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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 Vol XII, Edition 76
By Michael R. Blood
and Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO Californias
health insurance exchange led the
nation in enrollments during its
inaugural month of operation, but
the 35,000 tentative sign-ups
announced Wednesday represented
just a fraction of the eventual
goal.
The rst enrollment numbers to
be released under the federal health
overhaul also raised as many ques-
tions as they answered.
Covered California, the agency
steering the health overhaul in the
state, aims to sign-up as many as
2.2 million people by the end of
next year, either in private insur-
ance coverage or Medicaid servic-
es for the needy. For those seek-
ing coverage on the open market,
the agency will need to quickly
escalate enrollments to hit that
target.
The financial success of the
health overhaul relies on
enrolling millions of healthy,
young people across the country.
The gures released Wednesday by
the U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services did not disclose
demographic details showing who
was signing on, but Covered
California officials said those
seeking coverage in the state dur-
ing the rst month of open enroll-
ment were generally older and had
Slow start for health sign-ups
Covered California aims to enroll 2.2M people by the end of next year
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The launch of the Affordable
Care Act enrollment has boosted
by thousands the number of San
Mateo County families receiving
Medi-Cal benets, according to
the countys Human Services
Agency.
The county has 39,365 families
on Medi-Cal currently, which is a
19 percent increase or, 6,278
families from a year ago. In
October 2012, there were 33,087
families, said HSA spokeswoman
Efe Verducci.
In comparison, she said, the
year between October 2011 and
2012 saw a 6 percent caseload
uptick.
The county has a call center in
Belmont for those hoping to sign
County releases ACA enrollment data
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
More than 100 volunteers deco-
rated giant garland prototypes
yesterday in the Filoli visitors
center, one of the initial steps
leading into Holiday Traditions,
Filolis largest fundraiser of the
year.
Filoli in Woodside, the historic
site of the National Trust for
Historic Preservation and one of
the finest remaining country
estates of the early 20th century,
begins its holiday festivities Nov.
29, the day after Thanksgiving.
Its holiday events run for nine
days. The opening night premier
shopping event includes live
music, wine and appetizers.
Its absolutely beautiful and
magical, said event co-chair
Jackie Hasenstab, who also does
oral design for the visitors cen-
ter.
The first floor of the house,
along with the visitors center, are
transformed for the holidays by
more than 700 volunteers with
decorations, festive music and a
holiday boutique. Decorations
themselves go on sale, along with
ornaments and custom wreathes.
Each room has a unique theme,
including the dining room, which
looks like a farmers market.
Ice Fantasy for Filolis Holiday Traditions
Estate celebrates 31st year of fundraising festivities
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Filoli volunteer Linda White helps put up the garland decorations in the visitors center.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With the San Carlos City
Councils approval of a much-
scaled down Transit Village proj-
ect, the neighborhood group that
spent years fighting it is shelv-
ing plans for a referendum and
lauding the city for reaching an
acceptable solution.
We are pragmatic people and
because of the efforts of us and the
city and SamTrans, we now believe
that we can live with this, said
Ben Fuller, president of the Greater
East San Carlos group.
Fuller had threatened to take a
Former opponents applaud
smaller Transit Village plan
Neighborhood group wont move
ahead with its referendumeffort
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After updated Election Day
results showed Russ Cohen as the
winner of the third and nal slot
on the Burlingame City Council,
the nal results have ipped again
to show Ricardo Ortiz over Cohen
by eight votes.
The San Mateo County
Elections Ofce released updated
numbers from the Nov. 5 election
4:30 p.m. yesterday.
Ortiz formerly had 15.6 percent
with 1,644 votes and Cohen took
15.5 percent with 1,634 votes,
respectively. The vote then ipped
when numbers were reported
Friday and Cohen led by 17 votes.
Tuesday, the count revealed the
vote difference had narrowed, with
Cohen still on top. Cohen took
1,995 and Ortiz took 1,992 votes,
according to Tuesdays count.
Now, according to the nal count,
Ortiz has 2,048 votes, while
Ortiz up by eight in
final election tally
Cohen considers asking for recount in
race for third Burlingame council seat
See FILOLI, Page 23 See PLAN, Page 23
See ELECTION, Page 23
See LOCAL, Page 23
See NUMBERS, Page 17
MEDICAL WOES GROW
WORLD PAGE 31
NAPOLITANO SEEKS
UC TUITION FREEZE
STATE PAGE 7
LOUNGE TALKS
RIVALRY WEEK
SPORTS PAGE 11
CLINIC IN TYPHOON-HIT CITY OVERRUN WITH PATIENTS
Russ Cohen, Ricardo Ortiz
Woman discusses
forced exorcism allegations
STOCKTON A California woman
whose husband and son are accused of
kidnapping her to perform an exorcism
says they made her drink oil and told
her she had three devils inside her.
Forty-one-year-old Blanca Farias
told News10 in Sacramento she was
held down in the backseat of a pickup
truck Saturday after being picked up in
Stockton.
Her husband, 42-year-old Jose
Magana-Farias, and son, 20-year-old
Victor Farias, are scheduled to appear
in court Wednesday. It was not immedi-
ately clear whether they had attorneys.
Blanca Farias said she was taken to a
church, where the father and son and a
pastor bathed her in oil that they made
her drink.
She said the pastor told her she was
possessed as she threw up. The pastor
is not expected to face charges.
She said she was able to text her
boyfriend, and authorities were wait-
ing when she returned home.
Council candidate loses
support due to rap video
SAN BERNARDINO A San
Bernardino city council candidate is
drawing some ak after music videos
he recorded have turned up that critics
say promote violence and crime.
The San Bernardino Police Ofcers
Association recently pulled its
endorsement of Anthony Jones who is
in a runoff election for a council seat.
The organization said it received the
music videos in which some of the
lyrics focus on violence and a gunshot
sound effect is heard.
The 23-year-old Jones doesnt regret
making the videos, one of which was
recorded two years ago. He said he
wouldnt make similar videos now
because hes involved in local politics
and didnt appear too worried about
losing an endorsement.
Jones said he had been open about
his past in the music business and the
video had been made in collaboration
with others.
Bones of at least two
people found in desert graves
VICTORVILLE Authorities say the
bones of at least two people have been
found at what appear to be shallow
graves in Southern Californias
Mojave Desert.
The San Bernardino County Sheriffs
Department says a motorcyclist
reported nding skeletal remains on
Monday near Victorville. Coroners
ofcials conrmed theyre human.
Sheriff s investigators returned
to the area Tuesday and Wednesday
and dug up what appeared to be a
shallow grave. Authorities say they
found the remains of more than one
person but its unclear how many,
nor their age or gender.
Investigators say the remains appear
to have been there for quite some time.
The Daily Press of Victorville says
two and possibly three shallow graves
are in the area near the Interstate 15
freeway.
Victorville is about 60 miles north-
east of Los Angeles.
Kai the Hitchhiker indicted
on New Jersey murder charge
ELIZABETH, N.J. A man who
gained Internet fame as Kai the
Hatchet-Wielding Hitchhiker has
been indicted on murder charges in
connection with the beating death of
an elderly New Jersey man.
Union County prosecutors say 25-
year-old Caleb McGillvary could face a
life sentence if hes convicted. The
indictment was handed up Wednesday
by a county grand jury.
McGillvary is accused of killing 74-
year-old lawyer Joseph Galfy, whose
body was found May 13 in his Clark
home. Authorities say McGillvary and
Galfy met in New York City and
McGillvary stayed at Galfys home.
McGillvary was arrested in
Philadelphia several days after Galfys
body was found.
The Canadian gained a measure of
online fame in February after interven-
ing in an attack on a California utility
worker in which he described using a
hatchet to fend off a further attack.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Former Secretary
of State
Condoleezza Rice
is 59.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1982
During the Civil War, President
Abraham Lincoln gave the go-ahead
for Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnsides
plan to capture the Confederate capi-
tal of Richmond; the resulting Battle
of Fredericksburg proved a disaster for
the Union.
I never gave away anything without
wishing I had kept it; nor kept anything
without wishing I had given it away.
Louise Brooks, actress (born this date in 1906, died 1985)
Britains Prince
Charles is 65.
Rapper Reverend
Run is 49.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A piece of land art entitled Wish showing the face of an anonymous 6-year-old local Belfast girl is seen in this aerial view of
the Titanic quarter in Belfast, Northern Ireland.
Thursday: Partly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Highs around 60.
Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Thursday night: Clear...Breezy. Lows
in the upper 40s. Northwest winds 20 to
30 mph.
Friday: Sunny...Breezy. Highs in the
upper 50s. Northwest winds 20 to 30
mph...Becoming 15 to 20 mph in the afternoon.
Friday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming
mostly cloudy. Lows in the mid 40s. Northwest winds
around 20 mph.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
sunny. Highs in the upper 50s.
Saturday night through Monday night: Mostly clear.
Lows in the mid 40s. Highs in the upper 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1851, Herman Melvilles novel Moby-Dick; Or, The
Whale was rst published in the United States.
I n 1881, Charles J. Guiteau went on trial for assassinating
President James A. Gareld. (Guiteau was convicted and
hanged the following year. )
I n 1889, inspired by Jules Verne, New York World reporter
Nellie Bly (Elizabeth Cochrane) set out to travel around the
world in less than 80 days. (She made the trip in 72 days.)
Jawarharlal Nehru , the rst prime minister of independent
India, was born.
I n 1910, Eugene B. Ely became the rst aviator to take off
from a ship as his Curtiss pusher rolled off a sloping plat-
form on the deck of the scout cruiser USS Birmingham off
Hampton Roads, Va.
I n 1922, the British Broadcasting Co. began its domestic
radio service.
I n 1940, during World War II, German planes destroyed
most of the English town of Coventry.
I n 1944, Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra recorded Opus
No. 1 for RCAVictor.
I n 1969, Apollo 12 blasted off for the moon.
I n 1970, a chartered Southern Airways DC-9 crashed while
trying to land in Huntington, W.Va., killing all 75 people
on board, including the Marshall University football team
and its coaching staff.
I n 1972, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above
the 1,000 level for the first time, ending the day at
1,003.16.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
DUCTS ALLOW ZOMBIE ACCESS
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: When Quincy chewed up Jasons math home-
work, it was found to be a CALCU-LOSS
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
LADYM
DUFIL
LUPLAR
ONEGXY
2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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THE A:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Star,No.
2,in rst place; Gold Rush,No.1,in second place;
and Whirl Win,No.6,in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:45.54.
1 5 7
20 30 32 42 71 15
Mega number
Nov. 12 Mega Millions
5 31 50 55 56 9
Powerball
Nov. 13 Powerball
6 9 15 28 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
1 7 5 5
Daily Four
0 1 6
Daily three evening
1 9 13 34 46 13
Mega number
Nov. 13 Super Lotto Plus
Former U.N. Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali is
91. Actress Kathleen Hughes is 85. Former MLB All-Star
Jimmy Piersall is 84. Former NASA astronaut Fred Haise is
80. Jazz musician Ellis Marsalis is 79. Composer Wendy
Carlos is 74. Writer P.J. ORourke is 66. Zydeco singer-musi-
cian Buckwheat Zydeco is 66. Rock singer-musician James
Young (Styx) is 64. Singer Stephen Bishop is 62. Blues musi-
cian Anson Funderburgh is 59. Pianist Yanni is 59.
