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Education Guide 2013-2014

Bachelor Program Electrical Engineering Bachelor Program Automotive


Where innovation starts

Welcome
Dear student, Welcome to the Electrical Engineering department. The importance of our eld to society has not only increased enormously in the past 100 years but will continue to do so in the years ahead. This is evident in the societal challenges we are facing in healthcare, telecommunication, mobility and energy supplies. Just look at road vehicles, an area in which electrical engineering is becoming an increasingly dominant component. Hence the reason for TU/e to incorporate the automotive curriculum within our department. This study guide provides valuable information about the Electrical Engineering and Automotive Bachelor at Eindhoven University of Technology. It contains information about the structure of the three-year program and how the study is organized within our department as well as all kinds of practical study information. In addition to the information provided here, you are strongly urged to consult the general study information on the TU/e website for current timetables, examination dates and details of specic subjects. This study guide has been compiled with great care. If you have any questions, then drop in to the Education office (PT 1.26), the student counselor (CR 1.04) or me (PT 1.29). I wish you an enjoyable and fascinating study!

Prof.dr.ir. Bart Smolders | Director of Education, Electrical Engineering.

Foreword

Table of content

-----------------------------------------------------------------------1. The Bachelor College 1.1 Major in Electrical Engineering 1.2 Major in Automotive 6 9 16

------------------------------------------------------------------------------2. Practical study information 2.1 Types of education 2.2 Examinations 2.3 Honors program 2.4 OASE, the digital learning and work environment 2.5 Study supervision / binding study recommendation 2.6 Propaedeutic and Bachelor examinations 22 24 27 29 29 30 32

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------3. Program of previous generations (before 2012) 34 3.1 Electrical Engineering 36 3.2 Automotive 40 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------4. General information 4.1 The educational institute 4.2 Departmental Board 4.3 Departmental Council 4.4 Examination Committee 4.5 Curriculum Committee 4.6 Research programs 4.7 Communication and information 4.8 Connecthor 4.9 Study facilities 4.10 Besides your studies 42 44 45 45 46 46 47 47 48 48 49

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1. The Bachelor College

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Bachelor program Electrical Engineering - Bachelor program Automotive 2013-2014 | 9

You have chosen to study Electrical Engineering at the TU/e Bachelor College. Half of this three-year Bachelor program is devoted to your major (Electrical Engineering or Automotive), a study that will prepare you for a job as an engineer in your particular eld. All rst-year TU/e students follow a number of basic subjects like mathematics, physics and modeling, which are more or less the same for every study. In your rst year you are already able to choose a number of subjects and so shape your study right from the beginning. Of course, you also get non-engineering subjects because engineers are concerned with more than engineering alone. So the study curriculum comprises the following four components: M  ajor (90 credits). The major is, in fact, the main direction you choose to study. Electrical Engineering and Automotive are examples and both are taught within our department. B  asic subjects (30 credits). The basic subjects are followed by all TU/e students and include mathematics, physics, design and modeling. E  lective subjects (45 credits). Each student can (within certain norms and in consultation with the coach) compile an elective package. The elective subjects are spread throughout the entire program of Bachelor studies. U  ser, Society & Enterprise (USE, 15 credits). This part also concerns elective subjects, but not engineering ones. Examples of USE subjects are entrepreneurship, ethics and sustainability. There is also an introductory basic subject USE. All subjects in the Bachelor College are worth 5 credits each.

Illustration:

Major Basic subjects Elective subjects USE: User, Society and Enterprise

Detailed information about the Bachelor College and the subjects can be found at http://w3.tue.nl/en/education/1 It is advisable to consult this study page regularly to get the latest information. The Bachelor program will help you develop the skills you need in industry and you will learn to translate you knowledge of technology into applications that are relevant for society. You will train your analytical skills, learn to solve problems as well as to cooperate in teams. A Bachelor study at TU/e is often a preparatory phase to a Masters. TU/e has many options in this respect, but your TU/e Bachelor degree will enable you to do a Masters at many other places throughout the world. The relevant information in this Bachelor phase is outlined below. For the Electrical Engineering major see 1.1 and for the Automotive major see 1.2 (page 15). Section 2 contains useful information on matters like the forms of study we offer and how to enroll for examinations.

1.1 Major in Electrical Engineering -----------------------------------------------------1.1.1 Denition


The study of Electrical Engineering focuses on the app lications of electricity and magnetism, which in clude renewable energy systems, telecommunica tion, robotics, medical equipment and computers. Electrical engineering has been the fastest growing eld over the past fty years, having an enormous impact on society. Just think of the tumultuous rise of computers, the introduction of mobile telephony and key medical innovations, like the MRI scanner. The eld embraces both analog and digital systems in which hardware and software are equally important. More specically, Electrical Engineering comprises the following sub-elds: E  nergy Technology. This covers the whole chain from electricity supply and generation to the transport and consumption of electricity in equipment by both consumers and industry. The

incorporation of renewable energy sources in the system and intelligent network management (Smart grids) are currently the key research themes. In addition, the electrical circuits and materials that are able to resist and switch high voltages and ows are important. Vice versa, use can be made of the high voltages to inuence processes, for example with pulsed power. E  lectronics. This is geared to the analysis and design of electronic circuits and systems whereby the emphasis lies on extensive system integration in ICs (Integrated Circuits), or chips. The system requirements and properties of IC manufacturing determine how systems are subdivided into basic functions and then translated into circuits with optimum properties like circuit speed, output power and precision, all at minimum cost in terms of the IC surface area and power dissipation. At the lowest level, ICs consist of active non-linear components (transistors and other semiconductor components) and passive components (resistors, capacitors, coils).

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P  hotonics or opto-electronics. This scientic and engineering discipline focuses on the interaction between light (photons) and electrons (electronics). This concerns elements that convert electrical power into light (light source), elements that concert light into electric (light detector), and elements that enable the processing of optical signals using electrical or optical control signals (modulators, lters, circuits, etc.). Given the vast bandwidth available in the optical domain, photonic circuits are suitable for use in systems with a very large information transmission or processing capacity. E  lectronic Systems. These highly structured design strategies are used to create digital electronic circuits and systems, like microprocessors and videoprocessors. Applications are very diverse, varying from household (from washing machine to Xbox) to industrial use (professional printers and wafersteppers). C  ontrol Engineering. This area is involved in the optimized operation of high-tech systems through the design of dedicated steer and control signals, employing the important principle of feedback. Complex systems to be controlled appear in many domains, as e.g. mechatronic and automotive systems, communication networks, power distribution networks and production processes, and typically show dynamic behaviour in the form of time-dependent responses. Appropriate design of measurement and control systems is then of key importance to achieve high-performing systems, as e.g. nanometer precision positioning in lithographic production proceses. A central element in this eld is also the generic modelling tools for modelling dynamic processes across the boundaries of classical domains (electrical, mechanical, physics, chemical).

E  lectrical Mechanics. This describes the energy conversion between the electrical and mechanical world, as evident in electrical machines and actuators. Applications can be found in hybrid and electric vehicles, wind turbines, DVD players and electron microscopes. The control of these machines always contains electronics (power electronics) with electrical currents exceeding several amperes. Power electronics is essential as soon as any form of electrical energy has to be converted, such as 220 V AC to 12V DC current. The power range varies from milliwatts (for a cell phone for example) to hundreds of megawatts to connect an offshore wind farm to the land grid via a sea cable. A key feature of a power converter is, therefore, electrical efficiency. T  elecommunication. This concerns transmitting information from one place to another using connections like ber-optic cable or radio waves. In the past 20 years this eld has seen huge development with familiar applications like berto-the-home, ber-optic networks spanning the globe, our mobile telephone network and (wireless) internet connections. Key to this is the design of very high-capacity ber-optic connections that use rapid optical signal processing for the signal routing. Other aspects in this eld are the design of radio-over-ber systems, antenna systems with corresponding radio transmitters/receivers, modeling communication channels and the development of new signal modulation methods. S  ignal Processing. This eld concerns the description of signals and the analysis and design of signal-processing systems, including discrete as well as single and multi dimensional signals and systems. The signals are described in deterministic or stochastic terms. Research in the eld focuses

on the fundamentals of signal processing in terms of mathematical and theoretical physics notions, methods and models as well as on their application (as in medical systems), whereby the design, simulation and implementation of signal-processing systems play a central role. E  lectromagnetism. Many electrical engineering concepts can be derived from electromagnetism. Electromagnetic elds and applications are all around us; just think of microwaves, the antenna of your cell phone, traffic radar or an MRI scanner in a hospital. Electromagnetic waves are also used in the hyperthermal treatment of tumors. Within our own Electrical Engineering department research focuses on three themes: Connected World Care and Cure Smart and Sustainable Society During your study you will come into contact with each of these themes, in projects or in your nal Bachelor project. For more information about the themes, go to the website http://www.tue.nl/en/ 1 university/departments/electrical-engineering/

of mathematical analysis, algebra and probability theory, for rigorous analysis and derivation of new facts and programs. c.  representative knowledge of electrical engineering disciplines and methods, with an accent on mathematical modeling and a system approach. d.  an operational understanding of system engineering such as translating a societal need into a specication of requirements and subsequent translation to a system conguration.

