs and services provide sufficient opportunity to improve the industries competitive position in the long-term or whether there will be a distinct need for facilities to house programs and services for the agriculture industry. 1.6 STAGED APPROACH In order to bring industry and existing institutional input into the decision making process, and to insure an Agriculture Competitiveness Institute focused on priority projects, it is proposed that implementation proceed in a three staged process. Stage 1

Stage II

Stage III

Conduct public outreach, information gathering and evaluation Develop a virtual organization, or knowledge center, to coordinate and disseminate global industry data and encourage competitiveness. Partner with existing organizations and academic institutions to provide virtual programs and services to the agriculture industry and to prevent duplication.

Implement knowledge based, virtual programs. Determine whether a physical structure should be built to house programs and services that cannot be hosted virtually.

Option 1

Build a building to house programs and services.

Option 2

Do not build a building to house programs and i

Stage I-Public Outreach, Information Gathering and Evaluation Stage I focuses on public outreach and building support for the Agriculture Competitiveness Institute concept, coupled with further definition of key elements and focus of the Institute. The core concept for the initial organization is the creation of a Knowledge Center that can harness and utilize the vast expanse of information that is available, but often not utilized. At this stage it is important to identify a project champion(s) and to form a Board of Directors to carry the project into Stage II.

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Stage II-Project Implementation & Formation of the Knowledge Center This stage includes the planning, project development and funding required to develop the initial element the Knowledge Center. Not only is the cost/benefit ratio very high, but also it creates the momentum and communication required to define and establish other elements within the Institute. Most likely, this stage of the project will be housed in existing space, with a modest, but effective core staff. Stage III-Agriculture Competitiveness Institute Facility The final stage may be the identification of a complete Institute with a permanent home and the necessary fund raising to make it a reality.

Incentives for Building a Physical Structure Reasons to move forward with building a physical structure to house ACI programs and services, as suggested by Option 1 above, include: A. Programs and services that cannot be provided virtually. The representatives of the agriculture community in Monterey said the following programs and services could add value to their business: wet lab and dry lab space, post-harvest testing facilities, video-conference room, meeting rooms, demonstration kitchen, computer and work space, business incubation space, etc. B. Social and economic benefits of having a physical, central point for industry. Currently, There is no central hub of information, programs or services in Monterey County. There is no central place for agriculture related events, research programs, marketing or lobbying activities, training seminars, etc. A central hub for the agricultural industry can bring together: knowledge and information resources, education and training, business support resources, and science and technology. Creating a multi-purpose, central point for industry collaboration and innovation will develop synergies and lead to social and economic benefits for the County.

1.7 FINANCIAL CHALLENGES AND MOBILIZATION New programs and research centers do require both long term and operating capital. While the Institute should be guided by the momentum and needs of the private sector, the funding should come from a variety of sources, which include government, foundations, industry, private
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donations, and independent revenue streams. The importance of the agriculture and food industry sector in the region, coupled with its uniqueness and global importance, are factors that both governments and institutions feel are important. 1.8 LOOKING FORWARD The changing face of the international food system requires new approaches and institutions. An Agriculture Competitiveness Institute, to support an expanding and profitable food and agriculture industry, can work as an insurance policy for future profitability and growth. Most importantly, the programs and services offered by an Institute can encourage improved productivity, wages and working conditions for the agriculture and agribusiness workforce, the backbone of the industry.

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2.0 CURRENT THREATS TO AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY Estimates of the economic activity generated through crop production and the resulting value-added products in Monterey County exceed $10-12 billion annually, generated from a relatively small area of agricultural land. However, the agriculture and agribusiness landscape is changing rapidly. At issue is whether an institute or organization can be created that will help maintain, and encourage, global competitiveness in the Monterey County region. Is Monterey County agriculture at risk of loosing its competitive advantage? Yes. In fact, Monterey crops and products have already begun to loose market-share to foreign imports into the U.S. market and, are increasingly loosing market-share in export markets like Asia. According to studies by the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST) the United States has been consistently losing market share in international markets for processed and value-added food productions. The following are excerpts from a Los Angeles Times article in August 2001 that speaks specifically to the competitive challenges of the Salinas Valley (For entire article see Annex A). U.S. FARMERS FEARS GROWING "America has badly underestimated the resolve of the Chinese," said Uchida, director of international sales at Tanimura & Antle, one of the nation's leading exporters of fresh vegetables to Asia. "We took them for granted and now they're flexing their muscle." China has become the world's leading producer of fruits and vegetables. China grows seven times the amount of vegetables and twice as much fruit as the U.S. This growth was accomplished by having Chinese farmers drop less-profitable grains in favor of high-value export crops. It is in labor-intensive crops such as tree fruit and specialty vegetables where China has the greatest competitive advantage. About two years ago, Tanimura's brokers began noticing a steady increase in exports of Chinese vegetables to Japan. Not only was the Chinese produce being offered at 25% to 30% less than the market price, but the quality was good enough to satisfy the Japanese, who had grown more frugal as the economy worsened. Last year, exports of Chinese broccoli to Japan soared to 9,000 tons from just 2,265 tons the previous year while exports of U.S. broccoli, primarily from California, declined from 87,603 tons to 70,000 tons. Since then, the California firm's shipments of broccoli into Japan have been "substantially reduced" and exports of celery to the mainland--which until recently filled up to 15 shipping containers a week--have dried up completely In the mid-1990s, China began importing garlic to the United States. "China just came in and blew everybody away," said Don Christopher, president of Christopher Farms, who has lost his export markets in Europe, Japan and Australia to Chinese competition. "We can't just cry about it, we've got to do something," said George Tanimura, co-founder of Tanimura & Antle. "We've got to find a new business because of China," he said.
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Competitors like China create a real threat to Monterey agriculture. Today, exports of fresh and processed fruits and vegetable are decreasing while, at the same time, imports from other countries into the U.S. are on the rise. This is not good news for U.S. farmers. Experts suggest that Californias agricultural commodity quality differentiation is eroding due to:

Inadequate investment in innovative products Inadequate investment in quality upgrades Increased global competition > More liberalized trade agreements > Improved storage/transportation technologies > Improved packaging technologies > Improved logistics between buyer and seller Delays in technological innovation resulting from environmental activism and consumer concerns about biotechnology and the food system. 2

These factors are resulting in an inability for California producers to compete in the global marketplace. Accordingly, Western agriculture will shrink and profitability will continue to erode. Few acres will be farmed. Consolidation will lead to fewer farms. Water pressures, resulting in higher water prices, will require that water be used more efficiently.

How will Monterey Countys agricultural community compete with these competitive forces?
The agricultural community has three options: A. Play the low cost provider game against low cost providers like China B. Continue with business as usual while profits and market-share slowly erodes away C. Develop unique, value added products that demand higher prices and a higher return We suggest that option C, is the only solution that will contribute to Montereys competitiveness and the viability of the agricultural industry in the long term. Clearly, some individuals will independently find a way to compete successfully in this new environment. However, to maintain the competitiveness of the greater industry, broad-based adjustment must be made to adapt to the new business environment and global competitive pressures. Concerns about the competitive challenges facing the agriculture industry, prompted Monterey County to begin working with the private sector to explore projects that may work to encourage innovation and ensure the future competitiveness of the local industry. The opportunity to create an agricultural center, developed with and by industry representatives to encourage improvements in industry competitiveness, was the project researched for this study.

Wells Fargo Agribusiness Presentation to the Deans Advisory Council, UC Davis, April 17, 2002. 11

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3.0 THE PROJECT VISION The vision of the project is to create a cohesive approach to sustaining and growing the agriculture industry in Monterey County. One way to stimulate economic competitiveness is through a center or institute that provides research, business, and training programs to encourage the development of a vibrant and sustainable agricultural industry by working to build competitiveness and innovation. Michael Porter, a professor at Harvard Business School and one of the worlds leading authorities on competitive strategy and international competitiveness points to the benefits of coordinating information and interrelationships to improve industry competitiveness. While there are dozens of organizations and businesses providing services to the agricultural industry in Monterey County, currently, there is no central location or organization that acts to collect, analyze and/or disseminate information for the County. The development of an Agricultural Competitiveness Institute for the region could prove a valuable tool for facilitating and encouraging interaction among industry in a way that improves competitiveness. 3.1 An Opportunity for Monterey County Around the world, many regional governments and industry leaders are taking innovative steps, moving away from reliance on existing institutions or business structures, to insure a prosperous and growing local economy. Listed below are several examples of institutions that function as public/private partnerships. Fundacin Chile has been particularly successful. The organization has become a center for technological innovation in for the agriculture industry in Chile, helping to create businesses in industries ranging from a multi-million dollar seafood industry to making profitable improvements in the quality of fruit, vegetable and livestock production for export. EXAMPLES OF CNETERS & INSTITUTES IN OTHER REGIONS
Fundacin Chile, Santiago. An example of a government/private sector partnership. Staffed with business and technology-oriented individuals, it has created over 40 new private sector companies, and become the leading technology and innovation institution in Chile. (www.fundch.cl) Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis. Newest and largest research centers focused on agricultural biotechnology. With university and private sector funding of $140 million and a global perspective, this Center will play an increasingly important role in agricultural research. (www.danforthcenter.org) Food Innovation Research and Extension Center, New Jersey. Rutgers University established a 32,000 sq. ft, Center to assist both small and large firms further develop value-added food products. Specific services include quality assurance, food safety assistance, processing and analytical testing, marketing information, and post-harvest testing. (www.fire.rutgers.edu) Great Valley Center, Modesto. Formed to focus on policy issues facing the overall economy in the Central Valley, and help focus energy and attention to issues facing the agricultural sector in an increasingly urbanized world. (www.greatvalley.org) California Agriculture Technology Institute (CATI). Dedicated to improving the profitability of California agriculture. The organization has strong ties with industry, government and educational groups. Timely transfer of results from field and lab research is a high priority for CATI. They host a Center for Agricultural Business, A Center for Food Science and Nutrition Research, A Center for Irrigation Technology, and a Viticulture & Enology Research Center. (http://cati.csufresno.edu)
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In addition, a number of business incubators, many focused on biotechnology, have been established in the U.S. to service and provide an engine of growth for specific regions. Each of these centers offers a unique suite of services and programs to meet the needs of its agricultural community. These centers have been designed and built to spur smart growth and industry competitiveness for their regions and countries. Currently, Monterey County does not have such a center. There is an opportunity for business, public sector, and academic leaders in the County to create a unique agricultural center that will work to improve the regions continued competitiveness by encouraging regional growth and innovation.

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4.0 RESEARCHING THE CENTER CONCEPT To ensure that the design and development of the center or institute concept was driven by the needs and interest of the business community, Agland sought input through interviews, surveys as well as small and large group meetings. Agland met or spoke with County stakeholders including: - Representatives of Universities and Research Institutes - Representatives of Local, County-Wide, and Federal Public Agencies - Members of the Agribusiness Community - Heads of Associations and Nonprofits serving the Agribusiness Community 4.1 Interviews Agland consultants conducted a series of interviews with a.) SUPPLY SIDE organizations (providers of programs and services to the agriculture industry) and b.) Interviews with leaders of DEMAND SIDE organizations (business leaders). On the SUPPLY SIDE, Agland conducted interviews with the following types of organizations: Marine Sciences Research Institutes Agricultural Research Institutions County Offices and Services Education Institutions

SBDC and Other Business Support Services

On the DEMAND SIDE, Agland conducted interviews with multiple representatives from the following industries: Berry Wine Vegetable Seed Ornamental Nurseries

4.2 Surveys Agland developed two surveys, one for the DEMAND SIDE, one for the SUPPLY SIDE. - The DEMAND SIDE surveys were conducted to determine the need for and interest in an Agriculture Competitiveness Institute for the County of Monterey. - The SUPPLY SIDE surveys were conducted to determine what programs and services were being offered by organizations within the County. And, to determine how well current and planned programs and services are able to meet the needs identified through the DEMAND SIDE. 4.3 Meetings Agland hosted a number of small and large group meetings throughout the conceptual design process. The meetings were a forum for soliciting comments and suggestions. The feedback was incorporated into our project methodology and the ACI design. Meeting participants represented a broad cross section of the Monterey community.

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4.4 Agland Findings & Deliverables Through industry interviews, surveys and meetings, the Agland team found 78% of the interviewees have a medium to high interest level in participating in activities related to the development of a center focused on the agricultural industry, with over 28% of the respondents saying that they would invest money in the development of a center focused on agriculture. Survey respondents found Science & Research components the most important, followed by Business Support Services and Training & Education, respectfully. The average number of employee of the companies that completed the survey was 622 with more than 38% of the respondents have 50 or fewer employees. Around 72% percent of respondents, have some form of research and development labs in-house. Approximately 33% of the respondents said they may be interested co-locating with an industry focused center or institute. Phase I Deliverables As part of the first phase of the project, Agland completed the following deliverables: - Resource Guide. A guide to organizations and businesses providing programs and services to the agricultural community in Monterey County. - Product and Service Mapping. A matrix noting which organizations and businesses within the County meet or plan to meet the needs and interests identified in interviews, surveys and meetings with agribusiness representatives. - Summary of Surveys and Needs Assessment. A detailed log and evaluation of all of the DEMAND SIDE surveys conducted throughout the project. (See Annex B for copy of Phase I deliverables). Phase II Deliverables - Feasibility Study (Follows) - Architectural Renderings (See Annex C)

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5.0 DEVELOPMENT OF AN ACI Through our extensive community research and our evaluation of programs and services, Agland found that there is both an interest in and need for an agriculture-focused institute within the County of Monterey. A wide variety of resources are available for use by agricultural businesses within Monterey County. However, a lack of communication and cooperation between distinct resources inhibits local businesses from achieving the maximum utility from local programs and services. For the region to maintain competitiveness in an increasingly global marketplace, a formal effort is needed to improve coordination and dissemination of information and resources within the County. Currently, there is no industry driven center or institute in California that is designed to meet the unique needs of the local agricultural industry. Our research uncovered needs in the areas of business and support services, scientific research and development, education and training, and information and knowledge sharing. Based on these findings, Agland recommends the development of an agricultural center to be located in Monterey County. 5.1 Needs and Interests Voiced by Industry As part of our research for this project, Agland came up with a preliminary list of needs and interests voiced by members of the agricultural community in Monterey County during Phase I of the project (See Annex A). The program below resulted from interviews, surveys and questionnaires conducted with industry and with program and service providers. Agland compared a list of needs voiced by the industry to the service mapping developed in Phase I of this project to develop this preliminary conceptual program for the ACI.
PRELIMINARY ACI PROGRAMS AND SERVICES
Science & Research Wet labs & Dry Lab Space Wine Lab, Pilot Winery & Fermentation Space Post Harvest Lab for Research and Testing Plant Disease SWAT Team Knowledge Center Library and Information Services Transportation Information Center Computers & Work Space Business Support Services Training and Education Business Service Space Conference room Training/Meeting rooms/space Auditorium Business incubation space Room Designed for Industry Focus Groups Other Areas ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES Demonstration Kitchen & Tasting Room facilities Snack & Coffee Bar Reception Area & Common Space (designed to facilitate interaction between business, technology and educational components)

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To help the project team better evaluate programs and services, and in an effort to create a tangible product that community members could better visualize, react to and interact with, Agland hired the San Francisco based architecture firm, Gordon H. Chong & Partners to help us to evaluate program spaces, costs, and design concepts. Based on the programs and services identified above, the team developed preliminary building concepts. (See Annex C for preliminary building concepts). Over time, the program and services components outlined will (and should) evolve. Accordingly, a dedicated effort is required to move the development of the ACI forward.

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6.0 Three-Staged Approach for Development of an ACI To facilitate the evolution of a conceptual design for an ACI that best meets the needs and interests of the community, Agland suggests a three-staged process for evaluating the conceptual design and moving the project from conceptual design to implementation. An important component of Stage I and Stage II is the development of a Knowledge Center within the ACI. ACI Knowledge Center: An entity within the ACI that will work as a hub of information for the Monterey agriculture industry, coordinating and disseminating disparate information to the in a way that improves communication and stimulates the competitiveness of the region. Examples of services may include technology transfer to the region from other areas, coordination of specialized training programs, and centralization of currently fragmented information for use by industry (i.e. coordinating of transportation information, amalgamating government regulations, listing of company product standards, bringing together of training resources, etc.) The recommended staged approach is as follows: Stage I Stage II Stage III Conduct Public Outreach, Information Gathering and Evaluation Develop and Implement ACI Knowledge Center Programs and Services Option 1: Finalize Plan for ACI Facility and Build Facility (or) Option 2: Continue with Virtual Programs and Service
STAGE II This stage includes planning and development tasks required to build a board of directors, project funding, and a management team as well as further refine programs and services that will be hosted with the ACI. It also includes the development of a Knowledge Center that will begin providing services through organizational partnerships and online applications prior to the building of the ACI. 1. 2. 3. Develop Board of Directors Fundraise Hire Chief Executive Officer (CEO) 4. Obtain Location for Stage I Team 5. Build Stage II Management Team 6. Plan and implement programs and services 7. Build organizational partnerships 8. Finalize & Market ACI Program 9. Identify and obtain ACI Location 10. Refine architecture program STAGE III: Building ACI Facility During Stage III the ACI facilities may be constructed to meet requirements setforth by the Stage II Team. The Stage III Team members will be hired during this period according to the needs setforth by the ACIs finalized program. Fundraising throughout the operation of the ACI. 1. Build Stage III Mgmt Team 2. Continue fundraising 3. Build ACI & Begin Operations Option 2

STAGE I This stage focuses on marketing and building support for the ACI concept within the broader Monterey County community. Additional information will be gathered in Stage I to help to evolve the program structures and concept. Other key facets of Stage I include identifying a project champion and building an Advisory Board.

Option 1

1. Obtain funding for Stage I 2. Prepare ACI presentation & marketing brochure 3. Conduct a series of information meetings & market ACI concept 4. Identify project champion(s) and local institutional support 5. Identify specific projects for the Knowledge Center (Stage II) 6. Begin forming a Advisory Board and organizational structure 7. Seek Funding for Stage II

STAGE III: Virtual Center Continues Continue with development and management of programs and services in a virtual center.

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6.1 STAGE I - Public Outreach, Data Gathering & Detailed Evaluation STAGE I This stage focuses on marketing and building support for the ACI concept and program within the broader community in Monterey County. Additional information will be gathered in Stage I to help to evolve the program structures and concept. Other key facets of Stage I include identifying a project champion and beginning to build an Advisory Board. Agland recommends a consulting team be hired to facilitate Stage I activities. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Obtain funding for Stage I Prepare ACI presentation & marketing brochure Conduct a series of information meetings & market ACI concept Identify project champion(s) and local institutional support Identify specific projects for the Knowledge Center (Stage II) Begin forming a Advisory Board and organizational structure Seek Funding for Stage II

This study developed a broad concept for the ACI, outlining preliminary thoughts on how the ACI may function and the virtual and physical forms the ACI may take. Presumably, as the community becomes more involved and new needs are identified, the key functions and services provided by ACI will evolve. Agland recommends that the County move forward with an outreach and informational program to connect with the broader agribusiness community and to aid in the further definition and development of an implementation plan for the ACI. Stage I focuses on presenting the concept of the Agriculture Competitiveness Institute to the community. The particular focus will be further discussion with the agribusiness community and institutions identified in the Agricultural Resource Guide.

TASK 1: OBTAIN FUNDING FOR STAGE I & BEGIN PROJECT TASKS Efforts should be made immediately to obtain funding for Stage I. Tasks for this stage will include formulating an ACI presentation and marketing brochure, working to identify project champion(s) and local institutional support, conducting a series of information meetings & market ACI concept, working to identify specific projects for the Knowledge Center (See Stage II), and beginning to form an Advisory Board and organizational structure. TASK 2: PREPARE SUMMARY PRESENTATION AND MARKETING BROCHURE The Stage I should prepare a marketing brochure and presentation.

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Presentation. The presentation should be a concise 15-20 minute presentation that can be used at industry board meeting as well as other community meetings and events. The presentation should clearly state the projects vision, work history, and the state of the current conceptual plan. The presentation should underscore the emphasis that is being placed on community buy-in and involvement in the process and solicit feedback through formalized channel (a dedicated contact person, an evaluation sheet, etc.) The Brochure. The brochure should be a one to two page document that also succinctly describes the projects vision, work history, and the state of the current conceptual plan. The presentation should underscore the emphasis that is being placed on community buy-in and involvement in the process and solicit feedback through formalized channel (a dedicated contact person, an evaluation sheet, etc.). The brochure can be handed out at meetings and included with fundraising proposals.