Presidential adviser Valerie Jarrett is 57. Actress Laura San
Giacomo is 52. Actor D.B. Sweeney is 52.
3
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
REDWOOD CITY
Disturbance. An arrest was made in a ght
that involved ve people on Middleeld
Road before 11:18 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8.
Pet t y t hef t. Hubcaps were taken on
Broadway before 3:06 p.m. Thursday, Nov.
7.
St ol en vehi cl e. A car was stolen at the
Santa Cruz Avenue before 2:16 a.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 6.
Suspi ci ous vehi cl e. Adark colored mus-
tang was facing the wrong direction on
Woodside Road and Veterans Boulevard
before 2:16 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 6.
Compl ai nt. Loud banging was reported on
Rolison Road before 4:43 a.m. on
Wednesday, Nov. 6.
Accident. Minor injuries was reported after
a vehicle hit a tree on Farm Hill Boulevard
before 9:43 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 6.
Burglary. Alaptop was stolen from a home
on Redwood Avenue before 10:18 a.m. on
Wednesday, Nov. 6.
SAN BRUNO
Petty theft. Aman was arrested for stealing
$242 worth of materials on the 1100 block
of El Camino Real before 9:56 p.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 12.
Petty theft. Aman was arrested for stealing
$115 worth of items on the 1100 block of El
Camino Real before 8:17 p.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 12.
Petty theft. Hubcaps were taken off of a car
on the rst oor parking garage on the 1100
block of El Camino Real before 9:01 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 11.
Vandalism. There was a report of possible
gang grafti on the concrete at the intersec-
tion of Herman Street and Huntington
Avenue before 12:40 p.m. Monday, Nov. 11.
St ol en vehi cl e. A gold Nissan Maxima
was stolen on the 900 block of El Camino
Real before 11:31 a.m. Monday, Nov. 11.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstances. A woman
was walking around in her pajamas holding a
Winnie the Pooh bear on the 300 block of El
Camino Real before 11:29 a.m. Monday,
Nov. 11.
Golden Gate Bridge
officials eyeing toll hike
Drivers are expected to soon pay more to
cross the Golden Gate Bridge.
The bridges directors are set to consider
several options to raise tolls at a meeting
on Friday.
They include a 75-cent increase to $5.75
in April for drivers who use the FasTrak
electronic payment system and then anoth-
er increase to $6 in July 2016. Drivers who
dont use FasTrak would see their tolls
increase from $6 to $7 in April.
Another option would increase tolls for
non-FasTrak drivers to $8 starting in July
2016.
The bridge district is facing a projected
$142 million shortfall over the next sever-
al years.
Avote on any toll increase is not expect-
ed until early next year.
Foster City Pedway to reopen
The grand reopening of the Foster City
Levee Pedway will commence with a ribbon-
cutting ceremony 1:45 p.m. Nov. 20.
The eight-mile pedway has a new
smoother surface and is wider. The city
undertook a comprehensive plan to recon-
struct, repair and repave the levee pedway in
2010. It is accessible from the corner of
Port Royal Avenue and Cumberland Court.
Police reports
Hunger games
Police found an intoxicated man who
failed to pay his restaurant bill at the
intersection of Main Street and Stone
Pine Road in Half Moon Bay before
5:09 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7.
Local briefs
4
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
By choosing cremation you have many options. You can
have a viewing before the cremation, a memorial service
or visitation, even a graveside service. Afterward, the
container can be buried, stored in a columbarium, or
cherished as a keepsake, or there is the option of
scattering the cremated remains.
The choices are almost endless,
contact us to nd out more.
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-
San Mateo, and U. S. Rep.
Patrick Meehan, R-Springeld,
introduced The Article 32 Reform
Act, bipartisan legislation to reform
how the military conducts sexual
assault preliminary proceedings by
aligning them with civilian prelimi-
nary hearings, according to Speiers ofce.
The bill will bring Article 32 proceedings more in line
with civilian courts and limit the scope of the proceedings to
the question of probable cause to help prevent abusive and
unwarranted questioning of sexual assault victims, according
to Speiers ofce.
CITY GOVERNMENT
Classic Communities, Inc. has invited the public to
meet and discuss its proposed residential development of
106-120 Tilton Ave. in San Mateo. The developer plans on
turning the current .77 acres of vacant apartment building
into approximately 27 to 35 units consisting of three story
buildings and an underground garage, according to a letter
from Classic Communities, Inc.
Residents and local property owners are encouraged to
come learn about the proposal, ask questions and raise any
issues they may have. Staff from the city planning depart-
ment will also attend the meeting at 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Nov.
20 at the San Mateo Central Park Recreation Center
in Activity Room A.
The California Department of Transportati on
will hold a public scoping meeting to present a proposed
safety improvement project on El Camino Real at
Floribunda Avenue, in the Burlingame and Hillsborough
6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 19 at Burlingame
Main Library in the Lane Community Room, 480
Primrose Road. The purpose of the project is to improve
safety by reducing the potential for collisions and improve
trafc operations.
Caltrans, as owner and operator of El Camino Real, has
led a Notice of Preparation with the California State
Clearinghouse to prepare an Environmental Impact
Report/ Environmental Assessment.
The scoping meeting will be held to provide the public an
opportunity to view the scope of the project and provide
comments on potential environmental issues that should be
considered during the preparation of the reports.
Written comments on the Notice of Preparation will be
accepted until Dec. 21. Please send comments to: Yolanda
Rivas, District Branch Chief, Ofce of
Environmental Analysis, California Department
of Transportati on, 111 Grand Avenue, Mail Station 8B,
Oakland, CA 94623-0660; by fax: (510) 286-5600; or by
email: Yolanda_Rivas@dot.ca.gov.
For more information about the meeting, please contact
Gidget Navarro, public information ofcer, at (510) 286-
5574. Individuals who require documents in alternative for-
mats are requested to contact the District 4 Public
Affairs Ofce at (510) 286-6445.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A vote on dissolving the Millbrae
Business Advisory Committee was
pulled from City Councils agenda
Tuesday night, but committee mem-
bers still came to speak about why
they believe the group is necessary.
Vice Mayor Wayne Lee, liaison to
the committee, asked for the item to
be taken off, while Councilwoman
Marge Colapietro was frustrated with
the removal since she said many
members of the committee attended
and wanted to speak. The council first
discussed the possibility of nixing
the committee in early October
because of lack of productivity from
the group, a number of councilmem-
bers said.
Members were allowed to speak dur-
ing the meetings public comment
section.
Committee member Matt
Fitzgibbons said the members care
about the community in general and
six of the members came to the meet-
ing with the intention to speak. Until
two years ago, city staff would advise
the committee on new projects and
directions, Fitzgibbons said. Now,
this is rare or nonexistent, he added.
The issues and topics we cover
were expanded by Lee, he said. The
council should readvise the commit-
tee with an updated purview. We cant
be effective if were not privy to city
plans. Weve been managed through
the process of change, rather than
choosing our own future.
Why change the committee only to
dissolve it, Fitzgibbons asked.
Lee later said that he took the item
off the agenda to reconstitute it, per-
haps making the committee smaller
to keep it focused. The committee has
problems getting together and stay-
ing on the agenda, he said.
I dont know what they want now,
he said. The focus was on the econo-
my of the city and I was hoping to
take off to discuss with them person-
ally. It sounds like they just want a
downtown committee. I will meet
with the committee and discuss how
we can create a sustainable economy.
The committee is intended to con-
sist of 10 members who serve a term
of four years and may either reside or
work in Millbrae. The committee was
established to guide the implementa-
tion of the America Downtown Action
Agenda and advise the council on
downtown issues. Members may be
reappointed to additional terms and
serve without compensation. The
committee has struggled to reach a
quorum because only eight of these
seats are filled and the rest should be
filled, Fitzgibbons said.
Councilwoman Anne Oliva was on the
committee, but can no longer serve in
her capacity as a councilmember.
We are volunteers, he said.
Maybe there does need to be stricter
enforcement of attendance.
There was a particularly tense
moment when committee member Dan
Rogers addressed Lee as a councilman.
Vice Mayor Lee, thank you, Lee
replied.
Lee later said he was surprised he
was singled out on the issue.
They obviously dont want me as a
liaison anymore, he later said.
Rogers said he was irked by Lees
comments about staff spending too
much time on the committee, noting
that its only an hour and a half of
staff time a month versus eight volun-
teers time. Ed Banayat, president and
CEO of the Millbrae Chamber of
Commerce, and Community
Development Director Farhad
Mortazavi provide assistance to the
committee. Mortazavi advocated for
changes or dissolution of the commit-
tee at a past meeting.
A formal presentation would have
been better than personal attacks on a
councilmember, said Mayor Gina
Papan in response to the members
comments.
Other committee members came to
talk at the meeting. Members
Desmond Yuen, Karen Steffey and
Vernon Bruce said that the group is
positive overall.
In the past weve gotten great
information from council liaisons,
Bruce said. Its been lacking this last
year. In the past, we had funding from
the Redevelopment Agency. I would-
nt vote to dissolve this committee.
Additionally, Chair Harry Aubright
asked for the group not to be abol-
ished. He has been part of the com-
mittee since 2001.
We may not be perfect, but were
here to protect what we think is need-
ed for the community, he said. We
need to be able to work with city con-
sultants. Millbrae certainly has some
needs.
The committee meets at 8:30 a.m.
on the fourth Wednesday of each
month at the Millbrae Chamber of
Commerce.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Sparks fly over possible business
advisory committee dissolution
Members defend existence, want more input from Millbrae city staff
The focus was on the economy of the city
and I was hoping to take off to discuss with them
personally. It sounds like they just want a downtown
committee. I will meet with the committee and
discuss how we can create a sustainable economy.
Vice Mayor Wayne Lee
5
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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San Carlos Art & Wine Festival
Hooked on the Niners
Burlingame Pet Parade
Pen Voice
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Four Caltrain bridges in San Mateo are due
for an upgrade, so the transit agency is work-
ing with the North Central neighborhood to
ensure construction goes smoothly and dis-
ruption is minimized.
Caltrain is hosting an informational pub-
lic meeting with the Home Association of
North Central San Mateo to assess the con-
cerns tomorrow at the Martin Luther King Jr.
Community Center. Members of HANSCM
understand the project is a necessity, howev-
er, they are concerned with what the brush
clearing will unearth, noise pollution, estab-
lishing property lines and general street
diversion issues including worker parking
and where equipment will be stored.
The bridges at Tilton, Monte Diablo, East
Santa Inez and East Poplar avenues are well
past their prime and are no longer seismical-
ly safe, said Caltrain spokeswoman Jayme
Ackemann. Replacing the 110-year-old
structures will cost approximately $31.2
million is estimated to take about two years.
Caltrain will begin with clearing the brush
surrounding the tracks in December and con-
struction is set to begin July 2014. Streets
will be closed in eight-week rotations begin-
ning at the end of 2015.
Caltrain is working with a technique it used
during the replacement of several bridges in
South San Francisco. The bridges are pre-
fabricated off-site, allowing Caltrain to
reduce its effect on the public, Ackemann
said.
