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WE ARE WHAT WE EAT1


Music in Israel | MUS 74 & 139 @UC Berkeley | Midterm Exam | Fall 2013 Methodology
As explained in class, the approach to testing for this course is in line with the understanding that there are many concurring, and at times conflicting, ideas, perspectives, and listening modes involved in the topic we are all researching together (Music in Israel). The format of the Midterm will represent an attempt to be coherent with this approach, and will try to build on the ideas that, as a class, we can also work collaboratively, and that the sum of our collective knowledge is greater that its parts (each of our own backgrounds, perspectives, individual understanding of course materials, etc.). Therefore, we will try to make full use of the almost 3 days of brainpower (52 participants, including instructors, times ca. 80 minutes of lecture time = ca. 70 hours) that are available to us during each of our lecture meetings, in order to re-think what has been covered by our course thus far. The key is not to have all materials memorized, but to be able to quickly access all relevant information, to connect the dots, and to be able to elaborate on it all, on the basis of the tools built in class and of each students individual work preparing for it.

How to prepare
Students are required to review all work for Music in Israel since the beginning of the Semester, and to focus on the following: Class Syllabus Weekly Assignment Sheets (Week 1 through Week 9), and the listening assignments listed (and explained) in each of them, as well as the related reading materials (all sheets, articles, CD booklets, and links are available on bSpace) Course Blog and the resources listed on it

What to bring (packing list)


Yourselves (attendance is mandatory!) Personal computers (laptops, tablets, etc.), with access to AirBears and bDrive, as well as the electronic resources of the UC Berkeley Library (we will also have a few laptops/tablets available for you in case you cannot bring your own) Class materials (books, articles, mp3 files, etc.; all except for one book also available online) Weekly Assignment Sheets/listening guides Paper and pens/pencils or other materials to take/sketch notes Musical instruments, puppets, etc.: anything that you feel may help you in successfully work on the Midterm exam

After Ludwig Feuerbach (1804-1872). MUS 74&139 @UCB | Fall 2013 F. Spagnolo & R. Colwell

We Are What We Eat: Midterm

Instructions
A. Working Group and Workspace Setup (from 9:40 until 9:50: 10 minutes) 1. Choose a food from the 10 handouts available in class (first come, first serve) 2. Form a group with the students that have selected matching food handouts (and introduce yourself to the rest of the group) 3. Create a workspace within the Auditorium 4. Based on the table below, highlight the topic that your working group will be focusing on during the exam 5. Access these instructions online (at bit.ly/wearewhatweeat2013) 6. Create a bDrive document shared with all the students in the working group (use @berkeley.edu login and email addresses to create and share the document; further instructions at http://bconnected.berkeley.edu/) 7. Share the bDrive document with the instructors (spagnoloacht@berkeley.edu & rachel.colwell@berkeley.edu)

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tomato ptitim (Israeli couscous) beet halvah falafel cholent and/or chamin pizza sachlab limonanah (mint lemonade) orange

East-European communist 1920s German immigrant 1930s Polish immigrant (Holocaust survivor) 1940s Refugee from Muslim country (late 1940s-mid 1950s) Yemenite (preferably a woman; any historical period) Moroccan Israeli 1970-1980s Ethiopian immigrant 1980s-present Palestinian-Israeli 1990s-2000s Army recruit (any historical period) Child (any historical period)

We Are What We Eat: Midterm

MUS 74&139 @UCB | Fall 2013

F. Spagnolo & R. Colwell

B. Collaborative Work (from 9:50 until 10:35: 45 minutes) Based on the character that matches the food choice of your working group, work collaboratively on a shared bDrive document that includes a historical background (100-200 words); a synthetic profile or biography; and a musical example (soundtrack); all based on the guidelines given below. When setting up your workspace and evaluating your sources for the assignment, feel free to consult with the instructors. 1. Historical Background (100-200 words) Discuss the historical background of the character and of the topics that may be related to it, and summarize it in 100-200 words. Use primarily the Class Syllabus (including assigned books, articles, etc.), the Encyclopaedia Judaica, the Course Blog and any other resources from the Library. 2. Profile Write a synthetic profile/biography of a "character" (either hypothetical or historical) based on the one matching your working groups food choice, the topics that may be related to it, and the historical background you just wrote. Compile the profile based on the following parameters: 1. name(s) 2. relevant biographical dates (birth, immigration, death, etc.) 3. gender 4. age 5. languages known/spoken 6. socio-economic standing, class, etc. 7. dress code 8. profession 9. political orientation/beliefs 10. religious persuasion(s) 11. food habits 12. relationship with land/lands of origin 13. avatar (you may use the UCB Library Image databases as well as images.google.com and http://commons.wikimedia.org)

We Are What We Eat: Midterm

MUS 74&139 @UCB | Fall 2013

F. Spagnolo & R. Colwell

3. Soundtrack Select one (1) musical item from one of the main sources used in class: bSpace (listening assignments, research websites, etc.); the class blog; or YouTube. Embed the source file (or a link to it) in your document. Describe the musical item according to the following template: 1. title(s) or incipit 2. language(s) 3. vocal style (if any) 4. instrumentation (if any) 5. place/time of origin 6. brief description (up to 50 words) outlining the connection between the selected musical item and the historical background and the character you have chosen C. Evaluation (from 10:35 until 10:50: 15 minutes) All completed bDrive files will be posted at bit.ly/whearewhatweeat2013 presented to the class and discussed at the end of the session.

