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New Route PhD with Integrated Postgraduate Diploma Handbook

2013/14

Contents
Welcome and Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 7 Contacts .................................................................................................................................................. 7 New Route Contacts ....................................................................................................................... 7 Graduate School Contacts............................................................................................................... 7 About your degree .................................................................................................................................. 8 The New Route PhD Programme Structure ............................................................................................ 8 The Integrated Postgraduate Diploma................................................................................................ 9 Postgraduate Diploma Learning Outcomes .................................................................................... 9 Taught Programme and Assessment Structure ................................................................................ 10 Generic Module Learning Outcomes ............................................................................................ 10 Portfolios ....................................................................................................................................... 13 Generic Module Feedback ............................................................................................................ 13 Enrolment and Registration .............................................................................................................. 14 New Research Students ................................................................................................................ 14 Returning students........................................................................................................................ 14 Changing your personal details..................................................................................................... 14 Late enrolment/Registration ........................................................................................................ 14 De-registration .............................................................................................................................. 14 Requests to change registration status ........................................................................................ 14 Abeyance....................................................................................................................................... 16 Change to Mode of Study ............................................................................................................. 16 Research Students in Possession of a Tier 4 Visa.......................................................................... 17 Fees and Funding .................................................................................................................................. 17 Tuition Fees ....................................................................................................................................... 17 Examination Fees .............................................................................................................................. 18 Vice-Chancellors Prizes for Postgraduate Research ........................................................................ 18 Travel Prize .................................................................................................................................... 18 Research Poster Conference Prize ................................................................................................ 18 Doctoral Research Prize ................................................................................................................ 18 Research Funding .............................................................................................................................. 18 Dealing with Financial Problems ....................................................................................................... 18 Research Environment .......................................................................................................................... 19 Working Environment and Facilities ................................................................................................. 19 2

Graduate School Facilities ................................................................................................................. 19 Working Hours and Holiday Entitlements ........................................................................................ 20 PhD Process........................................................................................................................................... 20 Induction ........................................................................................................................................... 20 School Induction ........................................................................................................................... 20 New Route PhD Induction ............................................................................................................. 20 Supervision........................................................................................................................................ 21 The First Meeting .......................................................................................................................... 21 The Student-Supervisor Relationship ........................................................................................... 21 Changing supervisors .................................................................................................................... 23 Appointment of Supervisors ......................................................................................................... 23 Appointment of Externally Recognised Supervisors ..................................................................... 23 Approval to the Appointment of Externally Recognised Supervisors ........................................... 24 Formally Recorded Supervision Meetings .................................................................................... 24 Annual Progression ........................................................................................................................... 25 The Function of the Review .......................................................................................................... 25 The Review Process....................................................................................................................... 25 Review Criteria .............................................................................................................................. 26 Review Outcomes ......................................................................................................................... 26 Assessment, Progression and Award Regulations ................................................................................ 26 Modules, Assessment Blocks and Study Blocks ................................................................................ 26 Assessment: Grading and Marking ................................................................................................... 27 Core Assessments ............................................................................................................................. 27 Interim Awards.................................................................................................................................. 28 Requirements for a Postgraduate Certificate ............................................................................... 28 Accrediation of prior learning and awards (also known as recognition of prior learning) ......... 28 Award Regulations ............................................................................................................................ 28 Courswork Submission Deadlines and Submission Procedures ........................................................... 28 If you cannot submit your work on time ...................................................................................... 29 Coursework Late Penalties................................................................................................................ 29 Penalty for Late Submission of Capped Re-Assessments at any Time of Year ................................. 30 New Route PhD Student Support and Progress Monitoring ................................................................ 30 Programme Coaching ........................................................................................................................ 30 Confidentiality ............................................................................................................................... 31 3

Three-way Advisory Panel Meetings ................................................................................................ 32 Group Development Meetings ......................................................................................................... 32 Good Academic Practice ....................................................................................................................... 32 Introduction ...................................................................................................................................... 32 Your Responsibilities ......................................................................................................................... 32 Why should I reference my work? .................................................................................................... 33 What should I reference? ................................................................................................................. 33 Referencing Tips................................................................................................................................ 33 Summary Checklist of Information for References ........................................................................... 34 Final checks for avoiding plagiarism ................................................................................................. 34 TurnitinUK ................................................................................................................................... 35 Academic Misconduct ....................................................................................................................... 35 What happens if you are accused of academic misconduct ............................................................. 36 What happens if you are found guilty of academic misconduct ...................................................... 36 Where to get help ............................................................................................................................. 36 Research Ethics and Research Integrity ................................................................................................ 37 Ethical Approval ................................................................................................................................ 37 Research Integrity ............................................................................................................................. 37 Research and Skills Development ......................................................................................................... 37 Graduate School Training.................................................................................................................. 37 Researcher Development Programme.......................................................................................... 37 Online Training Modules ............................................................................................................... 38 The Researcher Development Framework (RDF) ......................................................................... 38 Keeping a Record of Your Training and Development .................................................................. 39 Involvement in Teaching and Learning ................................................................................................. 39 Thesis and Examination ........................................................................................................................ 40 Preparing Your Thesis ....................................................................................................................... 40 What is a Thesis?........................................................................................................................... 40 Format of your thesis .................................................................................................................... 41 Content of your thesis................................................................................................................... 41 Open Access .................................................................................................................................. 42 Submitting Your Thesis for Examination ........................................................................................... 43 Timing............................................................................................................................................ 43 Submission Process ....................................................................................................................... 43 4

Examination: the Viva Voce .............................................................................................................. 43 Timing and Practicalities ............................................................................................................... 43 Preparing for Your Viva ................................................................................................................. 44 Appointment of Examiners ........................................................................................................... 44 The viva voce process ................................................................................................................... 44 The examination outcome ............................................................................................................ 45 Process following minor amendments ......................................................................................... 45 Re-examination following major revision of the thesis ................................................................ 46 Archiving Your Thesis ........................................................................................................................ 46 Copyright and IP in Relation to Your E-Thesis................................................................................... 46 Conferment and Graduation ............................................................................................................. 47 Problems with Your Study..................................................................................................................... 47 Personal circumstances affecting your ability to study .................................................................... 47 Mitigating circumstances affecting your performance in an assessment ........................................ 47 Students with disabilities or chronic medical conditions ................................................................. 48 Supporting evidence for students with disabilities or chronic medical conditions ...................... 49 Problems with your Programme ....................................................................................................... 49 Complaints and Mediation................................................................................................................ 49 Mediation ...................................................................................................................................... 50 Appeals.................................................................................................................................................. 50 Appeals concerning academic assessment ....................................................................................... 50 Grounds for an appeal ...................................................................................................................... 51 A note on Appeals based on mitigating circumstances .................................................................. 51 Appealing against the outcome of your degree ............................................................................... 51 Challenges to academic judgement .................................................................................................. 52 Making an appeal .............................................................................................................................. 52 Stage One .......................................................................................................................................... 52 Stage Two .......................................................................................................................................... 52 Useful University Services and Links ..................................................................................................... 53 Accommodation ................................................................................................................................ 53 Alumni ............................................................................................................................................... 53 Brunel International .......................................................................................................................... 54 Computer Centre .............................................................................................................................. 54 Counselling Service ........................................................................................................................... 55 5

Disability and Dyslexia Service .......................................................................................................... 55 International Pathways and Language Centre .................................................................................. 56 Job Shop ............................................................................................................................................ 56 Library ............................................................................................................................................... 57 Security ............................................................................................................................................. 57 Student Centre .................................................................................................................................. 57 Other Support Services ..................................................................................................................... 58 University Policies ............................................................................................................................. 59 Programme Specification .................................................................................................................. 59

Welcome and Introduction


This handbook is for students registered on the New Route PhD Programme with Integrated Postgraduate Diploma. The information provided in this handbook is intended to complement the general University-level handbooks for students: Research Specific: http://intranet.brunel.ac.uk/research_handbook/ General Student Handbook: http://intranet.brunel.ac.uk/student_handbook/ The New Route PhD Programme with Integrated Postgraduate Diploma is co-coordinated by the Graduate School. The Graduate School is a place where you can meet other postgraduate students, find a quiet place to study, unwind in the social area and make the most out of your postgraduate experience.

Contacts
New Route PhD students are registered within the Academic School overseeing their individual research area and should therefore contact their personal supervisor or school research administrator with any queries or problems with the research element of their degree. However, the Graduate School co-ordinate the taught component of the programme and therefore any issues regarding the New Route PhD core modules should be directed to the Doctoral Programme Manager. Contact details of key staff members are shown below. The administrative contact (marked with a star) should be the first contact point for general enquiries relating to the programme. Your primary supervisor will normally be the first point of contact for matters related to your academic research, but where students have concerns that they do not wish to discuss with their supervisor, these can be raised with the New Route Programme Director. The Graduate School can also be contacted for general enquiries (graduateschool@brunel.ac.uk or phone +44(1)1895 265935 for Reception). Contact details for specific members of staff in the Graduate School are shown below. New Route Contacts Programme Director Dr Kate Hone Doctoral Programme Manager Jennifer Woodhead* +44(0)1895 265347 jennifer.woodhead@brunel.ac.uk +44(0)1895 266009 kate.hone@brunel.ac.uk

* Primary contact point for administrative queries. Graduate School Contacts For general enquiries, the Graduate School can be contacted at graduateschool@brunel.ac.uk or phone +44(1)1895 265935 for Reception. The contact details of specific team members are shown below:

Director, Brunel Graduate School Dr Kate Hone Programme Coach Dr Tina Ramkalawan Dr Senthila Quirke +44(0)1895 265150 +44(0)1895 267597 tina.ramkalawan@brunel.ac.uk senthila.quirke@brunel.ac.uk +44(0)1895 266009 kate.hone@brunel.ac.uk

About your degree


Research degrees at Brunel are governed by Senate Regulation 5 (SR5). See: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/administration/university-rules-and-regulations/senateregulations/research-degrees You are strongly advised to study SR5 carefully as it sets out the formal regulations concerning the award of your degree. The periods of registration for research degrees are as follows: Normal Duration Full-Time Students PhD MPhil New Route PhD Part-time Students PhD MPhil 48 months 24 months 96 months 48 months 36 months 12 months 48 months 48 months 24 months 60 months Maximum Duration

The New Route PhD Programme Structure


The New Route PhD is a four-year integrated programme of postgraduate training which combines research with a tailored course of advanced training in discipline-specific and generic skills. The research element is structured in much the same way as a traditional research degree resulting in the submission of a thesis and award of a PhD. The taught component is designed to be flexible and complement the students research, providing advanced theoretical and practical research skills to ensure a secure knowledge of the research area. The integrated postgraduate diploma awards your development as a professional researcher and explicitly recognises the personal and transferable skills obtained to make a significant contribution to your chosen field of research. 8

The Integrated Postgraduate Diploma


Students on the New Route PhD Programme will be studying for a PhD through independent research conducted in one of the partner academic schools at Brunel. Students will at the same time take an Integrated Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) which will enable them to demonstrate a number of learning outcomes which support their development as researchers. The PhD and Postgraduate Diploma will be awarded as two separate awards following the successful completion of the viva voce and providing the student has met all requirements for the PGDip as set out in Senate Regulations 3. The Integrated Diploma will only be awarded to students registered on the New Route PhD Programme and cannot be taken as a stand-alone course. A student will not be permitted to submit a thesis until all requirements for the award of PGDip have been met. The postgraduate diploma will be completed within 36 months of initial registration, unless prevented by mitigating circumstances. Postgraduate Diploma Learning Outcomes The learning outcomes of the taught element of the New Route PhD Programme with Integrated Postgraduate Diploma are formally: 1. Comprehension of basic principles of research design and strategy, including an understanding of how to formulate researchable problems and an appreciation of alternative approaches to research 2. Comptence in understanding and applying appropriate research techniques, methods and tools For behavioural scientists this encompasses a range of qualitative and quantitative methods and tools, including mixed method approaches For physical scientists this encompasses the use of appropriate research equipment and devices, and application of appropriate numerical analysis methods and tools 3. Capabilities for managing research, including managing data, and conducting and disseminating research in a way that is consistent with both professional practice and the normal principles of research ethics 4. Understanding of the significance of alternative epistemological positions that provide the context for theory construction, research design, and the selection of appropriate analytical techniques 5. Ability to effectively promote and explain the benefit and applicability of research ideas and findings to potential bodies, end users and other relevant audiences, such as students, policy-makers and the general public 6. Understanding of the key opportunities and constraints that arise from the academic, social, political, legal economic and environmental context in which research takes place 7. Ability to critically engage with the transferable skills agenda, including critical self reflection on personal skills development and training needs against a defined skills framework and the ability to articulate how skills gained could be utilised in a range of settings 8. Ability to engage effectively and appropriately with other researchers and end users in the process of knowledge production and transfer, including a critical appreciation of interdisciplinary team roles and the qualities of good research leadership 9

9. Ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the academic discipline in which the PhD research is situated 10. Ability to discern relationships between concepts and ideas and techniques across an area of substantive enquiry.