Construction will primarily occur at night
or on weekends so as not to interrupt any
train schedules, Ackemann said. While this
keeps the needs of commuters in mind, HAN-
SCM board member Karen Jensen said hav-
ing her son awoken by construction noises
and bright lights shined into his bedroom at
night is jarring.
Caltrain will work with residents to mini-
mize the impact during construction to the
greatest degree possible. Once work begins
in December, workers will clear brush sur-
rounding the tracks by removing about 70
heritage trees and vegetation, Ackemann
said.
Residents still have questions and Jensen
said she isnt sure if the two 80-foot-tall
Monterey pine trees in her backyard adjacent
to the tracks near the Santa Inez Avenue
bridge will be removed. Its distressful for a
residents screening trees to be removed, she
said.
Caltrain said it will replant some trees after
the project is nalized, however, a concern is
what their removal will stir up, said HAN-
SCM Co-president Bertha Sanchez.
Critters like raccoons, opossums and rats
that live in the vegetation may be scared up
and dispersed into the surrounding neighbor-
hood, Sanchez said. Hopefully, Caltrain will
inform residents how they plan to mitigate
pest infestation at the meeting, Jensen said.
One of the major components of the proj-
ect is raising the bridges to account for
updated vehicle clearance regulations,
Ackemann said. Because of the close prox-
imity to downtown, delivery trucks frequent
the area and over the years shes witnessed
several trucks get stuck under the Tilton
Avenue bridge, Sanchez said. Extensive
measures are needed to free the trucks and its
quite a spectacle, Sanchez said. Raising
the height of the bridge will also allow for
emergency vehicles to more readily access
the surrounding neighborhoods, Ackemann
said.
But an unavoidable issue could be where
Caltrains right-of-way begins and ends.
Caltrain hasnt consistently maintained its
property lines throughout the years and resi-
dents may unknowingly have structures that
overlap, Jensen said.
Theyre keeping their cards tight about
their right-of-way and where exactly it lies
there are some people that apparently
may have a house or garage on [Caltrains]
right-of-way that have been standing there
for quite a long time, Jensen said.
This could result in a nancial burden on
homeowners who, as individuals, have little
recourse, Jensen said.
Overall, Caltrain has done a good job
reaching out to residents to work with them
and mitigate many of their concerns,
Sanchez and Jensen said, but they hope to be
given more denite answers tomorrow.
Caltrain will be meeting with residents at
6:30 p.m. at the King Center at 725 Monte
Diablo Ave. in Social Room B.
Caltrain works with North Central over bridge replacement
Neighbors concerned over construction impact for $31.2 million project
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A former Daly City man accused of help-
ing a childhood friend and former lover mur-
der a teen acquaintance in 2001 before both
men went on the lam is guilty of rst-degree
murder and using a knife in the fatal stab-
bing, according to jurors who deliberated
three days before returning their verdict.
The decision means Reynaldo Maldonado,
34, will spend 25 years to life in prison for
the May 21, 2001, death of Quetzlcoatl Alba
in a storage unit turned teen hangout at the
Westlake Apartments. Jurors rejected a spe-
cial circumstance of lying in wait which
would have made Maldonado ineligible for
parole.
Maldonado was saddened by the verdict,
said defense attorney Paul Demeester, adding
that he assured his client he would seek a
new trial.
Prosecutor Jeff Finigan said he respected
the jurys verdict and, while he spoke with
them generally, they didnt specifically
address how they reached the decision.
Jurors returned the verdict late Tuesday and
it was read Wednesday afternoon, roughly
three days after they
began deliberating which
version of events to
believe the prosecu-
tions theory that
Maldonado participated in
Albas murder or the
defense contention that
friend Erick Morales
killed Alba before calling
Maldonado to hide the
bloody evidence.
Maldonado told jurors he complied out of
love for Morales and lied to Daly City police
because he feared his father.
Morales, 32, will stand trial next on Jan.
2. The two were arrested separately and
lengthy court wrangling over Maldonados
psychiatric evaluations also help keep the
prosecution separate.
Albas family was relieved by the convic-
tion but know they have another one to
go, Finigan said.
Amotive in Albas death was never clearly
offered to jurors and Finigan declined to the-
orize, citing the upcoming trial of Morales.
Finigan argued Maldonado held Alba down
while Morales stabbed him repeatedly in the
neck, arms and torso. Maldonado testied
Morales called him to the scene after killing
Alba and asked him to hide the knife, a cell-
phone and a sweatshirt. Both men were eyed
as suspects but each left Daly City shortly
after the murder. Maldonado eventually
ended up in Florida where, according to his
friend Mario Cajina, he confessed to the
killing and showed a photo taken of
Morales standing over Albas body.
Maldonado would later claim to have taken
the photograph as evidence of who commit-
ted the crime.
Cajina tipped off Daly City police who
found the buried items in the mens former
Daly City backyard. During trial, Demeester
contended Cajina lied to police about
Maldonados involvement because he was
angry at having been kicked out of their
shared home.
In 2007, authorities extradited Maldonado
who tried escaping his armed guards at San
Francisco International Airport by jumping
25 feet over a concrete railing while still
handcuffed.
In 2009, two years after Maldonados
arrest, Morales was apprehended after an
East Coast trafc stop revealed his identity.
Maldonados prosecution was then
delayed for four years as questions over
access to his psychiatric records wound
through the upper courts. Prosecutors want-
ed access to the evaluations because they
anticipated a psychiatric defense. Demeester
had argued it was privileged unless
Maldonado rst presented his own mental
health evidence but the California Supreme
Court ruled last year in favor of the prosecu-
tion. However, Forcum ruled in pretrial
motions the defense could not use evidence
of any mental disorder and upheld the deci-
sion after Maldonados testimony.
On Wednesday after the verdict was read,
Demeester said keeping the information of
lifelong brain impairment from jurors may
be one prong of his request for a new trial
and appeal.
He is in the borderline mentally retarded
range so had the jury heard that it may have
evaluated his testimony differently, evaluat-
ed his demeanor and statements to police
differently and may have been in a position
to consider everything differently,
Demeester said.
Maldonado and Morales are both in cus-
tody without bail.
Jury convicts man of killing Daly City teen in 12-year-old murder
Reynaldo
Maldonado
6
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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1301 Ralston in Belmont
By Aimee Lewis Strain
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
It will be at least a week before sam-
ples taken from a Redwood City metal
recycling facility re are analyzed by
ofcials with the Bay Area Air Quality
Management District, which has the
authority to issue a public nuisance vio-
lation against the company should it
determine that the re contaminated
regional air quality.
BAAQMD spokesman Ralph
Borrmann said Wednesday that the dis-
trict took air samples from a monitoring
station in Redwood City two miles from
the scene of Sundays re at the Sims
Metal Management at 699 Seaport
Blvd. in the citys industrial sector.
The re, which ignited a heap of
crushed cars and other large material at
around 1:20 p.m., caused several agen-
cies to issue shelter-in-place alerts to
residents. Nobody was injured in the re
and ofcials say theyll never know
what ignited the pile of heavy recy-
clables.
With any recycling center that
breaks apart materials with machinery,
there will be heat generated by fric-
tion, said Redwood City Fire Marshal
Jim Palisi. Well never know the exact
ignition source its not like a build-
ing re theres no denite area of
ignition to pinpoint. But we know it
wasnt natural, not arson and not delib-
erately set, he said.
Fire crews from throughout the coun-
ty aided Redwood City re crews in bat-
tling the blaze, which took reghters
seven hours to control. The re was
extinguished at 6:10 a.m. Monday. All
health alerts were lifted around 6:20
a.m. Monday.
Palisi said there is a specic protocol
for ghting a re in a metal shredding
facility and due to the tidy manner in
which Sims segregates its recycling
piles, the re was easier to control.
We had good access, good water sup-
ply and because of the segregated piles,
it wasnt likely to spread to the other
piles, Palisi said.
On Sunday, due to the weather condi-
tions this time of year, the smoke was
trapped close to the ground, impacting
sensitive respiratory groups, Borrmann
said. An air quality sample taken that
day indicated a level of 39 micrograms
per cubic meter, four micrograms above
the federal standard of 35 micrograms
per cubic meter of particulate matter
allowed before an alert is issued.
By Monday, however, that number
had dropped, due in part to a weather
system.
As the smoke dissipated, it dropped
the increase in poor air quality was
related to the re, Borrmann said.
In April 2007, there was a re at the
same recycling center and the BAAQMD
was forced to levy a public nuisance vio-
lation due to the large quantities of con-
taminates that annoy or cause a nuisance
to the public, according to Borrmann.
The BAAQMD inspects and regulates
all shredding facilities for the dust emis-
sions that come off the shredder and has
broad authority in issuing violations if
any state or federal rules are broken,
Borrmann said.
Air district awaits analysis after scrap metal fire
Matthew Wilder Litfin
Matthew Wilder Litn, age 52, died
quietly in the hospital Oct. 28, 2013, in
San Mateo after a two-month battle with
pulmonary hypertension. Matt leaves
friends in San Mateo, Novato,
Davenport, Idyllwild, Santa Cruz and
long-ago Tahoe.
Matt was gregarious, vocal, cheerful,
energetic and always reaching out to help
anyone and everyone. Always a xer-
upper, he loved to reclaim, repair, modi-
fy and enhance all manner of autos, appliances, circuits,
even structures.
Matt was very much focused on living vigorously in the
now, very close in to his family and some special friends.
He had very discerning tastes in contemporary music. His
interest in ecology, his dystopian movie collection, his
special computer setups and other special events were
always on Matts regular beat.
We all were very disappointed he couldnt attend the
Americas Cup regatta, the celebrations and the entire
extravaganza in San Francisco last summer.
He will be missed by mother Patricia Litn and father
Robert Litn, his sister Katy Kuhn and Hugh Kuhn, along
with his whole extended family in the South Bay.
Obituary
LOCAL/STATE 7
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Are You Healthy?
Are Your Health Insurance Premiums
Going Up As A Result Of ObamaCare?
If you answered Yes to both questions, I may be
able to help, but you need to call now.
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I n s u r a n c e S e r v i c e s
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A South San Francisco man
accused of raping one of his girl-
friends half-sisters for eight years
and behaving inappropriately
with another and a neighbor girl
may not be t for trial, according
to his defense attorney.
Kyle Clifton Vogts attorney
raised the question of competency
the morning jury trial was to
begin. Criminal proceedings were
put on hold and two doctors
appointed to evaluate Vogts abili-
ty to aid in his own defense. Those
reports are due back Dec. 27.
If incompetent, Vogt will be
sent to a state hospital for treat-
ment. If instead the doctors nd
him competent, Vogt will stand
trial on several felonies that could
send him to prison for life.
Vogt, 38, has
pleaded not
guilty to 11
counts includ-
ing rape, con-
tinuous sexual
abuse of a child,
sending harmful
sexual matter to
a minor, six
counts of lewd
acts with a minor under 14 and two
counts of lewd acts with a minor
over 14 by someone more than 10
years older.
South San Francisco police
arrested Vogt in 2012 after report-
edly learning he had been carrying
on a sexual relationship with his
girlfriends half-sister starting
when the victim was 5. The girl
told her mom what was going on
when she turned 13, according to
prosecutors.
After being taken into custody,
Vogt was also accused of molest-
ing one of the girlfriends other
half-sisters between 2000 and
2012 along with a neighbor girl
who was the rst victims friend.
