Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 17
STEREO PREAMPLIFIER INSTRUCTI NS ASSEMB OPERATI �AND FOR SERIAL NUMBER This number must be men­

STEREO

PREAMPLIFIER

INSTRUCTI

STEREO PREAMPLIFIER INSTRUCTI NS ASSEMB OPERATI �AND FOR SERIAL NUMBER This number must be men­ tioned

NS

ASSEMB

OPERATI

�AND
�AND

FOR

SERIAL

NUMBER

This number must be men­ tioned in all communications concerning this equipment.

((?- 0 ( ,.•'·"' . """""" ' ··· ' - rJ y1\/'aCCJ 11\1c-
((?-
0
(
,.•'·"'
.
""""""
'
···
'
-
rJ
y1\/'aCCJ 11\1c-
POST OFFICE BOX 88
COLES ROAD & CAMDEN AVENUE I BLACKWOOD. N. J. 08012. U.S.A.

SPECI FICATI ONS

Inputs:

3

stereo

low

level:

RIAA

phono

,

NAB

tape

head

(7%")

NAB tape head (7%")

"Special"

(optional

second

phono,

micro­

phone,

etc.) .

4

stereo

high

level :

FM-AM,

FM-Multiplex,

Spare,

Tape.

Outputs:

Tape output.

Audio output.

 

Controls:

Selector,

Volume,

Balance,

Blend.

Tone

Control

Distortion:

Range:

Individual Treble and

channel,

Scratch

Bass

each

Loudness,

for

Tape

Filter,

Monitor,

Power.

±

14

db at

20,000

cycles.

at

20

cycles.

_
_

20 db

Less than

2

volts

0.05%

(sufficient

intermodulation at

drive

output

to

any

amplifier).

Distortion

does

not

increase

at

lowe

r

settings

of volume

control.

Harm

onic

distortion below

the

measurement

capabilities

of

regular

commercia I

grade

test

Response:

equipment.

±

.5

db

10 cps

to

40 kc.

Response

 

not affected

by

position

of

volum

not affected by position of volum

control.

 

Transient performance:

Pa

and

Pa and ses squar with waves mjrumum without ringing defortnation from 20 shoot or nals. c

ses squar

with

waves

mjrumum

without

ringing

defortnation

from 20

shoot or

nals.

cps

to

20,000 cps.

on pulse

No

over­

bounc

type sig­

from

Instantaneous

recovery

overload.

   

Hum

and

noise:

74 db 1,000 Tap
74 db
1,000
Tap

microvolt

signal.

below

db at

cycles

Head;

20

high

level

2

60

eqwvalent

level

on

of

noise

10

RIAA;

on

miJii­

RIAA.

volt

60

db

and other

on

db on

inputs.

Radio

Gain:

Impedances:

 

Output

impedance

1,000 ohms;

ter­

 

minating

impedance

100,000

ohms

or

higher.

Low

level

input

im­

pedanc

pedanc 50,000 ohms; high

50,000

ohms;

high

level

input

impedance

250,000

ohms.

 

Tubes:

4

12AX7/ECC-83;

1

l2X4;

1

sele­

4 1 2AX7 / ECC- 8 3; 1 l2X4; 1 sele­ ruum stack. IIIII Hllll '

ruum stack.

IIIII Hllll ' ,::� \"' ' � lll'f- t-.: � i I�;I:, roo. � ;�
IIIII
Hllll
'
,::�
\"'
'
lll'f-
t-.:
i
I�;I:,
roo.
;�
2
I
0
20
100
\K
•••
I
�REDUE:NC.Y, CPS
l!:qualizulion.
fila.
I
OUT
T
I
-
20
•oo
IK
10
FR(QI,.IEN:CV.,CPS

Harmonic dt:stortion

p rcenlage.

IK 10 FR(QI,.IEN:CV.,CPS Harmonic dt:stortion p rcenlage. I'I �� . -1 fi:--: � 0>0 0 Ili
I'I �� . -1 fi:--: � 0>0 0 Ili ;, � - 1-1 0,!1 "
I'I
��
. -1
fi:--:
0>0
0
Ili
;,
-
1-1
0,!1
" 2\1' 3V4'1
OUTPUT
• VOLTS
1M
distortion.
.10
KC
square
from
DynaJ�it
wave
1 below)
Ls
m11.ch
like
on:ginal
r above).
�.·
P
'
'
I
b
L

IN STRUCTION S

FOR

A S SEMBLY

OF

DESCRIPTION

The Dynaco PAS-3X stereo preamplifier is a versatile two channel control center which permits either monophonic or st ereophonic reproduction from any program source (rec­ ords, tape, microphone, radio tuner) with any modern amplifier. This preamplifier design is most renowned for its low noise and low distortion, an d it provides striking simpl ic­

ity of operation while retaining full flexibility for the enthu­

siast's subtle adjustments.