Taught Programme and Assessment Structure


The programme is designed to be flexible and meet your individual needs as a researcher. The taught programme consists of generic and discipline-specific skills modules. The table below shows the taught modules you can expect to take during your PhD programme. The discipline-specific modules in your chosen academic subject area will vary according to your chosen department but all students will take the following modules; Theory and Practice in Research Research Design, Methods and Analysis Research Management, Leadership and Personal Development Academic Research Dissemination Knowledge Exchange and Research Impact

Module Code GS5525 GS5527/31

Title

Credits

Study Year(s) 1 1- 2 1 2

Assessment Year

Theory and Practice in Research Research Design and Analysis/Research Techniques and Analysis Research Management, Leadership and Personal Development Academic Research Dissemination Knowledge Exchange and Research Impact Guided Study OR Discipline-specific modules Total Credits

15 30

GS5530

15

1- 4

GS5528 GS5529 GS5526

15 15 30

1- 3 2- 3 By end of yr 2

3 3 Years 1,2 (or both)

120

Generic Module Learning Outcomes There are five core generic modules which all students enrolled on the New Route PhD Programme must complete as part of the taught requirements (see above table). Detailed module specifications are available on the University document archive and also on Blackboard Learn. The aims and learning outcomes of these modules are as follows: GS5525 Theory and Practice in Research

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The main emphasis is on developing students understanding of the nature of research and the philosophical assumptions that underlie approaches to knowledge acquisition. The module also aims to provide a broad overview of the range of issues involved in conducting PhD research to provide a foundation for the modules that follow. Learning Outcomes The module provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the following areas: Understand the significance of alternative epistemological positions that provide the context for theory construction, research design, and the selection of appropriate analytical techniques Appreciate the range of issues that are involved in conducting doctoral level research

GS5527 Research Design, Methods and Analysis (Behavioural Sciences) The aims of this module are to help students to develop the practical skils that they need in order to design and conduct original research in the behavioural sciences and to analyse and interpret the data obtained. Learning Outcomes The module provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills and other attributes in the following areas: Comprehension of basic principles of research design and a sophisticated understanding of the connection between research questions/hypotheses and the tools required to address them Understanding the benefits and pitfalls of the range of data collection methods used in the behavioural sciences Understanding the ethical issues inherent in conducting research involving human participants and knowledge of how to obtain the necessary ethical clearance to conduct research Proficiency in the collection and analysis of quantitative and qualitative research data Ability to recognise the strengths and weaknesses of data analysis, appreciating the effects of contextual factors on the collection and meaning of the evidence.

GS5531 Research Design, Methods and Analysis (Physical Sciences) The aim of this module is to help students to develop the practical skills they need in order to design and conduct original research in science, engineering and technology; to develop skills in implementing and documenting numerical analysis. Learning Outcomes The module provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills and other attributes in the following areas: Comprehension of basic principles of research design and a sophisticated understanding of the connection between research questions/hypotheses and the tools required to address them Ability to make an informed choice between alternative data collection and analysis tools and techniques 11

Proficiency in the use of appropriate techniques to implement and report upon advanced numerical algorithms Understanding of the ethical issues inherent in conducting research and the need to promote a safe research environment.

GS5530 Research Management, Leadership and Professional Development The module aims to provide a structured environment for students personal development, including skills development related to managing their research, leadership, working with those from other disciplines and career planning. Students will plan their own research process, analyse their own training needs and reflect upon their development of skills. The module will include reflection on the global environment in which research and research careers are embedded, and the consequent opportunities available for researchers (such as research funding). Learning Outcomes The module provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills and other attributes in the following areas: Ability to critically engage with the transferable skills agenda, including critical self reflection on personal skills development and training needs against a defined skills framework and the ability to articulate how skills gained could be utilised in a range of settings Understanding the key opportunities and constraints that arise from the academic, social, political, legal, economic and environmental context in which research takes place.

GS5528 Academic Research Dissemination The aims of the module are to introduce and give practice in methods to disseminate the results and activities of research to academic audiences. Learning Outcomes The module provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills and other attributes in the following areas: Ability to clearly present their research ideas and findings to academic colleagues in a variety of formats Understanding of the processes and requirements for peer reviewed publishing Ability to critically reflect upon the experience of peer reviewed publishing and disseminating work to academic audiences

GS5529 Knowledge Exchange and Research Impact The module aims to help researchers critically reflect upon the impact of their research in the wider world. They will consider how they can ensure that their research meets the needs of defined end users and that findings are effectively communicated in such a way as to ensure an impact in the wider world. Learning Outcomes The module provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills and other attributes in the following areas: Ability to effectively promote and explain the benefit and applicability of research ideas and findings to potential funding bodies, end users and other relevant audiences such as students, policy-makers and general public 12

Ability to engage effectively and appropriately with end users in the process of knowledge production and transfer

Students also have the option of completing either an individually tailored Guided Study (GS5526) or a minimum of 30 credits of discipline-specific modules selected from appropriate Masters level courses. GS5526 Guided Study The module aims to support researchers in developing their knowledge and understanding of the academic discipline in which their research is situated. Learning Outcomes The module provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills and other attributes in the following areas: Knowledge and understanding of the academic discipline in which their research is situated Ability to discern relationships between concepts and ideas and techniques across an area of substantive enquiry Ability to present a critical account of research related to their own work.

Portfolios Every New Route PhD student is required to keep a portfolio to effectively track their own personal development. Keeping a portfolio of the research skills you develop, as well as work you produce, helps you plan proactively and independently for further development in academic, personal and professional contexts. With the guidance of your programme coach and supervisor, it will enhance the process of research by encouraging self-reflection, the creation of personal records, and planning and monitoring progress towards the achievement of personal objectives. Portfolio submissions will be widely used in the submission of assessments for the generic modules on the course. Generic Module Feedback Each generic module will have an individual marking scheme that will clearly communicate the concept of criteria used for marking and which will be made available to students via Blackboard Learn. Individual one-to-one tutorials will be available on request to provide formative feedback and to support researchers in preparing for assessment tasks. Following submission, marking and second marking of assignments, the student will receive written/formal feedback along with their grade (provisional to Board Confirmation by the Board of Examiners). In addition, module leaders may provide general feedback to each cohort after students have received their individual written feedback. Module leaders will aim to mark and have assessments moderated within 2 weeks of the submission date. Students will also be asked to complete their own feedback on the quality of the module/assessment which will then be analysed to inform future module and course level planning in order to enhance the student learning experience.

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Enrolment and Registration


New Research Students On your first day, you will need to visit the Student Centre situated on the ground floor of the Bannerman Centre to complete enrolment and registration. Once the formalities have been completed (which includes the presentation of your passport for identification and your highest original qualification certificate) you will then be issued with a University ID proximity/swipe card and computer account. Your ID card allows you access to your research building and out-of-hours access to other University buildings. Your ID card also functions as your Library membership card. Loss of your ID card should be reported to the Student Centre immediately. Note that there may be a charge for replacement of your card. Your registration at the University will begin from the first day of the month in which you registered or from 1st October where registration is effective from the start of the academic year. The minimum and maximum periods of registration for your research degree, plus any periods of abeyance, will be calculated from this point. Returning students Returning/continuing students are required to enrol in September regardless of their start date and this is normally done through the Universitys eVision portal. If you do not enrol within the stated deadline, the University will take steps to de-register you (see below). Changing your personal details You can use eVision to change any of your personal details. This is particularly important if you change your name or address particularly in the period leading up to the Graduation Ceremonies. The Student Centre will require documentary proof if your name changes. eVision can be accessed from: https://evision.brunel.ac.uk/urd/sits.urd/run/siw_lgn?STU Late enrolment/Registration If you fail to attend formal enrolment or complete on-line enrolment within the notified deadlines, you will be liable to pay a late registration fee. De-registration If you do not comply with requirements for annual enrolment, the University has to assume that either you have not arrived or you are no longer studying at the University. You will then be deregistered. A re-registration fee will be applied if you seek to re-activate the registration. Requests to change registration status If you wish to make any change to your registration status, you should discuss your request with your supervisors in the first instance. If you and your supervisors agree the change should be made, then you need to complete the appropriate form (see table below) through your evision portal. Forms HDS1/HDS2/HDS5/HDS6/HDS8 are now available online via evision. All other forms should be obtained from your Research Administrator or equivalent. The changes that can be made, with the corresponding form number, are:

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Form HDS1

Name Period of Abeyance (via evision)

Function Used to suspend your studies during periods where circumstances prevent you from studying (see below for more details).

HDS2 HDS3

Withdrawal from your degree (via evision) Change of supervisor(s) Typically used if a change of supervisory team is necessitated by staff changes but may, in extreme circumstances, be used where the student-supervisor relationship is deemed to have broken down irrevocably (see supervision section for more information). Used where circumstances prevent a student from submitting their thesis within the maximum period of registration allowed by SR5 (see below). Modes are full time, full time not here, part time, part time not here and continuation (see below for more details). For requests to submit the thesis before the normal period of registration has elapsed. Supervisor permission must be given to submit early (see thesis section for more information) Used where it is decided to appoint a supervisor to the supervisory team who is not a member of staff at Brunel (see Supervision section)

HDS5

Extension to maximum registration period (via evision)

HDS6

Change of mode of attendance (via evision)

HDS8

Early Submission (via evision)

HDS9

Appointment of Externally Recognised Supervisor

Paper forms must be fully completed and signed by you/your first supervisor (whichever is appropriate) and then returned to your School Research Administrator. In most cases a brief case/explanation for the requested change will need to be included in the form in order for it to be accepted. If your School supports your request, your form will then be forwarded to the Quality and Standards Office for approval by the University. If the University approves your request, you will receive a letter confirming the change in your registration status direct to your contact address.

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Abeyance If there are circumstances affecting your ability to study over a prolonged period (e.g. for more than one month) you can apply to take a period of abeyance. These periods do not count towards the normal or maximum period of registration for your degree and the University does not charge tuition or other fees during periods of abeyance. A range of circumstances will be accepted as justification for abeyance (for instance personal illness, family circumstances, etc.). The important thing in any individual case is not the circumstances per se, but the impact that they have on your ability to study effectively. If you are considering a request for a period of abeyance you are advised to discuss this with your supervisor at the earliest opportunity. The University will NOT approve retrospective periods of abeyance. If you wish to apply for a break in your studies, you need to have the paperwork in place BEFORE the date you wish to start your break. You are not permitted to submit your thesis for viva voce examination immediately after your return from abeyance. When returning from abeyance you will be required to enrol and clear any outstanding tuition fees owed to the University before being permitted to resume your research degree studies. If you miss your annual review of progress (pink form) due to a period of abeyance, this will need to be completed prior to resumption of your studies. Change to Mode of Study Continuation If you have (i) passed your normal period of registration and (ii) completed your data collection/analysis but are still writing up your thesis, you can apply to be placed in continuation for a maximum 12 months. You should only apply to be placed in continuation if your supervisors agree you will submit your thesis for viva voce examination by the end of your 12 month continuation period. If approved, you are permitted to submit your thesis for viva voce examination at any time during this 12 month continuation period. If the University agrees your application to enter continuation, you will be (i) notified in writing by letter to your contact address and (ii) charged a reduced one-off, non-refundable tuition fee. If for whatever reason you do not submit your thesis for viva voce examination by the end of your continuation period, you will revert to your full or part time status, whichever is appropriate, and required to pay normal tuition fees as published by the University. If you are in continuation over the start of a new academic year, you are expected to enrol. Failure to enrol will lead to de-registration (see above). Extension The Chair of the Universitys Sub-Committee for Postgraduate Research Degrees may extend the maximum duration, normally by not more than 12 months (full time) or 24 months (part time), if such a request is supported by the authorised member of staff within the School. Any requests for an extension must be properly justified (e.g. by describing the circumstances which have meant it has not been possible to submit a thesis by the end of the maximum period of registration).

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Withdrawal You are free to withdraw from your programme of study at any time. Such decisions should not be taken lightly and you are encouraged to talk through your options prior to confirming withdrawal. The Graduate School Tutors are available for one-to-one appointments if you would like impartial advice. Occasionally students may be advised to withdraw by their supervisory team because of lack of progress or poor quality work. When this advice is offered informally you are not obliged to withdraw. However, if programme withdrawal is made as a recommendation from a formal review of your progress, you would be required to withdraw from the programme. A formal review of progress can be called at any time, not just annually in the normal cycle. A formal review will always include a member of academic staff who is independent of the supervisory team. Research Students in Possession of a Tier 4 Visa By law, the University is required to report to the UK Border Agency (UKBA) any student in possession of a Tier 4 Visa who (i) does not attend the University and/or (ii) changes their registration status/mode of study. If you have any queries in regard to any changes which may affect your Visa status, you should contact the Student Centre and/or Brunel International for advice: Student Centre +44(0)1895 266268 (direct line) student.centre@brunel.ac.uk Visit the Student Centre in person on the ground floor the Bannerman Centre. Brunel International +44(0)1895 265519 international.helpdesk@brunel.ac.uk

Fees and Funding


Tuition Fees
In accordance with Council Ordinance 10, the University will charge you an annual tuition fee according to your student status for each year of your registration. If you are a student who is also a member of University staff, subject to certain conditions, your tuition fees may be waived in full or in part. Council Ordinance 10 also sets out the circumstances in and basis on which the University will refund of tuition fees You can find Council Ordinance 10 and information about the annual tuition fees charged by the University at: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/administration/university-rules-and-regulations/councilordinances/10 17

http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/pg/postgraduate-fees Contact the Student Centre immediately if you encounter difficulties in paying your fees. If a sponsor is paying your fees, you will need to check with them for any special terms and conditions affecting your funding. Typically, sponsors will only cover fees / subsistence during the normal period of registration, so if your studies run over this period you may become liable to pay any additional tuition fees yourself.

Examination Fees
When you submit your thesis for viva voce examination, the University will not charge you the nonrefundable examination fee, as this cost is included in New Route PhD student tuition fees.

