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What is a city code? Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide The travel industry has

What is a city code?

Flight Attendant Initial Training

Pre-Arrival Study Guide

The travel industry has developed three-letter codes for every public airport in the world. The three-letter codes:

  • Simplify ticketing and baggage handling

  • Simplify record keeping

  • Allow maps and other travel guides to focus only on cities with public airports

The code is assigned to a specific airport (some cities have many airports), and is used by airlines, travel agents and other related industries worldwide.

How are city codes developed?

Sometimes the code is derived from the city name. For example:

  • DEN - Denver, CO

  • BOS - Boston, MA

Airports shared by two cities often reflect both names. For example:

  • DFW - Dallas/Fort Worth International, TX

  • MSP - Minneapolis/St. Paul International, MN

Sometimes the code is derived from the airport name. For example:

  • BDL - Bradley Field, Hartford, CT

  • IAH - Houston, TX George Bush Intercontinental (Formerly Intercontinental Airport Houston)

Sometimes the code’s origin is obscure or seems to have been randomly assigned. For example:

  • MCO - Orlando International, FL (Formerly McCoy Air Force Base)

  • CVG - Cincinnati, OH (Formerly Covington Field)

Sometimes large cities often have more than one airport, so they have been given collective codes that include all major airports in the area. For example, the New York City metropolitan area has three major airports, each with its own city code.

  • Newark - EWR

  • Kennedy - JFK

  • LaGuardia - LGA

New York City’s collective code (NYC) refers to all three.

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Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide One way to memorize the city codes is to

Flight Attendant Initial Training

Pre-Arrival Study Guide

One way to memorize the city codes is to develop memory aid. You can be creative when developing memory aid. An

example for BDL (Hartford, CT): “Hartford” is an insurance company and if you were hurt “badly” you’d want insurance. An example for SLC (Salt Lake City, UT): Utah competes with neighboring Colorado for skiers, and Salt Lake City’s businessman’s favorite site might be “Skiers Leaving Colorado”. Write or draw whatever works best for you.

Some flight attendants have successfully learned city codes by creating and using flash cards. Write the city code on the

front of a 3”x 5” note card. On the back of the card, write the corresponding city name and any other information that will

help you learn the three-letter code. Study the cards until you feel comfortable with the city codes and city names. Test yourself (or ask a friend to test you) by showing only the city codes, the city names or a mix of the two. Practice until you can quickly and confidently tell what is on the other side of each card.

You will need to complete the Pre-Arrival Exam with a score of 80% or better. Once you have achieved a score of 80% and printed out the certificate, you will not be tested any further on City Codes or Terminology. The city codes and terminology will be used throughout training and it is important to understand them.

Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide One way to memorize the city codes is to

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24 Hour Clock Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide United operates flights 24 hours a

24 Hour Clock

Flight Attendant Initial Training

Pre-Arrival Study Guide

United operates flights 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. To simplify flight and work schedules and to ensure we are working together, the 24-hour clock is used.

The 24-hour clock is simpler than the 12-hour clock because there is no AM or PM, only one continuous count. On a normal clock, the day starts at 12:00 midnight, and then goes around one more time until 11:59 PM. On the 24-hour clock, the day starts at one minute past midnight (0001) and ends at midnight (2400). Notice the colon separating the hours from the minutes is not used in the twenty-four hour clock.

Hours are counted as “one, two, three,” and continue past twelve to “thirteen, fourteen,” and so on. The military uses the 24-hour clock, so you may already be familiar with the way they “tell time.” Time is written with four digits (0100 is 1:00 am; 1400 is 2:00 pm) so you may hear someone pronounce the number by saying “oh-one-hundred hours” or “fourteen- hundred-hours.”

On the 24-hour clock, midnight is indicated as 0000. At 1:00am the 24-hour clock begins again, for example:

0001

  • indicates one minute past midnight

  • indicates five minutes past one in the morning

0105

  • indicates fifty-nine minutes past nine in the morning

0959

Beginning at ten o’clock in the morning, zeros are no longer needed to build the four digit units, for example:

1000

  • indicates ten o’clock in the morning.