The circuit of the Dynakit is unique, and is a subject of

patent applications. All stages are enclosed in feedback loops and are adjusted for an absolute minimum of distor­

tion and noise. Signals going through the preamplifier are

not audibly changed by p assage through this instrument, proving that its characteristics are ideal , since the goal of any high fidelity equipm ent is amplification and reproduc­ tion of the original signal without change.

Th preamplifier essentially has five parts. The power upply is one part and is commo n to both channels. This power supply contains a full-wave rectifier and a powe.r transformer. A separa te rectifying system is used to provide direct current to heat the filame nts of the tubes. This is one of the reasons why there is practically no hum in the Dyna­

kit.

h y there is practically no hum in t h e Dyna ­ kit. The remaining
h y there is practically no hum in t h e Dyna ­ kit. The remaining

The remaining four sections have several functions. There are equalizer-amplifier sta ges: hig h-g ain circuits designed

to bring up the

cartridges and at the same tim e to impose the proper play­ back characteristic on the frequency response. There is on e of these stages for left and another for the right stereophonic

level of such devices as magneti c phonograph

channels. The remaining two sections consist of the tw o amplifying-tone control stagP.s, one for left and on for right channel. High level signals uch as those from a radio tuner

High level signals uch as t ho s e from a radio tuner are fed t
High level signals uch as t ho s e from a radio tuner are fed t

are fed th roug h these stages, and the functions of volume

control, tone control, and similar control functions are

accomplished at these points in the circuH.

Although fue ·left and right chann els ar e essent i ally inde­ pendent, some control functio ns are common to both chan­ nels to facilitate use. For example, one volume control

controls the volume of

ance control is used to adjust the relative levels between t he

channels. A blend control, a unique Dynaco feature, permits controllable reduction of the stereophonic effeat in order to

eliminate any possibili t y of a "hole in the m i dd le" which character iz some types of stereoph onic source material

The selector switch also controls both channe ls

simultane­

ously as do the subsidiary switching functions of scratch filter, loudness, etc. However, the tone controls for each channel are independent, becaus it has been found that each channel must individualJy be adjusted for tonal balance because of differences between loudsp akers and room acoustics, which require such balancing in order to obtain optimum ster eophonic effect.

both ch annels simultaneously. A bal­

effect. both c h a nn e l s simultaneously. A bal­ Some of the hidden
effect. both c h a nn e l s simultaneously. A bal­ Some of the hidden
effect. both c h a nn e l s simultaneously. A bal­ Some of the hidden

Some of the hidden attributes of y our Dynakit lie in the unusual circuit arrangement in which there is no possibility of overloading of inputs regardless of tho output signal of the program source, nor is there any frequency discrimina­ tion a the volume is lowered. These common ailments of other designs have been completel y eliminated in the Dyna­ kit circuit. Som e other built in advantages which are not obvious are covered in the foll owing section which concerns

the application of the Dynakit.

which co n ce r n s the application of the Dynakit. THE DYNAKIT PA S-3X

THE

DYNAKIT PA S-3X PREAMPLIFIER

USING

YOUR

PREAMPLIFIER

Your D y nakit preamplifier has been designed to give you

long time performance, ease of operation, and complete flex­ ibility to handle all control requirements of both simple and elaborate Hi Fi systems. It serves as a central point of the entire Hi Fi s y stem to which everything else connects. On the rear of the Dynakit ar all of the input and output con­ nections. These come in two group s. The upper row is for the left or "A" channel The lower row is for the right or

"B" c hannel. If

you can use the upper row alone, although in some extremely

compl ex monophonic system it might be desirable to use the

lower row as a duplicate set of inputs, doubling tbe number

of possible signal sources.

for seven sources

practica l ly all requirements.