Vice-Chancellors Prizes for Postgraduate Research


Travel Prize The Graduate School invites applications for the Vice-Chancellors Travel Prize four times during the academic year. The standard Travel Prize is 500, however, where a research student is making an oral presentation at an internationally leading conference and demonstrates excellence across all criteria, funding up to a maximum of 750 will be available. Prizes are awarded as a contribution to travel costs incurred by you in attending a conference related to your field of research. Refer to this link: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/services/graduate-school/research-student-prizes/travel-prize Research Poster Conference Prize The Graduate School hosts an annual research student poster conference during the spring term. Prizes of 500 are awarded for the five best posters. Refer to the following link for further information: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/services/graduate-school/research-student-prizes/research-studentposter-conference Doctoral Research Prize Academic Schools are invited to nominate a maximum of two research students who have been awarded their degree in each academic year for the VCs Prize for Doctoral Research. Nominees must have submitted their thesis for viva voce examination within the maximum registration period. The University awards 500 and a certificate to the prize winners at Graduation.

Research Funding
For information on current research funding opportunities, you can register for updates with Research Professional, see http://intranet.brunel.ac.uk/research/rsdo/ResearchProfessional/guidance.shtml

Dealing with Financial Problems


The Advice and Representation Centre (ARC) in the Students Union can provide general advice on financial matters, see http://www.brunelstudents.com/advice/content/26813

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Research Environment
Working Environment and Facilities
You will have access to the facilities and equipment necessary to enable you to complete your research programme successfully. All New Route PhD students are offered a desk and computer within their School, however, this is often only available through a hot-desking system and students may be required to share study areas with other researchers. Therefore the Graduate School have arranged for New Route PhD students to have special and exclusive access to the desks and computers located in the Graduate School Training Room (room 119, 1st floor, Halsbury Building) when it is not in use for pre-booked seminars/workshops. A weekly timetable will be displayed on the door every Monday morning showing its availability for New Route PhD student use. Where more specialised equipment is required, there may be some access restrictions (e.g. laboratory working hours) to which you must adhere. For equipment with high demand, negotiation may be required to agree access and you are encouraged to factor time into your research plan to account for any restrictions.

Graduate School Facilities


As a member of the Graduate School you have access to a range of facilities outside of your research institute. The Graduate School is located in the Halsbury Building, opposite the Lecture Centre, near the central quad on the University campus.

It is a space set aside for postgraduate students and researchers to use at any time of the day or night and is accessible 24/7 by a proximity card (i.e. your student / staff ID card).

The lower level includes the Postgraduate Common Room, a kitchen, a Quiet Study Room, a Conference Room, and internet kiosks. 19

The Graduate School Reception is located on the first floor and is open from 9 am to 5 pm on weekdays for advice and support. Away from the main Graduate School building, the Postgraduate Study Centre on the 2nd floor of the Bannerman Centre Room 213 - offers dedicated computer and study space. It is available only to postgraduate students and can be accessed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Brunel Graduate School is live on Facebook and Flickr. Regular updates on news, events, workshops and competitions are announced through a monthly e-newsletter and via Facebook. Information about the social and networking events that are organised by the Graduate School can also be found in the Events section of the Graduate School website.

Working Hours and Holiday Entitlements


As a student you do not have contracted working hours or holiday entitlements. Your performance is formally assessed on your progress, rather than days/hours worked. However, where access to a laboratory or other key equipment is limited to standard working hours, it may be necessary to follow this working pattern in order to make adequate progress. Any holiday to be taken should be agreed with your supervisory team and notified to your research administrator. Normally PhD students should not exceed the holiday entitlement of a member of an equivalent member of academic staff (that is six weeks per year for a full time post). The University is also closed for one week at Christmas and one week at Easter, though out-of-hours access to some University facilities will remain available during that time. Some research funders may implement additional terms and conditions regarding working time or holidays, so you should check with your own funder if this is the case.

PhD Process
Induction
School Induction On arrival at Brunel you will receive the following general induction activities: An introduction to colleagues in your School Provision of a work area and PC A tour around the School and its facilities Introduction to general facilities (e.g. printers, photocopiers, etc) Introduction to specialised research equipment Issue of Health and Safety Equipment if applicable Information about any mandatory training (e.g. Health and Safety training) if applicable

New Route PhD Induction As a New Route PhD student you will also receive an induction led by the Graduate School. Here you will meet the New Route PhD Course Director/Director of the Graduate School, the Doctoral Programme Manager, New Route PhD Module Leaders and your allocated Programme Coach. You will also receive training on Blackboard Learn and be provided with all information relevant to your programme of study. 20

In addition the Graduate School runs a one-day induction event as part of their Researcher Development Series. The Researcher Development Series I: New Researcher Induction event is run in both the Autumn and Spring Terms. This event is for all new research students who are within the first 6 months (or part time equivalent) of their research. It includes sessions on The practicalities of doing a PhD at Brunel, Working with your supervisor, 'Building a professional network' and more. There is also an opportunity for students to meet with their peers from the wider Brunel research community during a linked social event. Prior registration is required for this event - follow the Researcher Development Programme links from http://www.brunel.ac.uk/services/graduate-school to book online. The Graduate School also runs short (one hour) interim induction sessions during selected months of the year (these are typically held on the first Wednesday of each month). You should receive an invitation to an event after you have registered, or please contact graduateschool@brunel.ac.uk for more information. This is followed by the monthly Afternoon Tea for Researchers which provides an opportunity to meet peers from the wider community at Brunel.

Supervision
Formal University Guidelines on the Supervision of Research Students can be found at: http://intranet.brunel.ac.uk/admin/registry/minutes/cqstl/scpgrd/home.shtml The First Meeting Within a few weeks of registration the student and supervisors should have agreed: the frequency of meetings and key dates for measuring progress. The frequency of meetings will vary by mode of study and stage in the work but must fall within University requirements on formally recorded supervision meetings (see below). In the initial stages weekly meetings may be appropriate. Supervisor and student should keep a written record of discussions that take place at these meetings and any agreed actions the programme of formal research training, including any courses of study or seminars, colloquia, etc. which the student is required to attend and/or be assessed in as part of the programme. Full use of the Skills Training Programmes provide by the Graduate School is encouraged (see below for more details of the training available) a date for the submission of the thesis outline - which should be within the first twelve months of registration, irrespective of mode of study an intended date for the submission of the completed thesis, which should be within the normal registration period

The Student-Supervisor Relationship Responsibility to progress and successfully complete your research degree lies with you. In order to fulfil your responsibility, you will be supported by at least two academic supervisors. Enjoying an effective and productive relationship with your supervisors is one of the keys to progression and successful completion of your research degree. There is no right way to manage a studentsupervisor relationship. Every relationship is different in personality, experience, circumstances and dynamics. It is therefore essential to develop a relationship which works for all parties and one which is based on respect, transparency, the ability to listen to each other and speak openly to agree

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expectations, targets or resolve differences of opinion. The key responsibilities of both you and your supervisors are set out below. Student Responsibilities: You are expected to approach your research degree in a mature manner, taking responsibility for your own progress, development and success. Your responsibilities therefore include: Conducting your research with due consideration to the practices, protocols and ethical guidelines relating to your field of expertise; Maintaining the progress of the work in accordance with the stages agreed with your supervisors, including in particular the presentation of written material as required in sufficient time to allow for comments and discussion before proceeding to the next stage; Discussing with your supervisors the type of guidance and comments you find most helpful, and agreeing a schedule of meetings; Identifying and taking part in appropriate training to support the progress of your research and your development as a researcher; Completing the annual progression exercise and meeting the Schools expectations in relation to your contribution to its research environment; Deciding when to submit your thesis for viva voce examination, taking due account of your supervisors' opinion and advice. Your supervisors' recommendation to submit cannot be taken as an indication that the Examiners will find the thesis acceptable for the award of a degree. If you decide to submit against the advice of your supervisors, your supervisors are required to formally record your decision; Submitting an original, written thesis which makes a contribution to knowledge in your chosen field of research for viva voce examination by Examiners; Keeping a formal record of supervisory meetings in compliance with University regulations (see below); Taking the initiative in raising problems or difficulties, however elementary they may seem.

Supervisor Responsibilities: The responsibilities of your supervisors include: Giving guidance about the nature of research and the standard expected, about the planning of the research programme, about literature and sources, about training, about requisite methodologies including arranging for instruction (where necessary), and about the problem of plagiarism; Maintaining contact through the establishment of regular tutorial and seminar meetings, in accordance with relevant policy and in the light of discussion of arrangements with you; Being accessible to you at other appropriate times when advice may be needed or making arrangements for another member of staff to be available; Giving detailed advice on the necessary completion dates of successive stages of the work so that the whole may be submitted within your normal registration period wherever possible; Requesting written work as appropriate, and returning such work with constructive criticism in reasonable time; Ensuring formal records of supervisory meetings are kept in line with University requirements; 22

Arranging, as appropriate, for the student to present his/her work at seminars and conferences which might provide a good opportunity to prepare for the viva voce examination; Ensuring that you are aware of inadequate progress or of standards of work below that generally expected, primarily through the annual progress review exercise, but also through structured discussion at regular intervals; Giving guidance to enable you to complete amendments required by Examiners following viva voce examination; Providing general advice and support of a pastoral nature.

Changing supervisors It is essential to the success of your programme of studies that you establish a good working relationship with the two supervisors and that this relationship encompasses your personal wellbeing as well as your academic progress. Where a student (or the supervisor) has difficulty in establishing such a relationship, he or she should inform the PG Tutor/Director of Graduate Studies. Additional support or a change of supervisor may then be arranged with the agreement of all parties. Students may also approach the Head of Institute or Director of the Graduate School to resolve a problem regarding the quality of the Schools learning and support provision that cannot otherwise be resolved by the supervisor or the PG Tutor/Director of Graduate Studies. The Graduate School offers training sessions on working effectively with your supervisor, which may be helpful in dealing with problems before they get too serious. The Graduate School Tutors are also happy to provide one-to-one advice on managing the student-supervisor relationship. Appointment of Supervisors You are assigned a 1st and 2nd supervisor on the commencement of your research degree. In some cases, depending on their research, students will be supported by more than two active supervisors. Your 1st Supervisor must be an employee of the University, be research active and have successfully supervised research. The 1st Supervisor will normally hold primary responsibility for the management of your progress. If a supervisor leaves the University, the School may either permit the transfer of registration of the supervisor's students to the new institution (if appropriate) or should appoint another supervisor, normally in consultation with the student(s). Where students are close to completing their programme, the supervisor may be appointed as an Externally Recognised Supervisor (see below) subject to approval from the University. If your supervisor(s) take a period of maternity/paternity or research/knowledge transfer leave, arrangements must be put in place to replace them unless they expressly agree in writing to continue to supervise you during their period(s) of absence. Appointment of Externally Recognised Supervisors Externally recognised supervisors may only be appointed: 1. Where the School does not have appropriate internal academic expertise to support a research student in their chosen field of research AND/OR the supervisor is no longer a member of School staff but the School wishes to retain their supervisory expertise; 23

2. Where the individual in question holds a Doctorate (or relevant professional qualification/experience) and has already successfully supervised research students; 3. To the role of 2nd supervisor. Senate Regulation 5 provides that 1st supervisors must be a full time member of academic staff of the University. Externally recognised supervisors are expected to support you in accordance with any regulations, ordinances, policies, guidelines and procedures issued by the University and/or School. Approval to the Appointment of Externally Recognised Supervisors Recommendations for the appointment of Externally Recognised Supervisors for research students must be approved by the School and the University. 1st Supervisors should submit the following to the Research Administrator: 1. A case for the appointment of the External Supervisor, including but not limited to the benefits of this appointment to the PGR student in question and the reasons why the School cannot provide supervisory support; 2. A copy of the recommended External Supervisors current Curriculum Vitae (CV). If the School agrees the appointment, an application will then be sent to the Sub-committee for Post Graduate Research Degrees (SCPGRD) to grant approval on behalf of the University. SCPGRD approvals must be renewed after 3 years. Formally Recorded Supervision Meetings The University requires you to formally record contact points with the University for each year of their registration - see table below. The School and/or University reserve the right to NOT progress you at your annual progression event if you do not record contact points. Full Time Students Enrolment/Registration Annual Progression Event Submission of your Thesis Attendance at viva voce examination A minimum 8 supervisory meetings Part Time Students/Students in Continuation Enrolment/Registration Annual Progression Event Submission of your Thesis Attendance at viva voce examination A minimum 4 supervisory meetings

The requirements in relation to contact points for part time students also relates to students who are completing major amendments as required by Examiners within a period of 12 months after viva voce examination. A few additional notes regarding your use of student-supervisor meetings as contact points: We recommend you use the pro-forma sent to you by the Research Administrator. If you do not use this pro-forma, make sure you record the same information particularly your student

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number in your own format. Signed (electronic or hard copy signatures) reports should be sent to your Research Administrator. You should keep a copy for your own records. Your meetings should be face-to-face. If this is not possible, as a maximum, half of your supervisory meetings may be via telephone conference or Skype. If you have been granted permission to conduct your data collection away from the University, you must still record your contact points.