  • indicates twelve thirty in the afternoon.

1230

To convert times before 1259 in the afternoon from the 24-hour clock back to the 12-hour clock, replace the colon and add the appropriate AM or PM designator.

24-Hour

1300

2:00

  • 0200 2:00

1400

3:00

  • 0300 3:00

1500

4:00

1200

  • 0100 1:00

  • 1100 11:00

  • 0800 8:00

2000

9:00

  • 0900 9:00

2100

10:00

  • 1000 10:00

2200

11:00

2300

AM

24-Hour

PM

12:00

  • 0000 12:00

  • 0400 4:00

1:00

5:00

1600

5:00

0500

1700

6:00

0600

6:00

1800

7:00

0700

7:00

1900

8:00

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Airline Terminology Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide To help you better understand the airline

Airline Terminology

Flight Attendant Initial Training

Pre-Arrival Study Guide

To help you better understand the airline industry, you will need to become familiar with some of the words, expressions and acronyms United employees use on the job. The list below includes some of the more commonly used terms. These terms will be used throughout training and during your airline career.

Words Related to Places & Things

Base the city where a flight attendants trip will begin and end. Also referred to as a domicile. Bidding the process in which flight attendants indicate their schedule preferences to determine schedules for a given month. The bidding process is done through the computer and schedules are awarded in seniority order. Block Out the time when the aircraft brakes are released at the gate. Block In the time when the aircraft comes to a stop at the gate and the brakes are set. Board Mail supplies, correspondence, equipment, etcshipped within the company from one station or department to another. Boarding the process of customers entering the aircraft, stowing their baggage and sitting in their seats. Briefing a short meeting of all flight crew members, also known as the crew briefing.

Charter Flights flights that are operating with a sports team or groups that have exclusive use of the aircraft and are isolated from the general public.

Checklist any written list of items designed to assist a flight attendant in performing their job responsibilities in a specific order.

Crew Resource Management / Threat & Error Management (CRM/TEM) interaction of flight crewmembers, with the use of teamwork and other skills, to ensure standard procedures and communication signals are used at all times.

Concourse large hallways in the airport that contain shops, information counters and the airline gates.

Continuing Qualification (CQ) annual training all flight attendants must attend. In CQ, flight attendants review and are evaluated on all safety and security responsibilities.

Deplane the process of customers exiting the aircraft at the end of their flight. Decompression either a slow or rapid release of air pressure from the cabin. Destination the city a customer is traveling to. Don to put on one’s body (i.e. “Don your life vest”).

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Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide Evacuation (Evac) – term used to describe the quickest

Flight Attendant Initial Training

Pre-Arrival Study Guide

Evacuation (Evac) term used to describe the quickest and most orderly method to exit customers from an aircraft in an emergency situation. Extra Section an additional flight, operating the same route as a regularly scheduled flight, to accommodate customers. First Aid the immediate and temporary administration of medical care. Ferry Flight to transfer an aircraft from one point to another, without customers. Flight Attendant Operations Manual (FAOM) a manual for flight attendants containing regulations, standards and policies & procedures necessary to conduct flight attendant duties and responsibilities on the aircraft. Gate area where customers check-in and wait before boarding the aircraft. Hangar a building where aircraft are serviced. Holding a flight that is “holding” is waiting to land or take-off. Hub a large airport where an airline connects customers. United operates hubs in EWR, IAH, CLE, ORD, IAD, DEN, LAX, SFO, GUM & NRT. Inbound customers or aircraft flying into a station. Jetbridge - a walkway connecting the aircraft to the gate area, also known as the jetway or loading bridge. Leg a segment of flight. An example would be a flight from Houston to Chicago would be one leg of flight. Non-revenue Customers (Non-Rev) airline employees and their family members who are traveling on stand-by status, also referred to as pass riders. Pairing a trip assignment for crewmembers with one or more flights. Pairings may be one to six days long.

Per Diem is a daily allowance for expenses. A specific amount of money that an organization gives an individual per day to cover living and traveling expenses.

Revenue tickets that have been paid for.