TASK 3: CONDUCT INFORMATION MEETINGS & MARKET ACI CONCEPT Agland recommends that the Stage I Team participate in a series of information meetings with community groups to market the ACI concept. Some of the groups may include: Vegetable producers Grape and wine producers Berry producers Educational and Research Institutions City government officials Ag related nonprofit organizations Educational Organizations Research Organizations An important component of Stage I will be to market the ACI concept to the broader community. This can be done through presentations at the following types of organizations: 1.) Chambers of Commerce 2.) City/County Government Meetings 3.) Industry Associations 4.) Meetings with representatives of local organizations and businesses Articles can be written about the concept and published in local newspapers and trade publications. These informational opportunities should be used to market the concept to the while, at the same time, soliciting constructive feedback from the community.

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TASK 4: IDENTIFY PROJECT CHAMPIONS & LOCAL INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT A key factor in building momentum for the project and for creating buy-in and support for the project will be identifying project champions (supporters, sponsors, etc). A project champion is an individual who believes in the project vision (developing an organization that can spur innovation and improve industry competitiveness) and is willing to put time, resources and capital into the evolution or development of the concept. The project, over time, may develop multiple project champions. The project will need local champions. People who are dedicated to seeing the project move forward and are well respected and trusted in the local agricultural industry. However, all of the project champions or supporters do not need to be from the agricultural industry or from Monterey County. There may be project supporters within local or national government or within private industry. For instance, ConEdison is a financial sponsor of the Center for Irrigation Technology in Tulare County. There may be similar sponsorship opportunities for the ACI. TASK 5: IDENTIFY SPECIFIC PROJECTS FOR THE KNOWLEDGE CENTER Agland recommends that part of the role of the Stage I Team be to identify and define specific projects for an ACI Knowledge Center. Our research to date has found that, in the global marketplace, information and knowledge sharing are becoming crucial tools for innovation. Although a wide variety of resources are available for use by agricultural businesses within Monterey County, a lack of communication and cooperation between distinct resources inhibits local businesses from achieving the maximum utility from local programs and services. For the region to maintain competitiveness in an increasingly global marketplace, a formal effort is needed to improve coordination and dissemination of information and resources within the County. The agricultural community has a high-level of interest the ACI having the ability to capture, evaluate, coordinate and disseminate information for the agricultural industry in a user-friendly manner. Acting as a hub for information for the agricultural industry, the Knowledge Center component of the ACI can focus on industry production as well as marketing and consumption. Many of these programs and services may be housed with partner organizations, including colleges, universities, associations, etc., in effect, creating a virtual organization. The following diagram identifies areas of data or information need on the production and marketdriven sides of the industry. A key task of the Stage I team will be reviewing and prioritizing the areas identified (labor issues, training and education, food safety, etc.) as well as identifying and planning for specific projects and programs that can be housed in the Knowledge Center. The Internet will be a useful tool for collecting, organizing, and distributing information to industry. A few illustrative examples of potential Knowledge Center programs are listed on the following page.

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ACI KNOWLEDGE CENTER CONCEPT


Links to and information about: Research & info as related to:

Finance & Investment

PRODUCTION MARKETING & CONSUMPTION

Consumer Research & Education

Labor Issues

Data Hub for Ag Industry


Science & Research Projects

Market Research

KNOWLEDGE CENTER TEAM


Industry Information Advocate

International Competition/ Cooperation

Training & Education

Food Safety Campaign Business Development Services Certification & County Brand Devt.

Certification Standards (Legal & Buyer) Association Programs & Services Internships ETC

Technology Transfer

Product Tracking Information

Examples of illustrative projects: 1. A specific project might be to utilize computer systems and software to collect retail price information in all major cities in the U.S. for key produce items of interest to Monterey producers. This data can be quickly summarized and given to producers and marketers. 2. Another project might be to collect industry wide worker safety information that could be utilized in support of reducing the cost of workmans compensation insurance or the creation of a transportation information center. 3. Another project might be to develop a consumer driven information system that documents the safety procedures utilized on different products to insure that safe and nutritious produce is delivered to the consumer.
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TASK 6: BEGIN FORMING ADVISORY BOARD & ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Individuals who have participated in Executive Committee Meetings and Task Force Meetings as related to Phase I and Phase II of this project may be interested in particpating as part of an Advisory Board moving forward. The Stage I team should conduct one-on-one meetings with individuals that voice interest in participating as part of the Advisory Board and seek-out and have initial conversations with potential Advisory Board candidates. Generally, an Advisory Board should consist of 10-12 Members representing industry, academics, and government. Member representation should be local, national, and potentially international. For more on Advisory Board development see Section 5.2.

TASK 7: OBTAIN FUNDING FOR STAGE II Throughout the Stage I process the team should be working to develop relationships with funding sources. As the programs and services for the KC component of the ACI are more clearly defined, the Stage I team can begin developing funding strategies and proposals for specific programs or facets of the KC. Please see Section 7.0 for additional information on fundraising.

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6.2 STAGE II - Project Implementation & Formation of the Knowledge Center STAGE II This stage includes planning and project development tasks required to develop a board of directors, project funding, and a management team as well as further refine programs and services that will be hosted with the ACI. It also includes the development of a Knowledge Center that will begin providing services through organizational partnerships and online applications prior to the building of the ACI. 1. Develop Advisory Board 2. Fundraise 3. Hire Chief Executive Officer (CEO) 4. Obtain Location for Stage II Team 5. Build Stage II Management Team 6. Plan and implement programs and services 7. Build organizational partnerships 8. Finalize & Market ACI Program 9. Identify and obtain ACI Location 10. Refine architecture program

We recommend that as part of Stage II, the ACI be developed as a stand-alone not-for-profit entity. This will: 1.) Allow for flexibility in developing partnerships with other organizations, be they private, public or non-profit 2.) Provide for additional funding channels including private donors, public agencies, foundation and grant making organizations, and via the development of independent revenue streams 3.) Create an environment that permits industry representatives and thought leaders to participate in and have ownership over the direction of programs and services hosted by the ACI. As part of this organizational development, an Advisory Board should be created and a CEO hired to manage fundraising, logistics, program and service development, and partnerships as well as to facilitate the conversation around facilities or building programs for the ACI.

TASK 1: DEVELOP ADVISORY BOARD A key step in building the ACI will be to develop a strong, well-rounded, Advisory Board. The Advisory Board may consist of 10-12 Members representing industry, academics, and government. Member representation should be local, national, and potentially international. The Board will be responsible for ascertaining the first round of start-up capital for the ACI development.
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More specifically, responsibilities of Board Members will be to:


Determine the organization's mission and purposes Select the executive staff through an appropriate process Provide ongoing support and guidance for the executive; review his/her performance Ensure effective organizational planning Ensure adequate resources and manage resources effectively Determine and monitor the organization's programs and services Enhance the organization's public image Serve as a court of appeal Assess the organizations performance3

It is not customary for Advisory Board Members of nonprofits to be paid. Board Members can contribute to the development of the KC in a number of ways. A. Ag Community Representation. Ideally, each agricultural sector within the County will have a well-respected community member on the Board. For instance there may be representatives from the wine, berry, vegetable, organics, nursery and seed industries. B. Thought Leaders. The Board should also host members that are thought leaders in the field of agriculture academics or industry leaders in technology, economics, global trade, packaging, and other areas identified as important to the growth of the industry. C. Government Representative. A public sector individual with connections to and understanding of public funding sources as well as knowledge of the local and national government structures and agencies will prove a useful contribution to the Board. D. High Profile Individual. An individual who is a public figure can help to market the Institute and play an integral part in fundraising. This individual could be a well-known political figure, business person, or celebrity. (See Annex D for Board Member Job Descriptions).

TASK 2: FUNDRAISE At this stage, fundraising becomes an important ongoing task. Board Members should help to facilitate much of the early organizational fundraising. Funds need to be raised to cover planning needs, staff salaries, programs and services and overhead. Initial funds will be used to hire a Chief Executive Officer (CEO) who will then lead fundraising efforts. Depending on how the programs and services for the ACI evolve, in Stage II and III the Board, CEO, and management team may need to focus significant efforts on fundraising for start-up capital costs.

Ten Basic Responsibilities of Nonprofit Boards," published by the National Center for Nonprofit Boards, Washington, DC 20036. 25

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TASK 3: HIRE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Key to the success of the ACI will be the development of a strong Advisory Board and the selection of a Chief Executive Officer (CEO) that will not only be a champion for the ACI but also have talent for building resilient and effective ties with the agriculture and business communities. TASK 4: OBTAIN LOCATION FOR STAGE II TEAM Agland recommends that, given the ACIs KC mission of becoming a hub of information for the agricultural industry, it is most suitable to locate the ACI team in Salinas during Stage II. Salinas hosts a number of the Countys agricultural related programs and services and is home to a notable concentration of County agriculture businesses. A. Building Needs For Stage II, the ACI team will need sufficient office space for approximately 5 people. At least one private office and a private conference space should be available to the ACI Team. The CEO as well as the Development Director and Industry Advocate, may intermittently need private space for conversations with potential donors, grant-makers, etc. However, the majority of the job functions of the team will have communicative attributes that may be well-suited to cubicles or shared space. B. Suggested Space The new Agricultural Wing at the Steinbeck Center in Salinas has been suggested as a potential location for the ACI team during Stage II. Traditional leased office space is also an option. One suggestion is the 2-year old building space on Harkins in Salinas next to Silva Produce and the Agriculture Commissioners office. There are 3000 square feet of space, renting at approximately $1.25 per square foot. TASK 5: BUILD STAGE II MANAGEMENT TEAM The following is a proposed management structure for Stage II of the ACI: MANAGEMENT TEAM Advisory Board Chief Executive Officer

Director of KC Devt. Research Associates


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The following are expected hires for Stage II: First hire: CEO Second hire: 2-3 Research Associates Third hire: Director of Development & Major Grants

TASK 6: PLAN & IMPLEMENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES The Stage II ACI team should begin to plan for and implement KC programs and services in partnership with other organizations (Please see Task 7 below for suggestions for organizational partnerships and illustrative program examples). The Stage II team will also seek to better understand, research and document the communitys need for programs and services that cannot be provided through a virtual organization.

TASK 7: BUILD ORGANIZATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS An important function of the ACI will be to bring together and utilize the capabilities and skills within a number of institutions within the region (see Agriculture Resource Guide) and to reach out to other institutions and thought leaders on a national as well as global basis. There are several institutions that have historically played a particularly important role in the agricultural economy and need to be included in the development and the establishment of the ACI. Research & Technology University of California ARS/USDA Markets & Consumers CA Strawberry Commission Agriculture Wing - Steinbeck Center Vintners & Growers Assoc. Education & Services Cooperative Extension Grower-Shipper Assoc. of Central California Hartnell College

In addition, there are a number of local institutions and organizations in education, finance, entrepreneurship, and economic development that will benefit from and have links to the ACI. The categories are described below in additional detail. A. Research & Technology The University of California and the Extension Service play an important role in California agriculture, both in research and education services. The County Extension Office is an important link to agriculture in Monterey. The University has and continues to develop research programs specifically focused on the needs of specific regions or crops. There has been continuing discussion of the University creating a Central Coast Field Station in the Salinas Valley, as a means of providing further research and support to the important production areas in the Salinas Valley and surrounding areas. Since it has been difficult to fully define a location and role for such an institution, consideration should be given to discussing the ACI development with the University Office of Agriculture. There
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may be opportunities for the ACI to serve the future needs of the agricultural industry, assisted by relationships with the University. The Agriculture Research Service (ARS), USDA has a research center in Salinas and both the staff and facilities can be utilized in specific projects of interest to both the ACI and ARS. B. Markets & Consumers An important role of the ACI is to create opportunities for producers to build stronger links to consumers, bridging what currently appears to be an information and relationship gap. Illustrative partnerships are as follows: The California Strawberry Commission in Watsonville is focused on the promotion of strawberries on a statewide basis. The Commission also sponsors research projects that support strawberry growers and production. The ACI is likely to be a resource that the Commission can draw upon for specific projects. The Monterey County Vintners and Growers Association represents the local wine industry and is particularly focused on establishing Monterey County as a world-renowned grape growing and wine-producing region. Similar to the Strawberry Commission, joint research or development projects with the Vintners and Growers Association could be undertaken by the ACI. C. Education and Services The Agriculture Wing of the Steinbeck Center, Salinas is an established non-profit organization that sponsors outreach and educational programs focused on the local agricultural economy. Construction of the Agricultural Wing is to start in 2003. The Center recently received a $250,000 grant from the California Department of Agriculture, Buy California Initiative to implement three programs to: 1. Create an Ag Academy to attract high school students into the agricultural profession; and 2. Develop Ag. Econ Challenge an interactive computer program designed to teach high school students about the economics of raising crops; and 3. Sponsor an Ag Forum to provide speakers for the general public on agricultural issues. The Steinbeck Center and its Board of Directors can be a useful sounding board and one of the lead institutions to assist in further developing the ACI. The Steinbeck Board members could help to facilitate the process of communicating the ACI concept to the broader Monterey County community. The Center also has the potential to provide temporary space and administrative services to the ACI. Another important organization in the region is the Grower-Shipper Association of Central California. Most of the vegetable and berry growers and shippers are members, and it is the principal organization that speaks for the fresh produce industry in the Salinas/Watsonville production area.

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Hartnell College serves the Salinas Valley region, and is an important education resource for the agriculture and agribusiness community. The College does provide specific agricultural oriented curriculum and sees ways in which the College can work with the ACI on joint educational programs. The College also has a small campus and land near the Salinas Airport that could be a Permanente site for the ACI. California State University Monterey is another relatively new education institution in the region that is interested in defining a role for involvement with the agricultural community.

TASK 8: FINALIZE & MARKET ACI PROGRAM There are a number of reasons that the Stage II team will want to consider moving forward with planning and preparing for the development of a physical structure to house ACI programs and services. First, in Phase I and II of this project, members of the agricultural community voiced a need for and interest in programs and services that cannot be provided virtually. These include wet lab and dry lab space, post-harvest testing facilities, a conference room, meeting rooms, testing kitchen, computer and work space, incubation space, etc. There also has been interest in representatives from public agencies (like the EPA) in the ACI. The Stage II team will work prioritize and evaluate these needs. Second, while it may be difficult to capture the financial benefits to the community of having a central point or location for agriculture related events, research, activities, and programs and services economic and social value does exist. One of the keys to the success of the ACI may be creating a hub for the agricultural industry that brings together knowledge and information resources, under the same roof with training, business support resources and science and technology; creating a multi-purpose central point for industry collaboration and innovation. The Stage II team will need to determine whether these benefits, coupled with the findings from above, merit the development of a physical structure.

If, upon reevaluating the need for a physical structure to house programs and service, the Stage II team finds that the community needs merits the development of a building to house the ACI the team will be responsible for finalizing a program and marketing the project and program to the community and potential financial sponsors or grant makers. TASK 9: IDENTIFY AND OBTAIN ACI LOCATION Potential for building reuse will depend on the programs and services identified for the ACI. If the ACI becomes an expanded version of the KC, commercial reuse is a viable option. However, if the program components contain wet/dry lab space and other research facilities, Agland suggests that the best alternative for Stage III may be new construction. These purposes require a unique space. A space that is comfortable and functional, while, at the same time, a space that can provide for highly technical facilities and uses. To date, no existing locations have been identified that are appropriate for reuse.
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A.

Location Specifications Given the purpose of the ACI, to act as a hub for industry and spur innovation and growth, Agland recommends that the ACI be built in the Salinas Valley. The town of Salinas is the most likely candidate as the City already acts as a central point for much of the agricultural industry in the region. To meet the program specifications and building requirements of the ACI, Agland recommends that the ACI be built on approximately 3-acres of land, on land bordering or in Salinas, with access to utilities.

B.

Location Options Ideally, the ACI team will find a donor willing to contribute an appropriate piece of land for the development of the ACI. If purchased, costs per acre may range from an estimated $150,000 to $250,000 per acre. The following have been identified or considered as potential locations for construction of the ACI: 1. Airport land owned by City 2. River Road Site, Morman Church Property (on Highway 68, $785/K for 4.3acres) 3. Hartnell College Property Adjoining USDA research Facilities (near Airport) 4. Industrial Park at Airport 5. Non-Salinas Options For more information on commercial properties contact: Mr. Wiley Mitchell, Associate Realtor Salinas,CA only commercial brokerage. www.btcommericial.com / Email: wmitchell@btcommercial

TASK 10: REFINE ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM If a decision is made to move forward with building a physical structure for the ACI the architectural concepts and program will need to be refined based on the Stage I and II team findings. The teams will interpret and translate the information obtained through community meetings, information sessions, experience with virtual programs and services, and independent research to determine the appropriate architectural program for the proposed ACI. Agland recommends that architectural team consult with the ACI team during this process to help the ACI team better understand cost structures, building functionality and structural solutions.

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6.3 STAGE III Agriculture Competitiveness Institute Facility STAGE III This is the implementation stage. During Stage III the ACI facilities are constructed to meet the requirements set-forth by the Stage II Team. The Stage III Team members will be hired during this period according to the needs set-forth by the ACIs finalized program. Fundraising will continue through Stage III and throughout the operation of the ACI. At the end of Stage III the ACI facilities, programs and services will be fully operational. 1. Build Stage II Management Team 2. Continue fundraising 3. Build ACI & Begin Operations Through interviews, surveys, and industry research the Agland Team worked with public and private sector representatives of Monterey County to develop the following preliminary program for the ACI facility. As the ACI team moves forward with their research and community involvement, the concept of the ACI will change in form and substance. TASK 1: BUILD STAGE III TEAM STAGE III MANAGEMENT TEAM
Advisory Board CEO & President

Admin Assistant

Facilities & Ops. Mgr.

Dir. of KC Services

Industry Advocate

Dir. of Development

Dir. of Finance

Research Associates

Internship & Training Mgr.

Grant Writers

Based on the programs and services proposed for the ACI we recommend the following management and administrative positions with representative annual salary estimates.

1 CEO 1 Director of Finance and Accounting [New Hire] 1 Director of Development Fundraising and Major Grants [From Stage II]
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1 Administrative Assistant to Senior Management [New Hire] 1 One Facilities Maintenance and Operations Manager [New Hire] 1 Director of Information and Library Services [New Hire] 1 Industry Advocate [New Hire: Part-time] 2 Research Associates of Information Services [From Stage II] Training and Internship Manager [New Hire]

TASK 2: CONTINUE FUNDRAISING Clearly, if the team decides to move forward with building a physical structure to house ACI programs and services the team will need to ascertain contributions for start-up capital and operations. Again, the preliminary concept for the architecture program realized in Phase II of the Agland project was as follows:
PRELIMINARY ACI PROGRAMS AND SERVICES
Science & Research Wet labs & Dry Lab Space Wine Lab, Pilot Winery & Fermentation Space Post Harvest Lab for Research and Testing Plant Disease SWAT Team Knowledge Center Library and Information Services Transportation Information Center Computers & Work Space Business Support Services Training and Education Business Service Space Conference room Training/Meeting rooms/space Auditorium Business incubation space Room Designed for Industry Focus Groups Other Areas ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES Demonstration Kitchen & Tasting Room facilities Snack & Coffee Bar Reception Area & Common Space (designed to facilitate interaction between business, technology and educational components)

In the initial years of operation, ongoing fundraising will be critical to the success of the ACI. As independent revenue streams are developed within the ACI, fundraising needs may decrease. (Please see Section 7.0 for more information on fundraising).