on either row, these s hould take care of

However, since there are inputs

y our Dynakit is used monophonically only,

are inputs y o ur Dynakit is used monophonically only, Two of the s o c

Two of the sockets for each charuml are for outputs. One

of the e, marked "audi o output," is connected to your power

a u d i o output," is connected to your power amplifier or amplifiers. Th other,

amplifier or amplifiers. Th

is connected to your power amplifier or amplifiers. Th other, m a r k e d

other, ma rked "tap

out," goes

Th other, m a r k e d "tap out," goes into the high level signal

into the high level signal input of a tape recorder if one is used in the system. The input marked "radio " on the tape recorder can be used for this function. When using this con­ nection, any signals going through the preamplifier can be remrded by turning on the tape recorder while the norma] playing and operation of the preamplifier are not affected.

There are a large number of inputs for each channel. The three low level inputs (which include necessary equaliza­ tion facilities for low level source materia)) are for magnetic phonograph cartridge, tape head ( in a tape deck which does

not have its own electronic amplification), and "special." This special input can be used for a variety of functions

including an extra phonograph, microphone, a different

equalization characteristic, etc.

There are four high level inputs for eac h channeL One of these is for radio, one for multiplex, on for tape recorder outpul (for tape recorders which have their own builL in pre­ ampl ifiers) , and a spare which can be used for TV sets or other high level input sources. If you do not have a mu l tiplex adapter or FM tuner with built in mul tip lex output, t he multiplex input can be used as an auxiliary high le ve l inp ut source.

an auxiliary h i g h l e v e l i n p u t

Also on the back of your preamplifier are four A outlets.

Two of these are switched on and off with the f ront panel '"on-off" switch, and two are on all of the tim e. Switched

outlets can be used to power your amplifier and t uner, and

these will go on and off when you switch the preamplifier on and off. The un-switched outlets should be used for d vice like the record player or t.ape recorder in which mechanical . witch-off at th app aratus is desirabl .

n i c a l . witch-off at th app aratus is desirabl . The l.ine
n i c a l . witch-off at th app aratus is desirabl . The l.ine
n i c a l . witch-off at th app aratus is desirabl . The l.ine
n i c a l . witch-off at th app aratus is desirabl . The l.ine
n i c a l . witch-off at th app aratus is desirabl . The l.ine

The l.ine cord comes out of the back panel, and this should not be plugged .in until you are familiar with the func tion of all of the controls. When it i s plugged in it should be in an

AC power source only. DC current.

This

preamplifier will not work on

The front panel contains all of the operating controls and switches. These will be discussed in turn.

Selector

Switch

The selector swi tch is used to pick the prog ram source

which you want to l isten. When switching rrom one input to

to

another this switch takes care of both channels simultane-

ously and also includes the necessary changes in equaliza­

tion for the different program material. Below this switch is

a smal l slide switch labeled 'l'APE·INPU'l'. This is part of the

selection function. When this switch is on "input" (this

is t he normal position ), all

selector switch is set comes through the entire preamplifier.

When

be heard through the preamplifier is a signal which is applied to the tape input socket-normally the output of a tape playback machine. However, while the switch is on "tape," the signal source to which the selector switch is

the only signal which can

program material to which the

Balance

Control

Below the stereo-monophonic switch is a control which adjusts the balance between the two channels. In center {>OSi­ tion equal signals go through both channels. Rotation to one side or the other reduces the signal in one channel. This is a fuU range control which will permit cutting out sound from one channel completely. The need for balancing exists be­

cause some program

sources are not

balanced

accurately,

and it is also possibl e that the two loudspeakers being used

have different efficrencies. Thus a certain amount of balanc­

ing is semi-permanent in nature while other balancing func­

tions vary from program source to program source. Thus it

rE>cords

is frequently necessary to rebalanc

it rE>cords i s frequently necessary to rebalanc w h e n changing o r when

when changing

or when switching the selectm· switch.