Revision updated or revised information which must be read and inserted in the Flight Attendant Operating Manual (FAOM). Revisions are issued several times a year and flight attendants receive their revisions at their assigned crew bases.

Tarmac generic paved areas at airports, especially the airport ramp area. Terminal A building at the airport containing check-in counters, security check points, concourses and airline gates.

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Words Related to the Aircraft Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide A/C – abbreviation for

Words Related to the Aircraft

Flight Attendant Initial Training

Pre-Arrival Study Guide

A/C abbreviation for aircraft. Aft the rear most section of the aircraft. Aircraft Left is the left side of the plane relative to the flight deck. Aircraft Right is the right side of the plane relative to the flight deck.

Airspeed the speed of an aircraft in relation to the air through which it is passing. Not the same as ground speed, which is actual speed of the aircraft over the ground.

Altitude distance above sea level, quoted in thousands of feet when an aircraft is in flight.

Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) a small engine used to operate a generator that supplies direct current power to an aircraft when the engines are shut down. The generator is typically used to power the air and lights while the aircraft is parked at the gate.

Attitude the position of the aircraft, as determined by the inclination of its axis in some reference, usually the earth or horizon.

Bank tilting the aircraft at an angle while turning left or right. Bulkhead a term used to define any dividing wall in the aircraft. Cabin the interior of the aircraft where the customers are seated. Cabin Key a key carried by all flight attendants while working, that opens compartments on the aircraft. Cabin Divider separates the premium cabins from United Economy. Cabin Exits refers to the exits located in the customer cabin, excluding the flight deck. Closet a compartment used to stow jackets, coats or limited quantity of carry-on items. Each closet is weight restricted. Configuration – the arrangement of an aircraft’s seats and other cabin features. Deadhead transportation for non-working crewmembers from one point to another, to cover a flight or return to base.

Demo also known as the Safety Demonstration. A demonstration of the safety features of an aircraft is presented to the customers through a video or by the flight attendants prior to every flight.

Doghouse a small compartment in the aircraft cabin used to stow equipment. Emergency Exit doors or windows used to exit an aircraft quickly in an emergency.

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Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide Flight Attendant (F/A) – any person trained in the

Flight Attendant Initial Training

Pre-Arrival Study Guide

Flight Attendant (F/A) any person trained in the policies and procedures governing the emergency evacuation of an aircraft.

Flight Deck the pilots sit in this area. The flight deck contains all controls and navigational equipment used to fly the aircraft.

F/A Jumpseat is a retractable seat with seat belts, located near exits, for flight attendants to sit on during takeoff and landing.

Floor Level Exits most door exits, level with the floor, allowing easy egress from the aircraft. Forward front of the aircraft toward the flight deck. Flush completely level or even with another surface. Fuselage the body of the aircraft to which the wings and tail are attached. Galley the kitchen area onboard the aircraft where meals and beverages are prepared.

Ground Power Unit a portable unit attached to the aircraft, while on the ground, which provides electrical power to the aircraft when the engines are not operating.

Ground Speed the speed of the aircraft in relation to the ground. A combination of the airspeed plus or minus the head winds and tail wind components determines your ground speed.

Gross Weight the total weight of the aircraft when fully loaded. It includes the weight of the aircraft plus all the contents, such as fuel, customers and supplies.

Hardstand a remote parking area near the airport terminal where an aircraft parks. A hardstand requires customers and crew to board or deplane the aircraft via stairs. Inboard the area in the cabin nearest the center of the aircraft. Landing Gear are retractable wheels comprised of the nose gear (under the flight deck) and main gear (under the wings). Lavatory restrooms located on the aircraft. Leading Edge the forward edge of the wing. Locking Compartment is an overhead bin or other compartments that is kept locked. These areas can be accessed by using the cabin key. Locking compartments may be used for stowing crew luggage or emergency equipment. Main Cabin the economy or coach section of the customer cabin; also referred to as United Economy. Narrowbody Aircraft any aircraft with a single aisle running the length of the cabin. Nose the nose of the aircraft is the cone shaped front of the plane.