TASK 3: BUILD ACI & BEGIN OPERATIONS Once the site for the ACI has been determined, the team will hire an architecture team and developer to oversee the building development process. The ACI team will need to: Clearly define architecture program (building components, square footage, etc) Hire Architects Hire Developer (if elected) Oversee schematic design (approx. 2-3 months) Oversee design development (approx. 3-4 months) Oversee development of construction documents (approx. 5-6 months) Oversee construction (approx. 12-18 months dependent on a number of factors) Oversee interior design & landscaping (approx. 1-3 months)
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7.0 FUNDRAISING We recommend that the strategy for Institute financing take a multifaceted approach, utilizing public sources, foundation sources, private sector funding, and generating independent revenue streams. Below are illustrative examples of funding sources. 7.1 Public Sources The following have been identified as potential public funding sources. A. Economic Research Service, USDA Title VI of the US Farm Policy provides funding for rural areas to undertake strategic planning, feasibility assessments, and coordination activities with other local, State and Federal officials. They also provide funding for value-added agricultural programs and rural business investments. As related to this Institute, the Value-Added Agricultural Product Marketing Development Grants were authorized to receive $40 million per year from CCC, with eligibility liberalized to increase participation in the program. Using money from this program, a new Agriculture Innovation Center Demonstration Program is being created to provide technical assistance, business and marketing planning and other non-financial assistance to valueadded businesses. B. Economic Development Administration (EDA). - The EDAs Mission is to "Enhance community success in attracting private capital investment and lucrative job opportunities." The EDA was established to generate jobs, help retain existing jobs, and stimulate industrial and commercial growth in economically-distressed areas of the United States. EDA assistance is available to rural and urban areas of the Nation experiencing high unemployment, low income, or other severe economic distress. D. Economic Development Department (EDD) of California. - The EDD recognizes the significant role that agriculture plays in Californias economy, and is committed to serving the needs of the industry. The EDD participates in a variety of efforts that benefit the agricultural community: 7.2 Foundation Sources Foundations in California and throughout the United States devote funding to economic development as well as agricultural and environmental causes. Several key potential sources for funding are highlighted below. (A list of the Top One Hundred Foundation by Asset Size and a list of Northern California Grant-making Organizations are included in Annex E). A. James Irvine Foundation. The Foundation funds projects and organizations that benefit the people of California. They provide funds for core operations; institutional strengthening; organizational development; planning/start-up; program development; and technical assistance. The average size of grants in 2000 was $275,000 with nineteen grants over $1 million and 48 grants between $300,000 and $1 million.
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B. Packard Foundation The Foundation provides national and international grants, and also has a special focus on the Northern California Counties of San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, and Monterey. In 2001, the Packard Foundation gave a total of $654,631,837 in 1,488 grants. Their median award size was $100,000. C. Harden Foundation The Foundation funds projects in agriculture and in California with a particular emphasis on the Salinas Valley. Grants range from approximately $5,000 to over $150,000. The Foundation has over $57,455,442 in assets. D. Clarence E. Heller Charitable Foundation (Organics) The Foundation supports projects aimed at encouraging research on practices for sustainable and organic farming systems and the adoption of those practices. Organizations funded in this area included the Organic Farming Research Foundation, National Campaign for Sustainable Agriculture and The Land Institute. 7.3 Private Sector Funding Private Sector Funding can take place via a number of vehicles. A. Donations from a private individual or organization Ideally, a community member or local organization will contribute substantially to the development of the ACI. A number of technology centers around the world were developed with a significant upfront investment from a corporation or private individual, including Fundacion Chile and the Danforth Center. The CEO and the Director of Development will work closely with the community and work to identify potential investors. B. Fundraising The KC team may work with the community on fundraising events and projects. Community raffles, run, golf, walk, or build-athons, auction etc C. Sponsorship Companies may elect to fund certain aspects of the ACI. For instance, in Tulare, CA ConEdison sponsors the Irrigation Technology Center a component of the California Agricultural Technology Institute. D. Membership As the ACI develops programs and services, there may be an opportunity to incorporate membership fees. These fees can be used to augment programs and services and contribute to the expansion of the KC in Stage I to the ACI in Stage III.

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Agriculture Competitiveness Institute Office of Environmental Resources

7.4

Potential Revenue Streams The KC will work to identify potential revenue streams for the KC and for the ACI. To date, the following revenue streams have been identified: A. User or membership fees for KC programs and services B. Rental revenues for incubator space C. User fees for use of wet lab space D. User or membership fees for use of post harvest facilities E. User or membership fees for pilot winery services and facilities F. User or membership fees for conference room and meeting room space * As programs and services develop, the KC Team should conduct additional research to determine whether it makes sense to charge individuals/organizations on a per use or membership basis. The KC Team will also need to determine the appropriate price points for services rendered.

8.0 CONCULSION During Phase I and Phase II of this project, Agland found there to be a community interest in and need for a center focused specifically on sustaining and improving the agricultural competitiveness of the Monterey County region. Our research has uncovered needs in the areas of business and support services, scientific research and development, education and training, and information and knowledge sharing. Agland has recommended a staged approach for moving forward with the development of the Agricultural Competitiveness Institute. With first stage focusing on marketing and building support for the ACI concept within the broader community in Monterey County and developing virtual programs and services, with the second stage focusing on planning and project development tasks required to develop a board of directors, secure project funding, and a hire a management team as well as further refine programs and services that will be hosted within the ACI, and with the third stage focusing on implementation and the possible construction of a physical structure to host the ACI programs and services.

Agland Investment Services, Inc.

35

Annex A Newspaper and Periodical Articles

Los Angeles Times Article


Published on AUGUST 08, 2001 in the LOS ANGELES TIMES

China's WTO Challenge: U.S. Farmers' Fears Growing


by EVELYN IRITANI SALINAS -- Early in his career, Richard Uchida heard Chinese farmers were starting to grow broccoli, celery and lettuce. "Give them 10 or 15 years," thought the young California vegetable broker, "they could be tough competitors." Uchida didn't have to wait that long. It has been only four years, but Uchida and other California producers and exporters are scrambling to hang on to their markets in Asia, where a glut of cheap Chinese fruit and vegetables is giving them a run for the money. Once gleeful about the profits to be made from helping to feed 1.3 billion Chinese, farmers from California's lush San Joaquin Valley to the apple orchards of eastern Washington now worry they will be overwhelmed by China's growing power, particularly once it enters the World Trade Organization. "America has badly underestimated the resolve of the Chinese," said Uchida, director of international sales at Tanimura & Antle, one of the nation's leading exporters of fresh vegetables to Asia. "We took them for granted and now they're flexing their muscle." Americans, who depend on Asian consumers to buy 38% of their $51 billion a year in agriculture exports, aren't the only ones worried. A steep rise in Japanese imports of Chinese spring onions, shiitake mushrooms and rushes for tatami mats triggered alarm among politically important Japanese farmers already suffering from the slowing economy. Japan recently imposed restrictions on those Chinese farm products, sparking retaliatory tariffs from angry officials in Beijing. U.S. government officials eager to get China into the WTO have tried to steer clear of the looming trade battles, choosing instead to focus on the opportunities that could be created if the United States gains greater access to that long-protected market. They predict China's farm imports could increase by $1.5 billion a year once it joins the Geneva-based trade group. U.S. farmers traditionally have supported free trade because of their dependency on exports. But with the strong dollar making it tougher to sell abroad, they are starting to have second thoughts about unleashing China's capitalist urges. Leading farm groups have told the White House they will not support new trade initiatives unless the U.S. agrees to keep controversial dumping penalties designed to protect domestic industries. "Our constituents are starting to question the value of some of these trade agreements," said Kraig Naasz, president of the U.S. Apple Association, whose members have lost a significant chunk of their market in Asia to low-cost Chinese competition. Just how far China has come is one of the great accomplishments in the realm of agriculture. The vast majority of China's population still is working the land and their incomes lag far behind their urban neighbors. Farmers have suffered from a shortage of water and energy. But in the less than a decade since the government lifted its heavy hand from farmers, China has become the world's leading producer of fruits and vegetables. China grows seven times the amount of vegetables and twice as much fruit as the U.S.

Page 1

Los Angeles Times Article


China Already Taking Chunks of Asian Market This growth was accomplished by having Chinese farmers drop less-profitable grains in favor of highvalue export crops. It is in labor-intensive crops such as tree fruit and specialty vegetables where China has the greatest competitive advantage. In apples, China's production jumped from 4 million tons in 1990 to a whopping 22.9 million tons in 2000. In pears, production over that same period expanded from 2.5 million tons to 8.6 million tons. Last year, exports of Chinese broccoli to Japan soared to 9,000 tons from just 2,265 tons the previous year while exports of U.S. broccoli, primarily from California, declined from 87,603 tons to 70,000 tons, California, the nation's leading farm state, ships 20% of its produce overseas. But more than fruit and vegetables are involved in these trade skirmishes. After years of browbeating by the U.S., Japan reluctantly began importing California rice, annually purchasing about 300,000 metric tons, much of the state's crop. But that privileged position has been threatened by China's growing role in the international market in the last five years. "They are becoming a more serious threat in some of our high-value markets," said Tim Johnson, president of the California Rice Commission. So U.S. farmers find themselves in the uncomfortable position of trying to balance future profits from increased access to China's still-nascent market against immediate losses as they compete elsewhere. A particular concern is Taiwan, where U.S. producers have enjoyed special access. Taiwan bans most imports from the mainland, but if China and Taiwan both join the WTO, as expected, officials in Taipei will be forced to drop their barriers to Chinese products. "China is already taking sizable chunks of the Asian market and the U.S. is the major loser," said Desmond O'Rourke, president of Belrose Inc., an agricultural consulting firm. "Should Taiwan open up to China under WTO, Washington could lose a 4-million-box market" in apples. Farmers need look no further than other trade disputes to have their worst fears confirmed. U.S. producers of garlic, canned mushrooms and crawfish have filed complaints against China in recent years, alleging products were sold below the production costs, a practice known as dumping. Seven years ago, Chinese garlic exports to the U.S. jumped from 3 million to 64 million pounds in one year and prices collapsed. After an outcry by U.S. growers, the government imposed a 376% dumping duty on all Chinese garlic, which effectively priced the country out of the market. "China just came in and blew everybody away," said Don Christopher, president of Christopher Farms, who has lost his export markets in Europe, Japan and Australia to Chinese competition. Though he still remains California's largest garlic producer with 4,600 acres, he gradually is reducing his acreage and increasing his imports. He now buys 10% to 15% of his product abroad and predicts that will rise to 50% in the coming years. "I just hope we never get kicked out completely," he said. China's swift ascent caught many in the West off guard because its farmers lacked modern storage facilities and transportation. As much as one-third of its crop never made it to market. But Frederick Crook, a Washington-based China agriculture specialist, said China's farmers have benefited from low labor costs, expanded agriculture research and subsidized land. U.S. farmers complain those benefits and other help from the government mean they are fighting with one hand tied behind their backs. "People say, 'Hey, this is some kind of Communist plot,' " said Crook, who was a China specialist for the U.S. Foreign Agriculture Service before starting his own consulting practice. "This is no plot at all. This is

Page 2

Los Angeles Times Article


just a bunch of hard-working Chinese farmers saying, 'Hey, I can raise some garlic, ship it to the U.S. and make some money.' " Markets Dry Up for California Grower As the operator of California's second-largest farm and processing operation, Tanimura & Antle must contend with land prices as high as $35,000 an acre, skyrocketing energy, fertilizer and water costs and a work force of 2,700 whose lowest-paid harvesters average $12 an hour plus benefits. Though much of China's tilling and harvesting are done by hand, the average worker makes less than $2 a day, and energy and water costs are a fraction of those in the U.S. About two years ago, Tanimura's brokers began noticing a steady increase in exports of Chinese vegetables to Japan. Not only was the Chinese produce being offered at 25% to 30% less than the market price, but the quality was good enough to satisfy the Japanese, who had grown more frugal as the economy worsened. Much of the Chinese imports were coming from farms established by Japanese trading companies, which provided the seed, the growing expertise and the transportation. Since then, the California firm's shipments of broccoli into Japan have been "substantially reduced" and exports of celery to the mainland--which until recently filled up to 15 shipping containers a week--have dried up completely. George Tanimura, co-founder of Tanimura & Antle, hopes that when the Japanese economy improves, its safety-conscious population will return to U.S. produce, which is grown under stricter health and safety standards than those found in most of China. Decades in Asia also have given the company such strong brand appeal that Japanese tourists regularly visit the company's picturesque headquarters outside of Salinas. But Tanimura, a second-generation Japanese American who survived the Great Depression and a World War II internment camp, is anticipating a fierce battle. "We can't just cry about it, we've got to do something," said the feisty 76-year-old, whose grueling work schedule includes early-morning visits to the fields and trips to operations in Arizona and Mexico. He is exploring the prospects for growing asparagus, which is developing a following in Asia. "We've got to find a new business because of China," he said. China didn't always inspire such trepidation. In 1994, jubilant apple growers were the first in the U.S. to get their product approved for sale to China, a market expected to buy at least 1 million boxes of fruit a year. But China imposed a 30% duty and restricted the U.S. to exporting less popular Red and Golden Delicious apples. U.S. sales never have amounted to more than 500,000 boxes. While U.S. apple growers struggled to get their fruit into China, farmers there were feverishly expanding their production of the Fuji and Gala apples favored by much of Asia. By offering lower prices and quicker delivery times, China, which exports just the top 1% of its apple crop, has squeezed the U.S. out of many Asian markets, particularly Singapore and Hong Kong. Washington, which produces more than half of America's apples, has borne the brunt of the global glut. Grant Daniel, a Santa Barbara native who farms 70 acres along the banks of the Columbia River in eastern Washington, is bracing for a third season of debt. He said it costs him $110 to produce a carton of Fuji apples that sells for $85. This year, he will be receiving a federal market loss assistance check, the first to be distributed to the apple industry. Those checks average $14,000 for each grower. "When China comes here, the prices are going to be so cheap that there's no way we can compete," said Daniel, the father of seven, who has borrowed against his farm to pay his bills. "All your costs are local but your prices are global."

Page 3

Los Angeles Times Article


As a second-generation apple grower whose family has been exporting fruit for 50 years, William Buak of Watsonville insists he favors open trade. But he agrees with other farmers who say the U.S. government needs to protect its own unless it wants to be totally dependent on foreigners for its food supply. Six months ago, Buak put his 160-acre orchard on the market, joining the 183 other Californians who have pulled out of the apple business in the last five years. Like his grandfather, who left Yugoslavia to chase a dream in a developing country known as America, he is convinced the future lies thousands of miles away from his idyllic hilltop home east of Monterey Bay. "If I was a young man today, China is where I would go," he said. "I'd put in a packing house and cold storage. There's a load of opportunities over there." This is one of an occasional series on the impact of China's entry into the World Trade Organization. It will examine social and political issues in California and China, as well as key industries such as agriculture and telecommunications.

Page 4

CENTRAL
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famouscrops,aswell asour long tradiwhole systems perspectivethat encomA Potential Solution in the Making: tion of developinginnovativetechpasses both internal and externalindusAn interestingcollaborativeproject niquesto advance our production capatry and marketplace factors.Are we is currently underwayin Monterey bilities and the quality of our products. willing to examineand changethe Countythat is exploring the possibility But the industry and the globalized deeplyembedded norms,policies and of the creationand developmentof an business climatethat we now operate objectivesof our organizations, to try to Agricultural Competitiveness Centerin in is increasingly typified by new elediscoverthe best strategicpath for the our area.The project feasibilitystudyis mentsof: rapid changeand technologifuture? In other words,arewe really being funded by an Economic cal advances, a consolidationof many looking outsidethe box enough? DevelopmentDepartmentgrant and elements in the marketplace, ever being coordinatedby the Monterey increasing regulatorypressure and Competitiveness is Key: CountyEnvironmental Resources Policy scrutinyon business and production Accordingto MIT's Director of the Department. Consultants havebeen practices, the needto be adaptiveto Centerfor Organizational Leaningat the meetingwith and interviewing key inevitable, pervasive, persistentand SloanSchoolof Management, Dr. Peter leadersthroughout MontereyCounty accelerating changeand a more conSenge, "in the long run, the only sustain- from agri-business to support industry sumerdriven savvymarketplace. All of able sourceof competitiveadvantage is and the educationalsectorto ascertain theseelements combineto makeit your organization's ability to learn faster the viability of anAgricultural more and more difficult to split our than its competition." But in the Compositeness Centerconcept. focusfrom the daily difficulties of doing increasingly complex business environAccordingto the consultants, "at business in this complexclimateto a ment,how doesan agriculturalbusiness issueis whether a Centercan be creatmore strategiclong rangeview of what actuallyaccomplishlearningand contined that can insure the continued comthe industrymight look like in petitiveness of the region and 20 years. spur innovation.The Centeris THROUGH COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS seennot asa governmentor uniAre We Continuing to versity activity,but a hybrid,freeInnovate? AND A SHIfT IN EMPHASIS TO START TO standing, industry driven instituMany management experts ALLOCATE RESOURCES tion,of working within the private interfeel that the key to success in ' TIME AND ENERGY face research and the the future maybe in developing TOWARDS BUILDING HUMAN POTENTIAL sector." At the core of the study companies that aremore agile AND KNOWLEDGE IN OUR ORGANIZATIONS is the local impact of the comand ableto changequickly.This ~ petitiveness factor for the agrisomewhatcounterintuitive WE MAY BE ABLE TO REFOCUS ON A LONGER culturalsector with thefollowapproachwould encompasses RANGE PICfURE OF REALITY. ing key elementsand factors continuousimprovement impactingthe situationaccordthrough emphasis on learning ing to the consensus so far: and developinga workforcewhose ua1 growth potential? One suggestion The flow and availabilityof inforcapacityto learn is constantlygrowing that is coming out of the growing literamation,innovationand knowledgeis ratherthan utilizing the recentlypoputure on the subjectsuggests, "if an orgaaccelerating.However, it is increasingly lar business tacticsof downsizingand nizationwants to achievebusiness difficult to monitor,synthesize and utistreamlining. The premisebeingthat excellence, it must createa changeorilize global marketintelligence,research our recent preoccupationwith a quick entedenvironmentwhere the creativity and production information and relate fix mentalitymayblind us to developof the employees is nurtured,developed it to specificbusiness problems. ing innovativesolutionsfor the long and sustained through educationand A rapidly changingglobal food

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Adopting a New Paradigm for Learning and Competitiveness Training: Management consultant,Edward Gordonsuggests, "manyorganizations are abrogatingtheir responsibilityfor employeedevelopmentby empower, ing people to figure out what new Preliminary Elementsfor an ,~ knowledgethey need,and encouraging Agricultural Competitiveness them to just do it. However, this 'do it Center: yourself;training is a naivemanageSomeof the major componentscur'ment strategyat the time when the , rently being discussed involv~a stateof 3:!Pbetweenthe so-called knowledge the art business knowledgecompo- . worker and workers who lack the

economypresents both opportunities andthreats(suchasChina)to local crop producers. A relativelysmallnumber of retail andfood servicebuyersset the price and standards for a largenumberof producers.