We Are What We Eat: Midterm

MUS 74&139 @UCB | Fall 2013

F. Spagnolo & R. Colwell

WE ARE WHAT WE EAT


Music in Israel | MUS 74 & 139 @UC Berkeley | Midterm Exam | Fall 2013

1 Tomato

We Are What We Eat: Midterm

MUS 74&139 @UCB | Fall 2013

F. Spagnolo & R. Colwell

WE ARE WHAT WE EAT


Music in Israel | MUS 74 & 139 @UC Berkeley | Midterm Exam | Fall 2013

2 Ptitim (Israeli Couscous)

Ptitim is an Israeli toasted pasta shaped like rice or little balls.It was invented by the Osem Food company in Israel in the 1950s. At this time, rice was scarce and so to provide for the dietary needs of Mizrahi immigrants, David Ben Gurion, Israels first prime minister, asked Eugene Proper, a founder of Osem, to create a wheat-based rice substitute.
We Are What We Eat: Midterm MUS 74&139 @UCB | Fall 2013 F. Spagnolo & R. Colwell

WE ARE WHAT WE EAT


Music in Israel | MUS 74 & 139 @UC Berkeley | Midterm Exam | Fall 2013

3 Beet

We Are What We Eat: Midterm

MUS 74&139 @UCB | Fall 2013

F. Spagnolo & R. Colwell

WE ARE WHAT WE EAT


Music in Israel | MUS 74 & 139 @UC Berkeley | Midterm Exam | Fall 2013

4 Halvah

Halvah is a Middle Eastern dessert made from sesame sesame seed paste. It is sold across Israel in slabs or small packages and comes in a variety of flavors, the most popular being chocolate and vanilla.

We Are What We Eat: Midterm

MUS 74&139 @UCB | Fall 2013

F. Spagnolo & R. Colwell

WE ARE WHAT WE EAT


Music in Israel | MUS 74 & 139 @UC Berkeley | Midterm Exam | Fall 2013

5 Falafel

Falafel is a deep-fried ball or patty made from ground chickpeas, fava beans, or both. It is a Middle Eastern dish adopted by early Jewish immigrants to Palestine. Considered the national dish of Israel, it is sold everywhere and usually served in pita pockets and topped with salads, pickled vegetables, and tahini (sesame paste).

We Are What We Eat: Midterm

MUS 74&139 @UCB | Fall 2013

F. Spagnolo & R. Colwell

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WE ARE WHAT WE EAT


Music in Israel | MUS 74 & 139 @UC Berkeley | Midterm Exam | Fall 2013

6. Cholent (Yiddish) / Chamin (Hebrew)

Cholent is a traditional Jewish stew. It is usually simmered overnight for 12 hours or more and eaten for lunch on the Sabbath. It was developed as a way to conform to Jewish laws which prohibit cooking on the Sabbath. Although there are many variations of the dish, the standard ingredients in cholent are meat, potatoes, beans, and barley. Chamin is a variant of the same culinary principles prepared among Jewish communities in North Africa and the Middle East.

We Are What We Eat: Midterm

MUS 74&139 @UCB | Fall 2013

F. Spagnolo & R. Colwell

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WE ARE WHAT WE EAT


Music in Israel | MUS 74 & 139 @UC Berkeley | Midterm Exam | Fall 2013

7 Pizza

Pizza, a globalized dish originating from Naples (Italy), has become a popular street food in Israel. It is sold at food vendors, sometimes in traditional varieties, and sometimes with a Middle Eastern twist. For example, Pizza Zaatar is a pizza made on pita bread and spiced with Zaatar.

We Are What We Eat: Midterm

MUS 74&139 @UCB | Fall 2013

F. Spagnolo & R. Colwell

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WE ARE WHAT WE EAT


Music in Israel | MUS 74 & 139 @UC Berkeley | Midterm Exam | Fall 2013

8 Sachlab

Sachlab is a thick milk-based drink made from orchid tubers called sahlab in Arabic. Some recipes add orange blossom or rose water, while others add coconut and cinnamon or nuts and raisins. It is popular in Israel during the wintertime.

We Are What We Eat: Midterm

MUS 74&139 @UCB | Fall 2013

F. Spagnolo & R. Colwell

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WE ARE WHAT WE EAT


Music in Israel | MUS 74 & 139 @UC Berkeley | Midterm Exam | Fall 2013

9 Limonanah

Limonanah is a type of lemonade made from freshly-squeezed lemon juice and mint leaves. It became popular in Israel in the 1990s.

We Are What We Eat: Midterm

MUS 74&139 @UCB | Fall 2013

F. Spagnolo & R. Colwell

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WE ARE WHAT WE EAT


Music in Israel | MUS 74 & 139 @UC Berkeley | Midterm Exam | Fall 2013

10 Orange

Citrus fruits, and citrus groves (in Arabic, bustan; in Hebrew, pardes ) are symbolic of wealth, well-being, and peace in the Middle East and in Israel. The Hebrew word for orange is the acronym, tapuz, for tapuach zahav , yellow apple (or golden apple).

We Are What We Eat: Midterm

MUS 74&139 @UCB | Fall 2013

F. Spagnolo & R. Colwell