1.1.2 Aim of the study


This study aims to bring you up to the level of engineering-science Bachelor as an electrical engineer. To this end the following objectives are central to the study: 1. To give the student a broad knowledge base to enable him/her to accommodate to the sub-elds of the subject through: a.  insight into the physics and related electrical engineering applications. b.  deductive skills, learned through the study

2. To provide the student with skills to optimize cooperation in a multidisciplinary team through: a.  the ability to recognize, place, formulate and communicate about engineering-science issues from practice. b.  the ability to analyze electrical engineering issues and provide a suitable solution, taking account of a variety of aspects that may emerge or be brought in by others. c.  an awareness of the place in and impact on the life cycle of the product in terms of design. d.  the ability to report competently in straight forward language and terminology, both written and verbal, on engineering-science results and methods. 3. To prepare the Bachelor properly for an engineeringscience Master in Electrical Engineering.

1.1.3 Electrical Engineering Curriculum


The Bachelor phase lasts three years and is completed with a nal Bachelor project. Each year is worth 60 credits, with each credit equivalent to 28 hours of study. A year is therefore 1680 hours of study, or 42 weeks of 40 hours.

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The rst year, the propaedeutic year, is designed to give the student insight into the contents of the rest of the study, subsequent studies and professional practice. It comprises basic subjects (including mathematics and physics) and various electrical engineering subjects. There is also plenty of scope for Design Based Learning (OGO in Dutch). For the entire rst semester you will be working on the Rock-your-Baby design assignment. Our department also offers a number of other fascinating OGO assignments in the rst year in which you will learn to solve electrical engineering problems through working in project teams. In the second and third years you will explore Electrical Engineering in more depth and more room becomes available for elective subjects. Both the propaedeutic year and the Bachelor phase close with an examination, the propaedeutic exam and the Bachelor exam. To be able to attend the Bachelor exam, you must have passed the propaedeutic exam. First year The chart below shows the Electrical Engineering Bachelor curriculum for the rst year, split into semester A and B. Each semester comprises two quartiles of ten weeks. So for each quartile you have three subjects, each worth 5 credits. Beside the name of the subject the subject code is also shown in the chart. The rst year has four basic subjects, six major subjects and two elective subjects.

Semester 1A
2WBB0 Calculus (general course) 5ECA0 Circuits (incl. OGO) 5EIA0 Computation I (incl. OGO) 3NBB0 Physics (general course) Elective I 5ESA0 Signals I (incl. OGO)

Semester 1B
0LAB0 Modelling (general course) 5ECB0 Electronic Circuits I 2DE20 Math 1 0SAB0 USE (general course) Elective II 5ESB0 Systems

Chart: Bachelor program year 1, Electrical Engineering major.

Be aware of the deadlines in choosing your electives. See http://w3.tue.nl/en/education/tue_bachelor_ college/study_structure/electives 3 Deepening elective packages for the major Electrical Engineering: Introduction in Electrical Engineering Care and Cure (2nd and 3rd year) Connected world (2nd and 3rd year) Smart & sustainable society (2nd and 3rd year) Approval of the Examinations Committee Before you can be awarded your certicate the Examinations Committee has to assess the depth and coherence of your study package. The Committee will in any case approve your free electives if you have taken at least two co-herent elective packages. If you have made other choices for your electives, you can best discuss this with your coach before you start the program and submit it for approval to the Examinations Committee.

Elective subjects in the rst year The major is the core of the Bachelors program and lays an important foundation for the discipline you have chosen. Next to that, the basis provides a context in which to mould the Eindhoven engineer. But, as each TU/e student is unique, the TU/e considers it important that, alongside a solid foundation, you can develop your scientic talents and learn to follow your own interests as much as possible within your Bachelors program. We have therefore built in a number of elective components. You can nd these in the USE component and the free electives. http://w3.tue.nl/en/education/tue_bachelor_ college/use_package/1 http://w3.tue.nl/en/education/tue_bachelor_ college/electives/2

Remedial English course The study Electrical Engineering along with all the course material and teaching especially if there are foreign students enrolled are in English. If you are concerned about your prociency in English, then you can take part in a course. This is not compulsory but facultative and is offered only in quartile 1. The subject code is 9ST17. Professional skills in the rst year In the rst year the professional skills (social and communication skills) are integrated in the major subjects, supplemented by separate training. More details on the professional skills are explained in section 2. The following page provides a summary of which professional skills are linked to which subjects.

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1A.1
Circuits (5ECA0) Professional Skill Planning and Organising Teamwork Writing Skills Content Workshop planning your work Workshop meeting skills Workshop Reporting skills Assessment Assignment Attendance Attendance

Professional skills in the second and third years TThe following scarts provide the necessary information about which professional skills are linked to which subjects. Semester 2A.1

1A.2
Signals I (5ESA0) Professional Skill Writing Skills Working together Reection Content Write individual part of group report Peer Review Assessment Assignment Attendance

Professional Skill

Content

Assessment Attendance & assignment

5EPA0 Writing Skills Workshop Writing Skills Electromagnetics I

Write personal report based on peer review Assignment

Semester 2A.2
Professional Skill Content Assessment Attendance & assignment Attendance Assignment Assignment Assignment Assignment 5EWA0 Teamwork Workshop Belbin team roles Electromechanics Teamwork Reection Presentation Skills Planning and Organising Searching and Dealing with Information Writing Skills Peer review Presentation of OGO Webinar? Apply handling scientic information in report Write individual part of group report

1B.4
Systems (5ESB0) Professional Skill Presentation Skills Presentation Skills Content Workshop presentation skills Presentation Assessment Attendance Assignment Attendance & assignment

Write personal report based on peer review Assignment

Searching and Dealing Library instruction with Information

Chart: professional skills year 1

Second and third years The general structure of the second and third years of your Bachelor College studies differs little from Semester 2A
7NAB0 Design (general course) Elective III 5EPA0 Electromagnetics I Elective IV 5EWA0 Electromechanics (incl. OGO) 5EWB0 Electrical power systems (incl. OGO)

the rst year although there is more scope for elective subjects. The chart below shows the subjects in the second and third years. Semester 3A
Elective VII 5ESC0 Signals II (incl. OGO) 5ESD0 Control systems (incl. OGO) Elective VIII 5ETB0 Communication Theory 5ECC0 Electronic Circuits II

Semester 3A.2
Professional Skill Content Peer review Write personal report based on peer review Assessment Attendance Assignment 5ESC0 Signals I / Teamwork 5ESD0 Control Reection Systems

Semester 3B.3
5XEC0 BEP Professional Skill Presentation Skills Planning and Orga-nising Searching and Dealing with Information Content Workshop presentation skills Project planning of BEP Workshop handling scientic information Assessment Attendance Assignment Attendance & assignment

Semester 2B
Elective V 5EIB0 Computation II 5ETA0 Intro Telecom Elective VI 5EMA0 Mathematics II 5EPB0 Electromagnetics II

Semester 3B
Elective IX Elective X 5XEC0 BEP Elective XI

Semester 3B.4
Elective XII 5XEC0 BEP 5XEC0 BEP Professional Skill Presenting Writing Content Final presentation BEP Individual BEP Report Assessment Assignment Assignment

Chart: professional skills for years 2 and 3 Chart: Bachelor program for years 2 and 3, Electrical Engineering.