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(people) capital? Gordon suggests that, "to grow and learn,people haveto collaborate. It won't work if a few people haveall the information and power and the rest do not. Thosewho lack the skills can be managed by offering training,but the truth is, in business you can win the war without killing off half the army." Through collaborativeefforts and a shift in emphasis to start to allocate resources, time and energytowards building humanpotential and knowledgein our organizations we may be ableto refocuson a longer range picture of reality. Theseefforts might alsobe enhancedand energizedif the local agriculturalindustry harnessed the naturalprogressiontowardsgreater innovation,new products and services to fit the changingmarketplaceand recapturethe competitive edgeby supporting the conceptsbeing developed in the Agricultural Competitiveness ToparticipateCenter. in the visioning for theAgricultural Competitiveness Cente1; contact Mary Claypool at Monterey County Environmental Resources Policy Department at .831-755-5856::

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nent,a research and technoJ~W component,and a training/edue"40ncomponent. The Centermight serveasa clearinghousefor information,a resource and conduit for critical businessand research informationfrom technologytransferto new business incubatorfunctionsand a facility for advanced training programs, strategic development and leadershiptraining. Several prototype structures are being examined suchas: Fundacion Chi)e, Monsanto's DanforthPlantSciences Center, and the GreatValleyCenterin Modesto, for cluesasto how to develop a unique Competitiveness Center for our area.

required skills,training,and education is widening at an alarmingrate." Accordingto Gordonthe most prevalent culture in Americanmanagement todayis expressed in the mantrathat "to drive up stock options,enrich shareholders and immediatelybeef up the bottom line asfast aspossible" is the only way to prosper. Recent high proille business failuresand the growing climate of competitiveness suggest that ominousconsequences often result from this type of tunnel vision. Is Americanbusiness losing its collective competitiveedge,due to lack of long rangestrategicthinking and investmentin intellectual

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Annex B Phase I Project Deliverables


Project Work Summary County Resource Guide Product & Service Mapping Needs Assessment & Surveys Questionnaire Sample

Project Work Summary

PROJECT WORK SUMMARY In March 2002, Agland Investment Services, Inc. was hired by the County of Monterey to evaluate the opportunity and need for a locally based research and business competitiveness center, focused on the agriculture and food industry in the greater Monterey region. The project was divided into two phases: Phase I and Phase II. Phase I Research and Needs Assessment Phase I was focused on determining local interest in and need for a center, and on understanding how the Countys public and private resources are working to meet industry needs. As part of the first phase, the Team conducted a series of interviews, surveys and small group meetings. Agland met with: - Members of the Agribusiness Community - Representatives of Universities and Research Institutes - Representatives of local, county-wide, and federal public agencies - Heads of Associations and Nonprofits serving the Agribusiness Community Deliverables for Phase I included the development of a Resource Guide (a guide to organizations and businesses providing programs and services to the agricultural community in Monterey County), a Product and Service Mapping (a matrix noting which organizations and businesses within the County meet or plan to meet the needs and interests identified in interviews, surveys and meetings with agribusiness representatives) and a Needs Assessment (a detailed log and evaluation of all of industry surveys conducted throughout the project). As part of the Needs Assessment research, the Agland team hosted multiple one-on-one interviews and small group meetings with representatives from the wine, vegetable, berry, finance, seed, chemical and agricultural technology industries. The Team also conducted a detailed survey with over 30 businesses in the County to assist in quantifying results. Survey results show that 78% of the interviewees have a medium to high interest level in the development of a center focused on the agricultural industry. And, over 28% of the respondents said that they would invest money in the development of a center focused on agriculture. Survey respondents found Science & Research components the most important, followed by Business Support Services and Training & Education, respectfully. Although the average number of employee of the companies that completed the survey was 622, more than 38% of the respondents have 50 or fewer employees. Around 72% percent of respondents, have some form of research and development labs in-house. Approximately 33% of the respondents said they may be interested co-locating with an industry focused center or institute. Through industry surveys and interviews, Agland developed a detailed list of programs and services that local businesses would like to see included in an agricultural center. Agland then measured this list of needs with the current and expected provision of programs and services from existing organizations within the County. Agland used information attained for the Resource Guide, as well as a detailed Questionnaire (sent to representatives of universities and research institutes, public agencies and heads of associations and nonprofits), to determine where needs could be met through existing or proposed programs and where there may be gaps that a new center or institute could fill.
Agland Investment Services, Inc. 1

In summary, Phase I found that there is no industry driven center or institute in California that is designed to meet the unique needs of the local agricultural industry. Granted, the University of California and the UC Extension System have a long and successful history of providing both research and extension services to the agricultural community, but an industry driven institution in the County that can convert a combination of scientific, market and economic information (not only from U.S. institutions, but also from global institutions), into specific industry and worker benefits does not exist, and is not currently being contemplated. Aglands research uncovered needs and gaps in the areas of business and support services, scientific research and development, education and training, and information and knowledge sharing. Phase II Developing a Feasibility Study Given the mix of science, business and information needs identified, the Agland Team developed a preliminary concept for an Agricultural Competitiveness Institute(ACI). Phase II work focuses on developing a feasibility study for the initial ACI concept. To this end, the Team brought together a project Executive Committee, made-up of local industry representatives (Berry, Vegetable, Wine, Seed, etc.) and public service leaders, to participate in the development process. The following were defined as terms of reference for Phase II as part of the ACI Feasibility Study: - A strategic plan for developing, managing and marketing the ACI - Site location considerations and infrastructure requirements - Estimated costs for land acquisition - Estimated construction costs - Estimated operational costs - Architectural Program and Conceptual renderings of the ACI Representatives of the Monterey agricultural community, and other business leaders with whom we spoke, generally supported the concept and the vision of an ACI. However, there are differences of opinion regarding the form that the ACI should take. While some community members support the notion of a physical structure to house programs and services, others feel that the programs and services that are most important to them can be housed in a virtual center. The Agland team and County representatives took into account the communitys interests and concerns and restructured the projects Phase II process and approach to address these concerns. Also, community input and suggestions helped to guide the subsequent Agland recommendations regarding the development of the ACI.

Agland Investment Services, Inc.

Agricultural Resource Guide

AGRICULTURAL RESOURCE GUIDE


MONTEREY COUNTY

November 2002 This Report was Prepared under an Award from the U.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration EDA Award No.: 07 79 05059

Recipient: Environmental Resource Policy Division Office of Economic Development, County of Monterey 240 Church Street, West Wing, Room 301, Salinas, CA 93901 Telephone: 831.755.5065

Prepared by: Agland Investment Services, Inc. 711 Grand Avenue, Suite 290, San Rafael, CA 94901 Tel: 415-460-1352 Fax: 415-460-5368 Email: agland@aglandinvest.com Web: www.aglandinvest.com and Economic Competitiveness Group 3020 Bridgeway Road, Suite 500, Sausalito, CA 94965 Tel: (415) 332-8500Fax: (415) 332-8519 Web: www.ecgroup.com

This publication was prepared by Agland Investment Services, Inc. The statements, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Economic Development Administration.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0 2.0 A. B. C. D. E. F. G. 3.0 A. B. C. 4.0 A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. 5.0 A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 4 AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS.............................................................. 5 AGRICULTURAL LAND-BASED TRAINING ASSOCIATION (ALBA)................................ 5 GROWER-SHIPPER ASSOCIATION OF CENTRAL CALIFORNIA .................................... 5 MONTEREY COUNTY CERTIFIED ORGANIC (MCCO) .................................................... 5 MONTEREY COUNTY FARM BUREAU .............................................................................. 6 MONTEREY COUNTY VINTNERS & GROWERS ASSOCIATION ...................................... 6 CALIFORNIA STRAWBERRY COMMISSION ...................................................................... 6 CALIFORNIA CERTIFIED ORGANIC FARMERS (CCOF)................................................. 7 COMMERCIAL LABORATORIES...................................................................................... 8 BOLSA ANALYTICAL ............................................................................................................ 8 DELLAVALLE LABORATORY .............................................................................................. 8 PRIMUS LABORATORIES .................................................................................................... 8 BUSINESS SUPPORT SERVICES ........................................................................................ 9 MARINA SMALL BUSINESS INCUBATOR (MSBI).............................................................. 9 MONTEREY COUNTY AGRICULTURAL COMMISSIONERS OFFICE............................ 9 MONTEREY COUNTY BUSINESS COUNCIL...................................................................... 9 MONTEREY COUNTY OFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT................................ 10 MONTEREY EXPORT ASSISTANCE CENTER .................................................................. 11 ONE-STOP CAREER CENTER AND OFFICE OF EMPLOYMENT TRAINING .............. 11 ONE STOP PERMIT ASSISTANCE CENTER ..................................................................... 11 SERVICE CORPS OF RETIRED EXECUTIVES (SCORE)................................................. 12 UC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION, SALINAS ..................................................................... 12 UC MONTEREY BAY EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY CENTER (MBEST).. 13 USDA/AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE (ARS), SALINAS .................................... 13 ORGANIC FARMING RESEARCH FOUNDATION........................................................... 14 SANTA CRUZ COUNTY AGRICULTURE COMMISSIONERS OFFICE ......................... 14 SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER.................................................................. 14 UC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY ............................................. 15 U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION(SBA) ............................................................ 15 CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY MONTEREY BAY ...................................................... 16 CENTRAL COAST COLLEGE............................................................................................. 16 GOLDEN GATE UNIVERSITY, MONTEREY CAMPUS .................................................... 16 HARTNELL COLLEGE........................................................................................................ 16 HEALD COLLEGE, SALINAS ............................................................................................. 17 MARINE ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION CENTER (MATE) OF MPC ......... 17 MISSION TRAILS REGIONAL OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAM.......................................... 18 MONTEREY BAY EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY CENTER (MBEST) ........ 18 MONTEREY INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (MIIS) ................................... 18 MONTEREY PENINSULA COLLEGE (MPC) .................................................................... 19 NAVAL POST GRADUATE SCHOOL................................................................................. 19
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EDUCATION AND TRAINING ORGANIZATIONS....................................................... 16

Monterey County Agricultural Resource Guide

November 2002

L. M. N. O. P. Q. R. S. T. A. B. C. D. E. 7.0 A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. 8.0 A. B. C. 9.0 A. B.

NEW HORIZONS COMPUTER LEARNING CENTER....................................................... 19 SHORELINE OCCUPATIONAL SERVICES....................................................................... 19 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SEA GRANT EXTENSION PROGRAM ......................... 20 CABRILLO COLLEGE ........................................................................................................ 20 EDUCATIONAL PARTNERSHIP CENTER (EPC) ............................................................. 21 GAVILAN COLLEGE........................................................................................................... 21 MONTEREY BAY EDUCATIONAL CONSORTIUM (MBEC) ............................................ 21 SST NETWORKING INSTITUTE......................................................................................... 21 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ................................................................. 22 AMERICAN AGCREDIT, ACA (SALINAS BRANCH) ......................................................... 23 CALIFORNIA COASTAL RURAL DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION .............................. 23 MONTEREY VENTURE PARTNERS, LLC (MVP)............................................................. 23 QUIVIRA VENTURE PARTNERS ....................................................................................... 24 CALIFORNIA SMALL BUSINESS LOAN GUARANTEE PROGRAM ................................ 24

6.0 FINANCIAL RESOURCES AND PROGRAMS...................................................................... 23

MARINE RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS ............................................................................ 25 HOPKINS MARINE STATION OF STANFORD UNIVERSITY .......................................... 25 MARINE POLLUTION STUDIES LABORATORY (MPSL) ................................................ 25 MONTEREY BAY AQUARIUM RESEARCH INSTITUTE (MBARI)................................... 25 MOSS LANDING MARINE LABORATORIES (MLML) ...................................................... 26 NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY (NRL) ........................................................................ 26 PACIFIC FISHERIES ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORIES (PFEL)............................... 27 INSTITUTE OF MARINE SCIENCES (IMS) ....................................................................... 27 LONG MARINE LABORATORY (PART OF UCSC) ........................................................... 27 OTHER BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS................................................................................ 28 COMMON GROUND MONTEREY COUNTY .................................................................... 28 MONTEREY COUNTY CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE ..................................................... 28 MONTEREY BAY INTERNATIONAL TRADE ASSOCIATION (MBITA) ........................... 29 MARKETING ORGANIZATIONS..................................................................................... 30 CENTRAL COAST MARKETING TEAM............................................................................. 30 MONTEREY COUNTY CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU.................................... 30

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Monterey County Agricultural Resource Guide

November 2002

1.0 Introduction Over the past 50 years, agricultural production in Monterey County has prospered and expanded. The agricultural industry produces over $3 billion of product at the farm level, and generates economic activity of over $7.5 billion within the region. Thanks to a temperate climate and fertile soils, Monterey County has become the number one vegetable-producing region in the nation. The Countys range of crops includes lettuce, artichokes, broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, strawberries, peppers, squash, carrots, asparagus, celery, tomatoes, mushrooms, brussels sprouts, garlic, onions and flowers. Monterey County also boasts over 40,000 acres of wine grapes, making the County one of the largest grape growing areas in California. Known as the Salad Bowl of the World, Monterey County produces much of our national produce and exports over 500 million pounds of product to countries including Canada, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Mexico and the European Union. During the last decade, organic production has expanded and many of the larger companies within the region are now generating organic product. The purpose of this guide is to identify the key research institutions, business support services, and education resources, within the greater Monterey region, that provide programs and/or services to the agricultural industry. Key activities and contact information are listed for each of the organizations included.

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Monterey County Agricultural Resource Guide

November 2002

2.0 Agricultural Industry Associations


A. AGRICULTURAL LAND-BASED TRAINING ASSOCIATION (ALBA) Year Established: 1986 Number of Employees: 6 Activities: The organization works to meet the social justice, ecological, and economic goals of small organic farmers in the region. The organization works to train farmers in: Production techniques Marketing methods Book-keeping Street Address: 1700 Old Stage Rd., Salinas, CA 93908 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5415, Salinas, CA 93915 Phone: (831) 758-1469 Fax: (831) 758-3665 Email: benechin@yahoo.com Contact Person: Patrick Troy, Agronomist B. GROWER-SHIPPER ASSOCIATION OF CENTRAL CALIFORNIA Year Established: 1930 Number of Employees: 4 Activities: The Association has represented growers and shippers of agricultural commodities in the Salinas and Pajaro Valleys since l930. It has over 300 members, which are predominantly vegetable, strawberry, seed and grape producers. Specific member services include representing the industry in governmental affairs, provision of legal services, labor relations consulting, member education, EPA/OSHA compliance, etc. Mailing Address: P.O. Box 828, Salinas, CA 93902 Street Address: 512 Pajaro Street, Salinas, CA 93901 Phone: (831) 422-8844 Fax: (831) 422-0868 Email: GSJBogart@aol.com Website: www.gsva.org Contact Person: James W. Bogart, President C. MONTEREY COUNTY CERTIFIED ORGANIC (MCCO) Year Established: 2002 Activities: MCCO was developed by county inspectors and a voluntary advisory committee made up of organic farmers, processors, and handlers. The program is supported by the Agricultural Commissioners office. For produce to be certified as organic, an operation must comply with rigid standards including long term soil management plans, buffer zones between organic farms and nearby conventional farms, and other specific requirements for labeling and record keeping. Prior to any crop harvest, soil must be free from prohibited matter for 36-months to meet requirements for certification. Further, all organic operations are required to maintain detailed records of all the materials applied in their growing operations. Strict guidelines are followed in annual certification inspections providing consumers full disclosure of how food is produced. Address: 1428 Abbott Street, Salinas, CA 93901 Phone: (831) 759-7325 Fax: (831) 422-1947 Email: willeyg@co.monterey.ca.us Website: http://www.co.monterey.ca.us/ Contact Person: Gerry Willey, Deputy Ag. Commissioner

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D. MONTEREY COUNTY FARM BUREAU Year Established: 1917 Number of Employees: 2-4 Activities: Monterey County Farm Bureau is a private, nonprofit association of farmers and ranchers throughout the County of Monterey. The Farm Bureau serves as a collective voice for farmers and ranchers and provides information, benefits and services. Farm Bureau cooperates with other agricultural organizations to fulfill its purpose of working for the solutions to the problems of the farm, the farm home and the rural community. Address: 931 Blanco Circle, Salinas, CA 93901 Phone: (831) 751-3100 Fax: (831) 751-3167 Email: mocofb@redshift.com Website: http://www.montereycountyfarmbureau.org/ Contact Person: Robert Perkins, Executive Director E. MONTEREY COUNTY VINTNERS & GROWERS ASSOCIATION Year Established: 1974 Number of Employees: 4 Activities: The Association is comprised of 56 wineries and vineyards that represent over 40,000 acres within Monterey County. The Organizations mission is to establish Monterey County as a worldrenowned grape growing and wine-producing region. Address: P.O. Box 1793, Monterey, CA 93942-1793 Phone: (831) 375-9400 Fax: (831) 375-1116 Email: info@montereywines.org Website: www.montereywines.org Contact Person: Rhonda Motil, Executive Director F. CALIFORNIA STRAWBERRY COMMISSION Year Established: 1946 Number of Employees: 20 Activities: The Commission is financed through a fee per tray. The annual budget is approximately $6 million; approximately $500,000 is for research contracted with universities and specialists. The Commission activities fall into three major areas: Overseeing and conducting agricultural research Promoting California strawberries through marketing programs targeted toward consumers, retailers, foodservice operators, export markets and industrial users Issues management Address: 41 Hangar Way, Watsonville, CA 95076 Phone: (831) 724 - 1301 Fax: (831) 724 -5973 Email: info@calstrawberry.com Website: www.calstrawberry.com Contact Person: Cindy Jewel, Executive Director

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G. CALIFORNIA CERTIFIED ORGANIC FARMERS (CCOF) Year Established: 1973 Number of Employees: 13 (in Santa Cruz), 3-4 part-time Activities: CCOF was one of the first organizations to certify organic farms in North America. CCOF set uniform guidelines and worked to legally define organic. CCOF only certifies organic farmers, processors, retailers, and wholesalers who comply with standards required by state and national laws. Their inspectors examine the crop, land, facilities, processes, and paperwork. The organization: - Certifies organic food - Works to expand public support for organic agriculture Address: 1115 Mission Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 Phone: (831) 423-2263 Fax: (831) 423-4528 Email: ccof@ccof.org Website: www.ccof.org

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3.0 Commercial Laboratories


A. BOLSA ANALYTICAL Year Established: 1992 Number of Employees: 4 Activities: A private water quality-testing laboratory. Address: 2337 Technology Parkway, Suite K, Hollister, CA 95023 Phone: (831) 637-4590 Fax: (831 634 1854 Email: aquaticlab@aol.com Contact Person: Tomas Moreno, Director B. DELLAVALLE LABORATORY Year Established: 1978 Number of Employees: 35 Activities: Dellavalle is a private company specializing in analysis for agricultural and horticultural purposes - primarily soil, plant tissue, water, fertilizers, manures and other related materials. Address: 1910 West McKinley, Suite 110, Fresno CA 93728 Phone: (800) 228-9896 or (559) 233-6129 Fax: (559) 268-8174 Email: Pmiller@Dellavallelab.com Website: www.dellavallelab.com Contact Person: Peggy Miller, Customer Service Representative C. PRIMUS LABORATORIES Year Established: 1987 Number of Employees: 60 (Salinas and Santa Maria) Activities: A private food safety laboratory, Primus provides: - Packing - Cooling - Field level auditing - Pesticide and microbiological analysis for growers. - Information for distributors Address: 2810 Industrial Parkway, Santa Maria, CA 93455 Phone: (805) 922-0055 Fax: (805) 922-2462 Website: www.primuslabs.com Email: primus@primuslabs.com Contact Person: Brian Mansfield, Sales Director

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4.0 Business Support Services


A. MARINA SMALL BUSINESS INCUBATOR (MSBI) Year Established: 2001 Number of Employees: 2 Total budget: $300,000 available to loan to tenants and local businesses Activities: The MSBI is located at the UC Monterey Bay Education, Science and Technology (MBEST) Center and was created with the fundamental goals of functioning as a business accelerator, working to create jobs and economic diversification. The organization: Assists small businesses through the early stages of business development Provides a start-up location for entrepreneurs Address: 3180 Imjin Road, Marina, CA 93933 Phone: (831) 582-9718 Fax: (831) 582-9546 Email: info@msbi.org Website: www.msbi.org Contact Person: Alan Bilinsky, Director

B. MONTEREY COUNTY AGRICULTURAL COMMISSIONERS OFFICE Activities: Works to promote and protect agriculture, the environment, and the public welfare and to assure consumer and business confidence in the marketplace. The Commissioners office issues an annual report summarizing the production (acres) and value of the corps produced within the County. Each County has a similar office. The office: Enforces pesticide use regulations Quarantine of plants Certifies phytosanitary standards Certifies organic standards Provides pesticide permits Offers weights and measures functions Address: 1428 Abbott Street, Salinas, CA 93901 Phone: (831) 759-7325 Fax: (831) 422-5003 Email: agcomm@co.monterey.ca.us Website: www.co.monterey.ca/ag/ Contact Person: Eric Lauritzen, Agricultural Commissioner C. MONTEREY COUNTY BUSINESS COUNCIL Year Established: 1995 Number of Employees: 1 Total Budget: $100,000 annual Activities: The Business Council work with the Monterey County community in: Issue resolution Address: P.O. Box 537, Salinas, CA 93901 Phone: (831) 646-5843 Fax: (831) 757-3248 Email: mcbc@mc-council.org Website: www.mc-council.org Contact Person: Mary Ann Leffel, President

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D. MONTEREY COUNTY OFFICE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BUSINESS SITE SELECTION Activities: The office has a database of over 800 locations in the County. The database contains detailed information on zoning and general plan restrictions. The County has a special handling procedure for commercial and industrial projects that will provide employment opportunities for projects that create fifty or more jobs. The office: Works one-on-one with businesses to find a location for business expansion or start-up Assists businesses with making city-level economic development contacts Puts clients in touch with real-estate brokers. Address: 240 Church St., Rm. 301, P.O. Box 180, Salinas, CA 93902 Phone: (831) 755-5065 or 755-5855 Fax: (831) 751-6933 Email: oed@co.monterey.ca.us or Hanson-beardsleejf@co.monterey.ca.us Website: www.co.monterey.ca.us/oed Contact Person: Jan Hanson-Beardslee, Business Development Coordinator DEVELOPMENT REVIEW COMMITTEE Activities: The DRC provides a coordinated approach to the departmental review and process for proposed major commercial and industrial developments in the County. Reviews and approves plans for new construction Street Address: Monterey County Office of Economic Development, 240 Church St., Rm 301, P.O. Box 180, Salinas, CA 93902 Phone: (831) 755-5065 Fax: (831) 751-6933 Email: oed@co.monterey.ca.us Website: www.co.monterey.ca.us/oed