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Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide Onboard Wheelchair – a collapsible wheelchair provided on aircraft

Flight Attendant Initial Training

Pre-Arrival Study Guide

Onboard Wheelchair a collapsible wheelchair provided on aircraft and used to transport non-ambulatory customers to and from the lavatory. Outboard the area in the cabin closest to the exterior of the aircraft. Overhead Bins storage compartments located above the customers seats. Placard sticker or posting in the aircraft cabin with information (i.e. exit signs, door operation instructions, etc.). Preflight Check a check performed by flight attendants to ensure emergency equipment and specific aircraft systems are in proper working order. Public Address System (PA) allows information to be broadcasted to the customers in the cabin. Ramp area where aircraft park outside of the terminal. Runway a long strip of pavement used by aircraft for takeoffs and landings. RON an aircraft remaining overnight at a station (Remain Over Night). Safety Information Card cards that are provided in the literature pockets of each seat back and contain safety information regarding that specific aircraft. Secure to lock, latch or stow. Ship aircraft are sometimes referred to as ships. Stow to secure an item on an aircraft. Tail the tail of the aircraft is attached to the back of the aircraft. The tail provides stability for the aircraft in flight.

Tail Number each aircraft in the United fleet is issued a number. This number is painted near the rear of the aircraft and is referred to as the tail number or ship number. You can also find the tail number located on a placard on the flight deck door and in the galley areas.

Total Exits refers to the total number of exits on the aircraft including both the cabin and flight deck. Trailing Edge the back edge of the wing.

Widebody Aircraft an aircraft with two aisles running the length of the cabin. There are customer seats on the left, an aisle, a center section of customer seats, an aisle and customer seats on the right.

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Words Related to Service Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide Appetizer – first course of

Words Related to Service

Flight Attendant Initial Training

Pre-Arrival Study Guide

Appetizer first course of the meal offered in United Business First or United Global First Beverage/Bar Cart a cart specifically designed for the aircraft, used to serve beverages. Beverage Flight a flight which is scheduled to serve beverages only. Brew Cup a metal basket in the coffee maker used to hold a coffee bag during the brew cycle. Brandy Snifter a stemmed goblet that tapers to a small opening for serving brandy. Bread Basket a metal or wicker basket used to serve warmed breads in premium cabins. Casserole Dish ceramic oven safe dish in which meals are cooked and served. Chefs Tip Sheets used to assist flight attendants with presentation and preparation of meal selections in the premium cabins.

Choice Menu - food selections available for purchase in United Economy on most flights longer than two hours within North America, Caribbean and select Latin America destinations.

Coffee Bag Soft paper filter pre-packed with coffee grounds. The coffee bag is placed in the brew basket when brewing coffee.

Cold Box container provisioned with lemons, limes, dairy and juice. Complimentary (Comp) Alcoholic beverage or other service items provided at no cost to the customer. Cordial an after dinner drink; also referred to as a liqueur. Cordial Glass small, narrow, stemmed glass used for serving cordials. Corkscrew devise used for removing corks from wine bottles. Crew Meals meals boarded specifically for pilots and flight attendants. Dish-up method of transferring entrée from oven to plate to tray in premium cabins. Downline Catering food items boarded on one flight but used on the next flight. Entrée the main meal selection. Glass Rack plastic container used to hold premium cabin glassware. Headset listening device used by customers to hear music or videos on the aircrafts entertainment system. Highball Glass glassware used in premium cabins to serve soft drinks, juices, milk, mixed drinks and beer.

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Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide Hot Cups – insulated styrofoam cups used for serving

Flight Attendant Initial Training

Pre-Arrival Study Guide

Hot Cups insulated styrofoam cups used for serving hot beverages in United Economy. Hot Towels moist, terrycloth towels provided in premium cabins at the beginning of every meal service.

Inflight Final Report (IFR) print out given to the flight attendant with premium customer names and other important information.

Inflight Hand Held Device (HHD) electronic device used by the flight attendants to inventory liquor and food. The HHD is also used to process credit card transaction for onboard purchases.