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Elective subjects in the second and third years In the second and third years, too, the department will offer you various elective subjects within the Electrical Engineering domain in which you can extend your knowledge. Of course, you can also opt for elective subjects or packages from other departments. In any case, at least one of the three coherent elective packages of 15 credits must be chosen from our department. You dont need to make your choice until the second year of your study and you can choose from the following themes:  Connected World, where you follow three in-depth subjects in the eld of Telecommunication.  Care and Cure, which offers you in-depth subjects in Electrical Engineering that relate to medical applications.  Smart & Sustainable Society, where subjects include smart electricity grids. Your Bachelor study is completed with the BachelorEnd-Project (BEP) which concerns a topic that relates to one of the three paths you have chosen for your coherent elective package at EE.

1.2 Major in Automotive -----------------------------------------------------1.2.1. Denition


Smart mobility has been designated one of the universitys three strategic areas. Automotive is a eld that fully complements the technological and societal challenges facing the automotive industry. Future developments in the industry will be geared to:  Smart mobility: how can smart automotive technology help reduce the number of traffic jams?  Clean vehicles: how can new methods make the car even more fuel-efficient and clean? TU/e is collaborating with the international business world on intelligent, productive mobility and transport as well as on safe, clean and efficient vehicles. More specically the Automotive eld concerns the following sub-elds and subjects: Thinking in terms of systems. This is central to Automotive. To get the highest level of efficiency from the technology, the design of vehicles requires a full system analysis and optimization of the parts/ disciplines that work together in the vehicle. In new cars 50% of the added value comes from microprocessors, electrical, electromechanical and network components. This percentage continues to rise. The challenge to the car industry is to ensure that the integration of sub-systems in the car does not compromise performance, reliability, safety and protability. This demands a lot of large-scale innovation research. In the area of mobility, energy supplies and the environment, automotive research and development can make a valuable (societal) contribution. With the increasing focus on the environmental impact of our mobility, the automotive sector is compelled to make more sustainable cars from an environmental perspective: CO2-neutral or emission-free. European legislation stipulates that CO2 vehicle emissions must be 20% lower within a number of years. For this reason a range of new technologies are being tested, like (plug-in) hybrid and fully electric cars. By using electricity as a exible and easy-to-regulate energy source, the efficiency of driving can be signicantly improved, emissions reduced and government requirements observed. Vehicle communication. This is becoming more and more important. A car or truck of the future can be regarded as a computer on wheels that shares data with the (logistics) infrastructure, with other vehicles and with their drivers through all kinds of communication technologies. The core of intelligent systems is cooperative mobility in which the traffic is seen as a variable network of vehicles that record and share information, respond to and are inuenced by each other. The development of cooperative mobility comprises communication from car to infrastructure (car-to-infra) and from car to car (carto-car) to boost safety, traffic ow and fuel efficiency. The Dutch Automotive sector wants to excel in several areas of automotive innovation since this will be attractive in terms of the international market as well as tie in with Dutch expertise and international competitiveness. These areas of innovation, which are evident in the Automotive study, are: Reduction of traffic jams. The amount of traffic jams represents considerable losses for the Dutch economy, hence the reason for the government to encourage the most efficient use of the road infrastructure and cooperative mobility initiatives. The A270 highway section between Eindhoven and Helmond has been designated as a national test track for research into car-to-car and car-to-infra innovations. Cooperative mobility. This involves designing and testing a system that integrates automotive technology and infrastructure via research into communication/connectivity and traffic management. Cooperative mobility is one of the keys to maintaining and improving traffic efficiency.

1.1.4 Bachelor End Project


You nish your Bachelor studies with the Bachelor End Project (BEP) that includes a number of professional skills such as presenting, reporting and acquiring information. These basic subjects are therefore not accounted for separately in the third year. The BEP assignment must be carried out during quartiles 3 and 4 of the 3rd year with a start session in week 1 of quartile 3 and a closing session in week 7 of quartile 4. The hours for this subject will be timetabled in for you. You choose a track and select an assignment within that track. There are around 15 assignment options per track, divided evenly across the capacity groups involved in the respective track.

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Bachelor program Electrical Engineering - Bachelor program Automotive 2013-2014 | 19

Vehicle efficiency. This focuses on improving combustion-engine vehicles to reduce fuel consumption through research into fuel-saving powertrains, bodywork and chassis. Despite highly promising developments in alternative powertrains, the majority of new vehicles in 2020 will still be powered by combustion engines, so vehicle efficiency remains an important area of innovation. Electric vehicles. Problems specic to electric vehicles need to be solved through research into electric powertrains, system design, peripheral systems and energy management. For the long term electric vehicles are regarded as the best alternative to combustion-engine vehicles. Technological and market developments will create opportunities in the Netherlands to open niches in the electric vehicle market. Platform electrication. This is geared to building fundamental technologies to enable intelligent electronics applications through research into software, mechatronics, embedded systems and nano-electronics. Electrication of platforms enables applications in other innovative elds. Vehicle optimization. This concentrates on developing technology in vehicles to improve safety, user convenience and comfort for the occupants, and includes research into driver assistance systems, vehicle dynamics and human-technology interaction.

 a.  insight into the physics and related automotive applications. b.  deductive skills, learned through the study of mathematical analysis, algebra and probability theory, for rigorous analysis and derivation of new facts and programs. c. r  epresentative knowledge of automotive disciplines and methods, with an accent on mathematical modeling and a system approach. d. an operational understanding of system engineering such as translating a societal need into a specication of requirements and subsequent translation to a system conguration. 2. To provide the student with skills to optimize cooperation in a multidisciplinary team through:  a.  the ability to recognize, place, formulate and communicate about engineering-science issues from practice. b.  the ability to analyze automotive problems and provide a suitable solution, taking account of a variety of aspects that may emerge or be brought in by others. c. a  n awareness of the place in and impact on the life cycle of the product in terms of design. d.  the ability to report competently in straightforward language and terminology, both written and verbal, on engineeringscience results and methods. 3. To prepare the Bachelor properly for an engineering-science Master in Automotive Technology or related discipline.

weeks of 40 hours. The rst year, the propaedeutic year, is designed to give the student insight into the contents of the rest of the study, subsequent studies and professional practice. It comprises basic subjects (automotive, mathematics, dynamics, physics and electrical engineering subjects). There will also be two OGO assignments in which you will learn to solve autotechnology problems through working in project teams. In the second year you will extend the basic knowledge built up in the rst year. Depending on your preferences, you can broaden or deepen your knowledge by opting to choose specic elective subjects. In the third year, you will probe deeper in one of areas of the Automotive through the electives (50%) that are available in both the A and B semesters of the third year, which is completed with the Bachelor end project. Professional skills (social and communicative skills) are largely integrated in the design assignments, supplemented by separate training. Both the propaedeutic year and the Bachelor phase close with an examination, the propaedeutic exam and the Bachelor exam. To be able to attend the Bachelor exam, you must have passed the propaedeutic exam. First year The chart below shows the Automotive Bachelor curriculum for the rst year, divided by semester A and B. Each semester comprises two quartiles of ten weeks. So for each quartile you have three subjects, each worth 5 credits. Beside the name of the subject the subject code is also shown in the chart. The rst year has four basic subjects, six major subjects and two elective subjects.

Semester 1A
2WBB0 Calculus (general course) 0ATA0 Automotive trends I 5AIA0 Computation for AU 3NBB0 Physics (general course) Elective I 5ASA0 Dynamics + math

Semester 1B 0LAB0 Modelling


(general course) 5AMA0 Auto mobility 2DE30 Signals+ Math 0SAB0 USE (general course) Elective II 5ESB0 Systems

Chart: Bachelor program year 1, Automotive Major.