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E. MONTEREY EXPORT ASSISTANCE CENTER Year Established: 1996 Number of Employees: 1 Activities: The Monterey Export Assistance Center office is part of an international network consisting of 105 U.S. Export Assistance Centers across the country and 65 offices in 82 countries. The Center assists Monterey Bay/Salinas Valley small and medium-sized firms realize their export potential by: Offering expert counseling and advice Researching and disseminating information on markets abroad Developing international contacts Providing advocacy services Address: 411 Pacific Street, Suite 316A, Monterey, CA 93940 Phone: (831) 641-9850 Fax: (831) 641-9849 Email: Mark.Weaver@mail.doc.gov Website: http://www.buyusa.gov/norcal/ Contact Person: Mark Weaver, EAC Manager F. ONE-STOP CAREER CENTER AND OFFICE OF EMPLOYMENT TRAINING Year Established: 1960s Number of Employees: 100 (full-time), 20-30 (temporary) Job classification breakdown: Trainers, Administrative Services, Administrative Management, Facilities, Program and Projects Coordinators Activities: The Center helps job-seekers select a new career, find a job, locate a suitable education or training program, create effective resumes and letters, plan finances and find benefits for which jobseekers may qualify. Employers in Monterey County can post job openings on the free website and review resumes of potential employees. The site also provides information on the local labor market, suitable training programs as well as information on human, legal and labor relations issues. The Center is a partnership between the Office for Employment Training, Department of Social Services and the Employment Development Department. The Center: Posts job listings Provides job placement services Conducts employee skill assessments Provides employee workshops Distributes employer information Address: 730 La Guardia, Salinas, CA 93901 Phone: (831) 755-4452 or (800) 870-4750 Fax: (831)-755-3246 Email: 565-onestop-web@co.monterey.ca.us Website: www.onestopmonterey.org Contact Person: Joe Warner, Director G. ONE STOP PERMIT ASSISTANCE CENTER Number of Employees: Approximately 120 Activities: The Monterey County Planning & Building Inspection Department provides one location where all land use departments are located and can be assessed for questions and advice on projects. The office provides brochures for the Planning Permit Process, Design Approval and Variances. Provides information regarding the planning and building permitting process Salinas Address: 230 Church Street, Building 1, Salinas, CA 93901 Marina Address: 2620 First Avenue, Marina, CA 93933 Phone: (831) 755-5025 (Salinas), (831) 883-7500 (Marina) Fax: (831) 755-5487 Email: mcmillank@co.monterey.ca.us or questions@co.monterey.ca.us Website: www.co.monterey.ca.us\pbi Contact Person: Kim McMillan, Public Relations
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H. SERVICE CORPS OF RETIRED EXECUTIVES (SCORE) Year Established: 1964 Number of Employees: 12 National staff, 11,500 volunteers, 389 chapters located through the US and its territories Activities: SCORE is a resource partner of the US Small Business Administration. The organization is dedicated to assisting the formation, growth and success of small business nationwide. Representatives of the organization can be reached through the Monterey Chamber of Commerce. Retired executives and business owners offer: Free mentoring and counseling services to local businesses. Local Address: c/o Monterey Chamber of Commerce, 380 Alvarado St., P.O. Box 1770, Monterey, CA 93940 Phone: (831) 648-5360 Fax: (831) 649-3502 (Fax to SCORE to the attention of Jesse Ostrom) Contact Person: Michael Grant, Chairman National Address: SCORE Association, 409 3rd Street, S.W., 6th Floor, Washington DC 20024 Phone: (800) 634-0245 Email: contact.score@sba.gov Website: www.score.org I. UC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION, SALINAS Year Established: 1919 Number of Employees: 16 full time and up to 12 seasonal and part-time Job classification breakdown: Academic research and extension staff in viticulture, entomology, weed science and vegetable crops, plant pathology, and irrigation and water policy. Total budget: $2,000,000 Research budget: $150,000 - $300,000 (varies yearly) Activities: Cooperative Extension (Agricultural Extension) is a department that is jointly supported by Monterey County, the University of California and the United States Department of Agriculture. Programs include: Consumer Science Program: The Nutrition, Family and Consumer Science Advisor works closely with other public agencies, as well as the general public. The program focuses on training trainers regarding nutrition, family budgeting, parenting, consumer awareness, adult and youth food stamp nutrition education, and food safety. 4-H Youth Program: The 4-H Youth Program has projects in areas of health and leisure, family and consumer science, engineering, computer science, and resource science, as well as the everpopular animal science and plant science programs. The program is open to all children and offers a wide range of programs. Agricultural Program: Five Farm Advisors with programs in Entomology, Irrigation, Water Quality and Water Policy, Plant Pathology, Viticulture, Weed Science and Vegetable Crops and Cross-County Assignments in Strawberries, Ornamental Horticulture, Economics, Livestock and Natural Resources, Pomology and Rangeland Management. Marine Science Program: The Marine Advisor serves Monterey Bay from the Moss Landing office. The Advisor applies and transfers information to solves practical problems in the areas of aquaculture, commercial and recreational fishing, environmental policy and conservation, marine education, harbor management, marine pollution and marine research.

Address: UC Cooperative Extension, 1432 Abbott Street, Salinas, CA 93901 Phone: (831) 759-7350 Fax: (831) 758 3018 Email: cemonterey@ucdavis.edu Website: http://cemonterey.ucdavis.edu Contact Person: Sonya Hammond, County Director
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UC MONTEREY BAY EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY CENTER (MBEST) Year Established: 1994 Number of Employees: 6 Job classification breakdown: 1 director, 1 enterprise development, 1 facilities planning,1 outreach 2 administrative staff Total budget: $20 million to date Square footage: 484-acre research center, adjacent to 605 acres of natural habitat Description of available rental space: 38,000 in two facilities Land development opportunities (as of 2002): 55 acres Activities: Specific business services (current or planned) include: incubator space, lease space, land development opportunities, technical training programs, business training programs, access to mentor networks, entrepreneurial training programs, and access to venture capital and angel financing. The centers objectives are to: Foster applied research and technology transfer, Establish a community of high-tech businesses, Encourage regional economic development and job creation, Enhance educational and research opportunities, and Provide competitive advantages for the Monterey Bay region. Tenants as of 2002 include: USGS, Hobi Industries, The Spot, AdAp Systems, Marina Small Business Incubator, University Extension Address: 3180 Imjin Road, Marina CA 93933 Phone: (831) 582-1020 Fax: (831) 582-1021 Email: info@ucmbest.org Website: www.ucbmest.org Contact Person: Lora Lee Martin, Director

K. USDA/AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE (ARS), SALINAS Year Established: 1941/1948 Number of Employees: 70 Job classification breakdown: 16 PhDs, 3 MS professionals, 26 technicians plus 5-10 post doctorial scientists on 1-2 year appointments. The principal research expertise represented within the Center is Entomology, Soil Science, Weed Science, Genetics and Plant Breeding, Plant Pathology, Soil Science and Agro-ecology Research budget: $3,500,000 Square footage: 100,000 sq. ft. plus 194 acres of land Activities: The ARS is the principal research agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for crop improvement and protection. In recent years there has been an expansion of research staff, funded by USDA, UC and specific commodity groups, such as the Artichoke Commission. Research projects are established based on priority and budgets, and often are for 2-5 years in duration. Address: 1636 E. Alisal Street, Salinas, CA 93905 Phone: 831 755 2800 Fax: 831-755 2814 Email: jmccreight@pw.ars.usda.gov Website: http://www.pwa.ars.usda.gov/Salinas/index.shtml Contact Person: Dr. James D. McCreight, Location Coordinator

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L. ORGANIC FARMING RESEARCH FOUNDATION Year Established: 1989 Number of Employees: 8 Total budget: $800, 000 (grants since 1990) Activities: The Organic Farming Research Foundation: Sponsors research related to organic farming practices Disseminates research results to organic farmers and to growers interested in adopting organic production systems Educates the public and decision-makers about organic farming issues Address: P.O. Box 440, Santa Cruz, CA 95061 Phone: 831-426-6606 Fax: 831-426-6670 Email: bob@ofrf.org Website: www.ofrf.org Contact Person: Bob Scowcroft, Executive Director M. SANTA CRUZ COUNTY AGRICULTURE COMMISSIONERS OFFICE Activities: (see Monterey Agriculture Commissioners Section) Address: 175 Westridge Dr., Watsonville, CA 95076 Phone: (831) 763-8080 Fax: (831) 763-8234 Email: agcomm@aol.com Website: www.cdpr.ca.gov/ Contact Person: David W. Moeller, Agricultural Commissioner N. SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER Year Established: 1990 Total budget: $140,000 for Monterey County, $390,000 for the district Activities: SBDC is supported by the Small Business Association (SBA) and California Trade and Commerce. The organization: Assists with small business start-up Helps businesses expand and develop Promotes minority and women-owned business Offers classes, workshops and free one-on-one counseling for business Operates a Women's Pre-Qualification Loan Program Provides micro-loans for start-up and existing businesses and export financing Distribute information on Monterey County Revolving Loan Funds, and all SBA Loan Programs. Cabrillo College: Address: c/o Cabrillo College, 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos, CA 95003 Phone: (831) 479-6136 Fax: (831) 479-6166 Email: tethomae@cabrillo.cc.ca.us Website: http://www.businessonline.org Contact Person: Teresa Thomae, Director Gavilan College: Address: c/o Gavilan College, 7436 Monterey Street, Gilroy, CA 95020 Phone: (408) 847-0373 Fax: (408) 847-0393 Email: rgillis@sdsldesigns.net Website: http://www.gavilansbdc.org Contact Person: Richard Gillis, Director

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O. UC COOPERATIVE EXTENSION, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY Number of Employees: 10 Job classification breakdown: Principal staff includes farm advisor specialists in Small Farm Management, Marine Sciences, Youth Development Advisor, Environmental Horticulture and a recently hired Strawberry Advisor. Total budget: $900,000 Activities: The County, the University of California, and Federal donors fund the UC Cooperative Extension. The Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources of the University of California provides the professional staff for the office as well as overall supervision and management of the department. The UC Cooperative Extension is the single largest applied research program in the County. They: Work with community to determine research interests and needs Conduct research in agriculture and environmental horticulture Address: 1432 Freedom Blvd., Watsonville, CA 95076 Phone: (831) 763-8040 Fax: (831) 763-8006 Email: ljtourte@ucdavis.edu Website: www.ucdavis.edu Contact Person: Laura Tourte, County Director P. U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION(SBA) Year Established: 1953 Activities: The SBA serves small businesses directly through a wide variety of programs. The SBA: Provides counseling business owners or potential owners, especially in the start-up phases Assists in the development of business plans and material necessary to launch a business Offers pre-business workshops Address: 2719 N. Air Fresno Drive, Suite 200, Fresno CA 93727 Phone: (559) 487-5791 or (800) 359-1833 ext. 6 Fax: (559) 487-5636 Email: carlos.mendoza@sba.gov Website: www.sba.gov Contact Person: Carlos G. Mendoza, Director

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5.0 Education and Training Organizations


A. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY MONTEREY BAY Year Established: 1995 Number of Employees: 329 Activities: The focus of the University is on science education. The University is primarily an undergraduate teaching program; however, almost half of the Universitys staff conducts research. Areas of research in the marine sciences include watershed and socio-economic impacts of watershed issues. Some research is also conducted with growers around pesticide management. Address: 100 Campus Center Bldg., Seaside, CA 93955 Phone: (831) 582-3000 Fax: (831) 582-3540 Email: Steve_Reed@csumb.edu Website: www.csumb.edu Contact Person: Steve Reed, Associate VP for University Relations

B. CENTRAL COAST COLLEGE Year Established: 1983 Number of Employees: 23 full and part-time staff, enrolls 200 students Activities: Located in Salinas, this private career college provides a specialized curriculum for adult students interested in professional careers. The College provides specialized training in Computer Office Administration, Accounting, Medical Office Administration/Billing, Medical Assisting, and Computer Network Support. Programs are offered every 4-6 weeks. Address: 480 So. Main Street, Salinas, CA 93901 Phone: (800) 922-2443 or (831) 922-2443 Fax: (831)753-6485 Email: future@cccbus.com Website: www.cccbus.com C. GOLDEN GATE UNIVERSITY, MONTEREY CAMPUS Year Established: 1971 Number of Employees: 4 (Director of Administration, Director of Academics, and Administrative Assistants) Activities: The Monterey Bay site offers degrees in Accounting, Business and Computer Information Systems. An MBA is offered with concentrations available on-site and online via CyberCampus. Address: 500 8th Street, Marina, CA 93933 Phone: (831) 884-0900 Fax: (831) 884-0913 Email: info@ggu.edu Website: www.ggu.edu/locations/monterey/mont/html D. HARTNELL COLLEGE Year Established: 1920 Number of Employees: 310 (117 Full-time faculty, 161 Classified, and 32 Managers) Activities: The College offers the first and second year of a college program and awards the associate of arts/sciences degrees and certificates of proficiency. The college also provides vocational training, Work Force and Community Development classes, Contract Education and numerous cultural and recreational activities. The College has transfer agreements with many California State University (CSU) and University of California (UC) campuses that guarantee admission for Hartnell students who have completed the two-year requirements. Address: 156 Homestead Avenue, Salinas, CA 93901 Phone: (831) 755-6700 Fax: (831) 755-6751 Website: www.hartnell.cc.ca.us
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Contact Person: Victor S. Krimsley, Vice President for Instruction E. HEALD COLLEGE, SALINAS Year Established: 1990 Activities: Heald College is a nonprofit, regionally accredited institution with 11 campuses in the western United States. It offers 18-month associate degrees, 12-month diplomas, and 6-9 month technical certification training programs. Address: 1450 N. Main Street, Salinas, CA 93906 Phone: (831) 443-1700 Fax: (831) 443-1050 Website: www.heald.edu F. MARINE ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION CENTER (MATE) OF MPC Number of Employees: 8 employees, 11 Advisory Board Members Activities: The MATE Center is a national partnership of educational institutions and organizations working to improve marine technical education in the U.S. and to meet the workplace needs of America's marine-related workforce and employers. Headquartered at Monterey Peninsula College, the MATE Center is one of eleven Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Centers established with funding from the National Science Foundation's ATE Program. The Center's mission is to help prepare America's future workforce for ocean-related occupations. MATE utilizes information from employers to improve and develop educational programs with a focus on marine technology. The Center focuses on community college education and the creation of strong links between community colleges and high schools, technical schools, four-year institutions, research institutions, and industry, government, military, and labor organizations. Address: 980 Fremont Street, Monterey, CA 93940 Phone: (831) 645-1393 Fax: (831) 646-3080 Email: info@marinetech.org Website: www.marinetech.org

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G. MISSION TRAILS REGIONAL OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAM Year Established: 1965 Number of Employees: 75 (varies) Activities: The Mission Trails Regional Occupational Program serves the County of Monterey and operates under the Salinas Union High School District. ROP provides training opportunities in vocational and technical studies for youth and adults. Courses are held year-round, both part-time and full-time courses during the day, in the evenings, and on Saturdays. Courses are free of charge to high school students. Adults are charged a $25 fee. ROP training develops marketable skills, abilities, attitudes, and work habits so students may secure jobs, work part-time, prepare for advance training, or upgrade and enhance vocational skills. Address: 867 East Laurel Drive, Salinas, CA 93905-1310 Phone: (831) 753-4209 Fax: (831) 422-5115 Email: Tvanoli@salinas.k12.ca.us Website: www.missiontrailsrop.org Contact Person: Tim Vanoli, Director H. MONTEREY BAY EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY CENTER (MBEST) Year Established: 1994 (operational Sept 2001) Number of Employees: 5 (1 director, 2 analysts, 2 administrative staff) Total budget: $20 million to date Square footage: 484-acre research center, adjacent to 605 acres of natural habitat Description of available rental space: 25,000 square ft available through main building and co-located Marina Small Business Incubator. Activities: The centers objectives are to foster applied research and technology transfer, establish a community of high-tech businesses, foster regional economic development and job creation, enhance educational and research opportunities, and provide competitive advantages for the Monterey Bay region. Address: 3180 Imjin Road, Marina CA 93933 Phone: (831) 582-1020 Fax: (831) 582-1021 Email: loralee@cats.ucsc.edu Website: www.ucbmest.org Contact Person: Lora Lee Martin, Director I. MONTEREY INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (MIIS) Year Established: 1955 Number of Employees: 70 full-time resident faculty Activities: In addition to the world-renowned Center for Nonproliferation Studies, the Institute hosts several other research centers that pursue extensive agendas in international policy and globalization issues. These centers attract scholars, journalists, and diplomats from around the world and bring international issues to the forefront of instruction on campus. Graduate programs include the Fisher Graduate School of International Business, the Graduate School of International Policy Studies, and the Graduate School of Translation & Interpretation. Other programs include Court and Medical Interpreting, Intensive Language Programs, English as a Second Language, and other Custom Language Services. Address: 425 Van Buren St., Monterey, CA 93940 Phone: (831) 647-4100 Fax: (831) 647-4199 Email: admit@miis.edu Website: www.miis.edu

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MONTEREY PENINSULA COLLEGE (MPC) Year Established: 1947 Number of Employees: 303 full-time, 243 part-time (Faculty: 126 full-time, 188 part-time. Classified: 154 full-time, 55 part-time. Administrators and management staff: 23) Activities: MPC, one of 107 colleges in the California Community College System, is the focal point for learning beyond the secondary school. The college offers courses to prepare students for transfer to four-year institutions, to prepare for the workplace, to update work skills or prepare for a new career, to gain a general education, and to improve basic skills in mathematics, reading, writing and science. Address: 980 Fremont Street, Monterey, CA 93940 Phone: (831) 645-1357 Fax: (831) 645-1390 Website: www.mpc.edu

K. NAVAL POST GRADUATE SCHOOL Year Established: 1951 Number of Employees: 1022 (350 PhDs, 10 Post Docs, 100 M.A.s) Research budget: 50 Million, 10% of this goes to marine sciences. Description of available rental space: 2 labs Activities: Research at the Naval Postgraduate School exists to support the graduate education of the students. Meteorology and oceanography is the bulk (10%) of the research. Other, non-marine areas of focus are its School of International Studies, Engineering and Applied Science, Business and Public Policy and Operational and Information Sciences. Split focus: 50% graduate education and 50% research. Address: 1 University Circle, Monterey, CA 93943 Phone: (831) 656-3260 Fax: (831) 656-2712 Email: Garwood@nps.navy.mil Website: www.nps.navy.mil Contact Person: Bill Garwood, Dept. of Oceanography L. NEW HORIZONS COMPUTER LEARNING CENTER Year Established: 1982 Activities: New Horizons Computer Learning Center is the global authority in information technology training, with more than 280 locations worldwide and a wealth of options, from instructor-led to technology-based training. New Horizons is the largest independent IT training company in the world. Each year, they teach more than 2.4 million students worldwide. Address: 5 Harris Court, Monterey, California Phone: (831) 458-3400 Fax: (831) 458-3700 Email: contactus@nhscz.com Website: www.newhorizons.com M. SHORELINE OCCUPATIONAL SERVICES Year Established: 1953 Number of Employees: More than 350 Activities: Shoreline Occupational Services is the education, training and employment division of Goodwill Industries in Santa Cruz, Monterey and San Louis Obispo Counties. Shoreline provides vocational rehabilitation services, vocational evaluation and assessment, occupational skills training, placement services, case management, job seeking skills and supported employment. Address: 1252 N. Main Street, Salinas, CA 93906 Phone: (831) 443-1283 Fax: (831) 443-5458 Website: www.scgoodwill.org/shoreline/indexsh.html

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N. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SEA GRANT EXTENSION PROGRAM Year Established: 1972 Number of Employees: 30 Activities: The Sea Grant Extension Program (SGEP) is California Sea Grant College Program's primary resource for helping Californians solve marine and coastal resource problems. Areas of research include coastal ocean, aquaculture, fisheries, new marine products, ocean engineering, marine affairs, and education. The organization transfers information and technology developed in its statewide research efforts to industry, government and the public. Address: P.O. Box 440, Moss Landing, CA 95039 Phone: (831) 633-7266 Fax: (831) 633-7267 Email: starr@mlml.calstate.edu Website: http://www-csgc.ucsd.edu/ Contact Person: Richard Starr, Marine Advisor O. CABRILLO COLLEGE Year Established: 1959 Number of Employees: 26 (Senior college management: 8; faculty, staff and student leadership: 4; research advisory committee: 14) Activities: In addition to campus academic programs, Cabrillo offers a variety of online courses through Distance Education programs in which instructors and students interact through live interactive television, telecourses and online courses. The newest addition includes a new Business Online program tailored to serve the small business community. In addition to academic programs, Cabrillo College offers a variety of programs and services of interest to college members and the community. Address: 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos, CA 95003 Phone: (831) 479-6100 Fax: (831) 477-5250 Email: johurd@cabrillo.cc.ca.us Website: www.cabrillo.cc.ca.us Contact Person: John Hurd, President

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Monterey County Agricultural Resource Guide

