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Problems in Pan Americanism by Samuel Guy Inman Review by: J. Fred Rippy The Journal of International Relations, Vol.

12, No. 4 (Apr., 1922), pp. 590-592 Published by: Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/29738529 . Accessed: 04/10/2013 01:31
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BOOK REVIEWS

and trust, the preponderance of the international cooperation evidence is against the former. What makes for it and sustains it in the original nature of man, the basic is, he thinks, something trend toward in? overrules coercion, domination, force, which in politics, and directs policy economics and even sex. telligence can be controlled, modified, and redirected. This trend, he believes, The repressive conduct of governments and the others in war time is the best proof that their defence of war on the ground that "you is purely ad hoc, since that policy change human nature" to change it. Change is possible, but it can is itself an attempt come about only through a change of heart. is sound and inevitable. His Mr. AngelPs argument political somewhat naive, and his psychological is, however, psychology too much to internationalism like counsel of despair. prerequisite A change of situation or of habit or both is much easier to effect than a change of heart, and just as likely to bring about the de? can't sired results. H. M. New Problems York, in Pan Kallen, School for Social Research. New

Americanism. By Samuel Guy Inman. Doran 1921. vii, 415 p. H. Company, George

The author of this book is not, strictly speaking, a statesman, or a historian; in the a political but he is a missionary scientist, sense has been connected that term. He with of broad, modern in for Latin effort America Protestant missionary many years and an attempt of a committee which represents he is now secretary in the to cooperate on the part of the Protestant denominations in He countries has travelled much the field. American Hispanic south of the Rio Grande, he has met and conversed with many of into their literature, wrestled with their leaders, he has dipped an appreciation of their culture, and acquired their problems, this of life. He has written and their manner their character, of creating a better under? intention the avowed volume with a warmer the two between and promoting friendship standing He has stated the purpose and scope of his book as Americas. follows: In the first place, an effort is made to have the reader share in of and belief in the future of the Latin the author's admiration in drawing up the Since it is unfair, however, American people. balance sheet of our friends to have only the credit side presented, are also of our southern the outstanding neighbors problems

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BOOK REVIEWS

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these have stated them. With given, largely as they themselves to show that in is reviewed friendly contacts established, history and in the South, there were the early days, both in the North warm reciprocal desires for Continental in incarnated Solidarity, of the South and Henry Clay of the North. Simon Bolivar But the Mexican War started a current of suspicion, which the Spanish control over American War and the extension of North American into hatred. The Monroe countries the Caribbean developed in Latin America; is shown to have been well received Doctrine reasons for later dislike of it are given, as well as the place the would like to see the doctrine occupy today, Southern Americans situation developed World in view of the new international by the of the various Pan American Conferences, The Significance War. in 1826 to Washington in 1916, is discussed and the from Panama in the whole about by the World War radical changes brought are studied. Next are dis? Friendship problem of Inter-American the understanding without cussed two outstanding questions, of the present of which no one can have a deep appreciation status of American Relations. These are the problems connected in the affairs of the of the United States with the intervention small countries of the Caribbean and the resultant of growth formed by the leading the influential school of Pan Latinists, writers of the South who are strongly opposed to the Pan Ameri? an effort is made to point out a few practical canists. Finally steps that North Americans might take to overcome the handicaps of past mistakes and misunderstandings and build up a true in which both those of the North and those American friendship an of the South shall be united in the motto, suggested by Argen? "America for Humanity." tine president, for North Ameri? Since the book is written by a North American cans, the recognized right of one to criticise those of his own house? hold has been used freely. to North If I have presented here largely the blame attached Americans for the inharmony of the past, it is not because it would not be easy to show the blame lying at the door of our neighbors. I therefore ad nauseam. But others have done that, sometimes the good qualities of our neighbors and prefer to help us magnify as the best policy for scrutinize carefully our own bad qualities as it is for building up personal friend? building up international, ships. (Foreword, pp. v-vi.) Mr. Inman has written for those Americans who reside north of the Rio Grande His and they will do well to read his book. of contempory and conditions in currents, opinions, knowledge If he often America is unusual for a North American. Hispanic reveals the missionary bent, the scientific student will know how to make due allowance, for Inman does not sail under false colors. He is absolutely frank, intensely earnest, and generally unpreju? diced and fairly accurate when dealing with historical matters.
THE JOURNALOF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS,VOL. 12, NO. 4, 1922

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592 The most

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defects of his book are his failure to dis? conspicuous Americanism between and Pan Ameri? Hispanic clearly tinguish to failure of Pan Hispanic the the his appreciate strength canism; to the anti-Yankee movement and to give sufficient emphasis of the French, the nations, European particularly propaganda and the Germans; and his inaccuracies and neglect the Spanish, matters. of proper form in bibliographical it should be noted, also, that his view of the Mexican Perhaps of the most recent is not in harmony with the findings War from in field. be research It best Mr. Inman's that may scholarly not to talk too much about this side of the matter, viewpoint but it would be hard to prove that that war was the piece of pure, it to be; and if Mr. unmitigated aggression which he represents the contemporary American Inman should investigate Hispanic be surprised at the results of his reaction to the war he might inquiry. J. Fred University Rippy, of Chicago.

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