Annual Progression
The University requires that the progress of each research student is reviewed at least annually. The review takes place in the summer term for each year of your registration. The process begins in April each year when the formal paperwork is issued by Registry and must be completed by mid August in order to allow you to enrol for the next academic year. All students must be reviewed. The only exceptions are those who have submitted their thesis between the issue of the forms and the review deadline (where the form is returned marked as thesis submitted) and those on abeyance (who must subsequently complete a review prior to resumption of their studies if they miss the summer review period). The Function of the Review The review has three functions: to provide a check at the School level that each student is receiving adequate supervision and making appropriate academic progress; to provide the student with a formal opportunity to demonstrate and discuss his/her progress with a member of his/her supervisory team and at least one other member of the School who is not part of the supervisory team; Note: If, at any time during the course of the year the student is dissatisfied with the progress of the work, he or she should discuss the matter with the Supervisors/Director of Graduate Studies. Supervisors should also discuss unsatisfactory progress with the student as and when appropriate. Students may be required to withdraw if their academic progress is not satisfactory to provide the Registry with information as to the students registration status for the next academic session.

The Review Process The University sets the minimum requirements for the annual review process. This currently includes: The provision of a report by the student detailing their progress, and comments on the teaching and learning facilities and skills training which have been made available A formal interview between the student, the supervisor, and at least one other member of academic staff, who is independent of the supervisory team, to discuss the students work Completion of the HD/P1 form (pink form) detailing the outcome of the review, signed by the supervisors, independent reviewer and the student as an agreed record of the interview

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Review Criteria In considering your progress the review panel will consider whether you have reached an appropriate phase of your research given your period of registration. Exact milestones will vary by discipline and topic but as a general guide a panel would look for the following types of achievement at each stage of a traditional PhD programme: Early Stage (end of year 1, full time): thorough grounding in relevant research literature and use of research techniques; a well developed research proposal (including formulation of any hypotheses, detailed plan of work and thesis timeline); a draft of the literature review Mid stage (end of year 2, full time): Well advanced in practical research work (e.g. experimental set up, data collection); evidence of research dissemination planning Final stage (end of year 3, full time): Completion of practical work, data collection and analysis; well advanced in thesis write-up; starting to prepare for the viva voce examination; evidence of research dissemination (e.g. presentation at research conferences, submission of journal article/s) All stages: attendance at relevant training events, especially those recommended at the start of the programme and/or the previous annual review (if applicable); engagement in research culture (e.g. regular seminar attendance); attendance at regular supervisory meetings and appropriate record keeping.

Review Outcomes As a result of the review, the following outcomes can be recommended: 1. You remain registered for your degree 2. You transfer to registration for an MPhil degree (applies to PhD students only) 3. You withdraw from your degree In addition, the review can recommend changes to your mode of study (for example a move to continuation mode for those who have completed the normal period of registration and are nearing the end of their thesis write-up).

Assessment, Progression and Award Regulations


This section of your handbook explains how your degree result will be calculated and the rules for reassessment. It is a summary of the most important parts of the full degree regulations (Senate Regulations 3 and 4) which are available on the University's intranet site: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/administration/rules/senateregs

Modules, Assessment Blocks and Study Blocks


The regulations describe the assessments in your programme as being divided into 'assessment blocks'. Assessment block refers to an assessment, or discrete group of assessments, to which a credit-rating and Level have been assigned. Assessment blocks combined with the associated block of study and teaching (a study block in the Regulations) are commonly referred to as 'modules'. We will use the term module in the following as that is the term you will usually hear.

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Assessment: Grading and Marking


Each assessment (other than those assessed on a pass/fail basis) will be either graded or marked, as appropriate to the type of assessment in question. The following table indicates the relationship between marks and grades. Indicative Mark Band 90 and above 80-89 73-79 70-72 68-69 63-67 60-62 58-59 53-57 50-52 48-49 43-47 40-42 38-39 33-37 30-32 29 and below Indicative Mark Band Grade A++ A+ A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DE+ E EF Grade Grade Point 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Grade Point

Panels and Boards of Examiners are responsible for all aspects of the assessment of your programme. Progression will be decided by the annual Board of Examiners which meets during the summer term (usually between June and August). Students must achieve the minimum grade profile for the PGDip (see SR3) in the 120 credits of the taught element in order to submit their thesis for examination. All 2nd attempts at assessment will be capped at C. The University has generic grade band descriptors for its postgraduate awards . You should also ensure that you are familiar with any relevant subject-specific marking criteria for your programme, which are to be found in the assessment guidelines for each of your modules on Blackboard Learn .

Core Assessments
Individual assessments, or whole modules, may be defined as core. A core assessment or core module is one which, if taken, must be passed at grade C- or better in order for you to be eligible for the award in question. An assessment or module may be core for one award and non-core for another award. You should consult the programme specification for your programme to make sure that you know which modules or individual assessments are core for your intended award. Please note that core does not mean the same as compulsory. A compulsory module is one which must be taken (i.e., not optional) in order to satisfy the requirements for an award.

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Interim Awards
If you do not successfully complete all the requirements to receive the Postgraduate Diploma,you may still be eligible for an award in recognition of what you have achieved on the programme. You will normally only receive one award: the highest award for which you have met the requirements at the point that you leave the programme. This is a Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert). The programme specification will explain if these awards are available, and if there are any requirements relating to core assessments which must be met before you can receive either of the above award. Requirements for a Postgraduate Certificate Maximum volume of assessment blocks (excluding dissertation) permitted in the taught part Grade Bands A, B and C Grade Band D Grade Bands E and F With grade below C- in any core block or core element of assessment (A++, A+, A, A-, B+, B, (D+, D, D-) (E+, E, E-, F) 0 B-, C+, C, C-) Accrediation of prior learning and awards (also known as recognition of prior learning) The University has policies on how accredited prior learning (APL) will be counted when considering your eligibility for awards. These are set out in Senate Regulation SR3.25 38. The School will be able to confirm to you any modules from which you have been given exemption, whether the exemption is graded or ungraded and how this will be taken into account when making decisions about the award.

Award Regulations
The award regulations for the award of PhD remain as currently defined in Senate Regulation 5 for research degrees. Procedures for the award of the Postgraduate Diploma will follow the requirements of Senate Regulation 3. An appropriately constituted Examination Panel and Board will consider research students grades and progression at the end of years 1-3 of the programme with a recommendation award of Postgraduate Diploma (or other) made at the end of year 3. Students will receive the award and certificates for both the PhD and Postgraduate Diploma at their graduation ceremony.

Courswork Submission Deadlines and Submission Procedures


Submission deadlines are the latest time/dates for submission without late penalty and earlier submissions are welcomed and encouraged it is good practice, and is psychologically beneficial to you, to submit coursework before the specified deadline day. All coursework deadlines (date and time) will be published normally not later than 2 weeks after the start of the relevant term on Blackboard Learn in your Module Assessment Guidelines. Any necessary changes to the published deadlines will be notified to students as soon as possible. Formal coursework assessment must be submitted by electronic submission in Blackboard Learn. You will be given guidance during your Induction in submitting your coursework via Blackboard 28

Learn, the Brunel e-learning system. The start date/time of your submission (which can take some time for large submissions) logged in Blackboard Learn will be treated as the submission date/time. Please note that we do not accept coursework submissions via any other mechanism than Blackboard. If you cannot submit your work on time If you cannot submit your work on time because of unforeseen circumstances, you must submit a completed Mitigating Circumstances Form together with supporting evidence to Dr Kate Hone, New Route PhD Programme Director, ideally by the deadline and in any case no later than 7 days after the deadline see section [Problems with your Study] for submission procedure. If you do not submit a Mitigating Circumstances form to Dr Kate Hone within 7 days of the deadline (unless not practicable), the standard late penalties will be applied to your submitted work. If you do submit a Mitigating Circumstances Form with supporting evidence, this will be considered by the Chair of the Mitigating Circumstances Panel (or their nominee) who will decide one of the following: that the MCs are not significant and decide that the normal late penalty should apply; that the MCs are accepted and define a revised submission deadline for you; that your MCs are serious/long term, suspend the late penalty requirements for your submission and require you to be counselled concerning your learning and assessment work plan.

You will be notified of the decision as soon as possible by Dr Kate Hone, New Route Programme Director.

Coursework Late Penalties


The following late penalty structure applies to all full-time and part-time taught-programme PGT students in the University. The penalty takes the form of a cap, which is applied after assessment of the work. (Please note that some assessments may contain a learning outcome related to the ability to submit work strictly to a deadline and is therefore part of the academic assessment of such learning outcomes. In such cases, the relevant modular/assessment block outline and coursework specification will define how a failure to submit to the given deadline will contribute to the marking/grading in the academic assessment of the coursework. Irrespective of the academic assessment of timeliness, the standard late penalty structure defined below will still apply after the academic assessment is completed.) A working day is here defined as Monday to Friday at any time of year, with the exception of UK national holidays (if submission cannot be made in person to the submission point or through Blackboard Learn, submission must be made by post). An absolute cut-off date may be specified by Schools for all coursework submissions in the School such that for any work submitted after that date, regardless of mitigating circumstances, no guarantee is given that the submitted work will be assessed in time to be presented to the relevant Panel and Board of Examiners.

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PGT (except dissertations) The following applies to all full-time and part-time taught postgraduate programme students commencing their studies from 1st September 2013 onwards: The penalty takes the form of a cap, which is applied after assessment of the work. The following caps will be uniformly applied, in the absence of accepted relevant mitigating circumstances: Up to 1 working day late Up to 2 working days late Up to 5 working days late Up to 10 working days late Up to 15 working days late More than 15 working days late Mark capped at 70% Mark capped at 60% Mark capped at 50% Mark capped at 40% Mark capped at 30% Mark capped at 0% Grade AGrade BGrade CGrade DGrade EGrade NS (non-submission)

PGT (except dissertations) The following applies to all full-time and part-time taught postgraduate programme students commencing their studies before 1 September 2013: The following caps to be uniformly applied, in the absence of relevant mitigating circumstances accepted by the BoE: Up to 2 working days late Up to 5 working days late Up to 10 working days late Up to 15 working days late More than 15 working days late Grade capped at B Grade capped at C Grade capped at D Grade capped at E Grade capped at F

Penalty for Late Submission of Capped Re-Assessments at any Time of Year


(Please note that this section does not apply if you are undertaking a further uncapped attempt due to accepted mitigating circumstances, in which case the policy described in the above sections applies) If you do not submit work for a capped re-assessment by the deadline notified to you, you will fail the re-assessment and it will be recorded as grade NS (non-submission).

New Route PhD Student Support and Progress Monitoring


Enhanced student support and guidance is integral to the New Route PhD Programme design. Each New Route student will have two academic supervisors. In addition to your two supervisors, you will also be assigned a dedicated programme coach (based in the Graduate School), who, in consultation with your supervisors, will guide and support you in your progress through the programme. Regular 3-way Advisory Panel Meetings will provide continual review of your training needs and achievements. Group Development Meetings will also take place between the Graduate School and student cohort as a whole. See below for further details.

Programme Coaching
The responsibilities of the Programme Coach are to:

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Encourage the student to review their progress throughout the programme and reflect on their individual development Help with any issues identified by the student, providing guidance and expertise in personal skills development during the research process Help the students to identify and take responsibility for their own training needs and explore a range of solutions Support the student in articulating the unique features of the New Route PhD programme and encourage the student to work constructively with their supervisor(s) to identify training requirements specific to the research topic

Please note that the programme coach will not replace or assume any role normally undertaken by a supervisor. The students supervisor will remain responsible for supporting and monitoring the students progression with regards to his/her research. The coach will support the students general learning and development within the context of guidance provided by the national Researcher Development Framework (Vitae, 2010). The programme coach acts in a facilitative capacity and aims to be mainly non-directive. As such, the coachee remains responsible for any decisions made in relation to their own learning and development. The coach cannot be held responsible for students decisions or actions. The responsibilities of the student with respect to coaching are to: Approach the coaching programme in a mature manner, taking responsibility for their own attendance, progress, development and the work they produce Discuss and agree with the programme coach any preferences for the nature of the guidance and support to be received Agree to a schedule of meetings and keep sufficient notes through which to monitor and record progress Attend a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 8 sessions per year with their allocated programme coach Reflect on their own personal development as researchers and identify training needs as required Identify their own training needs and skills development requirements Keep their supervisor informed regarding their personal development as a researcher and seek supervisor input when defining their training needs

The provision of coaching is a source of ongoing support and is not available as a troubleshooting session. The frequency of meetings between student and coach will vary between individuals. There will be flexibility over the scheduling of these sessions and dates will be negotiated between student and coach. The frequency of sessions might be expected to vary depending upon the stage of research and progress towards New Route learning outcomes. Confidentiality The Programme Coach undertakes not to disclose any information shared by the student during sessions to any third party, including the students supervisor, without the explicit permission of the student. Where appropriate the student may be encouraged to disclose relevant information to appropriate third parties, such as their supervisor, their school or one of the University support services. Notes from all meetings will be made and filed by the Programme Coach and all notes will 31

remain confidential unless there is a significant threat of harm to either the student or the University.

Three-way Advisory Panel Meetings


The Panel will comprise of student, supervisor and a nominated New Route programme representative from the Graduate School*. The panel is responsible for reflecting upon the timeliness and adequacy of the students progress with regards to both the research and taught element of the course and ensuring appropriate liaison between the contributing academic units. The Panel will meet first near the start of the programme and again in term 3 in years 1, 2 and 3 of the programme (normally ahead of the formal annual monitoring of progress which is held between April and August each year). The aim of the first meeting is to ensure that the supervisor is supported in understanding the structure and requirements of the New Route programme and is given the opportunity to contribute to a three-way discussion of the individualised training needs of the student, taking into account the focus of their research. Subsequent meetings will provide the opportunity for three-way reflection on progress on the programme. It will provide an opportunity for both the student and supervisor to receive feedback on the students progress within the taught component of the programme. It will also provide opportunities for further three-way discussion of ongoing training and support needs. * Normally the Programme Director, Doctoral Programme Manager or Graduate School Tutor.