Inflight Customer Kit a blue canvass bag containing items related to customer needs; band aids, coat tags, reports. Etc ... Linen cloth used in premium cabins to line a customer’s tray table. Liquor Seal a plastic device used to lock carts containing liquor and Choice Menu items. Meal Cart an aircraft cart in which meals are provisioned and served or sold from, in United Economy. Menu detailed list of food and beverages available to customers. Minis small bottles of liquor served on the aircraft. Mixers soda and juice used to mix cocktails. Oven Mitt insulated glove used to remove hot items from the oven. Phases of Flight specific stages of flight with designated safety and service duties. Pre-departure Beverage beverages served in premium cabins before the flight departs the gate. Pre-meal Beverage beverage service offered before the main meal service. Ramekins small china bowls used in premium cabins to serve mixed nuts, butter or sauces.

Serving Apron an apron is an outer protective garment that covers primarily the front of the body. An apron is usually held in place with two ribbon like strips of cloth that are tied at the back.

Service Flow direction in which service is conducted. At United, the service flow is always front to back. Serving Tongs Device used to lift and serve food items, such as bread. Sequence of Service the order in which elements of the service are presented. Special Service Request (SSR) form given to flight attendant identifying specific customer requests for assistance, including wheelchairs and electric carts. Three Tier Cart a cart with three shelves that is used in premium cabins to present and deliver the service.

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Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide Transcontinental (Trancon) – a flight that is operating from

Flight Attendant Initial Training

Pre-Arrival Study Guide

Transcontinental (Trancon) a flight that is operating from the east/west coast of the U.S. to the west/east coast of the U.S.

Walk-throughs a flight attendant requirement to assess the needs and to be available while walking in the cabin.

Words Related to People

Agents coworkers at the airport, who serve customers, handle baggage, direct aircraft and equipment on the ground. Agents working in the airport terminal are also called Airport Sales Agents (ASAs). Airport Alert a reserve flight attendant scheduled stand by at the airport. Airport Alerts may be assigned any trip during the 4-6 hours they are scheduled to stand by at the airport. Customers the passengers who travel are always referred to as customers. Flight attendants always need to be aware of our customers and their needs. Captain (CA) the captain sits in the left seat of the flight deck and is identified with four stripes on their uniform. Crew any person whose primary job function is working on board an aircraft in flight. Crew Scheduling the department responsible for assigning crewmembers to a flight. Complaint Resolution Officer (CRO) an airport agent who is specially trained in the rules and regulations involving persons with a disability. Flight Service Coordinator (FSC) a flight attendant working a position designated as the leader of the flight attendant crew on subsidiary Continental flights; also referred to as the lead flight attendant. First Officer (FO) pilot who sits in the right seat of the flight deck and has three stripes on their uniform. International Service Manager (ISM) - a flight attendant working a position designated as the leader of the flight attendant crew on TransAtlantic and Trans-Pacific flights on subsidiary Continental flights; also referred to as the lead flight attendant (FSC). International Relief Officer (IRO) an extra pilot scheduled on a flight used to relieve the working pilots for their crew rest. Minimum Crew is the least number of flight attendants required to be on the aircraft for customer boarding, in-flight and customer deplaning. Pilot-In-Command (PIC) the pilot responsible for the operation and safety of an aircraft during flight time. Purser a flight attendant working as the leader of the flight attendant crew on subsidiary United flights; also referred to as the lead flight attendant. Reserve Flight Attendant a flight attendant whose monthly schedule consists of predetermined periods of availability for flight duty. Reserve flight attendants generally have 10 scheduled days off a month.

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Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide Spinner – a customer left standing up in the

Flight Attendant Initial Training

Pre-Arrival Study Guide

Spinner a customer left standing up in the aisle after boarding is complete, without a seat. Thru Customer a customer who remains on the aircraft at an intermediate stop.

Words Related to Governmental Agencies

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) the governmental agency, which regulates the safety of airline operations through specific Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs).

Department of Transportation (DOT) the governmental agency that governs the economic concerns of the airline industry.

Transportation Security Administration (TSA) TSA employs a risk-based strategy to secure U.S. transportation systems, working closely with stakeholders in aviation, rail, transit, highway, and pipeline sectors, as well as the partners in the law enforcement and intelligence community.