Those acts allegedly included
sending inappropriate texts, kiss-
ing and groping.
Vogt threatened some of girls
with bodily harm to keep them
from talking, police said.
He split his time between homes
in South San Francisco and Davis
where he lived with his 30-year-
old girlfriend. Her younger sisters
often visited the couple and peri-
odically lived with them in both
cities, according to South San
Francisco police.
He remains in custody without
bail.
Competency questioned for rape defendant
Kyle Vogt
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
More than a quarter of San
Mateo Countys registered voters
took time to cast a ballot Nov. 5,
according to final figures from
the Elections Office.
Chief Elections Officer Mark
Church had predicted turnout
around 24 percent for the off-year
races and with final ballots
counted Thursday the figure set-
tled at 25.39 percent, or 91,293
of the countys 359,535 regis-
tered voters. Just more than one-
fifth of voters were counted at the
end of Election Night.
The low turnout isnt surpris-
ing for elections officials
because non-presidential and
gubernatorial years are nearly
always weak.
The final data also showed that
a growing number of voter are
opting for absentee ballots
rather than physically heading to
a polling place. Vote by mail bal-
lots counted for 19.40 percent
while 5.88 percent were at
precincts and .11 percent were
cast at voting centers.
Now that the votes are counted
though there may be a recount
requested for the Burlingame City
Council race the Elections
Office will begin its 1 percent
manual tally in anticipation of
certifying the results in early
December. The tally confirms
that the election was properly
conducted.
Election turnout around 25 percent
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO University
of California President Janet
Napolitano proposed a tuition
freeze on Wednesday for the 2014-
2015 school year in her first
address to the Board of Regents.
The freeze was among four ideas
she presented at the meeting in
San Francisco that she said aim to
push the system into the future.
She also wants to make UC a
zero-net energy consumer by
2025; streamline community col-
lege transfers; and improve the
process so innovations born from
university research hit the market
more quickly.
Napolitano said the freeze would
give the university system time to
create a new fee
policy to get it
right.
Tuition cuts
right to the
heart of accessi-
bility and
affordability
two of the uni-
versitys guid-
ing stars, she
told the
regents, adding later: I want
tuition to be as low as possible
and I want it to be as predictable as
possible.
Napolitano, the former secretary
of Homeland Security, spent the
past six weeks in her new job vis-
iting many of the systems 10
campuses.
California home
sales fairly flat in October
SAN DIEGO California home
sales and prices were fairly at in
October compared to September,
but other gures indicate a market
that is slowly regaining its health
after a yearslong slump, a research
rm reported Wednesday.
An estimated 36,468 houses and
condominiums were sold last
month, up just 1.2 percent from
September and down 7.1 percent
from October of 2012, DataQuick
said. The monthly sales were 15.4
percent below the October average
dating back to 1988, when San
Diego-based DataQuick began
keeping statistics.
The median sales price for a
home meaning half sold for
more and half for less was
$357,000 about a half-percent
increase over September. The price
was still more than 25 percent
higher than in October of last year
and marked the 11th straight
month that such year-over-year
gains have topped 20 percent.
Napolitano seeks tuition
freeze for UCs in 2014-15
Janet
Napolitano
Around the state
NATION 8
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Speech-to-Speech (STS)
Relay Service
STS Relay is for individuals with
speech disabilities or have diculty
being understood on the phone.
STS access numbers
English 866-988-4288
Espaol 866-288-7504
STS Training & Help Line* Available 9-5 PM PST
English 866-844-2626
*This number is available for use exclusively by California residents and individuals associated
with themwho wish to learn more about Speech-to-Speech service.
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
and Laurie Kellman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Planting a
paltry number on a national disap-
pointment, the Obama administra-
tion revealed Wednesday that just
26,794 people enrolled for health
insurance during the rst, awed
month of operations for the feder-
al Obamacare website.
Adding in enrollment of more
than 79,000 in the 14 states with
their own websites, the nation-
wide number of 106,000 October
sign-ups was barely one-fth of
what ofcials had projected and
a small fraction of the millions
who have received widely publi-
cized private coverage cancella-
tions as a result of the federal law.
The White House raced to reas-
sure anxious Democrats who are
worried about
the controver-
sial program,
which they
voted into exis-
tence three
years ago and
which seems
sure to be a
major issue in
next years
election campaigns. The adminis-
tration, trying to regain the initia-
tive, for the rst time indicated a
willingness to consider legisla-
tion to stave off the wave of can-
cellations thats compounding the
website technology problems.
Some Democrats are seeking
changes in Obamas signature pro-
gram, and key Republicans, many
pressing for repeal, said that even
Wednesdays feeble sign-up fig-
ures appeared to be pumped up.
The nal number 106,185 peo-
ple would be even smaller if it
counted only those who nalized
their enrollment by actually pay-
ing their rst months premium,
Republicans said.
Administration officials and
senior congressional Democrats
expressed condence in the pro-
grams future. We expect enroll-
ment will grow substantially
throughout the next ve months,
said Health and Human Services
Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, who
is in overall charge.
Even with the issues weve had,
the marketplace is working and
people are enrolling, Sebelius
said. Responding to GOP critics,
she said the rst premiums are not
due until Dec. 15.
The online, state-level insur-
ance markets were envisioned as
the new portal to coverage for
people who dont have health
plans on the job. But the federal
market was overwhelmed by tech-
nical problems when it opened
Oct. 1, and the experience of state-
run markets has been mixed.
The administration said an addi-
tional 1 million individuals have
been found eligible to buy cover-
age on the markets, with about
one-third qualifying for tax credits
to reduce their premiums. Another
396,000 have been found eligible
for Medicaid, the safety-net pro-
gram that is shaping up as the
health care laws early success
story.
For many Democrats, concerns
over the cascade of website prob-
lems has been compounded by the
focus on Obamas misleading
promise that Americans who liked
their health insurance plans could
keep them under the overhaul.
Obamacare posts lowhealth care signups
By Mike Stobbe
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA Next time you go
for a checkup, dont be surprised if
your doctor gets on your case
about your weight.
The medical profession has
issued new guidelines for ghting
the nations obesity epidemic, and
they urge physicians to be a lot
more aggressive about helping
patients drop those extra pounds.
Doctors should calculate your
body mass index, a weight-to-
height ratio. And if you need to lose
weight, they should come up with a
plan and send you for counseling.
We recognize that telling
patients to lose weight is not
enough, said Dr. Donna Ryan, co-
chair of the guidelines committee.
The good news? By next year,
most insurance companies are
expected to cover counseling and
other obesity treatments, follow-
ing in the steps of the Medicare
program, which began paying for
one-on-one help last year.
More than a third of U.S. adults
are obese, and thats been the case
since the middle of the last decade.
Officials define someone with a
BMI of 30 or higher as obese.
Doctors are told to get
serious about obesity
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obamas choice to run the
Homeland Security Department
placed the agencys core mission
counterterrorism as his third pri-
ority during a conrmation hearing
Wednesday and took some criticism
for submitting written answers to
Congress that cribbed responses
from several other Obama adminis-
tration nominees.
The two-hour hearing for Jeh
Johnson, the Pentagons former
top lawyer, was largely cordial.
Most senators questioning him sug-
gested he was likely to win conr-
mation easily and would become the
fourth Homeland Security secretary.
But following the hearing, Sen.
John McCain, R-Ariz., said he
planned to place a hold on his nom-
ination, joining another senior
Republican senator who has made
the same pledge.
In answers to a committee pre-
hearing questionnaire Johnson said
his top three priorities were lling
vacancies at the department,
addressing low morale and terrorism
priorities which say less about
the terror threat to the U.S. and
more about whats happened to the
sprawling bureaucracy created after
the 9/11 attacks.
Top priority for DHS pick:
Vacancies not terrorism
Kerry: New Iran sanctions
could scuttle diplomacy
WASHINGTON Secretary of
State John Kerry warned Congress
We d n e s d a y
against scut-
tling a historic
opportunity for
a nuclear pact
with Iran by
pressing ahead
with new sanc-
tions while
i nt e r na t i ona l
n e g o t i a t o r s
seek to prevent
Tehran from being able to assem-
ble an atomic weapons arsenal.
Kerry, who as a senator joined
the effort to impose crippling oil,
trade and investment restrictions
on Iran, said the United States and
other world powers are united
behind an offer they presented to
Iranian negotiators in Geneva last
week. But he said new action now
from U.S. lawmakers could shatter
an international coalition made up
of countries with interests as
divergent as France, Russia and
China, endangering hopes for a
peaceful end to the decade-long
nuclear standoff with the Islamic
republic.
Images show woman on
Chicago train with alligator
CHICAGO After tracking
down a small alligator skulking in
a baggage claim area at Chicagos
OHare International Airport,
authorities are now hunting for its
traveling companion.
The Chicago Transit Authority
has released a series of images
showing a woman who they
believe rode to the airport on a
CTA Blue Line train with the 2-
foot-long gator in the early morn-
ing hours of Nov. 1.
Around the nation
John Kerry
Barack Obama
OPINION 9
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Fire at Sims Metal
Editor,
The re at Sims Metal in Redwood
City on Sunday, Nov. 10 sent a thick
plume of smoke over my neighbor-
hood in unincorporated Redwood
City. The odor was like burning plas-
tic and the haze was dense over our
neighborhood. We could not be out-
side since the smell was so bad. We
did not get the shelter-in-place
phone message for at least two to
three hours after the re started. By
then the smoke was drifting thick and
low over North Fair Oaks, Menlo
Park and Atherton. Shame on Sims.
That said, this incident is a reminder
of just how foolish it is for Cargill to
continue their plan for residential
development on the salt ponds, just
steps away from the Sims metal
shredders.
Marsha Cohen
Redwood City
Obamacare/Chuck McDougald
Editor,
In the weekend edition, Nov 9-10,
Mr. McDougald outlines an opinion
piece (Obamacare, we hardly knew
ye) posted in the Wall Street Journal,
submitted by a San Diego woman
with stage four gall bladder cancer.
She is losing her life sustaining PPO
insurance policy and has nowhere
else to turn for the immediate future.
This is the ip side of the wonders
that the Affordable Care Act will pro-
vide. She is one of the few who has
individual policies that are being can-
celed as they do not comply with the
new Affordable Care Act requirements.
This of course is offset by the many
who will be able to have insurance
someday under the new government
program. The sorry fact here is that
big government put this all together
by politicians with no concern other
than to win political points at home
at any cost. I doubt that any private
business would be paid a nickel by
you or I, for turning out this excuse
for a nonfunctioning program beset
with so many problems, affecting so
many people.
Here in Silicon Valley, with all its
technology and code writing expert-
ise, a better plan could have been cre-
ated, at a better price, without the
political nonsense. Of course, we had
to do something.
Rick Zobelein
San Mateo
Free enterprise
system and health care
Editor,
So, Barack Obama isnt a licensed
insurance agent? How come? He said I
could keep my health plan. Well, it
has to comply with the minimum
standards that qualify it as real health
insurance and not a garbage policy,
somewhat like having an auto policy
that doesnt cover any damage to the
right front fender area. These are the
policies that have to be changed or
withdrawn from the market.
With all the hand-wringing that our
freedoms will be endangered if we
have to buy one of these genuine
health plans, youd think folks would
have more faith in the free enterprise
system, where if there is a demand the
market will supply a solution.