Group Development Meetings


Group Development Meetings will be an opportunity to discuss any issues or concerns you might have with your fellow New Route researchers allowing you to benefit from the views and experiences of others. These meetings will be attended by cohorts of students from different years across the programme to encourage peer learning. Group development meetings will normally be held twice a year.

Good Academic Practice


Introduction
Good academic practice involves completing your academic work independently, honestly and in an appropriate academic style, while referencing and acknowledging the sources you use. Your University induction and this guide will explain in more detail what Good Academic Practice means and the consequences of not engaging in it.

Your Responsibilities
It is important that you: Read the University guidance on academic practice

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Read the guidance on referencing and other academic conventions issued by your School and always follow these conventions

If you are unsure, ask for help and clarification at an early stage. See sources of help

Why should I reference my work?


At university, you need to show your understanding of the existing body of knowledge in your subject. It is vital that you know how to reference this material correctly. You'll need to engage with a variety of other ideas and texts, and make sure you acknowledge where these ideas have come from, by telling the reader what these other texts are. This is important in order to: Give credit to the people who came up with the arguments you're using and responding to Demonstrate that you have engaged with a topic Enable readers to follow up a topic by investigating your source material Avoid accusations of plagiarism

What should I reference?


Each reference must appear in two places: firstly in the text of your assignment, each time it is used (these are called citations) and, secondly, listed in full in the reference list at the end of the assignment. You may also list works you havent used and cited but have read as background; this list is called a bibliography. When you quote another persons work you should put it in quotation marks and reference it When you paraphrase or summarise another persons work, reference it When you refer to another persons ideas or theories, reference them When you copy a diagram, graph or table from someone else's work, reference it

Referencing Tips
Give yourself plenty of time to research and write your work. This will avoid last minute panic plagiarism Keep a record all the books and articles you find as you find them - always complete your references as you write your assignment, rather than filling in missing references at the end Follow carefully any guidelines provided by your tutors or in course material Put yourself in the place of the reader and ask yourself: do I have all the information I need to find that source again? Always cite the sources used in your assignments both direct quotes and ideas you have paraphrased or summarised. This is the basis of 'good academic practice'.

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Summary Checklist of Information for References


Book Chapter from Book Journal article Electronic journal article Internet site Newspaper article

Author Year of publication Title of article or chapter Title of publication Issue info e.g. volume Place of publication Edition Page nos. URL Date accessed De Montfort University (Sept 2007) De Montfort University: Department of Library Services. Available at: http://www.library.dmu.ac.uk/Support/Heat/index.php?page=475 (Accessed 3 May 2011)

Final checks for avoiding plagiarism


Follow this checklist before submitting your assignment : Are all the sources you have used acknowledged consistently using an established referencing system (e.g., Harvard, APA)? Are all the sources that appear in your reference list referred to (cited) within your work? Have you, to the best of your knowledge, used your own words throughout? Is it clear where all direct quotes start and finish? Has the wording of all direct quotes been copied accurately?

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TurnitinUK TurnitinUK is an electronic, "text-matching" service used by the University to assist in the identification of plagiarised work submitted for assessment. This process generates what is known as an Originality Report but this alone will not be advanced as the only grounds for suspecting that a piece of work is plagiarised or, indeed, as conclusive evidence against an accusation of plagiarism. The University expects all students to comply with the requirements of submitting work to TurnitinUK; this includes agreeing with TurnitinUK that it can be electronically checked for matches with existing sources and that an Originality Report can be generated. Work submitted to Turnitin, for the purpose of receiving an Originality Report, is automatically added to the Turnitin database. Any work submitted will be matched against numerous online sources, web pages and other student papers and the Originality Report will indicate the percentage of the submitted text that matches with the sources. All final submissions to Turnitin will remain on the Turnitin database. Work held on the TurnitinUK database may be used for the purpose of detecting future plagiarism and in any investigation of a suspected academic offence. TurnitinUK has a Privacy Pledge and a Usage Policy. The University advises that students should familiarise themselves with the contents of these. For further information concerning the use of TurnitinUK please contact the Head of Registry at Helen.Emerson@brunel.ac.uk.

Academic Misconduct
Students are sometimes tempted to gain an unfair advantage in their assessments. This is known as academic misconduct, and the most common form of misconduct is plagiarism. Plagiarism Plagiarism is defined as To take and use as ones own the thoughts, writings or inventions of another (Oxford English Dictionary). It has two elements: taking anothers work; and using the work as your own.

If you take anothers work but do not use it as your own because you reference it correctly it is not plagiarism. If you follow the guidance in this handbook, you should avoid plagiarism. However, there are other forms of academic misconduct that are just as serious, and carry the same penalties if proven : Collusion includes helping another student to cheat e.g. by letting them copy your work, in part or in whole.

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Cheating in Examinations includes taking unauthorised materials into the exam room or allowing someone else to sit your exam for you. Having the notes in the examination room or elsewhere with the intention of referring to them during the examination is itself an offence. Falsification may include the falsification of results, mitigating circumstances, a doctors certificate or any other document to gain an unfair advantage. Contract Cheating occurs when a student gets someone else to complete an assignment for them and then hands it in as their own work e.g. by posting an assignment on an essay mill website. Impersonation consists of a substitute taking the place of a student in an examination or other form of assessment.

What happens if you are accused of academic misconduct


Where a School suspects academic misconduct they will in the first instance write to you or ask you to meet with them to discuss the allegations, and you will be asked to respond to those allegations. If they do not accept your explanation, your case will be referred to the Vice-Chancellors Representative or to a Disciplinary Panel to determine whether or not you are guilty of a disciplinary offence. The Advice and Representation Centre http://brunelstudents.com/arc can assist you in understanding the disciplinary procedures and in writing your statement.

What happens if you are found guilty of academic misconduct


If found guilty of an academic offence, there is a range of penalties that might be applied. This includes expulsion from the University. Full details of the disciplinary process and the range of penalties can be found in Senate Regulation 6: http://.brunel.ac.uk/about/administration/university-rules-and-regulations/senate-regulations

Where to get help


If you have concerns about your ability to reference correctly, or any personal issues that may be affecting your academic performance (however complex they may appear), seek help promptly. In the first instance you are advised to speak to your supervisor. However, you can also get help from the sources shown below: The Graduate School provides skills training, online access to research skills training courses and a dedicated training session for part time research students. Find out more at: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/services/graduate-school The Counselling Service offers free appointments, arranged either by going to the Counselling Reception, opposite the Medical Centre (drop in without an appointment between 2 - 3pm Mon-Fri), or by phoning 01895 265070. Find out more at: http://intranet/brunel.ac.uk/counselling The International Pathways and Language Centre (IPLC) provides international students with English support through a range of courses and one-to-one tutorials. Find out more at: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/international/current-students/insessional-english/courses/

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The Subject Area Librarian for your School will be happy to answer any questions that you have and help you find the information you need. Find out more at: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/library The Academic Skills Service (ASK) is based on the ground floor of the Library and you can attend workshops, access drop-in advice services and access resources to help you improve your learning at university. Find out more at: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/library/ask Additional information is also available here: http://intranet.brunel.ac.uk/registry/QS/Intro%20students.shtml

Research Ethics and Research Integrity


Ethical Approval
Ethical approval must be obtained for all research involving human participants or human tissue samples. Further information on University policy and copies of the Application Form for Research Ethics Approval can be found at: http://intranet.brunel.ac.uk/registry/minutes/researchethics/home.shtml Research Ethics training is available (see Graduate School Training).

Research Integrity
All researchers at Brunel are expected to be aware of and abide by the Universitys Code of Good Conduct in Research Practice, see: http://intranet.brunel.ac.uk/admin/humanresources/handbook/academic/codeconduct.shtml

Research and Skills Development


Graduate School Training
Researcher Development Programme The Graduate School runs a series of dedicated workshops and events for all Postgraduate Researchers at Brunel. The Researcher Development Programme offers over 300 hours of workshops and seminars in a range of skills: Research, personal effectiveness, enterprise and employability, aligned to the national Researcher Development Framework (see below). Researchers are generally encouraged to participate in approximately two weeks per year of skills development to support the process of becoming effective researchers. Your level of participation in the programme is optional and your choice of what to attend will vary depending on your previous experience, personal interests and professional goals and you are advised to review your development needs regularly with your supervisory team. Workshops within the Researcher Development Programme are delivered by internal and external academics and experts. The majority are also delivered across disciplines to encourage researchers to develop their interdisciplinary skills and networks. 37

Part of the Researcher Development Programme is the annual Researcher Development Series 1, 2 and 3. These one day events cover: 1. New Researcher Induction 2. Intermediate Researcher Development 3. Advanced Researcher Development Doctoral students are encouraged to attend the series at appropriate times during the course of their PhD (i.e. Series 1. is for students in the first 12 months of their research, 2. for those between 12 - 24 months, and 3. for those in the final phase of their doctoral programmes). To attend, you must register online through the Graduate Schools workshop booking system and you may register for only one of the above workshops each year the one corresponding most closely to the stage of your doctoral study. For a full up-to-date listing of Graduate School training, click on the http://www.brunel.ac.uk/services/graduate-school icon at

Online Training Modules A number of online research training modules are available from the Graduate School. These can be accessed via the Universitys Virtual Learning Environment, Blackboard Learn, see: https://blackboard.brunel.ac.uk/ The Researcher Development Framework (RDF) The Researcher Development Framework has been designed by Vitae with input from researchers from across Higher Education and Research. The RDF sets out the knowledge, behaviours and attributes of effective researchers from new researcher to expert researcher appropriate for a wide range of careers. It provides a framework against which you can assess your strengths and identify areas for development. It is a common framework for researcher development across UK institutions and is recognised by the UK Research Councils and the Higher Education Academy. The RDF is structured around four domains, which encompass what researchers need to know to do research, to be effective in their approach to research when working with others, and in contributing to the wider environment.

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The RDF: Summary of 4 domains & 12 sub-domains

For more information on the RDF see: www.vitae.ac.uk/rdf Keeping a Record of Your Training and Development You are encouraged to keep a reflective record of your personal and professional development. Pebblepad software is available at Brunel to support this process if you wish to use it and training is available (please contact the Graduate School for more information). A record is also automatically kept of any Graduate School course that you attend using the attendance record from the course. You may access your records at any time and download a certificate of attendance or record of courses taken by visiting the Researcher Development Programme webpage, selecting My Course History and clicking on Download Certificate.

Involvement in Teaching and Learning


Learning and Teaching Committee publish formal guidelines on the participation of research students in the delivery of learning and teaching, which can be found here: http://intranet.brunel.ac.uk/admin/registry/minutes/cqstl/scpgrd/home.shtml External to Brunel, the WouldLikeToTeach initiative has been created by the Institute of Education, University of London, to help doctoral researchers and research staff find opportunities to get teaching experience in Higher Education. You can register your details as a potential teacher online at http://www.wouldliketoteach.org/ For those interested in receiving training in Learning and Teaching, an introductory session is available within the Graduate School Researcher Development Programme and a longer Graduate Learning and Teaching Programme (suitable for Graduate Teaching Assistants) is delivered through 39

Staff Development. More information on the GLTP and an up-to-date schedule can be found on the Academic Practice pages of the Staff Development website at: https://moss.brunel.ac.uk/SiteDirectory/staffdev/academicpractice/Pages/Home.aspx

Thesis and Examination


Preparing Your Thesis
What is a Thesis? Senate Regulations 5.26 to 5.33 give information about what a thesis is. Your thesis must conform to University Guidelines. The major part of the thesis, including the written material, must have been completed during the period of your registration with the University, under supervisory arrangements approved by the University. The thesis may include published papers by the candidate which must be acknowledged in the text of the thesis. Prior publication by the candidate and his/her supervisor(s) of papers or patents arising from the research being undertaken will not prejudice the assessment of the thesis by the Examiners. A student may include in a thesis work which s/he may have submitted for a degree of this or any other University or other recognised award-granting body, or published prior to his/her registration provided that this is clearly indicated in the text and that such material does not comprise a substantial part of the thesis. All work that is not the candidate's own must be acknowledged. It may be helpful for you to look at what the Examiners have to affirm about the thesis after your examination. Before recommending that a candidate be awarded the appropriate degree, Examiners are required to certify a. that they have satisfied themselves that the thesis is a satisfactory record of research undertaken by the candidate and is genuinely the work of the candidate; b. that, for a doctoral degree, the thesis forms a distinct contribution to the knowledge of the subject; c. that the candidate has given evidence of a broad knowledge and understanding of the discipline and of associated research techniques, and has shown that they have been successfully applied; d. that the thesis is satisfactory in its literary presentation; e. that the thesis is suitable for publication (by placing on the shelves of the University library or otherwise) as a work approved for a higher degree of Brunel University. Separate additional criteria apply to doctoral and to Masters candidates. A candidate for a doctoral degree (PhD, EngD, EdD, and DBA) must also show a satisfactory record of research and a thorough knowledge of the field of scholarship. The candidate is required to demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of his/her discipline and of associated research techniques and to show that they have been successfully applied. The thesis shall form a distinct and original contribution to knowledge in the discipline. 40

A candidate for a Masters degree (MPhil), is also required to demonstrate a satisfactory record of research, a broad knowledge and understanding of the field of study and of associated research techniques and to show that they have been successfully applied. The thesis should also include a critical survey of knowledge in the approved field of study. The award of a Masters degree does not require candidates to demonstrate a distinct and original contribution to knowledge in that discipline. A candidate for any research degree is required to show appropriate ability in the organisation and presentation of his/her material in the thesis, which must demonstrate clarity of expression and appropriate literary style. It must be in the English language, and must be suitable for publication, either as submitted or suitably abridged. It is most important that you acknowledge all your sources in your thesis and that you reference them in accordance with conventions in your discipline. If you fail to do so you may be charged with plagiarism which is a disciplinary offence and may result in you being expelled from the University without an award. Format of your thesis You should consult ISO7144: Documentation presentation of theses and similar documents. Advice on these matters is available from the Library or the Print Room Essential points of this Standard are that: the copy must be legible; the size of character used in the main text, including displayed matter and notes, should be not less than 2.0mm for capitals and 1.5mm for x-height (height of lowercase x); paper should be size A4, white, acid-free, and within the range 70g/m2 to 100g/m2; text should be single sided, right hand pages only; line spacing should be 1.5, with a 40mm margin at the binding edge and other margins not less than 15mm - margins should not include the page number. It is also important to check that any tables, diagrams, photographs etc also have suitable margins.

