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HEALTH AND SAFETY ATTENTION TO SMALL DETAILS CAN

PREVENT BIG PROBLEMS


D. POMMEN-PETERSON H. NELSON
this article begins on the next page F F
Health and Safety: Attention to Small Details Can Prevent Big Problems Managing health and safety issues is a critical part of doing business in the I 9C)()s. The implications for a business not implementing a solid health and safety program point toward increased injuries, high costs anti potential long-term liabilities for the company A health and safety program is an important component of the management system many types of businesses, but the range and scale issues are diverse: the issues at a chemical plant will he different from
those at an oil sands facility, and different again or a mine site. Health and safety concerns may change again when the project or facility is in another region or country. As a group of consulting companies that operates internationally Golder Associates' employees must be trained on several levels including the health and safety policies of the client issues of the client's specific project facility, and they must be thoroughly proficient in Golder Associates' own health and safety program. These three levels provide staff members with the knowledge and skills necessary to prevent
losses and injuries, and can provide significant benefits for the company. Does Your Program Measure Up? your company has already implemented a health and safety program or is interested in reassessing it, you may want to ask the following questions: Does senior management fully support the program? Does your company have a Health and Safety Committee? Do you provide comprehensive and continual training for employees? do you evaluate your program/plan and your training to ensure continual improvement?
Does your. miming include the tot lowing programs, and/or should it include others? Workplace hazardous materials information system WHMIS Transportation of dangerous goods Hazardous waste operations and emergency response to comply with occupational safety and health administration (OSHA). Accident investigation. Hydrogen sulphide training. Confined space entry. First aid and CPR. Bear awareness. Boat safety.
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Health and Safety: Attention to
Small Details Can Prevent Big Problems
Managing health and safety issues is a critical part of doing
business in the 1990s. The implications for a business not imple-
menting a solid health and safety program point toward increased
injuries, high costs and potential long-term liabilities for the com-
pany. A health and safety program is an important component of
the management system for many types of businesses, but the
range and scale of issues are diverse: the issues at a chemical plant
will be different from those at an oil sands facility, and different
again for a mine site. Health and safety concerns may change
again when the project or facility is in another region or country.
As a group of consulting companies that operates international-
ly, Golder Associates' employees must be trained on several lev-
els, including the health and safety policies of the client, issues of
the client's specific project/facility, and they must be thoroughly
proficient in Golder Associates' own health and safety program.
These three levels provide staff members with the knowledge and
skills necessary to prevent losses and injuries, and can provide
significant benefits for the company.
Does Your Program Measure Up?
If your company has already implemented a health and safety
program, or is interested in reassessing it, you may want to ask the
following questions:
Does senior management fully support the program?
Does your company have a Health and Safety Committee?
Do you provide comprehensive and continual training for
employees?
Do you evaluate your program/plan and your training to
ensure continual improvement?
Does your training include the following programs, and/or
should it include others?
Workplace hazardous materials information system
(WHMIS).
Transportation of dangerous goods (TDG).
Hazardous waste operations and emergency response to
comply with occupational safety and health administration
(OSHA).
Accident investigation.
Hydrogen suphide training.
Confined space entry.
First aid and CPR.
Bear awareness.
Boat safety.
Accessing regulatory environmental compliance.
November 1997, Volume 36, No. 10 5
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I /
Call for CIMAward Nominations
The Centennial year award celebrations will honour the exceptional men and women who,
through their leadership and the excellence of their work, have contributed significantly to the
minerals industry.
Robert Elver Mineral Economics Award
Distinguished Lecturers
CIM Fellowship
Julian Boldy Memorial Award
CANMETTechnology Transfer
Awards
Metal Mining Division Award
Mel Bartley Award
Medal for Bravery
ClMDistinguished Service Medal
Selwyn C. Blaylock Medal
lncoMedal
AO. Dufresne Award
J.C. Sproule Memorial Plaque
Members Award
Past Presidents' Memorial Award
Coal Award
Donald J. McParlancI Memorial Award
Order of Sancta Barbara
. _ Whodo you know who should receive special recognition? Here is the unique opportunity for
you to make sure their outstanding work is highlighted. By nominating someone worthy of a
CIMaward/ you will help, in the words of the Centennial theme, to recognize our pride in
the past, while defining our vision for the future.
Deadline for submission: December 15,1997
To receive nomination forms and further details please contact:
Peter Nguyen
(514) 939-2710, ext. 316 Fax: 1514) 939-2714

. Are Certificates of Training issued to staff members?


Is hazard identification a component of your program?
Do you provide personal protective equipment (PPE) that
stands up to chemical and toxicological hazards, including
personal respirators designed for the individual?
A Challenging Project
A project in an oilfield in Kazakhstan recently posed a health
and safety challenge for 'a Golder Associates project team.
Potential exposure to asbestos, hydrocarbons and radioactive
materials meant a detailed health and safety plan specific to the
site had to be developed well in advance of project startup, and all
personal protective equipment and monitoring equipment was
shipped to the location before the team left Canada. Unanticipated
hazards were addressed once the project team arrived. Such proac-
tive planning can decrease project costs, and potential injuries.
S m ~ 1 I Details == Big Savings
An Employee Assistance Program is one health and safety pro-
gram component that assists with additional health concerns not
covered by provincial health plans or extended health benefits. It
may include assistance with stress management, familylrelation-
ship conflicts, grief and loss, emotional and psychological dis-
tress, alcohol and drug abuse, and career/financial counselling.
Implementing a multifaceted health and safety program that
includes such assistance can help a company move from a reactive
focus to a proactive, preventive philosophy that links the work
environment with health, safety, efficiency and quality of life.
A comprehensive health and safety program is set up to address
a full range of potentially dangerous situations, from explosions,
fires or catastrophic release of a contained substance, to lack of
potable water for project members, injuries from equipment use or
a change in weather patterns that may affect safety. These situa-
tions can be extensive, and proper and continual training, and reg-
ular evaluation of each element of the program and its plans are
important.
A truly successful health and safety program calls for responsi-
bility and accountability at all levels of a company, from the
employee to senior management. To value and protect clients' and
employees' health and safety, and to develop planning that pays
attention to small details as well as the big picture, will mean
guaranteed benefits for your company and employees. ih
Key Components for a Successful ~
Health and Safety Program
Designate health and safety as a high priority for your
company.
Encourage commitment to the program with tasks and
responsibilities assigned to employees.
Implement strategic project-specific health and safety
plans that continually address ongoing hazards through the
project process.
Provide appropriate resources, including training and
equipment, on a continual basis.
Evaluate the success of the plan/program regularly and
work toward continual improvement and flexibility.
Communicate the plan/program to all internal and external
stakeholders, including project management, project mem-I
bers and employees, the client and client's employees if
appropriate.
Diana Pommen-Peterson, Coordinator - Human Resources,
Health and Safety
Holly Nelson - Marketing Coordinator, Golder Associates Ltd.
6 The Journal of Canadian Petroleum Technology