Germany, which has the strongest
economy in Europe, uses competing
nonprot plans to offer variety with-
out the need to satisfy shareholder
greed. Also, the physicians and CEOs
are compensated on a more moderate
scale. The fact is that their entire
country is covered and not just those
with jobs. Germany spends far less as
a nation per capita than we do on
health care. Perhaps that will lighten
the hearts of the scal conservatives?
Nah, its far more fun screaming about
losing our freedoms to Socialism
due to that Kenyan president we voted
in.
Mike Caggiano
San Mateo
Health care questions
Editor,
Why the big fuss over the
Affordable Health Care program? The
people voted Mr. Barack Obama to be
our president. We, the people, want
dependable health care. Our congres-
sional representatives passed the plan
did they read and understand all the
ne print? Is it what is good for all
the people, and is it affordable? Wi l l
the insurance, hospitals and drug
companies make a killing with this
Affordable Health Care deal?
Some changes can be made in the
future if necessary or wanted.
Paul Roelofsen
San Bruno
Letters to the editor
The Oklahoman
J
effrey Zients, the man called in
to rescue the federal govern-
ments health care website,
stated the obvious Friday when he
said HealthCare.gov was a long way
from where it needs to be. New
enrollment numbers illustrate the
point.
According to The Wall Street
Journal, fewer than 50,000 people
were able to sign up for Obamacare
insurance plans during October, the
rst month the site was up and run-
ning. Thats just one-tenth the num-
ber of people the administration had
expected would sign up.
The Journal obtained its gure from
two people familiar with the matter,
who cited internal government data.
The administration is supposed to
release the ofcial October enroll-
ment numbers this week. Theres no
reason to expect the number presented
by the Ofce of Health and Human
Services, which is overseeing enroll-
ment and the website, will be substan-
tially different from what the newspa-
per reported.
After all, HealthCare.gov has been
a disaster since its debut Oct. 1.
Americans have come to learn that the
administration was bent on getting
the ball rolling that day, despite test-
ing that showed the system wasnt
anywhere close to ready.
The Journal interviewed one man in
Illinois who had to try a half-dozen
times just to create a prole on the
website. In late October, he nally
was able to review premiums for some
insurance plans. He said he would like
to review the governments small-
business plans before making a deci-
sion, but that part of the site isnt
working.
The low number of sign-ups, partic-
ularly among younger Americans, will
eventually turn Obamacare on its head
because the higher rates paid by
younger, tter enrollees are needed to
help offset costs of services to older
Americans.
The spokeswoman for HHS says
ofcials expected all along that the
largest number of registrations would
occur closer to the Dec. 15 deadline.
Then again, the administration also
expected the website to work, too.
Sign-ups bode poorly for Obamacare
Faulty minutiae
I
always figured there was something wrong with
me but couldnt put my finger on it. Then I found
it the problem is my finger. At least nine of
them (if were counting thumbs).
The first time I pressed my hand down on the finger-
print plate at the San Mateo County Office of
Education, the readings were a little fuzzy. The woman
helping me was no slouch; with a long list of potential
volunteers needing processing for a local school dis-
tricts mentorship program,
this was not her first identi-
fication rodeo. When
charged with making sure
the state has the proper
information to weed out the
criminal and sketchy, one
cant be too careful.
She handed me a bottle of
lotion, explaining that the
oils often help the reader
pick up the unique swirls. I
bit my tongue from making
Silence of the Lambs
jokes about putting the
lotion in the basket. After all, I was trying to secure a
gig helping young, impressionable minds so it proba-
bly wouldnt have helped my case.
I rubbed my hands together, noted my shoddy cuti-
cles, joked about knowing I needed a manicure, and
tried again. She pushed down. She rolled the fingertips
back and forth. She peered at the screen. She paused
and hmmed. Then she grabbed my palm and turned it
over.
Oh, you have faulty minutiae, she said.
What? Faulty minutiae? How could I have faulty
minutiae? How do I even know what that is?
In a nutshell, the minutiae are the various ridge
points on the finger which are used to differentiate one
persons unique pattern from another. Mine apparently
were faulty and therefore illegible.
Leave it to the folks in education to teach me about
my deficiencies.
I was crushed. Nobody wants to hear they have a
deformity but it is particularly startling when one has
been going about their lives for years blissfully
unaware of a deficit until somebody else decides to
point it out. I was reminded of the dentist a few years
back telling me my overbite was atrocious and asking
hadnt anybody ever suggested braces? Um, no. Or the
optometrist assistant fitting my new pair of glasses on
my face and puzzling over why they sat so oddly on the
bridge of my nose. Oh, seems my ears are also uneven.
Then the optometrist, years into contact wearing,
pointed out that the eye with the technically better
eyesight actually has astigmatism. Who knew? Not
me.
Just like, apparently, the pads of my fingers are the
natural equivalent of some shady criminal type who
filed the prints off to avoid detection. Had I only
known sooner! Think of the potential life of crime!
Lets just try again, she said.
Lotion, rub, press, submit. The fingerprints in indi-
vidual squares popped up on screen. And below each,
minus the left index, was the machines cold judgment:
Rejected.
Over and over again like a cold slap from a first-
choice college: Rejected. Rejected. Rejected.
Youre not the only person this has happened to, the
administrator said.
So this isnt that rare? I clarified.
Well, its not that common, she replied.
So much for that. Add another quirk to the growing
list of slightly irregular body parts.
Back in the newsroom, I shared my plight which not
unexpectedly led to requests to view the faulty minuti-
ae. I held out both hands for inspection.
Yes, I see, they concluded.
Really? What exactly did they see aside from the con-
fusion on my face? Were they really expecting me to
believe my shoddy skin was so obviously visible?
In any case, before exiting the fingerprinting exer-
cise I was urged to return later and given some
Goldilocks-like advice: Moisturize. But dont over-
moisturize. And dont undermoisturize. Just the right
amount, whatever that is. At this point, Im leaning
toward handing over a cheek swab but first I must
prove my fingers are as boring and ordinary and read-
able as anybody else. I might once again be rejected
but am willing to give it a whirl.
Michelle Durands column Off the Beat runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-
5200 ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send
a letter to the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com.
Other voices
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Being
there
is why
Imhere.
Dow 15,821.63 +70.96 10-Yr Bond 2.725 -0.043
Nasdaq 3,965.58 +45.66 Oil (per barrel) 93.71
S&P 500 1,782.00 +14.31 Gold 1,281.20
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Macys gave the
stock market some early holiday
cheer.
Stock indexes climbed back into
record territory Wednesday after the
department store chain gave an opti-
mistic forecast for holiday sales.
Macys surged 9 percent, leading
strong gains among retailers including
J.C. Penney, Nordstrom and Target.
The forecast from Macys shows that
the U.S. may be heading into the holi-
days with a surprising retail wind at its
back. And its the latest news that sug-
gests the economy, while far from
robust, is showing stronger-than-
expected strength to close out the year.
That could continue pushing up a stock
market that is already soaring without
the benet of a booming economy.
When the consumer starts spend-
ing, its pretty much a rising tide,
said Ron Florance, deputy chief
investment officer for Wells Fargo
Private Bank. That gives a big lift
across the board.
The Standard & Poors 500 index
rose 14.31 points, or 0.8 percent, to
1,782, its 34th record close this year.
The index is up 25 percent this year. If
it ends 2013 with that gain, it would be
the best performance in a decade.
The Dow Jones industrial average
gained 70.96 points, or 0.5 percent,
to 15,821.63, also a record. The
Nasdaq composite rose 45.66 points,
or 1.2 percent, to 3,965.58, well
below its record close of 5,048.52
reached in March 2000.
Macys jumped $4.35 to $50.68. Its
earnings climbed 22 percent for the
quarter ended. Nov. 2. The department
store chain, which rose the most in the
S&P 500 index, was the rst major
retailer to report earnings for the quar-
ter.
The shopping season is a critical
time for retailers because it can
account for much of their yearly rev-
enue. The season also indicates where
consumer spending, a key driver of the
economy, is headed.
U.S. stocks started the day lower as
investors considered when the Federal
Reserve might start reducing its eco-
nomic stimulus.
The Fed is buying $85 billion of
bonds a month to keep interest rates
low and support the economy. That has
helped drive a rally in stocks this year.
Surprisingly strong reports on eco-
nomic growth and hiring last week
have led investors to speculate that the
Fed may pare back its stimulus sooner
than expected.
Were in a pause as everyone waits
for more data, said Kate Warne, a
strategist at investment adviser Edward
Jones.
Investors will closely follow
Thursdays confirmation hearing for
Janet Yellen, who has been nominated
to succeed Fed Chairman Ben
Bernanke, for clues about when the Fed
may begin to pull back its economic
stimulus.
Chegg, an online textbook rental
company, opped on its rst day of
trading, slumping $2.82, or 22.6 per-
cent, to $9.68. Another market debut
did much better: Extended Stay
America, a hotel operator, jumped
$3.87, or 19 percent, to $23.87.
Investors may have been concerned
about Cheggs lack of profits.
Although its annual revenue has con-
sistently grown to $213 million in
2012 Chegg said in its initial pub-
lic offering filing that it couldnt
assure investors it will be protable
anytime soon.
Cisco Systems fell $2.25, or 9.5
percent, to $21.72 in after-hours trad-
ing. The technology company said its
rst-quarter revenue grew at a slower
pace than analysts had expected and its
net income declined.
In government bond trading, the
yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell
to 2.73 percent from 2.77 percent
Tuesday.
About 90 percent of companies in
the S&P 500 have now reported third-
quarter results, and earnings are pro-
jected to rise by 5.6 percent in the
July-to-September period, according
to S&P Capital IQ. Thats better than
the 4.9 percent growth recorded in the
second quarter and better than the 2.4
percent growth in same period a year
earlier.
Stocks get retail therapy, hit new highs
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Macys Inc., up $4.35 to $50.68
The retailer dispelled investor fears of a tough holiday ahead and easily
topped Wall Streets third-quarter expectations.
United States Steel Corp., up 58 cents to $27.60
Morgan Stanley grows more comfortable with the steelmakers story
after meeting with new management, and issues an upgrade.
RealD, up $1.76 to $8.76
The 3-D technology company will try to mitigate losses from movie ticket
sales with a new focus on consumer electronics.
General Motors Co., up $1.78 to $38.44
The carmaker may be free of all government ownership by years end as
the U.S. sells its stake, which could mean dividends.
Nasdaq
Dendreon Corp., down 5 cents to $2.53
Quarterly sales of the cancer treatment Provenge declined about 13
percent, forcing job and costs cuts at the pharmaceutical company.
Potbelly Corp., up $2.52 to $29.58
Investors were wowed by big prots from the popular sandwich maker
during its rst quarter as a publicly traded company.
YRC Worldwide Inc., down $2.01 to $7.72
Losses grew faster than investors had expected for the less-than-
truckload-weight trucker and revenue fell short as well.
Perry Ellis International Inc., down $4.47 to $15
Fewer shipments and lower sales through its direct retail channel forced
the clothier to trim its quarterly revenue forecast.
Lululemon Athletica Inc., up $2.03 to $68.98
After a tough year that included a recall for see-through pants,J.P.Morgan
advises buying shares in the yoga retailer.