Content of your thesis Your thesis must conform to Brunel University guidelines. It may include work which you have already published, with other collaborators or as the sole author, but you must acknowledge this in the text and bind all such work at the end of the thesis. Work which you have submitted for an award at Brunel or any other University or award-granting body can also be included, but this too must be clearly indicated in the text and should not make up a substantial part of the thesis. The University has clearly defined rules on plagiarism, which are set out in Senate Regulation 6. You must clearly indicate all work included in the thesis that is not your own to avoid any risk of breaking these rules. Your supervisors will advise you on your Schools guidelines for what constitutes plagiarism in its academic disciplines. Further guidance on plagiarism is provided above in the section on Good Academic Practice.

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Introductory Pages Title pages should be laid out as shown below. The name of your supervisors may be included in the acknowledgments but should not be mentioned on the title page. The order of introductory pages is: title page, abstract (discussed in the next section), contents, acknowledgments. Example title page: INVESTIGATION INTO LITERACY OF PhD STUDENTS A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy by John Augustus Smith School of Arts Brunel University May 2005

Abstract Your thesis should contain an abstract, which may be edited by your supervisors. It should be on one side of A4 and no more than 300 words in length. The abstract should be bound after the title page and in a form suitable for separate publication since the University may publish it without further reference to you. Open Access Brunel encourages Open Access publication. Funds are available to support Open Access publishing (see http://www.brunel.ac.uk/services/library/research/open-access-publishing/). Brunel also has its own Open Access repository, BURA (see http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/) and all researchers are encouraged to place pre-print or open access versions of their publications on BURA to increase the exposure of their work.

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Submitting Your Thesis for Examination


Timing You must have completed the major part of the thesis, including the written material, during your period of registration with the University, under supervision arrangements approved by the University. You must submit your thesis before the end of your maximum period of registration (unless an extension has been formally approved by the Chair of the Sub-Committee for Postgraduate Research Degrees). The Chair of the Sub-Committee for Postgraduate Research Degrees may approve the submission and examination of a thesis before the end of the normal (minimum) period of registration if your Head of School and principal supervisor make a formal recommendation using form HDE1. Submission Process Your supervisors will advise you about when, in their opinion, your thesis is ready for submission, although you are not required to adhere to this guidance unless you have not yet completed your normal period of registration. Your thesis should be in 'Perfect Binding'; the Print Room can arrange to do this for you. Your supervisors will advise you about the number of copies which you must ask to have prepared; it will normally be three, but if you need to have additional examiners (e.g. as a member of Brunel staff) it may be more. You will also be expected to bring a further copy of the thesis with you to the viva voce examination. When you submit your thesis for examination, your principal supervisor and Head of School must certify (on 'Higher Degree Examination' form HD/E1) that you have completed the required study for the degree. Note: The University reserves the right to require the submission of an electronic version of your thesis, which will be subject to checks for originality and plagiarism.

Examination: the Viva Voce


Timing and Practicalities As a candidate for a PhD degree you will be required to defend your thesis at a viva voce examination. The Examiners may propose to recommend an award without holding the viva voce examination, but this only happens in exceptional circumstances, and in all such cases the permission of Senate must be sought. It is also normal practice for candidates for a Master's degree by research to undergo a viva voce examination. The viva voce must normally be held within three months of the date of submission of the thesis. The date is arranged in consultation with all concerned (normally the research administrator within your Institute will finalise the details). You have the right to invite your principal supervisor to be present at the viva voce. If present, your principal supervisor may speak during the viva voce only if invited to do so by the Examiners. Viva voce examinations are normally held on the Brunel campus, but may be held outside the University if you and all the Examiners so agree. Such arrangements are normally also subject to the 43

agreement of the Chair of the Learning and Teaching Committee and your Head of School. A senior member of the School, experienced in the examination of research students, must also be present if the viva voce is held off-campus. Preparing for Your Viva It is recommended that you read you thesis thoroughly at least once before the viva. You may take a copy of the thesis into the viva voce examination, including any notes that you wish to make. You are advised to seek further advice from your supervisor on the best way of preparing for your viva examination. One-to-one advice is also available from the Graduate School Tutors and a regular workshop is delivered on viva preparation. Some students find that a mock viva is helpful as part of their preparation. Students who wish to request a mock viva should speak to their supervisory team in order to arrange this. Appointment of Examiners All candidates will be examined by at least two examiners, one internal to the University and one external. Candidates who are current or recent members of staff must be examined by three examiners, two of whom are external to the University. An Independent Chair is appointed at the same time as the examiners; their role is to oversee the examination process, not to act as an examiner. Examiners must be formally appointed (following University procedures) prior to the start of the examination process (i.e. before copies of the thesis are sent out to examiners). Senate Regulation 5 sets out the rules around the appointment of examiners, see: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/administration/university-rules-and-regulations/senateregulations/research-degrees The viva voce process A typical running-order for a viva voce examination is Examiners Pre-Meeting Duration: normally between 30-60 minutes Examiners review their preliminary reports, review the University regulations, ensure they have the appropriate forms to complete and agree their line of questioning. Be aware that the Examiners preliminary reports are confidential to the University unless your Examiners expressly agree to release them to you for the purposes of completing your amendments, if they require any. You will be invited to defend your thesis and demonstrate the breadth of your knowledge in the presence of your Examiners, Independent Chair and one of your supervisors (if you have agreed to their presence) There are no time limits around viva voce examination but a minimum 90 minutes would not be unusual. Do not assume anything about the outcome time is no indication of result!

The Examination

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Deliberation

When their line of questioning has been exhausted, you will be invited to leave the room to enable your Examiners to deliberate the outcome. Do not be afraid to ask your Examiner(s) to repeat or clarify a question if you did not understand it first time. You will be invited to return to the examination room whereby your Examiners will (i) inform you of the outcome and (ii) explain the amendments they require you to make to your thesis, if any. Your examiners will also confirm the process for signing off your amendments if applicable.

Outcome

The Chair will normally allow for appropriate breaks but do not be afraid to request a break for comfort or to regain concentration during your viva voce examination. The examination outcome Your Examiners will complete a joint Report of Examiners (form AF1 or AF2 depending on the degree) and make one of the following recommendations: You be awarded the degree for which you were being examined; Your are awarded the degree subject to minor amendments (specified by your Examiners in their report) to the thesis to be completed within a period of up to 4 months; You are permitted to re-enter the examination and to re-present your thesis in a revised form within 12 months either with or without a further viva voce examination (as stipulated by the Examiners in their report); You be re-examined orally on the same thesis within 6 months; Your performance is insufficient to merit the award of PhD but you should be re-examined, with or without a further viva voce examination (as stipulated by your Examiner in their report), on your thesis for the award of an MPhil, following appropriate revisions within a period of not more than 6 months ( a further report must be made on form AF2); You are not awarded your degree.

You will receive a letter from the University confirming the outcome of your viva voce examination. Attached to this letter will be a copy of the extract from the Examiners joint report which outlines any amendments you are required to make. If applicable, the period in which you are expected to complete amendments commences from the date of your viva voce examination. In the rare event your Examiners disagree on their recommendations, they will be asked to submit separate reports to the University. Senate, after taking advice from the Learning and Teaching Committee, will resolve the disagreement based on the reports presented to them. Process following minor amendments When you have completed your minor amendments to the standard required by your Examiners, you must deliver one ring/spiral bound copy of your thesis to your Research Administrator. This will

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then be sent to your Internal Examiner (unless otherwise agreed at viva voce examination) who is responsible for signing off your amendments. Your Internal Examiner will complete form HDE4 to confirm approval to your amendments. The University will issue a letter to confirm the award of your degree on receipt of a completed HDE4 form from the School. The University will not approve the award of your degree if you are in debt to the University. Re-examination following major revision of the thesis If you are asked by your examiners to revise and re-submit your thesis for a second examination, you should note that you will be expected to pay a second examination fee. You will need to continue working closely with your supervisor to ensure that you understand and address the requirements set by the examiners. You are also advised to seek the advice of your supervisory team prior to submitting your revised thesis. Once you have completed the amendments to the standard required by your examiners, you must deliver a ring/spiral bound copy for each of your examiners to the Research Administrator. These will be sent to the internal and external examiners for reexamination. Should a further viva voce examination be required, this will be organised as above. No candidate for a research degree may be assessed on more than two occasions, except where the second examination is a re-examination for a doctoral award, following which the Examiners may, if appropriate, recommend that the candidate be examined on a third occasion for the MPhil degree. The outcomes available at a re-examination for PhD are therefore: You be awarded the degree for which you were being examined; Your are awarded the degree subject to minor amendments (specified by your Examiners in their report) to the thesis to be completed within a period of up to 4 months; You be re-examined orally on the same thesis within 6 months; Your performance is insufficient to merit the award of PhD but you should be re-examined, with or without a further viva voce examination (as stipulated by your Examiners in their report), on your thesis for the award of an MPhil, following appropriate revisions within a period of not more than 6 months ( a further report must be made on form AF2); You are not awarded your degree.

Archiving Your Thesis


It is a requirement under Senate Regulation 5 that all research students should provide the Library with an electronic version of their successful thesis. See the library website for information on the process: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/services/library/research/theses/submitting-your-thesis Your degree will not be conferred until you have submitted your thesis electronically to the Library. It is possible for theses to be kept confidential for a period of time by placing an embargo request with the Library. Further information can be found on the Library web page link shown above.

Copyright and IP in Relation to Your E-Thesis


Issues relating to copyright and IP in relation your thesis are discussed at: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/services/library/research/theses/e-theses

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Conferment and Graduation


Your degree can be conferred once your examiners have signed off your amendments, you have submitted an electronic copy of your thesis to the library (see below) and you have cleared any outstanding debts to the University. You will receive a letter from the University confirming the award of your degree. You will be able to attend the annual graduation ceremony in the July following confirmation of your award (providing your paperwork is processed prior to the cut-off date, usually in early June). All students registered on the New Route PhD Programme must have achieved the minimum grade profile in the 120 credits during the taught component to receive an award of postgraduate diploma at their graduation ceremony (see SR3 for the required grade profile). The postgraduate diploma must be completed 36 months after a students initial registration, unless prevented by mitigating circumstances.

Problems with Your Study


Personal circumstances affecting your ability to study
Many types of circumstances can affect your ability to study. These include, but are not limited to, illness in you or someone close to you, bereavement, childbirth and jury service. You are expected to let the University know of events that may affect your ability to study as soon as possible (and not later than 7 days from the first occurrence). In the first instance you should discuss your circumstances with your supervisor who can advise you on possible courses of action. It may be that you are advised to consider a period of abeyance (see Enrolment and Registration section of this handbook) or, if you are close to submission of your thesis, it may be that you need to apply for an extension to your maximum period of registration (see Enrolment and Registration section of this handbook).Your School may occasionally ask for documentary evidence to support your case for their files.

Mitigating circumstances affecting your performance in an assessment


Normally it will be possible to negotiate timing of key assessments (including annual progress reviews and formal examinations) to accommodate mitigating circumstances as long as supervisors and other staff are informed in advance (see above). However, if a student were to submit work for assessment or attend an assessment event and wish to claim that their performance was affected by mitigating circumstances, they would need to follow the University policy on mitigating circumstances. A mitigating circumstance is defined by the University as: a serious or significant event, and its consequences, which have significantly impaired the academic performance of a student in one or more assessed activities possibly over more than one term. Mitigating circumstances may include medical matters or events directly affecting someone other than the student (SR4.31)

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When the University looks at any claim of mitigating circumstances from you, it will act on the following principles: You are responsible for informing the Graduate School of any circumstances that you want to be taken into account. You must do this by submitting a claim for mitigating circumstances in writing, in advance if possible, but certainly no later than seven days after the deadline or exam or other assessment event; If you submit a Mitigating Circumstances claim late (more than 7 days after the assessment date) it must be accompanied by an explanation for its lateness, otherwise your claim will be rejected; Appropriate supporting evidence must also be submitted with the form (or separately if there is a delay in obtaining the evidence). Without supporting evidence, your claim of mitigating circumstances will normally be rejected; All information provided by you will be regarded as confidential (i.e., strictly restricted to those who need to know in order to reach a decision).