1.2.2 Aim of the study


The study aims to bring you up to the level of Bachelor as an all-round automotive engineer. To this end the following objectives are central to the study: 1. To give the student a broad knowledge base to enable him/her to accommodate to the sub-elds of the subject through:

1.2.3 Automotive Curriculum


The Bachelor phase lasts three years and is completed with a nal Bachelor project. Each year is worth 60 credits, with each credit equivalent to 28 hours of study. A year is therefore 1680 hours of study, or 42

Electives The major is the core of the Bachelors program and lays an important foundation for the discipline you have chosen. Next to that, the basis provides a context in which to mould the Eindhoven engineer. But, as each TU/e student is unique, the TU/e considers it important that, alongside a solid foundation, you can develop your scientic talents and learn to follow your own interests as much as possible within your Bachelors program. We have therefore built in a number of elective components. You can nd these in the USE component and the free electives. http://w3.tue.nl/en/education/tue_bachelor_ college/use_package/1 http://w3.tue.nl/en/education/tue_bachelor_ college/electives/2 Be aware of the deadlines in choosing your electives. See http://w3.tue.nl/en/education/tue_bachelor_ college/study_structure/electives 3

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Bachelor program Electrical Engineering - Bachelor program Automotive 2013-2014 | 21

Semester 1A.1
Professional Skill Content Assessment

Semester 2A
7NAB0 Design (general course) Elective III Elective IV 5EWA0 Electromechanics (incl. OGO) Electronics

Computation for AU (5AIA0) Automotive Trends I (0ATA0) Semester 1B.4


Semester 3A Elective VII


5AIC0 Vehicle Networking 5ESD0 Control Systems

Elective VIII 2IWA0 Automotive Software Eng. 5AMB0 Driver-centric Innovation (incl. OGO)

Planning and Organising Writing Skills Writing Skills Teamwork Teamwork Reection

Workshop planning your work Workshop Reporting skills Write individual part of group report Workshop meeting skills Peer Review Write reection report

Assignment Attendance Assignment Attendance Attendance Assignment

5EPA0 Electromagnetics I  5XCA0 Fundamentals of

Semester 2B
Professional Skill Content Assessment Elective V Elective VI

Semester 3B Elective IX
Elective X 5XEC0 BEP

Elective XI Elective XII 5XEC0 BEP

Systems (5ESB0)

Presentation Skills Workshop presentation skills Presentation Skills Presentation Searching and Dealing Library instruction with Information

Attendance Assignment Attendance & assignment

5APA0 Power Electronics 5AIB0 Sensing, computing (incl. OGO) Actuating 0ATB0 Automotive trends II (incl. OGO) 4AUB0 Powertrains and Vehicle mechanics

Chart: professional skills year 1

Chart: Bachelor program for years 2 and 3, Automotive major.

Deepening elective packages for the major Automotive:  Introduction in Automotive  Smart mobility design  Electric and hybrid vehicles Smart Diagnosis Approval of the Examinations Committee Before you can be awarded your certicate the Examinations Committee has to assess the depth and coherence of your study package. The Committee will in any case approve your free electives if you have taken at least two co-herent elective packages. If you have made other choices for your electives, you can best discuss this with your coach before you start the program and submit it for approval to the Examinations Committee. Professional skills in the rst year In the rst year the professional skills (social and

communication skills) are integrated in the major subjects. For more details, see section 2. Professional skills for the rst-year subjects are shown in the chart below. Remedial English course This course along with all the course material and teaching especially if there are foreign students enrolled are in English. If you are concerned about your prociency in English, then you can take part in a course. This is not compulsory but facultative and is offered only in quartile 1. The subject code is 9ST17. Second and third years The general structure of the second and third years of your Bachelor College studies differs little from the rst year although there is more scope for elective subjects. The chart below shows the subjects in the second and third years.

Professional skills in the second and third years The following scarts provide the necessary information about which professional skills are linked to which subjects. Semester 2A.1
Professional Skill Content Assessment Attendance & assignment 5EPA0 Writing Skills Workshop Writing Skills Electromagnetics I

Semester 2B.3
Trends II 5APA0 Power

Professional Skill
Writing Skills Searching and Dealing with Information Presentation Skills

Content
Webinar? Write individual part of group report Apply handling scientic information in report Presentation

Assessment
Assignment Assignment Assignment Assignment Attendance & assignment Attendance Assignment

0ATB0 Automotive Planning and Organising

Electronics Teamwork Workshop Belbin team roles Teamwork Peer review Write personal report based on peer review Reection

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Birgit van Huijgevoort


Semester 3A.2
Professional Skill Content Peer review Write personal report based on peer review Assessment Attendance Assignment 5AMB0 Driver Teamwork -centric Innovation Reection

Semester 3B.3
5XEC0 BEP Professional Skill Presentation Skills Planning and Organising Searching and Dealing with Information Content Workshop presentation skills Project planning of BEP Workshop handling scientic information Assessment Attendance Assignment Attendance & assignment

Semester 3B.4
5XEC0 BEP Professional Skill Presentation Skills Writing Skills Content Final presentation BEP Individual BEP Report Assessment Assignment Assignment

Chart: professional skills for years 2 and 3

1.2.4 Bachelor End Project


You nish your Bachelor studies with the Bachelor End Project (BEP). BEP assignments correspond with ongoing research activities within one of the capacity groups or URE (University Racing Eindhoven). The BEP includes a number of professional skills such as presenting, reporting and acquiring information. These basic subjects are therefore not accounted for separately in the third year. The BEP assignment must be carried out during quartiles 3 and 4 of the 3rd year with a start session in week 1 of quartile 3 and a closing session in week 7 of quartile 4. The hours for this subject will be timetabled in for you.

One of the boys! A year ago I didnt know what I had to choose, I was thinking of lot of different studies f.i. aerospace engi neering and mathematics. After a while my mom came up with the idea of going to the late beslissers dag at TU/e considering the major Automotive. After that day I was absolutely sure this was the study I wanted to do. After almost a year I still feel like I made the right choice. I was afraid that there wasnt enough mathematics included in the program, but this amount is just ne. Extra mathematic courses I choose within the electives. In my opinion the concept of the bachelor college gives you the possibility to take the courses you really like and adapt your schedule the way you want. Talking about studying Automotive at TU/e, people ask me rst what Automotive is about, because lots of

people never heard of it. My response: its a combination of electrical engineering and mechanical engineering and it includes cars and infrastructure as well. The second question people always ask: what it is like to study at a technical university, being a girl? This question is more difficult to answer. Most of the time, I start telling that Im used to hanging out with boys. But whats very funny is that its a little bit strange to be one of the girls in the beginning. Suddenly everybody knows who you are and during lectures youre always noticing there are only boys (except the girls next to you). But after a while you will get used to it and it denitely has its benet. The boys always want to help you and soon you will feel like you are one of them. My tip for new students is to work hard, but denitely dont forget to have fun!

22 | The Bachelor College

2. Practical study information

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2.1 Types of Education -----------------------------------------------------During your study you will encounter various didactical ways of education. These are described below. Lectures During a lecture the lecturer deals with the theory and corresponding applications of a subject with the aim of transferring knowledge and insight to the student, often using a presentation (slides) that you can also review after the lecture in the digital OASE learning environment. For more on OASE see section 2.4 and http://w3.tue.nl/en/education/1 Lectures also require an effort from students who must study the material beforehand. It is also important to make notes of the key issues and examples during the lecture. You will have to do assigned tasks. Exercise Sessions Many lectures have related instruction sessions whose aim is to apply the theory through exercises that you will tend to do individually. The instruction groups are smaller, so the lecturer has more opportunity to deal with individual questions. So use this opportunity! Dont forget to prepare the instruction sessions well. This has proven to be a successful way of completing a subject. Tutorials A tutorial (colstruction) is a blend of lecture and instruction where a piece of theory alternates with doing a number of tasks. Video-lectures Most lectures are video-recorded so that you can follow or review a lecture at any time.

Design assignments The design assignments are essential components of 'Design Based Learning (OGO in Dutch) that aims to boost the design competence of students. Communicative, social skills and project-based work play a key role in this. You are also expected to take initiative and responsibility. In the rst year you are automatically enrolled for the design assignments and in the second year you must do this in OASE, see section 2.4. Experience Mathness To help your transition from secondary school to TU/e the Pre University College of TU/e has created a supervision program, Experience Mathness, with a focus on mathematics and study skills. The program comprises three components: practice mathematical skills, making an entry test and a follow-up program for those students who have not passed the entry test. You will already have practiced via the website. The entry test is compulsory and is part of the rst mathematics subject Calculus. The entry test takes place at the end of the rst academic week and lasts an hour. If you fail the entry test, you will then do a follow-up program in which you practice the material one hour a week supervised by a lecturer and student mentors. You have one further opportunity to pass the entry test in the rst eight weeks. For more information, see www.tue.nl/en/ education/tue-bachelor-college/educationstructure/experience-mathness/2 or contact the student counselor, ir. Sjoerd Hulshof (CR 1.04) via s.hulshof@tue.nl or 040 247 3713.