November 2002

P. EDUCATIONAL PARTNERSHIP CENTER (EPC) Year Established: 1999 Number of Employees: 45 Activities: The EPC coordinates outreach efforts of the University of California, Santa Cruz. It is the first point of contact for K-12 schools, community colleges, businesses, and community-based organizations interested in creating partnerships with UC Santa Cruz. Together with its partners, the EPC builds college-bound communities that improve student learning and increase college-going rates among low-income and traditionally non-college-going students. The EPC provides services to designated schools and community colleges in Monterey, San Benito, San Mateo, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz Counties. Address: UC Santa Cruz, 3004 Mission Street, Suite 220, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 Phone: (831) 460-3000 Fax: (831) 460-3002 Email: epc@ucsc.edu Website: www.epc.ucsc.edu Contact Person: Call EPC Reception Q. GAVILAN COLLEGE Year Established: 1919 Number of Employees: 73 full-time, 175 part-time faculty (78 classified staff, 12 supervisors, 4 confidential staff, and 11 administrators). Square footage: 150 acres Gavilan College, 2,700 acres Joint Community District Activities: Small two-year lower division College program that prepares students for transfer to a fouryear college or university. The College also offers a variety of one- and two-year technical and occupational courses that lead to employment. There are 26 Associate Degree programs and 13 certificate and career programs offered. Address: 5055 Santa Teresa Blvd., Gilroy, CA 95020 Phone: (408) 847-1400 or (408) 848-4712 Fax: (408) 847-5102 Email: rjoyce@gavilan.cc.ca.us Website: www.gavilan.cc.ca.us Contact Person: Dr. Joyce, Rose Marie, Superintendent/President R. MONTEREY BAY EDUCATIONAL CONSORTIUM (MBEC) Activities: MBEC is a strategic alliance among the public educational institutions in the Monterey Bay crescent dedicated to increasing the levels of educational attainment of all students in the region. Address: 3004 Mission Street Extension, Suite 220, Santa Cruz, CA Phone: (831) 460-3054 Fax: (831) 460-3002 Email: mbec@cats.ucsc.edu Website: http://em.ucsc.edu/mbec/ Contact Person: Diane Siri, Chair of MBEC S. SST NETWORKING INSTITUTE Year Established: 2000 Number of Employees: 4 Activities: SST Networking & Training offers computer technology courses for the Santa Cruz and the surrounding Monterey Peninsula area. By offering class sizes limited to 6 students per class, the institute is committed to providing quality training. Address: 740 Front Street, Suite #265, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 Phone: (831) 421-9191 Fax: (831) 425-1150 Email: paul@sstnetworking.com Website: www.sstnetworking.com Contact Person: Paul Kelley, President/CEO
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Monterey County Agricultural Resource Guide

November 2002

T. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ Year Established: 1965 Activities: In conjunction with graduate teaching and intellectual inquiry, the campus is home to two Organized Research Units: the Institute of Marine Sciences and Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics. The University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory is a Multicampus Research Unit headquartered at UCSC. UC's Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP), a Multicampus Research Institute, includes a branch on the UCSC campus established in 1999. UCSC also is one of three UC campuses sponsoring the Institute for Bioengineering, Biotechnology, and Quantitative Biomedical Research, one of the California Institutes for Science and Innovation established in 2000. Over the years, UCSC has been awarded a total of $624 million for contracts and grants within these units and in numerous other campus research programs (including over $65 million in 2000-01). Address: 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 Phone: (831) 459-0111 Fax: (831) 459-4163 Admissions Email: mrcgrnwd@cats.ucsc.edu Website: www.ucsc.edu Contact Person: M.R.C Greenwood, Chancellor

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Monterey County Agricultural Resource Guide

November 2002

6.0 Financial Resources and Programs


A. AMERICAN AGCREDIT, ACA (SALINAS BRANCH) Year Established: 1917 Number of Employees: 10 Job classification breakdown: Managers, loan officers, appraisers and support staff Total budget: Total loans to agriculture in 2001 were $1.769 billion. Activities: American AgCredit is a member-owned cooperative providing credit and credit related services to eligible borrowers/stockholders for agricultural purposes. The Associations lending region stretches from Eureka to the North to King City in the South, and the principal focus is the coastal regions. The parent association also provides loans in Southern California through the merger of a sister institution. The corporate office is located in Santa Rosa, CA. The bank specializes in loans to the agriculture and related industries, and the loan packages include short, intermediate and long-term loans, construction loans, equipment leases and operating and production lines of credit. Address: 924 E. Blanco Rd., Salinas, CA 93901 Phone: 831 424 1756 Fax: 831 422 6599 Email: beemanj@agloan.com Website: www.agloan.com Contact Person: Mr. Robert LaBrier, Manager B. CALIFORNIA COASTAL RURAL DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION Year Established: 1982 Number of Employees: 18 Activities: Cal Coastal is a California chartered Financial Development Corporation that provides loan capital and other financial services to business and farms located along Californias central coast. Address: 221 Main Street, Salinas, CA 93901 Phone: (831) 424-1099 Fax: (831) 424-1094 Email: herb_aarons@calcoastal.org Website: www.calcoastal.org Contact Person: Herb Aarons, President C. MONTEREY VENTURE PARTNERS, LLC (MVP) Year Established: 1999 Number of Employees: 5 Activities: MVP is a venture capital firm focusing on startup and early stage companies that are exploring new sustainable development technologies. MVP invests in companies that deliver the opportunity for extraordinary financial returns by taking advantage of the synergies between business, society and the natural environment. MVP places emphasis on investing in California's Monterey Bay, Central Coast and Central Valley regions. Some of its activities include: Reviewing business plans Creating opportunities for entrepreneurs to put their ideas in front of potential investors Conducting market research and analysis Address: 2818 Congress Road, Pebble Beach, CA 93953 Phone: (831) 658-0800 Fax: (831) 401-2375 Email: info@plan2ipo.com Website: www.montereyvp.com and www.plan2ipo.com

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Monterey County Agricultural Resource Guide

November 2002

D. QUIVIRA VENTURE PARTNERS Activities: Company manages venture capital funds, and it is interested in establishing a $20 million fund focused on agriculture technology. Address: 100 Clock Tower Place, #130, Carmel, CA 93923 Phone: (831) 625-6500 Fax: (831) 625-6590 Email: swells@quiviraventures.com Website: www.quiviraventures.com Contact Person: Scott Wells E. CALIFORNIA SMALL BUSINESS LOAN GUARANTEE PROGRAM Year Established: 2001 Number of Employees: 3 Activities: The California Loan Guarantee Program enables a small business to obtain a term loan, line of credit or letter of credit when it cannot otherwise qualify for a loan. The program provides a lender with the necessary security, in the form of a guarantee, to approve a credit facility. The guarantees are issued on behalf of the State by the San Fernando Valley Financial Development Corporation, which primarily services the Northern Los Angeles and Eastern Ventura Counties but may service any request within the State of California. This is a state agency to assist small business organizations. Address: San Fernando Valley Financial Development Corporation, 12502 Van Nuys Blvd., #119, Pacoima, CA 91331 Phone: (818) 834-9860 Fax: (818) 897-8007 Email: nicole@vedc.org Website: www.sfvsbdc.org Contact Person: Nicole Schram, Director

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Monterey County Agricultural Resource Guide

November 2002

7.0 Marine Research Institutions


A. HOPKINS MARINE STATION OF STANFORD UNIVERSITY Year Established: 1891 (Hopkins Seaside Laboratory), 1917 (name changes to HMS) Number of Employees: 44 year round Job classification breakdown: 9 PhDs, 35 graduate students and Post Docs Description of lab space: 4 labs, space 100 % devoted to research Labs available for public use: No Activities: Hopkins Marine Station is a marine biology research and educational facility that operates as a branch of Stanford University's Department of Biological Sciences. Areas of research: ecology, conservation biology, physiology, biomechanics, and invertebrate biology. Address: Oceanview Blvd., Pacific Grove, CA 93950 Phone: (831) 655-6200 Fax: (831) 375-0793 Email: somero@stanford.edu Website: www-marine.stanford.edu Contact Person: Dr. George Somero, Director

B. MARINE POLLUTION STUDIES LABORATORY (MPSL) Year Established: 1990 Number of Employees: 20 Job classification breakdown: 10 M.A.s, 10 graduate students Research budget: $1.5 Million Square footage: Share space at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories and UCSC. Labs available for public use: No Activities: The organization conducts pollution testing and assesses effects of pollutants on aquatic organisms. MPSL combines the staff and facilities of Moss Landing Marine, the CA Dept. of Fish and Game, and UCSC. They conduct cooperative research and monitor work concerning all aspects of anthropogenic pollutants in the marine environment in CA. Their master level researchers are funded by state, regional water boards, EPA and NOAA. Address: P.O. Box 747 Moss Landing, CA 95039 Phone: (831) 633-6035 Fax: (831) 633-0128 Email: fairey@mlml.calstate.edu Website: www.mlml.calstate.edu/groups/mpsl/mpsl.htm Contact Person: Richard Fairey, Project Manager C. MONTEREY BAY AQUARIUM RESEARCH INSTITUTE (MBARI) Year Established: 1987 (by David Packard) Number of Employees: about 200 Job classification breakdown: 1/3 Ph.D. scientists, 1/3 engineers, 1/3 Post Docs. Total budget: 35 Million Research budget: 27 Million Square footage: 124,000 Description of lab space: 1/3 of square footage is laboratory space Labs available for public use: No Activities: MBARI develops advanced instruments and methods for ocean research using engineers and marine scientists working together. Institute scientists, engineers, and support staff also collaborate on a wide range of projects that include aspects of biology, ecology, chemistry, geology, benthic processes, midwater research, upper ocean biodeochemistry, ocean observing systems, remotely operated vehicle enhancements, and in situ instruments. Address: 7700 Sandholdt Road, Moss Landing, CA 95039 Phone: (831) 775-1814 Fax: (831) 775-1620
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Monterey County Agricultural Resource Guide

November 2002

Email: mcnutt@mbari.org Website: www.mbari.org Contact Person: Judith Connor, Dir. of Information and Technology Dissemination D. MOSS LANDING MARINE LABORATORIES (MLML) Year Established: 1966 Number of Employees: 50 Job classification breakdown: 12 PhDs, 10 Post Docs, and 20 M.A.s Research budget: $10 Million Description of lab space: 11 labs Labs available for public use: No Activities: Hosts marine research and teaching facilities for 7 Cal State Universities. Since its establishment, MLML has grown an international reputation for excellence in marine research and education. It is the second oldest marine lab on Monterey Bay. MLML has a graduate program offering Masters of Science in Marine Science, Benthic Ecology, Biological, Chemical, Geological, Physical Oceanography, Environmental Biotechnology, Icthyology, Oology, Ornithology, Mammalogy, and Phycology. Address: 8272 Moss Landing Road, Moss Landing, CA 95039 Phone: (831) 632-4400 Fax: (831) 632-4403 Email: coale@mlml.calstate.edu Website: www.mlml.calstate.edu Contact Person: Dr. Kenneth Coale, Director E. NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY (NRL) Year Established: 1923 (NRL), 1971 (Monterey Group) Number of Employees: 81 Job classification breakdown: 52 research personnel (29 Ph.D.s, 20 M.S.s, 3 B.S.s), 10 admin and support, 5 military, 6 visiting scientists/post docs, 16 on site contractors Research budget: 7-20 Million Square footage: 25,000 Labs available for public use: No Activities: NRL Monterey is the only scientific center in the Navy wholly dedicated to atmospheric research. NRL is responsible for conducting research and development to provide objective local, regional, and global atmospheric analysis and prediction as well as the development of automated weather interpretation systems to support Naval Operations; that is, the effect of atmospheric changes on naval communications and weapons systems. Research includes: basic atmospheric processes, air-sea-land interactions, numerical weather predictions, data assimilation and fusion, development of operational environmental products for now casting and forecasting. Key products include: numerical weather prediction systems, satellite data products, numerical atmospheric forecast, global atmospheric and oceanographic research. Address: 7 Grace Hopper Ave., Stop 2, Monterey, CA 93943 Phone: (831) 656-4758 Fax: (831) 656-4314 Email: phoebus@nrlmry.navy.mil Website: www.nrlmry.navy.mil Contact Person: Patricia Phoebus, Associate Superintendent

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Monterey County Agricultural Resource Guide

November 2002

F. PACIFIC FISHERIES ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORIES (PFEL) Year Established: 1969 (as the Pacific Environmental Group) Number of Employees: 16 Job classification breakdown: 5 Ph.D.s, 2 M.A.s, 5 support/technical staff Activities: PFEL provides environmental information to fishery scientists and managers. The organization: Specifies linkages of environmental processes to population dynamics of fish stocks Accounts for natural environmental variance (e.g. stock-recruitment relationships, multi-species interactions, habitat degradation and/or pollution, etc.) essential for managing human impacts on marine populations, Develops the means to effectively forecast effects of environmental variations on availability of fish and on resilience of fish populations to exploitation, Assesses the effects of global climate change on oceanographic processes important to fish populations and on the population dynamics of the fish, and Uses new approaches and technologies to characterize and evaluate marine fisheries habitat. Address: 1352 Lighthouse Ave., Pacific Grove, CA 93950 Phone: (831) 648-8447 Fax: (831) 648-8440 Email: gboehlert@pfeg.noaa.gov Website: http://www.pfeg.noaa.gov/ Contact Person: Dr. George Boehlert, Director G. INSTITUTE OF MARINE SCIENCES (IMS) Year Established: 1972 Activities: The IMS provides facilities and administrative and technical support of faculty, researchers, and students interested in marine sciences. Faculty from several disciplines in the natural and social sciences are associated with IMS. The institute supports a variety of research activities in many areas. The campus complex includes the IMS administrative office, faculty research laboratories; analytical labs for marine chemistry, biology, and geology; a computer laboratory; culture room for invertebrates and algae; portable seagoing analytic labs; and support facilities for the Ao Nuevo Island program (a 4,000-acre reserve). Address: University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 Phone: (831) 459-4026 Fax: 831-459-4882 Website: http://ims.ucsc.edu H. LONG MARINE LABORATORY (PART OF UCSC) Year Established: 1978 Number of Employees: 153 (part of UC), 75 (Federal and State labs) Total budget: Construction of the Center for Ocean Health was largely funded by a $5 million grant from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. Square footage: 12,000 square feet of permanent research buildings, 8,500 square feet of temporary office buildings, 2,000 square feet of facility support space in temporary buildings. Activities: The Lab focuses on public education as well as research in the ocean sciences. Long Marine lab is known throughout the world for the marine mammal research in areas such as diving physiology, physiological ecology, bioacoustics, and cognition. Active research at the lab is also underway in the areas of environmental toxicology, and in near-shore invertebrate marine biology. Address: Long Marine Lab, 100 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 Phone: (831) 459-2883 Fax: (831) 459-1221 Email: sldaven@cats.ucsc.edu Website: http://ims.ucsc.edu/rflml.html Contact Person: Contact Receptionist
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Monterey County Agricultural Resource Guide

November 2002

8.0 Other Business Associations


A. COMMON GROUND MONTEREY COUNTY Date Established: 1999 Number of Employees: 3 Activities: Common Ground works to: Conduct factual research and provide thoughtful analysis to decision makers and the community Educate the public regarding a balanced approach to development Promote responsible stewardship of resources in Monterey County Advocate for Smart Growth Mission: A non-profit group dedicated to the responsible stewardship of all the resources in Monterey County including agricultural land, water, open space and those elements necessary to ensure housing opportunities and a thriving economy for present and future generations. Common ground is an organization of individuals representing many sectors including agriculture, education, hospitality, construction, labor, business leaders, environment and low income housing advocates. Address: P.O. Box 1368, Salinas, CA 93901 Phone: (831) 373-1169 Fax: (831) 373-1172 Email: info@commongroundmc.com Website: www.commongroundmc.com Contact Person: Carol Kurtz, Executive Director

B. MONTEREY COUNTY CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE The Chamber of Commerce exists to promote, inform, and serve member businesses through a variety of programs. Below is information for the Chambers of Commerce Offices in Monterey County. 1. Aptos Chamber of Commerce Address: 7605-A Old Dominion Court, Aptos, CA 95003 Phone: (831) 688-1467 Fax: (831) 688-6961 Website: www.aptoschamber.com Email: John@aptoschamber.com Contact: John Hibble 2. Capitola Chamber of Commerce Address: 716-G Capitola Ave, Capitola, CA 95010 Phone: (831) 475-6522 Fax: (831) 475-6530 Email: capcham@capitolachamber.com Website: capitolachamber.com 3. King City Chamber Of Commerce Address: 200 Broadway, Suite 40, King City, CA 93930 Phone: (831) 385-3814 Fax: (831) 386-9462 Email: kcchamber@tcsn.net Website: www.kingcitychamber.com

Contact Person: Bruce Kitchin, President


4. Marina Chamber of Commerce Address: 211 Hillcrest Wagner Hall, PO Box 425, Marina, CA 93933
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Monterey County Agricultural Resource Guide

November 2002

9.0 Marketing Organizations


A. CENTRAL COAST MARKETING TEAM Year Established: 1996 Number of Employees: 11 Activities: The California Central Coast Marketing Team is dedicated to facilitating new investment, expediting projects and assisting businesses in locating and prospering in the region. The team is comprised of economic development professionals representing numerous communities and organizations. The organization works to attract business to the County in areas of wine production, software, multi-media and communication technologies. The Central Coast Marketing Team also participates in California trade shows and other promotional events. Address: Central Coast Marketing Team, King City Small Business Center, 399 East San Antonio, King City, CA 93930 Phone: (831) 386-1800 Fax: (831) 386-1804 Email: kcsbc@kingcity.com Website: www.ca-central-coast.org Contact Person: Contact Reception for Information

B. MONTEREY COUNTY CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU Year Established: 2000 Number of Employees: 33 (part-time and full-time) Job classification breakdown: Administration, Visitor Center Hosts, Information Specialists, Marketing Specialists, Travel Writer, Group Sales Activities: The organization works to: Provide information about the Monterey Bay area and its many attractions and services available to visitors Market Monterey County throughout the World Book major events and conferences Develop and disseminate marketing materials Address: P.O. Box 1770, 150 Olivier Street, Monterey, CA 93942 Phone: (888) 221-1010 or (831) 657-6400 Fax: (831) 648-5373 Email: info@mccvb.org Website: www.gomonterey.org Contact Person: Call general number for referral

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Product and Service Mapping

Monterey County Agricultural Competitiveness Center

Description of Service Mapping Document as of 6/25/02: This document acts to map programs and services being provided in and around Monterey County as they relate to the development of the Agricultural Competitiveness Center. As we work to develop a Conceptual Plan for the Agricultural Competitiveness Center in Monterey County, this Service Mapping document will assist us in identifying what organizations are providing (or planning to provide) programs and services that meet needs voiced by the business community.

PRODUCT & SERVICE MAPPING

Submitted to: Mary Claypool, Environmental Resource Policy Division

Office of Economic Development, County of Monterey 240 Church Street, West Wing, Room 301 Salinas, California 93901 Telephone: 831.755.5065

Submission Date: June 25, 2002

Example: Agricultural leaders may express an interest in specialized business seminars. We can use this guide to identify what organizations provide business seminars and then conduct further research to determine whether or not the seminars offered meet the needs set forth by the business leaders. From this information, we can determine whether we have an unmet need that can be addressed by the Center or an opportunity to partner with one or more of the organizations currently providing business seminars.

Prepared by:

Agland Investment Services, Inc.

711 Grand Avenue, Suite 290 Marina Bldg. San Rafael, CA 94901

Along the top of this Service Mapping are listed organizations that provide programs and services to the agricultural community. Listed along the left hand-side of the Guide are the needs and interest for the Ag. Competitiveness Center as expressed in interviews with the business community.