Big movers
By Paul Elias
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE How much does
Samsung Electronics owe Apple for
copying vital features of the iPhone
and iPad, such as scrolling and the
bounce-back function at the end of
documents?
Apple says $380 million. Samsung
counters with $52 million.
The companies made their demands
Wednesday during opening statements
of a patent trial in San Jose, Calif.
At issue are 13 older products a pre-
vious jury found infringed several
Apple patents. That previous jury
awarded Apple $1.05 billion after
determining 26 Samsung products had
infringed six Apple patents.
But a judge found the jury miscalcu-
lated $400 million in damages for 13
products and ordered a new trial to
determine the proper amount.
Apple lost sales because Samsung
was selling infringing products,
Apple attorney Harold McIhenny told
the jury. He argued that Apples lost
profits, Samsungs profits on the
offending devices and royalties owed
Apple, add up to $380 million.
In a fair ght, in a fair competition,
the money they got would have and
should have gone to Apple,
McIlhenny said.
Samsungs attorney Bill Price coun-
tered that consumers preferred
Samsungs devices, which operate with
Googles Android system, because of
the many differences rather than the
similarities they have with Apples
products. Price told the jury that
Samsung owes Apple $52 million.
Apple is simply asking for much
more money than its entitled to, Price
said.
Price readily conceded that Samsung
was guilty of copying Apples features,
but downplayed the signicance of the
technology in devices that are built
with hundreds of patents each.
This is a case not where were dis-
puting that the 13 phones contain
some elements of Apples property,
Price said. That doesnt mean Apple
gets to come in here and ask for a wind-
fall ... for more than it is entitled.
Samsung says it owes Apple $52 million
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FREMONT Tesla Motors says
three employees have been injured
after an aluminum casting press failed
at its factory in the San Francisco Bay
Area.
The company didnt disclose the
extent of the injuries Wednesday at the
Fremont factory. It says there was a
failure in a low-pressure aluminum
casting press, and the three workers
were hurt by hot metal. It released no
additional details.
Fire trucks were seen outside the fac-
tory in the afternoon. But Pam
Franklin, a Fremont fire employee,
said there was no re at the plant, and
the incident was being treated as an
industrial accident.
Santa Clara Valley Medical Center
spokeswoman Joy Alexiou says the
hospital had received at least two of
the employees. She didnt know their
conditions.
Tesla has made headlines recently
over res involving its Model S elec-
tric car.
Three injured at Tesla factory in California
Ciscos 1Q revenue falls below estimates
NEWYORK Tech bellwether Cisco Systems Inc. post-
ed lower-than-expected revenue for its scal rst quarter on
Wednesday and warned that its revenue for the current peri-
od could fall as much as 10 percent from a year ago.
Ciscos shares tumbled 11 percent in extended trading
after the company gave its guidance. In August, Cisco had
forecast revenue growth of 3 percent to 5 percent for the
current quarter.
Our team there did an exceptional good job managing
through this challenging period, said CEO John Chambers
in a conference call with analysts. However, the shut-
down, debt ceiling negotiations and delay of key decisions
exasperated the lack of condence among business leaders
we had highlighted over the past few quarters.
Cisco earned $2 billion, or 37 cents per share, during the
quarter ended Oct. 26. Thats down 5 percent from $2.09
billion, or 39 cents per share, a year earlier.
Chegg falls in first day as publicly traded company
NEWYORK Not all Internet IPOs are created equal.
Shares of Chegg declined Wednesday in their rst day on
the New York Stock Exchange, offering proof that
investors are selective in their affection for newly issued
technology stocks.
Chegg Inc.s shares, trading under the CHGG ticker
symbol, dropped $2.82, or 23 percent, to close
Wednesdays trading session at $9.68.
The Santa Clara-based company, which provides
online textbook rentals primarily to college students
and other education services, said the initial public
offering of 15 million shares priced at $12.50 per share.
That was above the projected price range of $9.50 to
$11.50 per share.
Business briefs
<< Page 13, Full Central
Coast Section results
Thursday, Nov. 14, 2013
BACK TO THE GRIND: KAEPERNICK SHAKES OFF THE NAYSAYERS, GOES BACK TO WORK > PAGE 13
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Woodside had to get to the playoffs to
catch a breather.
After going the ve-set distance in each
of its final two regular-season matches,
Woodside cruised to victory in the Central
Coast Section Div. II opener yesterday,
sweeping No. 12-seed Branham 25-7,
25-17, 25-10.
The No. 6-seed Wildcats came out ring
seven aces in the rst set and didnt look
back, never trailing throughout the entirety
of the match.
I would have been a little upset if we
would have taken more than three sets (to
win it), Woodside head coach Kyle
Mashima said. We knew the ranking of the
team coming in. We expected them to be no
better than the lower half of our league, and
we went 3-0 with all those teams. Our
expectation was we should be able to handle
it.
Woodside now advances to quarterfinal
play Saturday, traveling to No. 3-seed St.
Francis at 7 p.m.
Christine Alftin looks poised to take on
her former school. The Woodside senior
transferred from St. Francis after her sopho-
more season, and has yet to get the better of
them. The Lancers not only eliminated
Woodside in the CCS opener last season,
they also swept the Wildcats in this sea-
sons non-league opener.
If yesterday is any indication though,
Alftin is one who thrives on the pressure.
The senior had quite a busy day yesterday, as
Woodside held a lunchtime ceremony to
honor its volleyball star as she ofcially
signed a letter of intent to play at Cal next
season. Come game time though, it was
business as usual for the Peninsula Athletic
League Bay Division MVP.
Shes ready to go, Mashima said. Shes
ready to nish it off. Weve got St. Francis
Woodside wins CCS opener
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Carlmont has shown some exceptional
depth at the net this season.
From the surefire moxie of Ella
McDonough to the power barrage of
Charlotte Jackman, the Scots boast a pair of
senior hitters who can kill at will. And
through their rst varsity season, junior
Sabrina Miller and sophomore Alexis
Morrow have proven their mettle by
anchoring the block.
Meanwhile, the centerpiece of the start-
ing six, running the playoff-bound squad
like clockwork, has been setter Amelia
Tupou.
Tupou rhymes with you go hasnt
received the acclaim as have some of the
Bay Divisions heavy hitters. However, the
senior has earned the praise of Carlmont
head coach Chris Crader, who considers his
third-year senior one of the elite talents of
the Peninsula Athletic League.
I think shes the best setter in the
league, Crader said. If we would have won
the league (title), I would have made a push
for her to be MVP.
Carlmont fell two games shy of the title,
nishing in a second-place tie with Menlo-
Atherton behind Bay Division champion
Woodside. Early in the season, it was
Carlmont who handed Woodside its only
loss in league play this season. But a two-
game skid in the penultimate week of the
season cost the Scots dearly, as they lost
back-to-back games to Woodside and M-A.
[Crader] wanted to win league, and we all
jumped onboard with that, Tupou said.
And then we played Woodside at our
school, we beat them, and we were like,Oh.
We have a chance at this. Its completely
possible. Then we were rolling but we
just kind of strolled our way through the
middle of the season. Then when we played
M-A and Woodside again, I dont know
(what happened).
Still, the Scots earned the nal guaranteed
postseason bid in the Bay. They open
Central Coast Section Div. I play tonight as
the No. 6 seed, travelling to No. 3-seed
Tupou the glue for Carlmont
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Amelia Tupou, a three-year varsity starter, is the engine that makes the Carlmont offense go.
T
his weekend is arguably the biggest
of the season when it comes to
Peninsula Athletic League football as
Rivalry Week kicks in for the 18 PAL
squads.
That being said, certain games carry more
cache with the average fan than other.
Granted, fans, stu-
dents and players of
a particular school
believe their rival is
the biggest one on
the schedule, and for
those communities,
theyre right.
But for those won-
dering what all the
hoopla is, Ill try to
break down the
importance/compet-
itiveness of each
game.
Menlo School
versus Sacred
Heart Prep, The Valpo Bowl.
Although among the youngest of all the
rivalry games, 2013 is only the 11th edi-
tion, it is arguably the most competitive.
Menlo holds a 6-4 advantage during the regu-
lar season, winning four of the rst ve
meetings. But the rivalry has been taken up a
notch because of three Central Coast Section
matchups, with the Gators holding a 2-1
edge including a win over the Knights in
the CCS Division IVchampionship game
last season.
These teams have split the last four games.
Burlingame versus San Mateo, The
Little Big Game. This is the granddaddy
of high school rivalry games. Not only is it
the longest-running rivalry game on the
Peninsula, but one of the longest-tenured
matchups in the Bay Area.
A brief look
at this weeks
rivalry games
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SALT LAKE CITY With his penchant
for poetry, Todd Christensen never t the
Raiders renegade mold. But that didnt keep
him from becoming one of the teams best
all-time tight ends.
A ve-time Pro Bowl selection and two-
time Super Bowl winner, Christensen died
from complications during liver transplant
surgery Wednesday. He was 57.
Christensens son, Toby Christensen,
said his father died at Intermountain Medical
Center near his home in
Alpine, Utah. He had
been waiting for 10
months for a donor liver.
After a stellar career at
running back for BYU
from 1974-77,
Christensen was a sec-
ond-round pick for the
Dallas Cowboys in the
1978 NFL draft.
He was waived by the
Cowboys after breaking his foot in training
camp but landed the next year with the
Raiders, where he played for 10 seasons at
tight end and won Super Bowls in 1981 and
1984.
In 1983, he had 92 catches, setting the
NFL record at the time for tight ends. He n-
ished the season with 1,247 yards receiving
and 12 touchdowns.
He broke his own record three seasons
later with 95 catches. He nished his pro
career with 467 catches for 5,872 yards and
41 touchdowns a TD record for a Raiders
tight end. He surpassed 1,000 yards receiv-
ing in three different seasons.
Todd was an excellent football player and
was prolic in the passing game, said for-
mer Raiders coach Tom Flores. He was a
hybrid tight end, an H-back before it
became a football term. He started out as a
special teamer and was named our special
teams captain right away while playing
behind Raymond Chester and Dave Casper.
He then helped us win Super Bowls.
Former Raiders teammate James Lofton
posted to Twitter on Wednesday: He was
truly great both on and off the eld.
Former Raider great Christensen dead at 57
See SCOTS, Page 16
See CCS, Page 14
See LOUNGE, Page 16
Todd
Christensen
SPORTS 12
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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||ke th|s!
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It may only be a small sample size, but the
California Community College season has
begun and there are some early trends worth
noting.
On the womens side, the College of San
Mateo dropped a season-opening result to
American River but bounced back emphati-
cally to beat Hartnell College and capture its
rst win.
And with added depth in 2013-14, its sim-
ple to see that in order for CSM to be suc-
cessful, itll have to get get production from
all parts of the roster.
Against American River, the CSM starting
ve scored 44 of the 58 total points and the
bench managed those 14 points by shooting
10 percent from the oor.
It was also a less than stellar day on the
glass as no CSM player had more than eight
rebounds. The Bulldogs also managed just
six steals for the game.
That all changed against Hartnell. The
CSM bench came up with 22 huge points
helping maintain a 34-9 halftime lead post-
ed by the starters.
McKenna Hilton had her second big game
offensively. She scored 20 against American
River and followed that with a team-leading
14 points on 6 of 10 shooting from the
oor.