All cases will be formally and carefully considered, but not all will be accepted. Some circumstances are clearly beyond the control of students, but some are not. For example, the normal pressures and challenges of student life are unlikely to be accepted as mitigating circumstances. Likewise, if a student could reasonably have foreseen the circumstances, they are unlikely to be accepted.

Students with disabilities or chronic medical conditions


If you have a disability or a chronic medical condition and feel that this affects your studies, you are encouraged to contact the Disability and Dyslexia Service (DDS) as soon as you arrive at University in order to arrange support. This support is designed to enable you to meet deadlines, and ensure your condition does not affect your performance. Being a disabled student (including having a chronic medical condition) in itself is very unlikely to be accepted as a mitigating circumstance, as the likely impact on your studies is foreseeable as soon as the disability is known. However, there may be additional circumstances that affect your performance or prevent you from completing an assessment on time. Some examples are: A change in circumstances which means that the support you already get no longer meets your needs (such as an unforeseen worsening of symptoms, or an acute flare-up) A delay in setting up support A recent diagnosis of a condition where there is not enough time to set up support A course of treatment which has had unforeseen side effects that affect your studies.

Please remember that it is your responsibility to inform the University about a disability or chronic medical condition in a timely manner such that reasonable adjustments can be agreed and implemented for you mitigating circumstances can only come into play when things go wrong unexpectedly.

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Supporting evidence for students with disabilities or chronic medical conditions If the circumstance relates to a medical condition, mental health condition or late diagnosis, the evidence must state the following: The condition The symptoms When the condition arose or was diagnosed The impact on your ability to study or complete the assessment(s) on time Whether any acute episode is associated with the condition and Whether it was known to your medical practitioner Whether you have suffered an acute episode during the time the claim refers to.

The evidence should be a letter from a GP, the University Medical Centre or a hospital; in the case of a late diagnosis for a specific learning difficulty, such as dyslexia, a diagnostic report is required. The Disability and Dyslexia Service may also be able to write a supporting letter.

Problems with your Programme


Issues concerning the delivery of your research programme should always be raised as soon as possible. Problems should be raised locally (with your supervisor, research administrator or New Route PhD Programme Director) in the first instance if possible. Issues can also be raised confidentially through the student reps on your programme or through the Students Union. The Graduate School Tutors are happy to provide appointments to provide one-to-one advice if requested. For issues that cannot be resolved locally, University Complaints and Appeals processes are available. These are discussed below in more detail.

Complaints and Mediation


The University welcomes the views of its students. It recognises that there may be occasions when you are dissatisfied with an aspect of your experience at Brunel. It is the Universitys policy that such concerns are dealt with in a fair and transparent way that respects the rights of all individuals involved. There are a number of stages in the complaints process (see below) and hopefully the matter can be resolved at an informal stage within the School. Full information about the complaints process can be found at: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/administration/appeals-and-complaints Stage 1 - Informal Stage You are encouraged to raise day to day issues initially with your supervisor(s) or Research Administrator, either in person or supported by your student representative. If you feel unable to do this you should raise the matter with the Doctoral Programme Manager in the Graduate School.

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Stage 2 Raising a Formal Complaint with the School If your complaint cannot be resolved informally then you can refer it to the Director of the Graduate School. You should complete a Complaint Action Form which can be downloaded from the above mentioned website and send it to: Dr Kate Hone Director, Brunel Graduate School Brunel University Uxbridge UB8 3PH kate.hone@brunel.ac.uk Your complaint form should be clear and to the point and set out: The nature of the complaint and how it has affected you; The action you have taken to try to resolve the complaint giving details of any meetings that have taken place; Evidence offered in support of the complaint; An indication of the desired outcome if the complaint is upheld.

The Director of the Graduate School will acknowledge receipt of your complaint within 7 days and may arrange a meeting with you within 21 days, at a mutually agreeable time. Following this you will receive a written response confirming the decision. If the complaint is not upheld at this level you will be given reasons for the decision. Final Stage Raising a Complaint with the University Student Complaints Officer If your complaint is not resolved within the School, you may ask for it to be reviewed by the Student Complaints Officer by writing to the Student Complaints Officer within 21 days of receiving notification of the outcome from the School. Mediation If you bring a complaint under the Universitys Complaints Procedure, you may be offered mediation. The aim of this service is to resolve problems quickly and easily. Further details can be found by following the Mediation link from the University Appeals and Complaints page: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/administration/appeals-and-complaints

Appeals
Appeals concerning academic assessment
An Academic Appeal is a procedure that allows a student to formally challenge the decision of the Board of Examiners on specified grounds (see grounds for an appeal below). The procedure for making an appeal is summarised below and is also set out in the Senate Regulations. You must stick to the published timeframes. If you think that you might have grounds for appeal you should try to see if you are able to resolve the matter by talking to your personal tutor or the senior tutor first 50

(but please do not delay submitting your appeal to your School). You must submit your appeal as an individual. You cannot appeal simply because you think you deserve a better grade/degree classification. The University's procedures for appeals against academic assessment are set out in Senate Regulation No 6.1-6.38, a copy of which may be obtained from the Academic Registrars office, or from your School office. Senate Regulation No. 6.1-6.38 is also available on the University website: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/administration/rules/senateregs/sr6

Grounds for an appeal


The decisions of a Board of Examiners may be challenged on the following three grounds: 1. That there exist circumstances materially affecting the student's performance which were not known to the Board of Examiners when its decision was taken and which it was not reasonably practicable for the student to make known to the Board beforehand; 2. That there were procedural irregularities in the conduct of the examinations and/or assessment procedures, including assessment of coursework, of such a nature as to create a reasonable possibility that the result might have been different had they not occurred; 3. That there is evidence of prejudice, bias, or inadequate assessment on the part of one or more Examiners.

A note on Appeals based on mitigating circumstances


It is not normally acceptable for mitigating circumstances to be submitted and considered after you have received your results. The Academic Appeals Committee will normally only consider appeals submitted based on this ground when a student can demonstrate that they could not have submitted them at the appropriate time. You are reminded that all mitigating circumstances should be submitted to your School office as close as possible to the time that the circumstances occurred, and no later than 7 days after the assessment affected. See your handbook for guidance. IF YOU ARE IN ANY DOUBT ABOUT WHETHER SOMETHING MIGHT AFFECT YOUR PERFORMANCE TELL YOUR SCHOOL ABOUT IT AT THE APPROPRIATE TIME. Information on how to submit mitigating circumstances is available above. The Universitys general regulations are set out in Senate Regulation No.4: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/administration/university-rules-and-regulations/senateregulations/assessment-of-students-on-taught-programmes

Appealing against the outcome of your degree


A student in their final year who wishes to appeal against the outcome of the degree awarded must indicate their intention to do so before the date of their Degree Congregation. An award which is the subject of an appeal will not be conferred until the appeal has been dealt with by the Academic Appeals Committee. This means that you will not be able to attend the graduation ceremony whilst the appeal remains unresolved.

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Challenges to academic judgement


You cannot appeal solely because the result is worse than you would have wished or worse than you feel you deserve. No appeal will be allowed on the grounds that, although the decision of the examiners was properly made, you believe the Board of Examiners to have erred in its judgement of the academic standard you achieved.

Making an appeal
The procedures for academic appeals have two main phases. The first is internal resolution by your home School or Institute. Once this has been completed academic appeals may be considered by the Universitys Academic Appeals Committee.

Stage One
You must submit a case for internal resolution to the Graduate School within 14 days of notification of the Board-confirmed results. The School will normally aim to respond to students requests for internal resolution within a maximum period of 14 days. You must apply on the standard request for internal resolution form, which is copied at the end of this Handbook as appendix 1.

Stage Two
If the internal resolution does not result in the outcome you had wanted, you can then submit an appeal to Registry for consideration by the Academic Appeals Committee. You must submit your appeal within 21 days of notification of the result of the internal resolution. Students who submit a case to the Academic Appeals Committee will normally be asked to provide a copy of the formal record of internal resolution. Appeals submitted to the Academic Appeals Committee must be made in writing and addressed to the Secretary of the Academic Appeals Committee, who is based in Registry. A pro forma for submission is available from Registry or can be downloaded from the Web at: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/administration/appeals-and-complaints Sources of Information and Advice: You should consult the handbook for your programme provided by your School/Institute. You may ask for additional information on processes from your School/Institute office. The Appeals and Complaints section of the University website contains more detailed information and the Academic Appeals form: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/administration/appeals-and-complaints You may seek further help and advice from the Advice & Representation Centre of the Students' Union: http://www.brunelstudents.com/ You should remember that it is your responsibility to ensure that your case is submitted within the time-limits set for each stage of the process.

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Useful University Services and Links


Accommodation
The Accommodation Office is responsible for the allocation of all undergraduate, postgraduate and research students to University Residences and for notifying the Finance Office invoice amounts for accommodation fees. The University campus provides self-catering accommodation for approximately 4,549 students including 112 studio flats for co-habiting couples. There is a variety of accommodation including single bedrooms that share kitchen and bathroom facilities, to modern flats where several bedrooms are grouped around a shared kitchen/dining area. Over 84% of the Halls of Residence feature bedrooms with en suite facilities. All rooms on campus have free IT network access points. Additionally a new residential hall, Isambard Close, includes 17 buildings with 1342 units, comprising of 112 studio flats, 1190 en-suite rooms and 40 disabled rooms. Accommodation prices range from 94.01 (standard) to 117.74 (en-suite) per week. All postgraduate students are eligible for on-campus accommodation and to facilitate their studies, postgraduate students are grouped together in halls of residence. The accommodation office will also assist those who may choose to live off-campus. All New Route PhD students are guaranteed a place in University accommodation in their first year if they would like it. There is even some availability for couples in studio flats (though unfortunately we cannot accommodate children). For more information on postgraduate accommodation facilities please visit the Accommodation Office website http://www.brunel.ac.uk/life/accommodation/residences or contact the Accommodation Office via: Tel: 01895 267900 E-mail: accom-uxb@brunel.ac.uk

Alumni
When your degree is awarded, you will automatically become a member of the Brunel Alumni, joining some 70,000 past Brunel students throughout the UK and the world. We have successful entrepreneurs, financiers, lawyers, engineers, designers, scientists, technologists, teachers, health professionals and researchers all making a difference in their community. Many Brunel Alumni are in decision making roles in both public and private organisations all over the world. If you go to the theatre, it is quite likely that our performing arts students are involved in the production. We ask our Alumni to assist our current students by offering work placements and careers advice. They are invited to come back to give talks, bring their companies research requirements back to Brunel and generally benefit from a continuing relationship with our University. We offer our 53

Alumni routes to further professional development and to advice and consultancy from the research expertise within our Schools. We keep in touch with our Alumni through the annual free Brunel Link magazine and through e-mail. We encourage them to let us know how they are doing and if we are able to assist in any way so that both Alumni and Brunel can mutually benefit from a life-long friendship. To find out more contact Alumni relations at: +44(0)1895 267775 (direct line) http://www.brunelalumni.co.uk/ Visit the Alumni office in Wilfred Brown building

Brunel International
Brunel International is situated within the Russell Building and useful contact details are: General Enquiries international.helpdesk@brunel.ac.uk http://www.brunel.ac.uk/international +44(0)1895 265519

Language Courses

iplc@brunel.ac.uk

Finance

international-finance@brunel.ac.uk

Immigration Advice

immigration@brunel.ac.uk

Computer Centre
The Computer Centre supports the University in its access to a wide range of software, the Internet, the Intranet, electronic mail and various services across the Joint Academic Network (JANET). A full list of the standard software and systems available can be found on our website at https://moss.brunel.ac.uk/cc Information about the support we provide to the University, our location and opening hours can also be found on our website. Your username and password to access the Brunel Network will be generated during your initial registration process. If you experience difficulty thereafter, you should contact us for help via e-mail at computing-support@brunel.ac.uk As a registered student, you can purchase University-supported software packages and selected hardware from the Computer Shop on the ground floor in John Crank building. 54

Counselling Service
The University Counselling Service offers free and confidential counselling to all staff and students. +44(0)1895 265070 brunel-counselling@brunel.ac.uk http://intranet.brunel.ac.uk/counselling/index.html

Disability and Dyslexia Service


Brunels Disability and Dyslexia Service offers advice and support to students with disabilities, including dyslexia and other specific learning difficulties, mental health disabilities, mobility and sensory impairments and unseen disabilities such as epilepsy, diabetes, arthritis and RSI. Support is organised in negotiation with each student to ensure that individual needs are met. The service is confidential and details are only passed on with students consent, and then only to ensure necessary support is provided. The type of support that may be available includes: Extra time in exams Extended library loans Assistance with applying for Disabled Students Allowances Dyslexia screenings and full diagnostic assessments Provision of note takers, communicators and other support workers Specialist one-to-one dyslexia tuition Loan of key equipment such as digital recording devices for recording lectures Support group for students with specific learning difficulties

Disability Advisers are available by appointment Monday to Friday throughout the year to make an appointment either phone or drop into the Disability and Dyslexia Service Office (Bannerman Centre, room 315). +44(0)1895 265213 disability@brunel.ac.uk http://intranet.brunel.ac.uk/disability/

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International Pathways and Language Centre


The International Pathways and Language Centre offer English language courses to help international students at Brunel achieve academic success. Classes are available free of charge to registered students whose native tongue is not English, for example: Writing for Academic Success; Grammar for Academic success; Seminar and Presentation Skills for Academic Success; Listening and Discussing for Academic Success; Reading for Academic Success; Pronunciation for International Intelligibility; Writing for Research Success; Discussing and Presenting for Research Success.