Engineering skills Engineering skills training is part of specic subjects within the Bachelor College in which you learn to apply theory to practice. These skills are structured and timetabled such that they also provide preparation for the design assignments. Other general skills are also taught: M  easuring quantities, units, standards, measuring instruments, measurement circuits, measurement methods, automated measurement systems like LabView, errors and inaccuracies. S  imulation and analysis using MATLAB, C++, SPICE and Simulink, among other programs. The structure of engineering skills during the Bachelor study reveals clear learning paths: 1. f  rom highly prescriptive to sensible individual choice; 2. from trial and error to a systematic approach; 3. from simple and straightforward to complex; 4. f  rom practicing and doing to a qualitative test of problem approach and problem solution; 5.  from implementation report to account of work and results. Many engineering skills training sessions are held in central competency labs or in the specialized laboratories of the research programs.

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Professional skills The modern engineer not only has to be procient within his own eld but must also have a number of other skills. In industry the work is often project based whereby various disciplines cooperate in teams. In this context, it is important to have the necessary skills to communicate, report in writing, present verbally, cooperate in a project group, have contact with customers and principals, interview, negotiate and acquire information. Some professional skills take the form of training, and some training sessions you do with your project group at a specic moment in the timetable during your rst two years when you are scheduled for other training. When you have actively taken part in training and completed all the tasks satisfactorily, the training is signed as completed and registered in your dossier. For other professional skills you perform your tasks in the design assignment (OGO) group. These may include minute-taking, active participations in discussions and debate in the OGO group and nding information on the subject you are working on. These activities are assessed by your

project leader, a lecturer who is involved or the skills lecturer. You cannot always complete these professional skills in one OGO; the lecturer will keep track of the activities of a particular professional skill you have completed. Once you have nished the required number of activities to a sufficient level, the respective skill is noted and initialed as completed (GN) or assigned a grade. The professional skills are subdivided into ve clusters that include the following relevant sub-skills: 1. Communicate: write and present, 2. Cooperate, 3. Reect, 4. Plan and organize, 5. Find and process (scientic) information. The information on your own study/curriculum describes in which subjects the various professional skills are integrated.

Training by STU As part of the professional skills you will also follow a number of training sessions, such as presenting, given by the central STU organization. During the training you are expected to be active by giving a presentation during the presentation training. Preparatory tasks are part of all training. Students who do not complete these tasks or do so unsatisfactorily or too late will not be allowed to participate in the training. Bachelor End Project (BEP) The student completes the Bachelor phase with the Bachelor End Project (BEP), the aim of which is to gain experience in doing an individual project in het electrical engineering/automotive eld selecting a subject that ts in with your chosen theme (Connected World, Care and Cure, Smart & Sustainable Society or Automotive). You do this assignment in one of the capacity groups and thus experience real research for the rst time. The BEP begins with a kick-off meeting at the start of semester B of the third year of your study. During these sessions you select a subject on which you will work an average of two

days a week. At the end of the semester you will have to give a presentation and hand in a report in the form of a paper.

2.2 Examinations -----------------------------------------------------Types of examination The Bachelor study contains different types of examination. For most theory subjects a written exam applies in which you can make supplementary use of sub-tests while so-called observation examinations apply to skills where, for example, the quality of a written report of an engineering skill is assessed. In the subject descriptions in OASE the type of examination employed is stated per subject. (http://w3.tue.nl/en/education/)1 Procedure The examination timetable can be found on the study website (http://w3.tue.nl/en/education/)1. A written examination lasts a maximum of three hours. You have at least two moments per year to do

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given the binding study recommendation for rstyear students. So this applies only to rst-year subjects.

2.3 Honors program -----------------------------------------------------The TU/e Honors Academy offers brand-new excellence tracks for Bachelor students, and in the future for Master students as well. The overall goal is to prepare students for scientic, societal and personal leadership in a society that is affected exponentially by changes and developments. a written exam for a specic subject. The rst is in the examination period following the quartile in which the subject is taught and then (the re-sit) one quartile later. For a subject ending in quartile 4, the re-sit is in a week (interim week) in August. You must report in good time for a written examination. OER More details on the regulations for sub-tests and examinations can be found in the education and examination regulations (OER) and the examination regulations on the intranet. Registration of exams Registrations for study components result in automatic registrations for the relevant interim tests and the rst subsequent nal test. Interim tests are mandatory. If the student is not able to participate in an interim test or does not hand in any work, then the grade will be marked as 0. In case of exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the Examinations Committee, the student may request a retake interim test. If a student does not participate in a nal test, then he/she may not register for the retake of that nal test in the same academic year. Students are obliged, before or during the nal test, and at the request of the examiners or the invigilators, to identify themselves by showing their student card and valid proof of enrollment for the current academic year. If they do not have a student card, students can also identify themselves using a valid form of identication. If the student is unable to do this, he/she may not take part in the nal test. A student who did not successfully pass (4.9 or lower) an examination will be automatically registered to take part in a centrally organized retake of the nal test, A student who wishes to retake a nal test for an examination successfully passed must register at the STU in the manner specied by the STU no later than ve working days before the scheduled date of the nal test period in question. Marking period for written exams Lecturers must have marked the examination within three weeks. This applies across the board throughout the university. In the fourth quartile and the interim period, the marking period is a week, At the Honors Academy various Honors Tracks have been launched, addressing major societal and scientic questions and challenges. Examples of these themes include: How do we get people to take responsibility for their own health and wellbeing? Rethinking Power, a major challenge for our own environment What new opportunities arise when the merger of the internet, mobility and traffic grows stronger and stronger? In the track of your choice you are challenged to take the lead in your own development and in the project you are doing. You get the chance to work together with students from other departments, to meet inspiring coaches, to explore the forefront of know ledge and to meet with people from industry. Dive into your own discipline or explore other disciplines, its all up to you. The honors work will be on top of your regular work at your own department, and has a workload of 30 credits (840 hours in total; about 10 hours per week). It is divided in two parts of 15 credits each.

After the rst part your progress and the quality of your work are assessed. This is also a moment of reection on continuing your honors work or not. Successful completion of the full honors gives you an Honors Degree Certicate, a letter of recommendation and 30 additional credits. If you only complete the rst part you get a certicate and 15 additional credits. Actual information, see http://w3.tue.nl/nl/ onderwijs/tue_bachelor_college/tue_honors_ academy/2

2.4  OASE, the digital learning and work environment -----------------------------------------------------OASE is the digital learning and work environment of TU/e. It enables you to:  Get information on studies, subjects, examinations and timetables. Register for examinations, subjects and groups. Compile a personal lecture timetable. Access subject and group classes for subjects. Consult results. Consult a study package. Manage email and agenda. Log in The digital learning and work environment can be found via http://w3.tue.nl/en/education/1. You can log in using the same user name and password as for your TU/e email. How to use In the upper left of the page you see several tabs: News, Activities, Sources, People and Search. Once logged in, you will see ve personal tabs at the bottom of the page: Prole, E-mail, Agenda, Results

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and Timetable. These tabs contain relevant information for you. News contains news items of the university and of the subjects for which you are registered. You can personalize the news channels you want to see. The Activities tab contains information on subjects. Here you can register for subjects and examinations. When logged in, you can see a summary of all subjects for which you are registered. The folder containing documents and notices as well subject timetables can be accessed via this tab. The Sources tab shows your library loan and reservation data. Using the Search tab you can nd information within the OASE 1. The personal Prole tab allows you to see and change your personal details. The E-mail and Agenda tabs bring you to the Outlook Web Access, from which you can manage your email and agenda. The Results tab lets you see all the assessments you have had while the Timetable tab reveals your timetable according to the subjects for which you are registered.