Rebounding was also big for the Bulldogs.
Amanda Lee, from her guard position, pulled
down 10 as CSM out-glassed the Panthers
46-25.
And as a team, the Bulldogs were aggres-
sive defensively and notched 30 steals. Lee
had ve and Catherine Cooper tallied six.
But again, the key was CSMs depth and
bench production. Head coach Michelle
Warner said Julianne Llacer is probably the
fastest player on the team this season and
she showed just how valuable her speed
could be. Coming off the bench, Llacer
scored nine points, pulled down four boards
and had six steals.
Over on the mens side, Caada head coach
Mike Reynoso predicted his team would face
its fair share of bumps in his rst year at the
helm of the Colt program.And the early part
of the season suggests Reynoso was at least
partially correct.
Sure, the Colts are off to an 0-3 start and
that doesnt look pretty in the standings.
But, with the exception of Game 1 (a 16-
point loss to Sacramento City College), the
Colts have competed at the level Reynoso is
hoping for.
We were in control during a couple of
those games for about 16 or 17 minutes,
Reynoso said. We just couldnt close things
out. The rst two games, it took us a while to
adjust our defensive pressure. Like we talked
about earlier, we want to be a physical team.
But we kind of shot ourselves in the foot.
Reynoso said the Colts were victims of
overaggressiveness. In the rst two games,
a total of 140 fouls were called the major-
ity against Caadas perimeter players. Its
not wonder that in three losses, teams are
averaging 97.4 points per game and six dif-
ferent players have eclipsed the 20-point
mark against them.
We did a good job of adjusting against
Monterey, Reynoso said. We just didnt
close out on shooters as tight as we needed
to. You have to give credit to Monterey
though. They knocked down 17 3s. We just
need to do a better job of piecing things
together. We really need to take pride in our
defensive game and were still not playing
as hard as we can.
But on the positive side, it appears
Reynoso may have found his main scorer
something he was unsure about before his
Colts stepped on the court.
Rohndell Goodwin had led Caada in scor-
ing in all three games with performances of
15, 25 and 27 points.
Hes just an absolute player, Reynoso
said. The thing we really like about
Rohndell is, yes hes averaging 25 a game,
but hes not taking bad shots. Hes not
shooting a high volume. Hes inside. Hes
outside. Hes getting to the line. Hes going
to be our main scorer.
Israel Hakim has been a key offensively
contributor as well. Hes averaged 15 points
per game.
There arent many guys in the state who
can guard him off the bounce, Reynoso
said. He can blow by a lot of people. He just
needs to work on his shot and shore up that
part of his game.
Former Carlmont Scot David Hobbs is on
an early scoring spurt as well.
But, its like I told the guys, if we put up
90 points, we should be getting the W,
Reynoso said. Weve proven we are capable
of scoring that much, which is reassuring
because I didnt think that would be the case
at all.
And finally at Menlo College, Jolise
Limcaco turned in strong performances in
two Southern California games to earn the
California Pacic Conference womens bas-
ketball Player of the Week honor.
Limcaco put up 12 points and dished out
eight assists in a loss at Hope International,
but turned around the next night to lead her
team to a 64-62 win at Biola. The junior
point guard poured in 21 points to go with
her nine assists and four steals.
The Menlo Oaks are now 2-1 on the sea-
son and nd themselves ranked No. 24 in the
NAIApreseason polls.
CSM women split first two; Caada men off to rough start
SPORTS 14
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Ben Walker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Clayton Kershaw of the
Los Angeles Dodgers and Max Scherzer of
the Detroit Tigers breezed Wednesday to
baseballs Cy Young Awards.
Kershaw won the prize as the National
Leagues best pitcher for the second time in
three seasons after posting a 1.83 ERA
lowest in the majors in 13 years.
This is such a cool thing. I cant even
explain what it means to me, Kershaw said
in an interview on MLB Network. It really
is a huge honor.
The 25-year-old lefty with a big-breaking
curve drew 29 of 30 rst-place votes from
members of the Baseball Writers
Association of America. Adam Wainwright
of the St. Louis Cardinals was picked rst on
one ballot.
Kershaw went 16-9 and topped the NLwith
232 strikeouts. He also won the Cy Young
Award in 2011 and nished second last year
to knuckleballer R.A. Dickey.
Scherzer took the AL honor after leading
the majors with 21 wins. He received 28 of
30 rst-place votes.
The right-hander lost only three times and
was the lone 20-game winner in baseball.
He ranked second in the majors with 240
strikeouts and was fth in the ALwith a 2.90
ERA.
Scherzer smiled and raised both arms when
the results were announced.
Girls tennis
The season ended for both of the
Peninsula Athletic League teams in the
Central Coast Section tournament, but
top-seeded Menlo advanced to Fridays
quarterfinal match.
Carlmont, which beat Los Gatos 5-2 in
the first round, suffered a 6-1 loss to No. 2
seed Saratoga (13-5). The Scots lone win
was a big one, however, as No. 1 singles
player Cori Sidell posted a 6-0, 6-2 win.
Its a big result for Sidell, who will be
the No. 3 seed in the CCS individual tour-
nament in a couple weeks.
The loss dropped Carlmont 18-2 to end
the season.
Hillsdale, which finished as co-champs
with Carlmont for the PAL Bay Division
crown, was eliminated by Menlo School,
5-2.
Hillsdale ends the season 17-3, while
Menlo improves to 22-1. It will host No.
8 Mitty in the quarterfinals 2 p.m. Friday.
Girls water polo
Top-ranked Sacred Heart Prep now know
who it will play in Saturdays quarterfinal
match. The Gators (19-&0 will take on No.
8 Santa Catalina (15-5), which beat No. 9
Willow Glen 11-8 Tuesday evening.
Carlmont, the No. 9 seed in the Central
Coast Section Division I tournament, ral-
lied from a 3-1 halftime lead to knock off
No. 8 Los Altos, 7-6 in double overtime.
The Scots trailed 5-3 in the fourth quar-
ter, but got a goal with less than 10 sec-
onds left to force overtime. Carlmont
scored twice in the first extra period and
then held off the Eagles in the second
overtime.
Carlmont (13-8) advances to the quarter-
finals where it will face top-seeded St.
Francis (23-2) Saturday at a time and place
to be determined.
In the Division II tournament, No. 12
Burlingame saw its season come to an end
with a 12-5 loss to No. 5 Soquel. The
Panthers finish their season with a record
of 9-16.
Boys water polo
Serra, the No. 6 seed, cruised into the
quarterfinals of the Division I tournament
with a 15-6 win over No. 11 Carlmont
Tuesday evening at Palo Alto High.
Joe Kmak paced the Padres with six
goals, with Tyler Breen adding five more.
The win improves Serra to 12-13 overall
this season and the Padres will face No. 3
Menlo-Atherton Saturday at a time and
place to be determined.
Carlmont finished the season with a
mark of 8-16.
In Division II action, 12th-seeded
Hillsdale, making its first-ever CCS
appearance, had a short stay as the
Knights were eliminated by CCS power
and No. 5 seed Soquel, 18-6 Tuesday night
in Palo Alto.
Volleyball
Eighth-seeded Notre Dame-Belmont
cruised an easy win over No. 9 King City
in a CCS Division IV opening-round
match Wednesday night.
The Tigers (19-12) routed King City 25-
16, 25-16, 25-21 to advance to the second
round where theyll take on No. 1 Menlo
School (26-5) at a time to be determined
Saturday at Menlo.
In Division II action, No. 12 Aragon saw
its season come to an end with a straight-
set loss to No. 5 Westmont, 25-13, 25-13,
25-18. The Dons finish the season with a
record of 22-15.
In a Division III match, No. 9 Terra Nova
pulled out a four-set win over No. 8 Notre
Dame-San Jose, 25-22, 16-25, 25-18, 25-
19. The Tigers (21-2) advance to take on
top-seeded Valley Christian (28-7) at 7
p.m. Saturday at Valley Christian in San
Jose.
In other volleyball news, No. 3
Burlingame (19-11), which was to play
No. 6 Saratoga at Capuchino High, is now
being played at Mills, beginning at 7 p.m.
Saturday. In Division I, top-seeded Menlo-
Kershaw and
Scherzer win Cy
Young Awards
think about. So, shes got a lot riding on it
to get there.
Alftin and company came out blazing yes-
terday, as senior hitter Dani Walsh started
the match with four straight service points
to spark a lopsided win in Game 1. Alftin
also contributed seven straight service
points, including ve aces.
We knew [Alftin] was one of the top hit-
ters around, so we just tried to stay on top of
her, Branham fth-year head coach Heather
Cooper said. But shes phenomenal.
In Game 2, Haili and Heilani Hoeft got in
sync to show off their patented sister act at
net. Heilani tabbed four of her eight match
kills in the set, with Haili seamlessly set-
ting almost all of them.
We grew up in the same room, eating the
same food, wearing the same clothes,
Heilani Hoeft said. So were basically the
same person.
In Game 3, Alftin mopped up with ve of
her match-high 13 kills, including the game
winner. Alftin admitted earlier in the week
that she was looking ahead to Woodsides
clash with St. Francis. But now the compe-
tition looks to be stacking up in hurry, as
St. Francis is the rst big hurdle to clear en
route to a possible matchup with No. 2-seed
Los Altos in the seminals, and a projected
championship appearance by No. 1-seed
Archbishop Mitty.
If we played like we played against M-A,
where we blocked really well and we played
tremendous defense, we have shot at taking
the (St. Francis) game, Mashima said. So,
we just have to be tight and we have to be on
it. If we have a crisp game there, then it will
be very, very competitive.
Continued from page 11
CCS
CENTRAL COAST SECTION ROUND-UP
MENLO ATHLETICS
Melissa Tran of Menlo girls tennis returns a
shot in her teams 5-2 win over Hillsdale.
SPORTS 15
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Girls Fast Pitch
14~U
2014 Summer Try~Outs
November 16 & 17, 2013
November 23 & 24, 2013
Pitchers and Catchers 9:00 am
All Players 10:00am -12:00 pm
Sequoia High School
1201 Brewster Avenue
Redwood City, CA
If you have questions, please contact
Jeff Miller ~ Head Coach
jeff@norcalblitz.com
650-280-1514
www.norcalblitz.com
@Tampa
10a.m.
FOX
12/15
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/1
vs. Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/8
@Jets
10a.m.
CBS
12/8
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
vs.Titans
1:05p.m.
CBS
11/24
@Dallas
1:30p.m.
CBS
11/28
vs. Tampa
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/21
@Canucks
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/14
@Oilers
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/15
@Chicago
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/17
vs.L.A.
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/27
vs.Devils
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/23
vs.Atlanta
5:40p.m.
ESPN
12/23
vs. Chiefs
1:05p.m.
CBS
12/15
@Chargers
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/22
vs. Grizzlies
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/20
vs.Thunder
7:30p.m.
TNT
11/14
vs.Utah
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/16
@Utah
6p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/18
vs.Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/23
@Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN/ESPN
11/22
vs. St.Louis
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/29
@Pelicans
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/26
vs.Denver
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/29
@Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/29
THURSDAY
Volleyball
CCStournament quarternals
DivisionI
No.6 Carlmont (21-10) at No.3 Salinas (21-9),7 p.m.