Telephone: 415-460-1352 - Fax: 415-460-5368 E-Mail: agland@aglandinvest.com Web page: http://www.aglandinvest.com

Build infrastructure for public outreach Build strong marketing program around technologies to remove negative spin

Product Tracking Technologies Get rid of three tier supply system

Computer Systems & Services GIS systems Custom programming Software programs for Winery Business

SERVICE MAPPING (Guide to Programs and Services Offered In and Around)

Business Space Incubator space to house small businesses starting out Office rental space Flexible office space to meet seasonal demand

Marketing & Branding Marketing programs at the County level Marketing consultants for individual businesses

BUSINESS SERVICES Business Information Services Market Research Assistance/Knowledge Center Services Business Seminars Consumer Preferences Research Technology Transfer from Overseas International Market Research Export Market Development

Conference room to hold more than 100 people

Supply Chain Management Techniques to manage pressure from big buyers

Videoconferencing and other high tech business systems Other high tech business systems for use in meetings and conferences 5.2 6.0

13.0

16.0 6.0

14.2 3.2

3.0

6.0 3.0 1.2

15.0 5.0 6.0 5.0 3.0

3.0 3.0

4.2

1.0 1.0

6.0 1

Number of organizations providing a related service Agricultural Land-Based Training Association (Alba) Monterey County Agricultural Commissioners Office Uc Cooperative Extension - Salinas Usda/Agricultural Research Service (Ars) - Salinas * Organic Farming Research Foundation * Uc Cooperative Extension-Santa Cruz County * Bolsa Analytical* Dellavalle Laboratory* Primus Laboratories* Hopkins Marine Station Of Stanford University* Marine Pollution Studies Laboratory (Mpsl)* Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (Mbari)* Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (Mlml)* National Undersea Research Program (Nurp)* Naval Research Laboratory (Nrl)* Pacific Fisheries Environmental Laboratories (Pfel)* Institute Of Marine Sciences (Ims)* Long Marine Laboratory (Part Of Ucsc)* Business & Education Alliance - Monterey Peninsula (Beam)* Central Coast Marketing Team* Small Business Development Center (Sbdc) Marina Small Business Incubator (Msbi)* Monterey County Business Council* Monterey Bay International Trade Association (Mbita) Monterey County Convention And Visitors Bureau* Monterey Export Assistance Center One-Stop Career Center And Office Of Employment Training* Service Corps Of Retired Executives (Score)* Small Business Development Center, Cabrillo College (Sbdc)* King City Chamber Of Commerce* Monterey Peninsula Chamber Of Commerce* Pacific Grove Chamber Of Commerce* Salinas Valley Chamber Of Commerce* California State University Monterey Bay Central Coast College* Golden Gate University Monterey Campus* Hartnell College* Heald College, Salinas* Marine Advanced Technology Education Center (Mate) Of Mpc Mission Trails Regional Occupational Program* Monterey Bay Education, Science & Technology Center (UC M Monterey Institute Of International Studies (Miis) Monterey Peninsula College (Mpc)* Naval Post Graduate School* New Horizons Computer Learning Center* Shoreline Occupational Services* University Of California Extension Santa Cruz, Monterey Bay* University Of California, Sea Grant Extension Program* Cabrillo College* Educational Partnership Center (Epc) Gavilan College* Monterey Bay Educational Consortium (Mbec)* Sst Networking Institute University Of California, Santa Cruz* Grower-Shipper Association Of Central California* Monterey County Certified Organic (Mcco) Monterey County Farm Bureau* Monterey County Vintners & Growers Association* California Strawberry Commission* California Certified Organic Farmers (Ccof)* American Agcredit, Aca (Salinas Branch)* California Coastal Rural Development Company California Small Business Loan Guarantee Program* Quivira Venture Partners* Business Site Selection/ OED* Financial Labs

0 0

1 1

Ag Resources

1 1 1 1 1

Note: (1) Items with * were determined by consultant research. (2) When a service is proposed or expected it is denoted with (.2) and shaded. Agland Investment Services, Inc. 1

Marine Research

1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1

Business Support Services

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1

1 1

0 1

1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Chamber Education and Training Associations

Permiting

Development Review Committee (Drc)/ OED* One Stop Permit Assistance Center/ OED* Common Ground Monterey County*

Other

SERVICE MAPPING (Guide to Programs and Services Offered In and Around)

Financing Financing alternatives for small and medium businesses Catalyze funding for university-research interaction Funding for new business development Funding for new product development Provide seed funding for collaborative and crossdisciplinary research initiatives Other Water Safety Certification Organic Certification Other Food Safety Certification

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY Wet Labs Provide genomics and bioinformatics DNA sequencing Applied Biology Research High end technology facilities, equipment & machinery Research disease resistance Pest & Disease research Meta Stem Culture Conduct research and create report on pollution issues Lab to Measure Product Traits Organic Research 3.0 8.0 1.0 3.0 5.2 5.2 10.0 10.0 2.0 2.0

Post Harvest & Packaging Shelf-life testing Refrigeration Nutrient Analysis New film techniques New Atmosphere and Quarantine Technologies 3.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 1.0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

3.0 4.0 2.0

1.0 4.0 0.0

5.0

4.0

Number of organizations providing a related service Agricultural Land-Based Training Association (Alba) Monterey County Agricultural Commissioners Office Uc Cooperative Extension - Salinas Usda/Agricultural Research Service (Ars) - Salinas * Organic Farming Research Foundation * Uc Cooperative Extension-Santa Cruz County * Bolsa Analytical* Dellavalle Laboratory* Primus Laboratories* Hopkins Marine Station Of Stanford University* Marine Pollution Studies Laboratory (Mpsl)* Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (Mbari)* Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (Mlml)* National Undersea Research Program (Nurp)* Naval Research Laboratory (Nrl)* Pacific Fisheries Environmental Laboratories (Pfel)* Institute Of Marine Sciences (Ims)* Long Marine Laboratory (Part Of Ucsc)* Business & Education Alliance - Monterey Peninsula (Beam)* Central Coast Marketing Team* Small Business Development Center (Sbdc) Marina Small Business Incubator (Msbi)* Monterey County Business Council* Monterey Bay International Trade Association (Mbita) Monterey County Convention And Visitors Bureau* Monterey Export Assistance Center One-Stop Career Center And Office Of Employment Training* Service Corps Of Retired Executives (Score)* Small Business Development Center, Cabrillo College (Sbdc)* King City Chamber Of Commerce* Monterey Peninsula Chamber Of Commerce* Pacific Grove Chamber Of Commerce* Salinas Valley Chamber Of Commerce* California State University Monterey Bay Central Coast College* Golden Gate University Monterey Campus* Hartnell College* Heald College, Salinas* Marine Advanced Technology Education Center (Mate) Of Mpc Mission Trails Regional Occupational Program* Monterey Bay Education, Science & Technology Center (UC M Monterey Institute Of International Studies (Miis) Monterey Peninsula College (Mpc)* Naval Post Graduate School* New Horizons Computer Learning Center* Shoreline Occupational Services* University Of California Extension Santa Cruz, Monterey Bay* University Of California, Sea Grant Extension Program* Cabrillo College* Educational Partnership Center (Epc) Gavilan College* Monterey Bay Educational Consortium (Mbec)* Sst Networking Institute University Of California, Santa Cruz* Grower-Shipper Association Of Central California* Monterey County Certified Organic (Mcco) Monterey County Farm Bureau* Monterey County Vintners & Growers Association* California Strawberry Commission* California Certified Organic Farmers (Ccof)* American Agcredit, Aca (Salinas Branch)* California Coastal Rural Development Company California Small Business Loan Guarantee Program* Quivira Venture Partners* Business Site Selection/ OED* Associations Chamber Labs

1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Ag Resources

1 1 1

1 1

Note: (1) Items with * were determined by consultant research. (2) When a service is proposed or expected it is denoted with (.2) and shaded. Agland Investment Services, Inc. 2

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

Marine Research

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Business Support Services

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Education and Training Financial

Permiting

Development Review Committee (Drc)/ OED* One Stop Permit Assistance Center/ OED* Common Ground Monterey County*

Other

Testing Food Safety Pesticides H2 0

Soil Phytosanitary

SERVICE MAPPING (Guide to Programs and Services Offered In and Around)

Technology Information Clearinghouse Technology Transfer Trials & Variety Development Place for wine pilots for variety development Greenhouse Services Product Development Atmosphere technologies Packaging technologies Mechanization Biotechnology Laser & digital technologies Create demonstration forum to show best practices Promote end user enhancements in nutraceuticals Focus on output traits Food Safety Technologies New Horticulture Crop Development New Processed Product Research Development of Tools to Measure Harvest Yields New Hybrid Plant Development Development of Tools and Techniques to Increase Productivity Other Host panels of scientists and industry to review and prioritize research proposals Provide research and technologies that can either improve scope of markets, or reduce production costs like land and labor Spectrometer 8.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 2.0 5.0 0.0 6.0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 1 1 1 0.0 1.0 2.0 4.0 2.0 2.0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

4.0 4.0 7.0 1 1 1 1 1 1

5.0 4.0 1 1 1 1 1 1

Number of organizations providing a related service Agricultural Land-Based Training Association (Alba) Monterey County Agricultural Commissioners Office Uc Cooperative Extension - Salinas Usda/Agricultural Research Service (Ars) - Salinas * Organic Farming Research Foundation * Uc Cooperative Extension-Santa Cruz County * Bolsa Analytical* Dellavalle Laboratory* Primus Laboratories* Hopkins Marine Station Of Stanford University* Marine Pollution Studies Laboratory (Mpsl)* Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (Mbari)* Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (Mlml)* National Undersea Research Program (Nurp)* Naval Research Laboratory (Nrl)* Pacific Fisheries Environmental Laboratories (Pfel)* Institute Of Marine Sciences (Ims)* Long Marine Laboratory (Part Of Ucsc)* Business & Education Alliance - Monterey Peninsula (Beam)* Central Coast Marketing Team* Small Business Development Center (Sbdc) Marina Small Business Incubator (Msbi)* Monterey County Business Council* Monterey Bay International Trade Association (Mbita) Monterey County Convention And Visitors Bureau* Monterey Export Assistance Center One-Stop Career Center And Office Of Employment Training* Service Corps Of Retired Executives (Score)* Small Business Development Center, Cabrillo College (Sbdc)* King City Chamber Of Commerce* Monterey Peninsula Chamber Of Commerce* Pacific Grove Chamber Of Commerce* Salinas Valley Chamber Of Commerce* California State University Monterey Bay Central Coast College* Golden Gate University Monterey Campus* Hartnell College* Heald College, Salinas* Marine Advanced Technology Education Center (Mate) Of Mpc Mission Trails Regional Occupational Program* Monterey Bay Education, Science & Technology Center (UC M Monterey Institute Of International Studies (Miis) Monterey Peninsula College (Mpc)* Naval Post Graduate School* New Horizons Computer Learning Center* Shoreline Occupational Services* University Of California Extension Santa Cruz, Monterey Bay* University Of California, Sea Grant Extension Program* Cabrillo College* Educational Partnership Center (Epc) Gavilan College* Monterey Bay Educational Consortium (Mbec)* Sst Networking Institute University Of California, Santa Cruz* Grower-Shipper Association Of Central California* Monterey County Certified Organic (Mcco) Monterey County Farm Bureau* Monterey County Vintners & Growers Association* California Strawberry Commission* California Certified Organic Farmers (Ccof)* American Agcredit, Aca (Salinas Branch)* California Coastal Rural Development Company California Small Business Loan Guarantee Program* Quivira Venture Partners* Business Site Selection/ OED* Financial Chamber Labs Ag Resources

Note: (1) Items with * were determined by consultant research. (2) When a service is proposed or expected it is denoted with (.2) and shaded. Agland Investment Services, Inc. 3

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Marine Research

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Business Support Services

1 1

1 1 1 1

Education and Training Associations

Permiting

Development Review Committee (Drc)/ OED* One Stop Permit Assistance Center/ OED* Common Ground Monterey County*

Other

TRAINING AND EDUCATION Specialized Training Safety & Hazardous Materials Food and Operational Safety Regulatory Issues GPS technology Machinery Operation & Maintenance Workmans compensation Language skills Computer skills Management & Supervisory Training International Business

Train-the-trainer Human Resources Labor Issues

Consensus Building Act as a focal point and mediation between players Encourage conversations between players (coastal zone interaction area) 15.0 1 1 1 0 7.2

4.0 2.0 6.0 6.0 2.0 1.0 10.0 14.0 10.0 11.0

0.0 2.0

Outreach Conduct outreach to take technology to end-user 7.0 in field Provide consumer education 6.0 Provide internship opportunities 9.4 Partner with training programs in high schools 6.4 promote entry into life sciences Act as Public Relations Center or Office of 14.0 Information Provide Ag/Urban Interface Opportunity 6.0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Number of organizations providing a related service Agricultural Land-Based Training Association (Alba) Monterey County Agricultural Commissioners Office Uc Cooperative Extension - Salinas Usda/Agricultural Research Service (Ars) - Salinas * Organic Farming Research Foundation * Uc Cooperative Extension-Santa Cruz County * Bolsa Analytical* Dellavalle Laboratory* Primus Laboratories* Hopkins Marine Station Of Stanford University* Marine Pollution Studies Laboratory (Mpsl)* Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (Mbari)* Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (Mlml)* National Undersea Research Program (Nurp)* Naval Research Laboratory (Nrl)* Pacific Fisheries Environmental Laboratories (Pfel)* Institute Of Marine Sciences (Ims)* Long Marine Laboratory (Part Of Ucsc)* Business & Education Alliance - Monterey Peninsula (Beam)* Central Coast Marketing Team* Small Business Development Center (Sbdc) Marina Small Business Incubator (Msbi)* Monterey County Business Council* Monterey Bay International Trade Association (Mbita) Monterey County Convention And Visitors Bureau* Monterey Export Assistance Center One-Stop Career Center And Office Of Employment Training* Service Corps Of Retired Executives (Score)* Small Business Development Center, Cabrillo College (Sbdc)* King City Chamber Of Commerce* Monterey Peninsula Chamber Of Commerce* Pacific Grove Chamber Of Commerce* Salinas Valley Chamber Of Commerce* California State University Monterey Bay Central Coast College* Golden Gate University Monterey Campus* Hartnell College* Heald College, Salinas* Marine Advanced Technology Education Center (Mate) Of Mpc Mission Trails Regional Occupational Program* Monterey Bay Education, Science & Technology Center (UC M Monterey Institute Of International Studies (Miis) Monterey Peninsula College (Mpc)* Naval Post Graduate School* New Horizons Computer Learning Center* Shoreline Occupational Services* University Of California Extension Santa Cruz, Monterey Bay* University Of California, Sea Grant Extension Program* Cabrillo College* Educational Partnership Center (Epc) Gavilan College* Monterey Bay Educational Consortium (Mbec)* Sst Networking Institute University Of California, Santa Cruz* Grower-Shipper Association Of Central California* Monterey County Certified Organic (Mcco) Monterey County Farm Bureau* Monterey County Vintners & Growers Association* California Strawberry Commission* California Certified Organic Farmers (Ccof)* American Agcredit, Aca (Salinas Branch)* California Coastal Rural Development Company California Small Business Loan Guarantee Program* Quivira Venture Partners* Business Site Selection/ OED* Chamber Labs

SERVICE MAPPING (Guide to Programs and Services Offered In and Around)

1 1

Ag Resources

1 1

1 1 1 1

Note: (1) Items with * were determined by consultant research. (2) When a service is proposed or expected it is denoted with (.2) and shaded. Agland Investment Services, Inc. 4

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Marine Research Business Support Services Education and Training Associations Financial

Permiting

Development Review Committee (Drc)/ OED* One Stop Permit Assistance Center/ OED* Common Ground Monterey County*

Other

Needs Assessment & Survey Data

Monterey County ACI

Needs Assesment Survey

NEEDS ASSESMENT SURVEY SUMMARY OF DEMAND SIDE SURVEYS OVERVIEW The Needs Assessment Survey (also Demand Side Survey) was designed to assess the agricultural business communitys interest in and need for an Agricultural Competitiveness Center in the County of Monterey. As part of this survey and assessment, we spoke with representatives from the wine, vegetable, berry, finance, seed, chemical and agricultural technology industries. Including surveys, group meetings, and interviews we have spoken with leaders of over 30 businesses in Monterey County. The results of the surveys show that 78% of the people we spoke with have a medium to high interest level in this project and that 78% would like to participate in upcoming meetings on the Center. Over 27% of individuals said they had a high level of interest in the Centers development. And, over 28% of the respondents said that they would invest money in the development of the Center. In terms of priorities for Center programs and services, the respondents ranked Science & Research components the most important, followed by Business Support Services and Training & Education respectfully. Although the average number of employee of the companies that completed the survey was 622, more than 38% of the respondents have 50 or fewer employees. Around 72% percent of respondents, have some form of research and development labs in-house. Approximately 33% of the respondents said maybe when asked if they would co-locate within the Center. Please see the following survey data for further detail.

Agland Investment Services, Inc.

Page 1

Monterey County ACI NEEDS ASSESMENT SURVEY SUMMARY OF DEMAND SIDE SURVEYS DATA SURVEY INFORMATION

Needs Assesment Survey

Number of companies that completed the survey: 18 Additional interviews with business leaders or agriculture industry representatives: 11 Breakdown of companies with completed survey by industry segment*

Wine: 16.7% Vegetable: 33.3% Berry: 16.7% Finance: 5.6% Seed: 11.1% Chemicals & Technology: 16.7%

GENERAL COMPANY INFORMATION Average year companies founded: 1974 Average total number of employees: 622 Average full-time employees in Monterey County: 103 Average seasonal employees in Monterey County: 264 Research labs in house: 13 Average number of PhDs: 1.1 Average number of MAs: 1 Average number of technicians: 6.1 Of companies surveyed 22% have staff retainment issues 83% are conducting variety trials 50% are breeding new plants 50% working in new product development The survey participants ranked the priority of programs and services in business, research and training in the following order: 1. Science & Research 2. Business Support Services 3. Training & Education

Agland Investment Services, Inc.

Page 2

Monterey County ACI BUSINESS NEEDS The following were identified as business needs and ranked as follows: 1. Web Labs 2. Core Research Facility 3. Business Support Services 4. Access to Capital 5. Office Space Business services and support needs were prioritized as follows: First Market Research Assistance Computer Systems & Services Second Product Packaging Supply Chain Management Marketing/Branding tied Third Financial Planning & Analysis Fourth

Needs Assesment Survey

Inventory Management

Fifth

Financial Services & Capital

Agland Investment Services, Inc.

Page 3

Monterey County ACI RESEARCH NEEDS

Needs Assesment Survey

Companies with relationships to academic, educational and/or research organizations: 12 Companies have relationships with: USDA UC Davis University of Arizona University of Arkansas UC Cooperative Extension Monterey Institute for International Studies Fresno State University Cal Poly The most commonly mentioned relationships were with Fresno State, Cal Poly and UCD Weighted ranking of potential services and facilities proposed for the Center: 1. Analytical instrumentation lab 2. Field research traits 3. Use of specialized instruments 4. Continued education and training 5. Soil and leaf analysis 6. Computer lab 7. Interaction with specific researchers 8. General science research 9. Product commercialization 10. Cell culture 11. Fermentation scale-up space The represents companies that are willing to pay for the program or service identified. Continued education/training: 10 Computer lab: 7 Specialized instruments: 6 Analytical instrumentation lab: 4 Cell culture: 4 Scale-up fermentation: 2 Product commercialization: 1 Use of product prototyping facilities: 1 33% of the companies said maybe when asked if they would co-locate with-in the Center The remaining 67% said no or left the question blank.

Agland Investment Services, Inc.

Page 4

Monterey County ACI TRAINING NEEDS

Needs Assesment Survey

The technical skills most referenced as important for their company/industry were the following (with the most frequently noted first): 1. Supervisors 2. Lab technicians 3. Human resources 4. Accounting & finance 5. Law 6. Business Managers Computer technician and computer skills were also written-in an important. Companies in the survey recruit from Regional college or universities: 61% Technical or vocational schools: 33% Local high schools: 28% Other colleges or universities: 22% Seven companies said they would help co-sponsor training at the Center.

LEVEL OF INTEREST IN CENTER Level of company interest in project: Low = 22.2% of companies Med = 50.0% of companies High = 27.8% of companies 78% of the companies stated they are interested in participating in upcoming meetings. When asked if they would be willing to invest in the Center, 28% said they would invest.

Agland Investment Services, Inc.

Page 5

Questionnaire Sample

Organization Name ________________________________________________

Do you currently provide?

Do you plan to provide?

AGRICULTURAL COMPETITIVENESS CENTER ('Questionnaire Sample)

Please Complete and Fax to 415-457-1208 or email to carrie@aglandinvest.com by June 21, 2002

When?

If YES, please briefly describe current or planned program or service.

BUSINESS SERVICES Business Information Services Market Research Assistance/Knowledge Center Services Business Seminars Consumer Preferences Research Technology Transfer from Overseas International Market Research Export Market Development Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N

Marketing & Branding Marketing programs at the County level Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N

Marketing consultants for individual businesses Y N Build infrastructure for public outreach Build strong marketing program around technologies to remove negative spin Y N Y N

Supply Chain Management Techniques to manage pressure from big buyers Product Tracking Technologies Y N Y N

Y N

Y N

Get rid of three tier supply system

Y N

Y N

Agland Investment Services, Inc.

PLEASE COMPLETE AND FAX TO 415-457-1208 or EMAIL to Carrie@aglandinvest.com by June 21, 2002

Organization Name ________________________________________________

Do you currently provide?