English language tuition is available from Brunels Language Centre, but this resource is to improve already existing skills. Please contact the Language Centre for further details about class times and surgeries: Tel: 01895 265533 or email: language.centre@brunel.ac.uk. The Language Centre is located within Brunel International in room 115 on the first floor of the Russell Building, Science Park.

Job Shop
As an integral part of the Placement and Careers Centre, the Job Shop is here to help you find parttime and vacation work throughout your time at Brunel. The service was established in response to the increasing need among students to offset the expense of full-time study by taking on part-time work. However, we feel that taking on work during your course is not just about earning some extra cash; its also an opportunity for you to acquire and enhance those all important transferable skills which employers seek when you graduate. The Job Shop advertises opportunities for local and national employers, as well as on-campus jobs for students. We hold Part-time and Vacation Work Jobs Fair, bringing employers with immediate vacancies directly to you. The Job Shop can also advise you on matters such as alternative jobhunting resources, job applications, tax and national insurance. The Job Shop, Placement & Careers Centre First Floor, Bannerman Centre, Uxbridge Campus Tel: 01895 265759 Email: jobshop@brunel.ac.uk Web: www.brunel.ac.uk/services/placement-and-careers

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Library
The library is located in the Bannerman centre. Locating and using information relevant to your subject is an essential skill for you to acquire, and it is worth spending time finding out what is available. More information pertaining to the library including latest opening times can be found on the Brunel Library website: www.brunel.ac.uk/life/study/library Do not rely solely on standard texts when writing essays. Remember that lecturers often read over 100 essays on the same topic and are very familiar with the contents of major textbooks. When researching an essay, spread your net wide by searching through journals and bibliographies for relevant literature. Please note that the materials in the Library are for the use of all students. Thus, if you remove any without returning them you are depriving your fellow students. These materials are expensive and often impossible to replace so please be considerate. Books which are recommended for particular modules are available in the library, often on restricted access, but there are never enough copies to satisfy student demand fully. It is in your interest therefore to buy a certain number of key texts.

Security
The Security Control Centre is located at the end of the Wilfred Brown building and is staffed 24/7. If you have security concerns or require emergency services, you can contact them via: +44(0)1895 255786 (direct line) +44(0)1895 266943 (secondary line) +44(0)1895 265999 (confidential crime line voice mail only) https://moss.brunel.ac.uk/SiteDirectory/Operations/security/Pages/default.aspx

Student Centre
The Student Centre is located on the ground floor of the Bannerman Building. The Student Centre provides a range of administrative services and support to all students; from registration and re-enrolment, through course duration to graduation and former students. A Student Adviser team provides support with: Student Administration enquiries; Finance enquiries; General Accommodation; Student Annual Parking permits; Student Access ID cards; E-Vision.

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A records team within the Student Centre maintain students individual SITS records and a Funding team provide access to learning funds, scholarship, bursary and Student Loan Company services. Please see the Student Centre website at https://intra.brunel.ac.uk/s/studentcentre/Pages/ContactUs.aspx for the latest opening hours The Student Centre can also be contacted by email at student.centre@brunel.ac.uk

Other Support Services


Useful web-links and contact telephone numbers for other services provided to students on campus are set out in this table: About Brunel: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/life

General information about the University including a map of the campus and travel information.

ARC:

http://brunelstudents.com/arc

Access to free advice relating to finance, immigration, academic and other student issues

Arts Centre:

http://www.brunel.ac.uk/services/artscentre

Information about the musical, theatrical and other arts-related events on campus.

Medical Centre:

http://www.brunel.ac.uk/health/medical-centre

Access to medical advice. +44 (0)1895 234426

Media Services:

+44 (0)1895 266355

Information about the range of media production and audio-visual services provided on campus

Operations:

https://moss.brunel.ac.uk/SiteDirectory/Operations/Pages/default.aspx

Information about the operational on campus services including reception, parking, waste management, security and Health & Safety

Sport & Fitness:

http://www.brunel.ac.uk/services/sport

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Information about the sporting facilities and events on campus

Student Services:

http://intranet.brunel.ac.uk/student_services/

A general directory to the on-campus services available to students

UBS:

http://www.brunelstudents.com/

Access to the events, services and advice provided by the Union of Brunel Students (UBS)

University Policies
You can find the University policies on the website at: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/administration/policies-and-other-important-documents

Programme Specification

1. Awarding institution 2. Teaching institution(s) 3. Home school/associated institution 4. Contributing school(s)/associated institution 5. Programme accredited by 6. Final award(s) and FHEQ Level of Award

Brunel University Brunel University Graduate School

Business School; School of Engineering and Design; School of Health Sciences and Social Care; School of Information Systems, Computing and Mathematics; School of Social Sciences; School of Sport and Education

PhD and one of the following: Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Manufacturing and Enterprise Engineering Research Postgraduate Diploma in Biosciences Research Postgraduate Diploma in Business and Management Research Postgraduate Diploma in Design Research Postgraduate Diploma in Economics and Finance Research Postgraduate Diploma in Education Research Postgraduate Diploma in Electronic & Computer Engineering Research Postgraduate Diploma in Human Sciences Research Postgraduate Diploma in Information Systems & Computing Research Postgraduate Diploma in Mathematical Sciences Research Postgraduate Diploma in Mechanical Engineering Research

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7. Programme title 8. N/A 9. Normal length of programme (in months) for each mode of study 10. Maximum period of registration for each mode of study 11. Variation(s) to September start 12. Modes of study 13. Modes of delivery 14. Intermediate awards and titles 15. N/A 16. JACS Code 17. Route Code

NewRoutePhD with Integrated Postgraduate Diploma

48 months

60 months

October or January start

FT Standard Post Graduate Diploma

C900RBBNEWID G100RMANEWID H200RCENEWID H300RMENEWD

H780RMNNEWID L100RECNEWD N200RMGNEWD N200RMGNEWID

G500RCSNEWID G500RISNEWD H150RDMNEWID H300RMENEWID H600RELNEWD

L100RECNEWID L500RSWNEWD L900RHSNEWD L990RSONEWID X200REDNEWID

18. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme design

QAA Quality Code QAA Framework for Higher Education Qualifications Researcher Development Framework and Researcher Development Statement (replacing the RCUK Joint Skills Statement) http://www.vitae.ac.uk/policy practice/234381/RDF-overview.html Concordat to support the career development of researchers http://www.researchconcordat.ac.uk/ ESRC Postgraduate Training and Development Guidelines 2009 QAA Code of practice for the assurance of academic quality and standards in higher education; Section 1: Postgraduate research programmes (2004) http://www.qaa.ac.uk/academicinfrastructure/codeOfPractice/section1/default.asp Graduate School Plan (revised, 2010-2012), with links to University

19. Admission Requirements

Applicants will need to meet the standard PhD admission requirements in their home academic school for their PhD research. Applicants will normally be expected to hold a good first degree (usually a minimum of 2.1) or a Master's degree of a UK university (or recognised equivalent) in a relevant

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subject. Applicants will also have an appropriate standard of English Language. Applicants offering IELTS will need to have an overall grade of 6.0 for science, technology and IT programmes and an overall grade of 6.5 for most other programmes. 20. Other relevant information (e.g. study abroad, additional information on placements) 21. Programme regulations not specified in Senate Regulation 3. Any departure from regulations specified in Senate Regulation 3 must be stated here and approved by Senate. 22. Further information about the programme is available from: Jennifer Woodhead, Doctoral Programme Manager, Brunel Graduate School

23. EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught component of the NewRoutePhD aims to support an individuals development as a research professional. The taught programme, together with the associated PhD research, aims to produce researchers who are well prepared to embark on careers as academics or professional researchers. As well as the skills to conduct and disseminate high quality academic research, researchers will develop a range of broader (transferable) skills to help ensure that their work has impact in the wider world.

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24. PROGRAMME AND INTERMEDIATE LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding (K) cognitive (thinking) skills (C) and other skills and attributes (S) in the following areas:

Level

Category (K = knowledge and understanding, C = cognitive (thinking) skills, S = other skills and attributes) K,C

Learning Outcome

Associated Modular Blocks Code(s)

Comprehension of basic principles of research design and strategy, including an understanding of how to formulate researchable problems and an appreciation of alternative approaches to research Competence in understanding and applying appropriate research techniques, methods and tools For behavioural scientists this encompasses a range of qualitative and quantitative methods and tools, including mixed methods approaches For engineering researchers this encompasses the use of appropriate research equipment and devices, and application of appropriate numerical analysis methods and tools Capabilities for managing research, including managing data, and conducting and disseminating research in a way that is consistent with both professional practice and the normal principles of research ethics. Understanding of the significance of alternative epistemological positions that provide the context for theory construction, research design, and the selection of appropriate analytical techniques. Ability to effectively promote and explain the benefit and applicability of research ideas and findings to potential funding bodies, end users and other relevant audiences such as students, policy-makers and the general public. Understanding of the key opportunities and constraints that arise from the academic, social, political, legal, economic and environmental context in which research takes place. Ability to critically engage with the transferable skills agenda, including critical self reflection on personal skills development and training needs against a defined skills framework and the ability to articulate how skills gained could be utilised in a range of settings.

GS5525; GS5527/31 (or physical sciences equivalent)

K,C

GS5525; GS5527/31 (or physical sciences equivalent)

K,C

GS5525; GS5530; GS5528; GS5527/31 (or physical sciences equivalent)

K,C,S

GS5525; GS5527/31 (or physical sciences equivalent)

K,S

GS5530; GS5529; GS5528

K,C

GS5530; GS5529

C,S

GS5530

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K,C,S

Ability to engage effectively and appropriately with other researchers and end users in the process of knowledge production and transfer, including a critical appreciation of interdisciplinary team roles and the qualities of good research leadership. Ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the academic discipline in which the PhD research is situated Ability to discern relationships between concepts and ideas and techniques across an area of substantive enquiry

GS5529; GS5530; GS5528

K,C,S

GS5526; GS5601

K,C,S

GS5526; GS5601

Learning/teaching strategies and methods to enable learning outcomes to be achieved, including formative assessments

Workshops, seminars and lab classes will be provided to support student learning and skills development. Individual one-to-one tutorials will be available to provide formative feedback and to support researchers in preparing for assessment tasks. Regular coaching sessions involving the researcher, programme coach and research supervisor will be held to support researchers in identifying their development needs and mapping these to programme classes.

Summative assessment strategies and methods to enable learning outcomes to be demonstrated

Portfolio assessments will be used widely with content negotiated with the supervisor and programme team. Assessment tasks will include oral and poster presentations as well as reflective writing. Other assessment types may be used depending on choice of optional modules from the home academic school for the PhD.

25. Programme Structure, progression and award requirements

Programme structures and features: levels, assessment blocks, credit and progression and award requirements Compulsory block: one which all students registered for the award are required to take as part of their programme of study. These will be listed in the left hand column; Optional block: one which students choose from an option range. These will be listed in the right hand column; A core assessment is an assessment identified within an assessment block or modular block (either compulsory or optional) which must be passed (at grade C- or better) in order to be eligible to progress and to be eligible for the final award. All core assessments must be specified on the programme specification next to the appropriate assessment or modular block: Where students are expected to pass the block at C- or better, but not necessarily all elements, then the block itself is core. e.g. AB5500 Project (40) Core: Block

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Where only some elements of assessments are required to be passed at C- or better, these will be identified by listing each element that is core e.g. ABXXX1 Title (XX credits) Core: 1 & 4 Where students are expected to pass all assessments in a block then this will be identified. By setting the assessment this way, students are also required to pass the block by default. This will be identified thus: e.g. ABXXXX Title (XX credits) Core: All, Block A non-core assessment does not have to be passed at grade C- or better, but must D- or better in order to be eligible for the final award.

Level 5

Compulsory assessment block codes, titles and credit

Optional assessment block codes, titles and credits

Compulsory study block codes, titles and credit volume

Optional Study block codes, titles and credit volume

Compulsory modular block codes, titles and credits GS5525 Theory and Practice in Research (15 credits) GS5530 Research Management, Leadership and Personal Development (15 credits) GS5528 Academic Research Dissemination (15 credits) GS5529 Knowledge Exchange and Research Impact (15 credits)

Optional modular block codes, titles and credits Either GS5527 Research Design, Methods and Analysis [Behavioural Sciences] (30 credits) OR: GS5531 [Physical Sciences/Biosciences) version (30 credits) And a total of 30 credits from the following: Level 5 modules available in the home school; GS5526 Guided Study (30 credits); or GS5601 Guided Study (15 credits)

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Level 6 Progression and Award Requirements As per Senate Regulation 3 (September 2013 onwards): http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/administration/university-rules-and-regulations/senate-regulations/sr3-2013onwards Thesis Element Assessment by thesis and viva voce examination As per Senate Regulation 5 http://dev.brunel.ac.uk/about/administration/university-rules-andregulations/senate-regulations/research degrees Progression requirements and award of PhD to be determined by SR5. In the event a student fails to meet the requirements of PG Dip, they will not be permitted to submit their thesis for examination. The PhD and Postgraduate Diploma will be awarded as two separate awards once the student has successfully passed the viva voce examination and met all requirements for the PG Dip.

Please note: this specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if he/she takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. More detailed information on the learning outcomes, content and teaching, learning and assessment methods can be found in the module outlines and other programme and module information. The accuracy of the information contained in this document is reviewed by the University from time to time and whenever a major modification occurs, and may be checked by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education.

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