Tone

Controls

controls for each

channel. These are of the typ in wllich the center setting is l:lat respons without frequency discrimination. These 'on­

There

are

inclividual

bass

discrimination. These 'on­ There are inclividual bass and trebl this switch is on "tape," set will

and

trebl

These 'on­ There are inclividual bass and trebl this switch is on "tape," set will be

this

switch is on

"tape,"

set will be available at the tape output socket on the rear. The reason for this arrangement is that a tape machine

which has an extra head for monitor purposes can be recording the program material selected by the sele ctor switch while flipping the TAPE-INPUT switch back and fo rth

permits the user to compare the sound source material with

tape machine-enabling an A-B com­

parison of the

the sound from th

m ­ parison of t h e t h e s o u n d from

recording process.

tro is increas or decrease the signal level at frequency ex­ t•· mes d pending
tro is increas or decrease the signal level at frequency ex­
t•· mes d pending on whether th y are rotated clockwise or
counter-clockwise. Normal "fiat" use of these controls is in
th
c
nter position wi th variation
made to correct the tonal
This specially chosen control gives
balance to please the taste of the ljstener . It is recom m
nded
that
these should
be
left centered
and
adjuslments
mad
with refer nee to the flats tti ng ratb r than having the user
a slow i ncrease in volume over the
fall in the habit of pr erving a etting which offers a large
amount of t nal corr ction all th time. The reference point
hould alwa
s be the cent
r
·et.ling whid1 gives no frequ
ncy
m ost
satisfactory operation
discrimination. It i
practical als
to
use the Lone controls
akers.
Below the vol­
to correct for record compensation cbaracteristi
s of records
of old vi11tag
which do not follow the Rl.AA standard play­
at
lower
level
s
ttings
of
th
back
characteristics.
to ex­
low
lev
Is
of
sou nd,
when
music
is
Below the ton
controls are located th
scratch filter and
thinner.
Th
loudn
ss
compensa­
below
400 ·ycles
and
ffectiv
ly
power switch. Th sc ratch filter, when ' on," gives res ponse
essentia!Jy flat to 7,000 cycles with a rapid roll-ofl' th reafter.
th
front
of
th
concert
hall.
This is a unique configura tio11 which removes high frequfmcy
no
frequency discrimina­
distortion and noi
with practica.lly no eff
t n the music.
and
this
will
be
preferred
ince th effect is o high in the audible ran e, the action of
but
most
)j
teners
wm
find that
th
con h ·ol will
hardly be
no ti cea bl
u:nl
ss th r i a sign ifi­
will
add
njoyment
for
listening
at
cant amount of high frequency omponent present. How­
corr
ction
do
s
not
add
boom
or
ever, wher. there is a g rea t deal f hiss r.· hjgb frequ ncy
distortion, it can be r ed u ced significantly b y proper use of
the scratch
filter.
Selector)
program
GENERAL
WIRING
PRACTICE
count
r-clockwlse
posi ti on
the
two
Assembly of Lb
Dynakitpreamplifier is quit
simp!
com­
independent. As the control
pared to general kit assembly •·equi .r em ents. This is true be­
cause all critical parts of the Dynakit are fa tory assE>mbled
for you on the printed circuit assemblies. Oth r parts ar
lJUt
the
two stt-'reo
channels
are being
out in th open thr ugh a free and unclutte1·ed l ayout so
si tion for playing mono­
ther
is
easy
a ·cessibility
for
wiring
or
tmubl
shooting
purposes.
onstruction
of
your
Dynak.it
should
not
take
more than about eig h t hours becaus_of these simptificntions.
lab
led "A" and ''B 'are positions in
Upon
opening
your
kit, check the components with
the
parts l.ist.
Familiarize
yourself
with the components;
thev
can be identiiled by comparison with lh
pi ctorial
diagram
and
by specified
color coding.
Proper
C{)!or coding will b
mentioned
for
each
resistor as it is used.
Tools
required
for·
easy
assembly
of
your
Dynakit
are
soldering .iron small tip or soldering gun, long .nose pliers,
screwdriver, and wire utters. Although not essential, a low
cost wire stripper and cutter of the type which can be pur­
chased for less than $1.00 will greatly facilitate cutting and
cartridge
input
on
the
"B"

bass

toward

is off, there is

stripping the various leads in the kit.

Volume

Control

The output of bo th channels is con troll d sirnuJtaneously

by the volume control.

close tra king of the two stereo channels so that the pro­ gram material will remain in balance over most of the

a l a n c e o v e r m o s t o f

range of the volume control. 'l'h tap r rat of Ulis control

is chosen to provide

first half

of rotation and a more rapid volume increase

above

12 o'clock.