lecturers, the supervision comprises: coaching; the mentorate; course study skills;  rst-year study recommendations (pre-Christmas and end of the academic year);  study planning in the 2nd year. More specialist supervision is provided via the STU. Coaching The supervision by lecturer coaches, in order to help you in making choices, is a key component of the Bachelor College. Throughout your Bachelor studies you will be coupled to a coach with whom you will discuss issues at various moments during the academic year. These discussions will center on the process of the choices you have to make throughout your study, with the rst choices concerning the elective subject choices in quartile 2 and quartile 3/4. The nature of the discussions with your coach is reective, which means that your coach encourages you to think about the choices you have to make as a Bachelor undergraduate and giving you specic feedback on them. More details about the coaching can be found on the intranet of the Bachelor College. Mentorate For a number of years senior third or fourth-year students have acted as mentors to rst-year students, supervising them from the introduction week for a semester. Student mentors assist in the instruction sessions of a number of rst-year subjects. They ensure that rst-year students quickly nd their way in their studies and in the department, that they feel at home and point out their responsibilities for their studies. The mentor acts as a safety net. Mentors also enable the department to respond quickly in the event that there is a threat of something going wrong. To ensure structural contact with the mentor, a two-

weekly mentor hour is timetabled in the rst quartile. The student counselor takes care of the coordination of the mentorate and offers support where needed. Study recommendation After each semester the rst-year students receive an individual study advice, based on their study results, among other things. Just before Christmas students receive an initial recommendation based on interim results and observations bythe study counselor and the student mentors. Experience reveals that these recommendations tend to be a good indication for the successful completion of studies. At the end of the rst-year each student receive the compulsory official rst years recommendation. This recommendation is binding, which means that the university can prevent a student from re-enrolling in the second year. The department does all it can to avoid such a situation: if the department considers someone unsuitable, the student is informed early on in the rst year and then properly supervised towards a suitable study. There are agreements in place with the Fontys Electrical Engineering curriculum for a student to transfer in January to a HBO (higher vocational education) program for a further three and a half years. Study planning for the second year At the end of the rst year of study students that have signicant arrears in their studies are charged to draw up a study plan and discuss this with the student counselor. Only after this plan has been approved can the student be given permission to study in the second year. This prevents students becoming even further adrift and enables the department to monitor progress.

2.5.2 Binding recommendation for continuation of studies


Students are subject to a binding study recommendation (BSA) composed of:  A written pre-recommendation concerning the study progress of a student within fteen days at most after the examination period in the second quartile for the academic year in which the student rst enrolled for a Bachelor curriculum. This prerecommendation is a warning sign in the event of insufficient study progress.  At the end of the first year of enrollment for the propaedeutic phase of the Bachelor study, a decision on continuation is determined by:  the student having gained at least 40 credits (of which 20 credits due to major courses) in the propaedeutic phase of the program, in which case the student may continue;  the student having gained 35 (must be a multiple of 5) credits or less in the propaedeutic phase of the program, in which case the student may not continue and will not be allowed to enroll for the study for the next three years. The lesson of the experience of recent years teaches that it is the exception that students must be rejected on the basis of the BSA. The structure of the propaedeutic year (see 1.2 and 1.3) is such that students for whom the study is not suitable are made aware of this well before the end of the academic year (normally around Christmas) and draw conclusions. The student counselor of the department is geared to helping these students subsequently nd a suitable study.

2.5  Study supervision / binding study recommendation -----------------------------------------------------2.5.1 Study supervision in the rst year
The study programs of the Electrical Engineering department train you for autonomous, independent professional practice. This is why the study supervision is concentrated in the rst year and gradually wound down in the second and third years. Apart from direct intrinsic supervision by

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Maarten Slenter

2.5.3 Study recommendation in second and third years


If you successfully complete the propaedeutic year, you can still ask the student counselor for a recommendation, the difference being that the initiative for this more frequently has to come from the student. The supervision differs per person. In almost every case, the planning for the rest of the study is a central thread. The student counselor checks the progress of all Electrical Engineering students twice a year and may initiate discussions now and then with the students based on this analysis. The STU also offers students who are at an advanced stage of their study various kinds of study supervision. At the end of the study you can call on the STU for training to apply for a job, for example. Consult the STU for more information.

2.6  Propaedeutic and Bachelor examinations -----------------------------------------------------There is a propaedeutic (P) and Bachelor (B) award ceremony twice a year, in November and in April. You have to enroll for an examination date, and the registration deadline for the P or B examination is stated on OASE 1. Enter Electrical Engineering or Automotive as search term and check the box also show Exams. The rest is self-explanatory. There are several examination dates but only two award ceremonies per academic year.

I have always liked electronics, especially computers. I liked the logic behind them. So when it came to my choice of study, I didnt doubt and felt Electrical Engineering would be it. After an information day and even following a course myself, I was sold. I already registered my choice, with more than a year to go before I would actually start. Luckily, my choice was right. I am studying Electrical Engineering for almost two years now and I havent had a single doubt about my choice. The abstract way of solving problems, the people I meet, the courses I get, they only have strengthened my choice for Electrical Engineering. These are not the most important reasons for me though.

In the end, knowing that Electrical Engineering is going to be an important discipline for many years to come is what assures me that I made the right choice. One tiny bit of advice: The Walhalla is a very nice place, but be aware about the combination of going there and studying for exams!

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3.  Program of previous generations


This part of the study guide describes the program for students that began their studies in 2011 or earlier.

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3.1 Electrical Engineering -----------------------------------------------------3.1.1 Third year


You make the study choices in your third year. In the rst semester you choose a minor worth 30 credits from the following list: Biomedical Instrumentation Engineering Engineering for Health Connecting Intelligence Educatie en Communicatie variant I Educatie en Communicatie variant II / Educatie Industrial Design Entrepreneurship and Innovation Human Technology Interaction Applied Physics Design of Mechanical Systems Technische Informatica Technische Wiskunde

You enroll for a minor via OASE 1 and automatically receive an email containing instructions. To do a so-called free minor you need to have submitted an application for approval to the examinations committee before 1 May. A special minors market is organized in the spring each year. More information about the minors can be found on the intranet via http://w3.tue.nl/nl/diensten/stu/onderwijs/major_ minor/minoren/2. In the second semester you choose from three tracks: Connected World, Care & Cure and Sustainable Society. Each track has a number of compulsory subjects, a number of elective subjects and the Bachelor End Project (5AF94). The total is 30 credits. The gure below shows the tracks with compulsory subjects. Below is a list of the elective subjects that can be followed within all three tracks.

Subject code

Quartile

Elective

Credits

5L130 5GG40 5LL91 5P645 5JJ50 5JJ90 5LL85 5GG15 5EE30 5GG75 5CC60 5CC70 5CC80 5LL70 5K019

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

Electrophysiology Electromagnetic waves and radiation Telecom Systems Power System Analysis Calculation networks Computer networks Photonics Fundaments of electrical engineering building blocks Power electronics Communication Electronics Signals III Adaptive systems Verication and performance analysis Intro. medical imaging Information theory

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3.1.2 Bachelor End Project


You nish your Bachelor studies with the Bachelor End Project (BEP) that includes a number of professional skills such as presenting, reporting and acquiring information. These basic subjects are therefore not accounted for separately in the third year. The BEP assignment must be carried out during quartiles 3 and 4 of the 3rd year with a start session in week 1 of quartile 3 and a closing session in week 7 of quartile 4. The hours for this subject will be timetabled in for you. You choose a track and select an assignment within that track. There are around 15 assignment options per track, divided evenly across the capacity groups involved in the respective track.

Care and Cure Electrophysiology 5L130  Electromechanical waves and radiation 5GG40 elective 1 elective 2 elective 3 BEP (incl. BV/TV)

Connected World

Smart&Sustainable Society Power electronics 5EE30 Power system analysis 5P645 elective 1 elective 2 elective 3 BEP (incl. BV/TV)

In the rst week of quartile 3 there is a kick-off meeting to: explain the structure and organization of the BEP allow track coordinators to introduce each track present an overview of the assignments per track Students will have a couple of days after the kick-off to indicate their rst and second assignment preferences. This will serve as the basis to designate the assignments to the students. If any assignment is oversubscribed, the students study results will be the deciding factor.

Telecomm. Systems 5LL91 elective 1 elective 2 elective 3 elective 4 BEP (incl. BV/TV)

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The assignments correspond to the theme of the tracks and the ongoing research activities within one of the capacity groups. Once you have selected an assignment, you will carry it out in a capacity group, spending an average of 20 hours per week on it. The assignment is completed with a paper (maximum 4 pages) and a presentation during the joint panel session. The will be a closing panel session for each track attended by the BEP coordinators, the supervisors and the students. Each student will have the oor for 10 minutes. The nal grade will be decided after the panel session.

3.2 Automotive -----------------------------------------------------3.2.1 Third year


You make the study choices in your third year. In the rst semester you choose a minor worth 30 credits from the following list: Biomedical Instrumentation Engineering Engineering for Health Connecting Intelligence Educatie en Communicatie variant I Educatie en Communicatie variant II / Educatie Industrial Design Entrepreneurship and Innovation Human Technology Interaction Applied Physics Design of Mechanical Systems Embedded Systems Technische Informatica Technische Wiskunde You enroll for a minor via OASE 1 and automatically receive an email containing instructions. To do a so-called free minor you need to have submitted an application for approval to the examinations committee before 1 May. A special minors market is organized in the spring each year. More information about the minors can be found on the intranet.