International Air Transport Association (IATA) IATA is an international trade body representing some 230 airlines comprising 93% of scheduled international air traffic. The organization also represents, leads and serves the airline industry in general.

Words Related to United

United Continental Holding, Inc. the parent company of United. Subsidiary Continental (S-CO) refers to former Continental Airlines. Subsidiary United (S-UA) refers to former United Airlines. Inflight Services the name of the flight attendant department at United. Chelsea Food Services – United’s in-house catering company. Chelsea kitchen locations are EWR, IAH, CLE, DEN and HNL.

Go Forward Plan – United’s business plan is called the Go Forward Plan. The Go Forward Plan is designed to keep key goals on the top of all co-workers minds. Divided into four parts, known as cornerstones, the plan covers every aspect of the United operation. The four cornerstones are:

  • Fly to Win be profitable every year.

  • Fund the Future maintain appropriate liquidity and use our assets to build our future.

  • Make Reliability a Reality deliver clean, safe and reliable air transportation and a competitive product.

  • Working Together make United a great place to work.

Choice Menu – the name of United’s food for sale program in United Economy on most flights in the Americas.

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Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide Global Services – Global Services is a worldwide service

Flight Attendant Initial Training

Pre-Arrival Study Guide

Global Services Global Services is a worldwide service and recognition program for our most valuable customers. This invitation-only program is comprised of Fortune 500 company executives, as well as top executives and CEO’s of major U.S. corporations, who are the decision makers for the travel services utilized by their company.

Mileage Plus – United’s frequent flyer program; levels of Mileage Plus are Silver, Gold, Platinum and 1K.

United Global First United Global First is the name of the forward cabin product on three-class aircraft, offering customers a higher level of privacy and the luxury of a flatbed suite, personalized attention and priority airport services.

United Business First United Business First is the name of the forward cabin on two-class aircraft and the middle cabin on three-class aircraft. This business-class product across the whole fleet elevates services and comfort on long-haul international flights.

In other markets, the name of the premium cabin will depend on where the aircraft flies. Most aircraft on other routes have two-cabins. In these markets, the aircraft itself will be the same, but you could have a different name depending on the route. These two names will be United First or United Business.

United First – United’s premium cabin for customers traveling within the U.S., including Hawaii and Alaska. This cabin is the forward most cabin of the aircraft.

United Business – United’s premium cabin for customers traveling to/from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America and northern South America, as well as intra-Asia routes where United Global First and United Business First are not available. This cabin is the forward most cabin of the aircraft.

United Economy Plus an exclusive area at the front of the United Economy cabin that offers additional legroom. Hemispheres Magazine the monthly in-flight magazine, Hemispheres, found on United and United Express flights in seatback pockets.

Inflight Services Weekly a departmental update published for all flight attendants and is required to be read by all flight attendants. The Inflight Services Weekly is published each Wednesday.

SkyMall Magazine a shopping magazine available on all flights; customers may remove it from the aircraft. Star Alliance a global airline network of more than two dozen world-class airlines.

Willis Tower – United’s headquarter building located in Chicago, Illinois, formerly known as the Sears Tower. United occupies 13 floors of the Willis Tower and is its largest tenant.

Crew Communication System (CCS) CCS is designed for a variety of crew scheduling functions and company services. CCS is accessible from the base and home computers through the internet.

Flying Together the intranet site for all United coworkers. Flying Together provides news and information about the company and your coworkers, access to all departments and links to the tools that help you do your job.

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Flight Attendant Initial Training Pre-Arrival Study Guide United Express – regional airlines contracted by United to

Flight Attendant Initial Training

Pre-Arrival Study Guide

United Express regional airlines contracted by United to fly customers. These carriers often connect customers from smaller cities to the larger hubs. Most regional jets offer 35 70 seats onboard and some may even include a premium cabin and United Economy Plus.

United Voices United Voices is the central point for consolidating and coordinating the various departmental efforts to improve our operation. We encourage you to use this resource to communicate your operational concerns.

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