This enables

with both low and high efficiency sp

ume con trol is the loudness switch which permits you to

add

volum

loudness

compensation

sounds

control. me frequencies softly, it gives incr as the list-ener the swit h in the
control.
me
frequencies
softly,
it
gives
incr
as
the
list-ener
the swit
h
in the
volume
th

tr

"])layed

the swit h in the volume th tr "]) l a y ed tion moves When

tion

moves

When

tion

by

d

Because the ear is not as sensitiv

at

control circuit,

high fidelity purist ,

its

use

in

mode<ation

low

levels.

This

sonk

muddiness

to the reproduction.

Blend

Switch

(Stereo-Mono

This switch Fulfills the funct.ion of blending th

ma terial.

stereo channels are completely

At

extreme

is rotated clockwi e, th tereo effect is progressively elimi­ nated. When the control passes th center position to the

point mark d

added t oget her . This is the prop r p

mark d added t o ge t h e r . This is the prop r
mark d added t o ge t h e r . This is the prop r

"A + B,"

phonic records as it is desirable to combine the sound

channels for maximum fidelity when playin g monophonic

di cs. The two position

when p l a y i n g monophonic di cs. The two position w h

which monophonic sound sources are sent through boLh speaker channels. When on "A,'' the left input sou rce appears

through both; when on "B," the right inpu t source appears through both loudspeakers. For· example, if an AM-FM

tuner of the stereo type is plug ged into the radio sockets in

the rear, the "A" position of this ·witch wm give FM repro­ duction th rough both peakers, and the "B" position will give AM reproduction through both speakers. It is al o prac­ tical by U'3ing this switch t.o use any other pair of inputs as

separat

use any o t h e r pair of i n p u ts as sepa

monophonic sources. For example, it is possible to

u e the "s peci al " input as a microphone sour ce on the "A"

ec i a l " i n p u t as a microphone so u r

channel

channel.

and

a

monophoni ·

4f

Good soldering

technique is valuable in obtaining satis­

ALL SOL­

DERING MUST BE DONE WITH ROSIN CORE SOL­

DER. There is no warranty on any equipment in which acid

Make sure t hat the solder used is

core solder has been used.

factory results

from

any

electronic equipment.

plainly marked

"Rosin

Core."

If you have solder on hand

the or igin of which is doubtful it is wise to obtain new 50/50

or 60140 rosin core solder. Whenever soldering is required.

the assembly instruct i om specify it by " ( S) . " If this sym­

bol

is not shown a fter a connection is specified, it indicates

that

further

connections will

be made at that

point

before

soldering.

Soldering is accomplished

by

hea ting

the j oi nt with the

iron until solder is hot enough to flow when touched to the

joint.

It is not desirable to

feed

the solder to

the iron.

It

should be fed to the junction of iron and joint. A fter the sol­

der flows, the iron should be held in place for a few seconds

and removed when it is seen that the solder has contacted

both parts of the connection -the lug and the wi re to wh ich

it is connected. It should not show a ball of solder but a

smooth transition from solde r to component lead.

Before applying solder the joint should be clean and the

lead

should

be crimped

in

place so as

to have mechanical

security. It is not necessary to wrap leads around contact.s

many times. A single turn and pinching together with long

nose pliers

is sui table.

After solderin g.

there should

be no

play at thP joint if the lead is wiggled with a pair of p l iers .

It is practical to do all sol dering with a pencil type i ron of

low wattage rating. A small tip is extremely useful when

wo rk ing in a con fi ned space. If a sol dering gun is

should be used with discretion since the amount of heat

available is far more than requi red for soldering light wires.

used, it

Component leads sh ould be trimmed as they a re used; the

be

length

made from po i n t

nets.

should

be such

that

the

proper

connection

can

to point without strain on lugs or compo­

to allow wires to touch

Care should

be exercisPd not

one another unl ss they are act ually connected to the same

l ss they are a c t u a l l y connected to the same

point.

The instructions which follow have been arranged for sim­

plified procedure in which the work can be done without

interference between the various portions of the wiring. It is

recommended that the instructions be followed on a stt'p by

step basis, cheeking off ea ch �t:agP as it is eompiPtP.CI.

for reference> and :-til con­

nections checked against these before going on to the next

If the wiring is dotw methodically and each step

stage.

Tlw

pictoria l diagrams shou ld be used

checked

carefully,

your

preamplifier

should

work

without

difficulty

as soon as

it is cumpll."ted.

 

Mechanical

assembly

of