In the second semester you choose 3 elective subjects from the list below and the Bachelor End Project (5AF94). The total is 30 credits. Q3 DBL Combustion engine (4GB10) Introduction Telecom (5ETA0) Q4 DBL Robot-arm (4GB20) Mathematics II (5EMA0) Electric Drive Systems (5XWB0)

3.2.2 Bachelor End Project (5AF94)


You nish your Bachelor studies with the Bachelor End Project (BEP). BEP assignments correspond with ongoing research activities within one of the capacity groups or URE (University Racing Eindhoven). The BEP includes a number of professional skills such as presenting, reporting and acquiring information. These basic subjects are therefore not accounted for separately in the third year. The BEP assignment must be carried out during quartiles 3 and 4 of the 3rd year with a start session in week 1 of quartile 3 and a closing session in week 7 of quartile 4. The hours for this subject will be timetabled in for you.

3.1.3 Engineering and Professional skills


Professional skills are divided into training and individual assignments. The training is centrally planned and followed as a group while individual assignments are your own responsibility, which means that you must ensure that you make room for these in your study and take the initiative to enroll via OASE 1.

40 | Program of previous generations

4. General information

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4.1 The Educational Institute -----------------------------------------------------As a student there are various ways that you will come across the board and the organization of study in the department. The education institute organizes the study, comprises the curriculum secretariat, policy and educational support, educational quality assurance, study advice, education desk and coordination of practicals. The education information desk is responsible for the administration and logistics of the studies as well as signals educational bottlenecks, takes care of planning and timetabling, and gives information to students and lecturers. The student and project administrations are part of the education desk. If you have any questions about routine matters, you can contact student administration (PT 1.26), which processes all the student study data, including results and grades. Enrolment related details must be given to the Student Service Center (STU) in the main building. Contact: Annelies Meerbach student administration), PT 1.26, tel. 040 247 3537, email a.t.meerbach@tue.nl, Lies Termeer (study information coordinator), PT 1.26, tel. 040 247 4429, email e.j.a.termeer@tue.nl

advised by the curriculum committee. Within the agreed budget the Director of Education is responsible for attracting the required lecturers from the most appropriate capacity group. Moreover, the Director of Education is responsible for the quality of the education, informing the curriculum committee of his proposals concerning the curriculum and the quality of the education being provided. The Director of Education advises the research programs on improvements to the quality of the capacity provided. For automotive matters the Director of Education is assisted by dr.ir. Rob Mestrom who, in his role as Automotive coordinator, supports the Director of Education in shaping the contents of the automotive Bachelor curriculum and other tasks referred to above. Contact: Rob Mestrom, CR 1.05, tel 040 247 4042, email r.m.c.mestrom@tue.nl The student counselors of the department are dr.ir. Jan Vleeshouwers, ir. Sjoerd Hulshof and drs. Martine Greijmans. They inform, advise and supervise students, predominantly in the rst years of their study. They signal educational bottlenecks for the department and analyze student data related to study progress. As advisors they are connected to the examination and curriculum committees. Contact: Sjoerd Hulshof, CR 1.04, tel. 040 247 3713, email s.hulshof@tue.nl, Jan Vleeshouwers, PT 1.27, tel. 040 247 3217, email j.m.vleeshouwers@tue.nl, Martine Greijmans, CR 1.06, tel. 040 247 3237, email m.h.m.greijmans@tue.nl

4.1.2 Student Body (Studentenburo)


The Electrical Engineering Student Office (SB) fosters the interests of the students and comprises three students who act as contacts for their fellow students in educational matters. Given their daily contact with students, the Student Office provides early warning of educational bottlenecks as well as organizes various annual councils in which students of the respective year have a seat. Contact: Studentenburo, PT 2.33, tel. 040 247 3534, email sb@sb.ele.tue.nl Education Information Desk You can go there for questions and comments concerning Electrical Engineering studies. The desk is open every Tuesday from 13.00 to 13.30 and is manned by students and Student Office staff. Contact: Education Information Desk, PT 1.26, tel. 040 247 4429, email onderwijsloketEE@tue.nl

Contact the secretariat: Monique Hunck, PT 1.09, tel. 040 247 5427, email m.d.m.Hunck@tue.nl Greetje van Gemert, PT 1.09, tel. 040 247 3195, email g.v.Gemert@tue.nl

4.3 Departmental Council -----------------------------------------------------The departmental council (FR) is the departments representative body and exercises the right of approval and advice towards the board, which requires this approval in order to make decisions on the departments regulations and part of the education and examinations regulations. The departmental council is selected from the departments personnel (every two years) and students (every year). Staff and students have ve seats each on the council. For current council members see http://w3.ele.tue.nl/en/organization/1. Contact: dr.ing. Guus Pemen, CR 1.14, tel. 040 247 4492, email a.j.m.Pemen@tue.nl

4.2 Departmental Board -----------------------------------------------------The departmental board comprises three members: the dean (prof. dr.ir. Ton Backx), research portfolio board member (prof.dr.ir. Arthur van Roermund), and operations director (drs. Suzanne Udo). The Director of Education (prof.dr.ir. Bart Smolders) is advisor to the board. There is also a student advisor to the board (Leon van Barschot) who attends the meetings to voice the opinions of the students where appropriate. The members and the student advisor are appointed by the Executive Board.

4.1.1 Director of Education, student counselors


Professor dr.ir. Bart Smolders is the Director of Education of the department and responsible for the structure and implementation of studies, proposing education and examinations regulations (curriculum, including content and forms of study) annually. For the study contents he consults the professors and is

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4.4 Examination Committee -----------------------------------------------------The departmental board proposes an examination committee to administer organize and coordinate the examination. The members of this committee, appointed by the departmental board, are responsible for the education within the curriculum. The examination committee designates examiners to administer the examination. These personnel are charged with being responsible for the education in the respective subject as well as for experts from outside the institution. The examination committee sets the regulations and guidelines. Where the regulations are inconclusive, the examination committee consults with the students and lecturers concerned to arrive at a decision. The composition of the examination committee is on intranet. Contact: Annelies Meerbach, PT 1.26, tel. 040 247 3537, email a.t.meerbach@tue.nl

The OC advises on the study feasibility and graduation success rates of the curriculum among other things. Does one credit actually correspond to 28 hours work? Is the curriculum as it should be or are changes needed? Is the teaching good and how do the study materials rate? Are there pitfalls and, if so, what can you do about them? Are there organizational bottlenecks? The curriculum committee is also responsible for evaluating the teaching and proposes educational improvements to the Director of Education. One of the tools of the curriculum committee is the poststudy questionnaire that normally concerns a single subject: the rst-year subjects are surveyed each year while a selection is taken from the subjects that come later on. The committee also evaluates the greater whole, such as the propaedeutic year of the entire study. To this end, too, students are given a questionnaire. Once the questionnaires are processed by the Education and Student Service Center (STU), representatives from the curriculum committee discuss the results with the lecturers concerned and try to propose concrete changes where appropriate. The composition of the curriculum committee, which comprises both staff and students, can be found at http://w3.ele.tue.nl/en/organization/1. The OC meets once every four weeks. The meeting is announced on the notice board at the porters lodge. The best way of contacting the curriculum committee is via the secretariat. You can also speak to one of the members directly. Contact: ir. Rein van Asten, CR 1.04, tel. 040 247 5774, email r.a.t.m.v.asten@tue.nl

4.6 Research programs -----------------------------------------------------Education and research within the department of Electrical Engineering are contained within the research programs, a list of which is shown below along with the capacity group chair for each program. Meer information at http://w3.ele.tue.nl/en/ organization/researchprograms/2. Group
Electrical Energy Systems (EES)

Chairman
prof.ir. W.L. Kling

Electromechanics and Power Electronics (EPE) prof.dr.ir. E. Lomonova Electronic Systems (ES) prof.dr.ir. A..A. Basten Mixed-Signal prof.dr.ir. A.H.M. Microelectronics (MsM) van Roermund Control Systems (CS) Signal Processing Systems (SPS) Electro-optical Communication (ECO) Electromagnetics (EM) prof.dr.ir. P.M.J. van den Hof prof.dr.ir. J.W.M. Bergmans prof.ir. A.M.J. Koonen prof.dr. A.G. Tijhuis

4.7 Communication and information -----------------------------------------------------The Communication unit of the Department of Electrical Engineering focuses on: Providing study information. Maintaining the website and the Wall of Fame.  Organizing activities for school pupils (e.g., open days, orientation days). Making and editing brochures.  Organizing symposia and other facultative activities in the eld of communication. Providing information via Connecthor. Highlighting the departments research activities.  Assisting staff within the department in respect of communication. Contact: Pauline van Gelder-Hoen,PT 1.15, tel. 040 247 46 44, email p.e.r.v.Gelder.Hoen@tue.nl, Rianne Sanders, PT 1.15, tel. 040 247 24 22

4.5 Curriculum Committee -----------------------------------------------------The curriculum committee (OC) is appointed by the departmental board and advises, solicited or otherwise, the Director of Education and the departmental board on all educational aspects of Electrical Engineering (including the education and examinations regulations of Bachelor and Master studies). The curriculum committee also assesses how the education and examinations regulations of Bachelor and Master studies are implemented.