Do you plan to provide?

AGRICULTURAL COMPETITIVENESS CENTER ('Questionnaire Sample)

Please Complete and Fax to 415-457-1208 or email to carrie@aglandinvest.com by June 21, 2002

When?

If YES, please briefly describe current or planned program or service.

(BUSINESS SERVICES CONTINUED) Computer Systems & Services GIS systems Custom programming Software programs for Winery Business Business Space Incubator space to house small businesses starting out Office rental space Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N

Flexible office space to meet seasonal demand Y N Conference room to hold more than 100 people Y N Videoconferencing and other high tech business systems Other high tech business systems for use in meetings and conferences Y N Y N

Financing Financing alternatives for small and medium businesses Catalyze funding for university-research interaction Funding for new business development Funding for new product development Provide seed funding for collaborative and cross-disciplinary research initiatives Other Water Safety Certification Organic Certification Other Food Safety Certification Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N

Y N Y N Y N

Y N Y N Y N

Agland Investment Services, Inc.

PLEASE COMPLETE AND FAX TO 415-457-1208 or EMAIL to Carrie@aglandinvest.com by June 21, 2002

Organization Name ________________________________________________

Do you currently provide?

Do you plan to provide?

AGRICULTURAL COMPETITIVENESS CENTER ('Questionnaire Sample)

Please Complete and Fax to 415-457-1208 or email to carrie@aglandinvest.com by June 21, 2002

When?

If YES, please briefly describe current or planned program or service.

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY Wet Labs Provide genomics and bioinformatics DNA sequencing Applied Biology Research High end technology facilities, equipment & machinery Research water/disease resistance Pest & Disease research Meta Stem Culture Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N

Conduct research and create report on pollution Y N issues Lab to Measure Product Traits Y N

Post Harvest & Packaging Shelf-life testing Refrigeration Nutrient Analysis New film techniques Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N

New Atmosphere and Quarantine Technologies Y N

Testing Food Safety Pesticides H20 (Cleaning & Certification) Soil Phytosanitary Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N

Agland Investment Services, Inc.

PLEASE COMPLETE AND FAX TO 415-457-1208 or EMAIL to Carrie@aglandinvest.com by June 21, 2002

Organization Name ________________________________________________

Do you currently provide?

Do you plan to provide?

AGRICULTURAL COMPETITIVENESS CENTER ('Questionnaire Sample)

Please Complete and Fax to 415-457-1208 or email to carrie@aglandinvest.com by June 21, 2002

When?

If YES, please briefly describe current or planned program or service.

(SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY CONTINUED) Technology Information Clearinghouse Technology Transfer Trials & Variety Development Place for wine pilots for variety development Greenhouse Services Product Development Atmosphere technologies Packaging technologies Mechanization Biotechnology Laser & digital technologies Create demonstration forum to show best practices Promote end user enhancements in nutraceuticals Focus on output traits Food Safety Technologies New Horticulture Crop Development New Processed Product Research Development of Tools to Measure Harvest Yields New Hybrid Plant Development Development of Tools and Techniques to Increase Productivity Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N Y N

Other Host panels of scientists and industry to review Y N and prioritize research proposals Provide research and technologies that can either improve scope of markets, or reduce production costs like land and labor Spectrometer Agland Investment Services, Inc. Y N

Y N

Y N

Y N

Y N

PLEASE COMPLETE AND FAX TO 415-457-1208 or EMAIL to Carrie@aglandinvest.com by June 21, 2002

Annex C Preliminary Architecture Concepts

Annex D Advisory Board Member Descriptions

BOARD MEMBER GENERAL JOB DESCRIPTIONS

The following are general job descriptions for Advisory Board Members including the President/Chief, the Vice President/Vice Chair and the Treasurer.

President /Chief General: Ensures the effective action of the board in governing and supporting the organization, and oversees board affairs. Acts as the representative of the board as a whole, rather than as an individual supervisor to staff. Community: Speaks to the media and the community on behalf of the organization (as does the executive director); represents the agency in the community. Meetings: Develops agendas for meetings in concert with the executive director. Presides at board meetings. Committees: Recommends board committees to be established. Seeks volunteers for committees and coordinates individual board member assignments. Makes sure each committee has a chairperson, and stays in touch with chairpersons to be sure that their work is carried out; identifies committee recommendations that should be presented to the full board. Determines whether executive committee meetings are necessary and convenes the committee accordingly. Executive Director: Establishes search and selection committee (usually acts as chair) for hiring an executive director. Convenes board discussions on evaluating the executive director and negotiating compensation and benefits package; conveys information to the executive director. Board Affairs: Ensures that board matters are handled properly, including preparation of pre-meeting materials, committee functioning, and recruitment and orientation of new board members.

Vice President / Vice Chair General: Acts as the president/chair in his or her absence; assists the president/chair on the above or other specified duties. Special Responsibilities: Frequently assigned to a special area of responsibility, such as membership, media, annual dinner, facility, or personnel. Some organizations choose to make the vice president, explicitly or implicitly, the president-elect.

BOARD MEMBER GENERAL JOB DESCRIPTIONS Treasurer General: Manages the board's review of, and action related to, the board's financial responsibilities. May work directly with the bookkeeper or other staff in developing and implementing financial procedures and systems. Reports: Ensures that appropriate financial reports are made available to the board. Regularly reports to board on key financial events, trends, concerns, and assessment of fiscal health. Finance Committee: Chairs the Finance Committee and prepares agendas for meetings, including a year-long calendar of issues. Auditor: Recommends to the board whether the organization should have an audit. If so, selects and meets annually with the auditor in conjunction with the Finance and/or Audit Committees. Cash Management and Investments: Ensures, through the Finance Committee, sound management and maximization of cash and investments.1

1 Dayton, Kenneth. Governance is Governance, Independent Sector Press, 1828 L Street NW, Washington DC, 20036, 202/2238100.

Annex E Foundation Information

FOUNDATION LISTS TOP 100 FOUNDATION IN THE U.S.


As of Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 Name/(state) Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (WA) Lilly Endowment Inc. (IN) The Ford Foundation (NY) The David and Lucile Packard Foundation (CA) The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (NJ) J. Paul Getty Trust (CA) The Starr Foundation (NY) W. K. Kellogg Foundation (MI) The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (NY) The Pew Charitable Trusts (PA) John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation (IL) The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation (CA) The California Endowment (CA) The Rockefeller Foundation (NY) Robert W. Woodruff Foundation, Inc. (GA) The Annie E. Casey Foundation (MD) The Annenberg Foundation (PA) Charles Stewart Mott Foundation (MI) Casey Family Programs (WA) The Kresge Foundation (MI) The Duke Endowment (NC) John S. and James L. Knight Foundation (FL) The Freeman Foundation (NY) The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, Inc. (MD) Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation (MO) The McKnight Foundation (MN) The New York Community Trust (NY) Richard King Mellon Foundation (PA) Robert R. McCormick Tribune Foundation (IL) Carnegie Corporation of New York (NY) Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (NY) W. M. Keck Foundation (CA) Assets $21,149,088,035 12,814,397,581 10,814,697,000 9,793,212,529 9,044,511,000 8,793,485,757 6,257,848,627 5,719,735,520 4,888,237,000 4,800,776,253 4,479,153,951 3,930,366,990 3,366,256,100 3,211,126,000 3,139,654,481 3,001,942,131 2,932,205,767 2,881,802,805 2,811,000,726 2,770,530,893 2,489,158,509 2,198,985,122 2,113,688,541 2,063,325,086 2,022,289,482 2,006,436,000 1,930,370,263 1,910,014,037 1,855,000,000 1,711,510,640 1,574,746,419 1,533,721,000 End Date 12/31/00 12/31/01 9/30/01 12/31/00 12/31/01 6/30/01 12/31/00 8/31/01 12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 2/28/02 12/31/01 12/31/00 12/31/00 6/30/01 12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/01 12/31/00 12/31/00 2/28/01 6/30/01 12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 9/30/01 12/31/00 12/31/00

33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68

The James Irvine Foundation (CA) Houston Endowment Inc. (TX) The Cleveland Foundation (OH) Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (NY) The Brown Foundation, Inc. (TX) Wallace-Reader's Digest Funds (NY) The Packard Humanities Institute (CA) The Chicago Community Trust and Affiliates (IL) Donald W. Reynolds Foundation (NV) The William Penn Foundation (PA) Marin Community Foundation (CA) The Henry Luce Foundation, Inc. (NY) The Anschutz Foundation (CO) Freedom Forum, Inc. (VA) The Joyce Foundation (IL) Walton Family Foundation, Inc. (AR) The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc. (OK) The California Wellness Foundation (CA) Howard Heinz Endowment (PA) Kimbell Art Foundation (TX) Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation (NY) The Meadows Foundation, Inc. (TX) Barr Foundation (MA) Hall Family Foundation (MO) Burroughs Wellcome Fund (NC) The Moody Foundation (TX) Daniels Fund (CO) The Ahmanson Foundation (CA) Weingart Foundation (CA) Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Inc. (NY) J. Bulow Campbell Foundation (GA) The San Francisco Foundation (CA) The J. E. and L. E. Mabee Foundation, Inc. (OK) The Bush Foundation (MN) The Greater Kansas City Community Foundation and Affiliated Trusts (MO) The George S. and Dolores Dore Eccles Foundation (UT)

1,509,641,006 1,506,627,708 1,499,767,419 1,373,141,818 1,323,153,103 1,303,278,360 1,302,804,659 1,302,626,633 1,269,083,024 1,170,193,129 1,150,556,205 1,059,392,814 1,050,694,662 1,037,110,607 999,530,958 973,255,920 971,672,378 937,122,812 912,613,000 912,000,000 892,935,524 879,029,308 863,124,698 861,619,838 832,146,472 815,100,261 807,072,730 785,613,000 779,796,365 753,327,772 748,020,452 741,480,884 735,208,451 726,484,372 719,476,000 703,246,088

12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/01 12/31/00 6/30/01 12/31/01 12/31/00 9/30/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 6/30/01 12/31/00 11/30/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 10/31/00 12/31/01 12/31/01 12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 11/30/00 12/31/00 8/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/01 10/31/01 6/30/01 12/31/00 12/31/00 6/30/01 8/31/01 11/30/01 12/31/00 12/31/00

69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100

The Goizueta Foundation (GA) William Randolph Hearst Foundation (NY) The Columbus Foundation and Affiliated Organizations (OH) M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust (WA) Boston Foundation, Inc. (MA) Conrad N. Hilton Foundation (NV) Longwood Foundation, Inc. (DE) Hartford Foundation for Public Giving (CT) Wayne & Gladys Valley Foundation (CA) Surdna Foundation, Inc. (NY) The Edna McConnell Clark Foundation (NY) Communities Foundation of Texas, Inc. (TX) The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation (CA) Pritzker Foundation (IL) The John A. Hartford Foundation, Inc. (NY) The Picower Foundation (FL) The Robert A. Welch Foundation (TX) Park Foundation, Inc. (NY) The Saint Paul Foundation, Inc. (MN) The Commonwealth Fund (NY) The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, Inc. (WI) McCune Foundation (PA) The Skillman Foundation (MI) The Pittsburgh Foundation (PA) California Community Foundation (CA) The Minneapolis Foundation (MN) Smith Richardson Foundation, Inc. (CT) Vira I. Heinz Endowment (PA) James S. McDonnell Foundation (MO) The Sherman Fairchild Foundation, Inc. (MD) Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust (NC) Wallace H. Coulter Foundation (FL)

686,026,134 681,667,630 677,889,306 657,113,213 656,806,419 652,314,629 651,327,269 647,516,680 643,410,730 639,962,016 634,990,723 627,493,000 626,364,967 624,307,067 623,590,336 614,755,414 612,796,502 600,084,849 588,426,310 587,191,972 579,739,000 564,425,633 563,302,206 548,374,723 547,793,428 542,651,730 540,477,728 526,725,527 511,780,451 510,359,835 509,843,148 508,683,997

12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 6/30/01 2/28/01 9/30/01 9/30/00 9/30/00 6/30/01 9/30/01 6/30/01 12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 8/31/01 12/31/00 12/31/00 6/30/00 12/31/01 9/30/01 12/31/00 12/31/00 6/30/01 3/31/01 12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 12/31/00 8/31/01 9/30/00

Northern California Foundations


1. 3. 5. 7. 9. 11. 13. 15. 17. 19. 21. 23. 25. 27. 29. 31. 33. 35. 37. 39. 41. 43. 45. 47. 49. 51. 53. Advanced Micro Devices (www.amd.com) Akonadi Foundation (www.akonadi.org) American Express AOL-Time/Warner Foundation (www.aoltwfoundation.org) Appleton Foundation Applied Bio Systems Atkinson Foundation Bank of America Foundation (www.bankamerica.com) Banks Family Foundation (ww.banksfamilyfoundation.org) Bay View Bank Bernard Osher Foundation Bert W. Martin Foundation California Consumer Protection Foundation California Council for the Humanities (www.calhum.org) California Endowment (www.calendow.org) California HealthCare Foundation (www.chcf.org) California Wellness Foundation (www.tcwf.org) Candelaria Fund Caroline Tower (Lifetime Member">) Center for Ecoliterary Changemakers (www.changemakers.org) Charles and Helen Schwab Foundation (www.schwabfamilyfdn.org/) Chauncey & Marion D. McCormick Family Foundation Chevron Texaco Corporation (www.chevron.com) Cisco Systems Foundation (www.cisco.com) CITIBANK (www.citibank.com) Clarence Heller Charitable Foundation ( h f ) 2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14. 16. 18. 20. 22. 24. 26. 28. 30. 32. 34. 36. 38. 40. 42. 44. 46. 48. 50. 52. 54. McKay Foundation McKesson Foundation (www.mckesson.com) Mendocino County Community Foundation Mervyn's and Target Stores (www.mervyns.com) Milagro Foundation (www.milagrofoundation.org) Miriam & Peter Haas Fund Morgan Family Foundation Morris Family Foundation Morris Stulsaft Foundation (www.stulsaft.org) Mount Zion Health Fund, Inc. Myrtle V. Fistchen Charitable Trust Omidyar Foundation (www.omidyar.org) Oracle Foundation (www.oracle.com) Pacific Gas and Electric Company (www.pge.com) Peninsula Community Foundation (www.pcf.org) Penney Family Fund (www.commoncounsel.org) Philanthropic Ventures Foundation (www.venturesfoundation.org) Ploughshares Fund (www.ploughshares.org) PMI Mortgage Insurance Co. Pottruck Scott Family Foundation (www.pottruckscott.org) Providian Financial (www.providian.com) Richard & Rhoda Goldman Fund (www.goldmanfund.org) Roberts Enterprise Development Fund (www.redf.org) Rosenberg Foundation (www.rosenbergfdn.org) Rudolf Steiner Foundation (www.rsfoundation.org) S.H. Cowell Foundation (www.shcowell.org) SBC-Pacific Bell ( b ll / b )

(www.cehcf.org) 55. 57. 59. 61. 63. 65. 67. 69. 71. 73. 75. 77. 79. 81. 83. 85. 87. 89. 91. 93. 95. 97. 99. 101. 103. 105. 107. Clorox Company Foundation (www.clorox.com) Columbia Foundation (www.columbia.org) Community Foundation for Monterey County (www.cfmco.org) Community Foundation of Santa Cruz County (www.cfscc.org) Community Foundation of the Napa Valley (www.cfnv.org) Community Foundation Silicon Valley (www.siliconvalleygives.org) Community Technology Foundation of California (www.zerodivide.org) Compton Foundation (www.comptonfoundation.org) Crescent Porter Hale Foundation Cultural Initiatives Silicon Valley (www.arts4sv.org) David & Lucile Packard Foundation (www.packard.org) Dean & Margaret Lesher Foundation Dunspaugh-Dalton Foundation Earth Share of California (www.earthshareca.org) Ed Nathan (Lifetime Member">) Elizabeth & Stephen Bechtel, Jr. Foundation Evelyn & Walter Haas, Jr. Fund (www.haasjr.org) Fireman's Fund Fitzpatrick Foundation (www.fitzpatrickfoundation.com) Fleishhacker Foundation Foundation Center (www.fdncenter.org/sanfrancisco) Foundation for Deep Ecology (www.deepecology.org) Foundation of the State Bar of California Fountation for Global Awakening (www.ffga.org/fga) French American Charitable Trust Friedman Family Foundation Gap Foundation (www.gapinc.com) 56. 58. 60. 62. 64. 66. 68. 70. 72. 74. 76. 78. 80. 82. 84. 86. 88. 90. 92. 94. 96. 98. 100. 102. 104. 106. 108.

(www.pacbell.com/www.sbc.com) Seven Springs Foundation Shaklee Corporation (www.shaklee.com) Shinnyo-En Foundation (www.sef.org) Sierra Health Foundation (www.sierrahealth.org) Sobrato Family Foundation (www.sobrato.com/foundation) Sonora Area Foundation (www.sonoraarea.org) Stuart Foundation (www.stuartfoundation.org) Sun Microsystems Foundation (www.sun.com/aboutsun/comm_invest/) Surdna Foundation (www.surdna.org/) Susie Tompkins Buell Foundation Tang Foundation The Abelard Foundation (www.commoncounsel.org) The ArtCouncil (www.theartcouncil.org) The Bothin Foundation (www.pacificfoundationservices.com) The Braddock Foundation (www.braddockfoundation.org) The C.A.W. Foundation (www.pacificfoundationservices.com) The Charles Schwab Corporation Foundation The David B. Gold Foundation The Durfee Foundation (www.durfee.org) The East Bay Community Foundation (www.eastbaycf.org) The Flora Family Foundation (www.florafamily.org) The Ford Foundation (www.fordfound.org) The Fred Gellert Foundation The Glikbarg Foundation The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation (www.kff.org) The James Irvine Foundation (www.irvine.org) The Kimball Foundation (www.pacificfoundationservices.com)

109. 111. 113. 115. 117. 119. 121. 123. 125. 127. 129. 131. 133. 135. 137. 139. 141. 143. 145. 147. 149. 151. 153. 155. 157. 159. 161. 163.

George Frederick Jewett Foundation George H. Sandy Foundation George-Straley Foundation Giles W. & Elise G. Mead Foundation (www.gileswmeadfoundation.org) Gordon E. and Betty I. Moore Foundation (www.moore.org/) Haigh-Scatena Foundation Harden Foundation The AB Fund Hellman Family Foundation Horizons Foundation Hull Family Foundation Humboldt Area Foundation (www.hafoundation.org) IBM Corporation Jenifer Altman Foundation (www.jaf.org) Jewish Community Endowment Fund (www.sfjcef.org) JoMiJo Foundation (www.jomijo.org) Junior League of San Francisco (www.jlsf.org) Justice and Hope Fund Koret Foundation (www.koretfoundation.org) Kristi Yamaguchi's Always Dream Foundation Larry Kramer (Lifetime Member">) Leavens Foundation LEF Foundation (www.leffoundation.org) Levi Strauss Foundation (www.levistrauss.com) Lisa & Douglas Goldman Fund Louis R. Lurie Foundation Lowell Berry Foundation Marin Community Foundation (www.marincf.org)

110. 112. 114. 116. 118. 120. 122. 124. 126. 128. 130. 132. 134. 136. 138. 140. 142. 144. 146. 148. 150. 152. 154. 156. 158. 160. 162. 164.

The Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health (www.lpfch.org) The Mary A. Crocker Trust The Roberts Foundation (www.pacificfoundationservices.com) The San Francisco Foundation (www.sff.org) The Stanley Langendorf Foundation The Valley Foundation (www.valley.org) The Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation (www.fdncenter.org/grantmaker/gerbode) The Women's Foundation (www.twfusa.org) Three Guineas Fund (www.3gf.org) Tides Foundation (www.tides.org) Trio Foundation Truckee Tahoe Community Foundation True North Foundation United Way of the Bay Area (www.unitedway.com) Van Loben Sels/Rembe Rock Foundation (www.vlsrr.org) Vanguard Public Foundation Veritas Software Foundation (www.veritassoftwarefoundation.org) Vodafone-US Foundation (formerly AirTouch) (www.vodafone-us.com) W. Clement and Jessie V. Stone Foundation W.K. Kellogg Foundation (www.wkkf.org) Walter & Elise Haas Fund Walter S. Johnson Foundation (www.wsjf.org) Wayne & Gladys Valley Foundation Wells Fargo Foundation (www.wellsfargo.com) William and Flora Hewlett Foundation (www.hewlett.org) William Randolph Hearst Foundation (www.hearstfdn.org) Y & H Soda Foundation Zellerbach Family Fund