Photonic Integration (PhI) prof.dr. M.K. Smit

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4.8 Connecthor -----------------------------------------------------The Connecthor is a departmental magazine for the staff, students and alumni of the department. The magazine is made by the department of Electrical Engineering in cooperation with the study association Thor and appears four times a year. For more information or previous issues see http://w3.ele.tue.nl/en/connecthor 1. This site also tells you how to send your copy to the editors.

subjects which are taught and researched at TU/e. Students may borrow publications from the Library free of charge using a fully automated loan system. Opening hours are Monday-Friday 08.00-22.30 h., and Saturday-Sunday 10.00-22.00 h. The digital collection is avail-able via the website round the clock, 7 days a week. For detailed information about the TU/e Library, opening hours and services go to www.tue.nl/library2 Education and Student Service Center The Education and Student Service Center (STU), HG 0.72, provides information and advice about matters like study nance, student jobs, nancial matters, enrolment (student cards), registering/withdrawing from examinations, and examinations. See http://w3.tue.nl/en/services/stu/3 Contact: Education and Student Service Center, tel. 040 247 4747, email stu@tue.nl

4.9 Study facilities -----------------------------------------------------Library The TU/e Library is located in the MetaForum building at the center of the campus. An inspiring and information-oriented environment for individual and collective study and work. Via the Library website and on the shelves you nd an extensive, varied and up-to-date collection of digital and printed information resources. The main focus is on

Notebook Service Center Every rst-year student (bachelor or master) with a main enrollment at the TU/e can buy a notebook from the TU/e, at a heavily subsidized price. At this moment more than 95% of the students take advantage of this opportunity. The notebook also contains various accessories: rucksack, mouse, security cable, RSI notebook stand, separate keyboard and network cable. The notebook is supplied ready for use, including the necessary software. More information can be found at the central Notebook Service Center (NSC) (in the MetaForum building) or at the NSC at the department. See http://w3.tue.nl/en/services/stu/notebook/ notebook_regulation/4

venue for activities regularly organized by the Thor study association and informal get-togethers held by the department. Walhalla is open on working days from 16.30 till 19.00. For more information see http://www.hetwalhalla.nl 5. Thor The department of Electrical Engineering has its own study association, Thor (www.thor.edu) 6. The association was formed in 1957 and is for all students of Electrical Engineering and Automotive at Eindhoven University of Technology. Thor has three sub-associations: O  DIN, for telecommunication engineering (www.odin.ele.tue.nl) 7 W  ALDUR, for three-phase power and energy technology (http://w3.ele.tue.nl/nl/ees/waldur/) 8 Thor tries to ease the study for students through all kinds of services, for instance selling Thor study books to students and organizing activities to help students prepare better for their post-graduate futures. Such activities include excursions to electrical engineering companies, study trips, symposia and

4.10 Besides your studies -----------------------------------------------------Walhalla Walhalla is a place where students and staff meet outside of work or study time. Its pleasant atmosphere is complemented by low-price drinks. Walhalla is the

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meetings with former students about their careers. Finally, the association organizes various informal activities, the introduction and nice parties. IEEE Student Branch Eindhoven IEEE (the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.) is an international organization of and for electrical and information technology engineers with more than 330,000 members worldwide. It organizes conferences, published specialist literature and issues standards. Special sub-associations, the Societies, focus on a specic eld and publish journals, among other things. IEEE SBE is the Student Branch of TU/e, organizing a wide range of activities each year with the aim of trying to better prepare students socially, culturally and professionally for their future. For more information about IEEE, the Student Branch and its activities and possible membership, visit http://sites.ieee.org/sb-tue/1

Tech United The robot soccer team Tech United plays in the midsize league (top division) of the Robocup competition. Each team has ve autonomous robots on the pitch. In 2010 Tech United won the unofficial European Cup, and was World Champion in 2012 for the rst time in the Midsize League. It is quite a task to come up with a winning team. All the separate design components have to be integrated into one cohesive robot soccer team. This knowledge derives from a large group of staff, many from the department of Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. Tech United has different robots: the successful soccer-playing robots, the care robot Amigo and a Humanoid. Contact: http://www.techunited.nl/en 2

Solar Team Eindhoven The Solar Team Eindhoven will participate in the brand-new Cruiser Class category of the World Solar Challenge, for the rst time in 2013. This will be the beginning of a tradition in which the Solar Team Eindhoven will successfully participate in this race in Australia, realizing greater ambitions every year. The Solar Team Eindhoven will compete in the Cruiser Class. This means that next the criterion of speed, the car will be judged for the number of people transported, the amount of electricity taken from the grid, and its user friendliness. So for this class the challenge is obviously more than just a race. Since the Solar Team Eindhoven wants to contribute to the development of a car of the future, the design demands more than just a focus on speed. Comfort, ease of use, and feasibility are all key terms. The team consists of 22 students who spend a whole year full-time working on the rst solar family car. Contact: www.solarteameindhoven.nl 3

TU/ecomotive TU/ecomotive will yearly participate in the Shell Ecomarathon Europe Competition. The UrbanConcept class the team has chosen to enter with their vehicle. The restrictions in the rules obliges to produce a vehicle that comes really close to a normal car. The team started with eight second-year students working part-time on the car as a project, part of our study program. To be able to make this a success, they put in some of their spare time as well. In May 2013 they succeed in their goal. They got qualied with their electric car EM01, drove all laps, they were able to drive 534 km with 1 liter of fuel. Their car seemed to be one of the most reliable cars during this competition. Contact: www.tuecomotive.nl 4

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Texas van Leeuwenstein

University Racing Eindhoven University Racing Eindhoven (URE) takes part in the Formula Student competition every year. This international competition involves some 450 teams from universities and polytechnics. In 2010 the electrical class was launched: Formula Student Electric. URE races in this class whose races take place on famous circuits like Hockenheim and Silverstone. The team comprises around 60 students, including many Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering students, who work on the race car in their spare time. Every year the team designs a new car along with the corresponding drawings. Once the design is ready, the team can begin production and then the really vital testing part of the annual cycle to be able to excel during the races. Believe it or not, almost every component is designed by the team itself. Contact: www.universityracing.nl 1 After I graduated high school, I hadn't had a clue what education to choose. I decided to take a break and started working fulltime at a supermarket. I wasn't very interested in cars and vehicles until I got my drivers licence and bought my rst car. After working at the supermarket for nearly a year, I denitely knew I had to get back to school. I always had a hard time picking. Choosing a bachelor course wasn't an exception. I narrowed down my choices to Mechanical engineering and Electrical engineering. I was determined to choose between both until the bachelor program Automotive came across . The car is a perfect example of a combination of both disciplines, but it's absolutely not the only example. These disciplines can be found in nearly every high tech product and this broad aspect inspired me to choose for the automotive bachelor program. Studying the automotive program isnt easy, so keep up as long as you can and show interest in your subjects, the bachelor Automotive can be both broadening and deepening. Opportunity: When I decided to start a new Student Team with 5 other bachelor students, the faculty tried to help us the best they could. Our initiative, TU/ ecomotive, wanted to participate in the Shell Ecomarathon. A goal we achieved past year by designing, collecting and building a small city car. The team's goal for next year will be making a street legal small city car when still performing at the Eco-marathon.

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