FRIDAY
Girls tennis
CCS quarternals
No. 8 Mitty at No. 1 MenloSchool, 2 p.m.
Football
Sequoiaat Carlmont,Menlo-AthertonatWoodside,
Half Moon Bay at Terra Nova, Sacred Heart Prep vs.
Menlo School at Sequoia, Mills at Capuchino,
Aragon at Hillsdale, Kings Academy at Jefferson, 7
p.m.
SATURDAY
Girls volleyball
CCStournament quarternals
DivisionI
No. 9 Cupertino (23-12)/No. 8 Santa Teresa (18-13)
winner at No. 1 Menlo-Atherton (20-9), 7 p.m.
DivisionIII
No. 6 Saratoga (18-11) vs. No. 3 Burlingame (19-11)
at Capuchino,No.5SouthCity(18-14) at No.4Aptos
(24-8), 7 p.m.
DivisionIV
King City/Notre Dame-Belmont winner at No. 1
Menlo School (26-5),TBA
DivisionV
No. 5 Thomas More (19-9) at No. 4 Crystal Springs
Uplands School (13-15), 7 p.m.
Girls water polo
CCStournament quarternals
DivisionI
No.12 Fremont (18-4)/No.5 Mitty (14-7) winner vs.
No. 4 Menlo-Atherton (16-8),TBA
DivisionII
No. 9 Willow Glen (9-9)/No. 8 Santa Catalina (14-5)
winner vs. No. 1 Sacred Heart Prep (19-7),TBA
Boys water polo
CCStournament quarternals
DivisionI
Serra vs. No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (14-10),TBA
WHATS ON TAP
NFL
ATLANTAFALCONSActivated LB Sean Weath-
erspoonfromtheinjuredreserve/returnlist.Signed
OT Sean Locklear. Released LB Thomas Howard.
CAROLINAPANTHERSAgreedtotermswithLB
Dan Connor. Placed CB James Dockery on injured
reserve.Signed G Travis Bond from the Minnesotas
practice squad.
CHICAGOBEARSSigned S Derrick Martin to a
one-year contract.
GREENBAYPACKERSSigned RB Orwin Smith
to the practice squad.
HOUSTONTEXANSSigned LB D.J.Smith and S
Jawanza Starling. Signed CB Loyce Means and WR
Rico Richardson to the practice squad. Placed WR
Andy Cruse on the practice squad injured list.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS Claimed WR-KR Kyle
Williams off waivers from San Francisco. Released
WR Chad Hall.
MINNESOTAVIKINGSSigned OT Jamaal John-
son-Webb to the practice squad.
OAKLANDRAIDERS Re-signed DL Brian San-
ford. Re-signed OL Jack Cornell to the practice
squad.SignedLBChrisMcCoytothepracticesquad.
TAMPABAYBUCCANEERSSigned RB Michael
Hill from Green Bays practice squad.
NHL
BUFFALO SABRES Fired general manager
Darcy Regier and coach Ron Rolston. Named Ted
Nolan interim coach and Pat LaFontaine president
of hockey operations.
MONTREAL CANADIENS Assigned F Gabriel
Dumont and D Greg Pateryn to Hamilton (AHL).
WASHINGTONCAPITALSAssigned D Dmitry
Orlov Hershey (AHL).
TRANSACTIONS
Florida State quarterback
investigated in sexual assault
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. Florida
State quarterback Jameis Winston
is under investigation in an
alleged sexual assault reported
nearly a nearly a year ago.
Winston has been spectacular
for the No. 2 Seminoles in his rst
college season. He has passed for
2,661 yards and 26 touchdowns to
help Florida State win its rst nine
games and move into position for
a spot in the BCS national cham-
pionship game.
The report does not mention
Winston by name, but it says the
incident took place between 1:30
and 2 a.m. last Dec. 7.
It describes the suspect in the
sexual assault case as being
between 5-foot-9 and 5-11 .
Winston is listed by Florida State
at 6-4.
Sports briefs
16
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
Salinas for a 7 p.m. start. This marks the
fth straight year Carlmont has advanced to
the playoffs. Now its win or go home for
the Scots, who have amassed a 14-11 career
record in CCS play, with two section
crownsrst in the inaugural playoff tour-
ney in 1975, then again in 2005.
While Woodside senior Christine Alftin
was named Bay Division MVP yesterday,
Tupou still received apt recognition.
Carlmonts setter earned a rst-team All-Bay
Division nod, her second in as many sea-
sons.
Tupou is at a crucial juncture of her vol-
leyball career though. Having played year
round since she was a freshman, she has
long desired to play in college.
I really want to (play in college), Tupou
said. Like, really badly.
However, as she joins the elite Encore 18
club team this winter, Tupou is hoping to
eld a serious college offer. Many players at
the high club level already have secured
their future college plans. But Tupou said
she has no idea what the future holds for her.
No idea, Tupou said. So, this club sea-
son, its imperative that I get myself out
there and hopefully something turns up.
All of Carlmonts ve seniors are in the
same boat, as none of them have inked a
college commitment. McDonough is cur-
rently considering some schools on the
East Coast. Senior libero Bailee Roces is
also likely to play at the next level.
According to Crader, so to will Tupou. And
he gures she will be a very pleasant sur-
prise to some college coach somewhere.
Shes going to end up somewhere and
someone is going to be really red up the
third [day] of practice about what she can
do, Crader said.
Thats the thing about the entire squad.
Smooth and efcient, the Scots dont have
the flamboyant talent as do their Bay
Division rivals Woodside and M-A. They do
have the talent though. Perhaps more
importantly, Carlmont has remarkable team
chemistry.
I would say (we are) passionate, Tupou
said. Everybody goes for every ball,
theyre loud, everybodys screaming. When
our team is loud, thats when you know
were on our game.
So, the Scots hope to make a ruckus in
Salinas tonight. And if all goes according to
plan, that ruckus will emanate from the set-
ting prowess of Tupou.
Being able to trust every single player
on the court and know that theyre going to
do their job when I need them to, I love that
about my team, Tupou said.
Continued from page 11
SCOTS
As, Punto agrees
to $3M, one-year deal
ORLANDO, Fla. Inelder Nick Punto
agreed Wednesday to a $3 million, one-year
contract with the Oakland Athletics following
a little more than a season with the Los
Angeles Dodgers.
Puntos deal, announced Wednesday, calls for
a $2.75 million salary and includes a $2.75
million club option for 2015 with a $250,000
buyout. The option could become guaranteed
based on days on the active major league roster
next year, not including time on a disabled list.
The 36-year-old was acquired by the Dodgers
from Boston on Aug. 25, 2012, as part of the
nine-player trade that sent Josh Beckett, Carl
Crawford and Adrian Gonzalez to Los Angeles.
Punto hit .255 this year with two homers and
21 RBIs in 116 games.
He has a .248 career average with
Philadelphia (2001-03), Minnesota (2004-
10), St. Louis (2011), Boston (2012) and Los
Angeles.
Punto had a $1.5 million base salary each
season under the two-year deal he signed with
Boston and earned $250,000 annually in ros-
ter bonuses by being active for at least 150
days.
Sports brief
Talk to longtime Peninsula residents and
this was THE game no matter your aflia-
tion or whether you were even connected to
the schools. The pageantry, the tradition, the
halftime show, most other games pale in
comparison.
On the eld? Its actually been a bit one-
sided recently, with Burlingame dominating,
having won 10 of the last 12 matchups,
many of which havent been too close. Those
that have come down to the wire, however,
have been among the most exciting. In a 24-
23 Burlingame win in 2005, it took the
Panthers breaking up a pass in the end zone
to hold off the Bearcats. San Mateo got its
revenge in 2009, when John Niupalau hauled
in a 44-yard scoring pass with 42 seconds to
play to beat Burlingame 25-20.
When this game is close, no other rivalry
game compares when it comes to the drama
and fan reaction. When this game is competi-
tive, you get goose bumps watching.
Aragon versus Hillsdale, Battle of
the Fleas.Astrange name, until one con-
siders the translation of pulgas of Alameda
de las Pulgas means ea in Spanish. Both
schools reside on what is colloquially known
as The Alameda, thus, the name has stuck.
But enough about that. After the Little Big
Game, this game probably has the most
cache among Peninsula football fans but
the one most wonder if it really is a rivalry
game. Some say to be rivals, both teams need
to win some games and this is the most lop-
sided rivalry of all, considering Aragon has
not lost since 1991 thats 21 straight
wins for the Dons, for those counting.
There have been times over the last several
years in which many believed the Knights
might actually give the Dons a game, only to
see Aragon roll over Hillsdale once again.
The Hillsdale team that beats Aragon to
snap the drought will go down in school his-
tory.
Menlo-Atherton versus Woodsi de.
One of two rivalry games that doesnt have a
nickname, this is arguably the most physical
game played all year between any two teams.
There really seems to be a general dislike
between these two and you can see it in the
hitting and the celebrating during the game.
This is a pendulum-type series, with one
team controlling it for several years before
the other reels off a number of years in a row.
Right now, M-Ais dominating, having won
three in row. From 2004 to 2006, however, it
was Woodside that won three straight.
Half Moon Bay versus Terra Nova,
The Skull Game. This game is kind of
like the little brother (Half Moon Bay) tak-
ing on his bigger brother (Terra Nova). Every
now and then, little bro gets the better of his
older sibling but, more often than not, its
the Tigers handing the Cougars a beating.
The rivalry was much more even in the
early days, but Terra Nova has dominated over
the last 14 year, with the Tigers winning 11
times. Half Moon Bay, however, won most
recently in 2010, stunning Bay Division
champion Terra Nova, 34-10.
Carlmont versus Sequoia, Battle
for the Teremerre Trophy. Although it
doesnt get the most hype, there is no more
even rivalry, given the number of years these
teams have played.
This year is the 58th meeting between the
two and Carlmont holds a slim 30-28 advan-
tage following Sequoias 35-0 win last sea-
son. Sequoia has won four of the last six
meetings.
El Camino versus South City, The
Bell Game. One of those intra-city rival-
ries that is huge in the South San Francisco
community. What made this game so unusual
until this year is that the game was
always played at Clifford Field, the school
districts eld that is on the South City cam-
pus. So while El Camino is the home team
every other year, the Colts have never
enjoyed a true home-eld advantage.
Until this season. With the construction of
a new football facility, El Camino, for the
rst time, will host the Bell Game. Given the
Colts havent beaten the Warriors in 20
years, this year is as good as any for El
Camino to break that streak.
Capuchino versus Mills, Battle of
the Strip. This is one of those Civil War
type games in which family could go against
family. Because the two schools are so close
to each other, many of the players grew up
going to school together before diverging
once they get to high school. You even have
some families who have relatives that have
attended both schools.
Jefferson versus Kings Academy.
The newest of all the rivalries, it has only
been in existence since 2008 when Kings
Academy entered the PAL. Neither team had a
specic rival and, with all the other schools
already established longtime ties with other
schools, these two teams were thrown
together to round out the schedule.
Of the ve meetings between the two
teams, Kings Academy has won four times.
Maybe over the next couple of decades if
it lasts that long it will become a true
rivalry game. Right now, it just lacks the piz-
zazz and history of all the other rivalries on
the Peninsula.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
LOCAL/WORLD 17
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
previously been denied coverage.
Meanwhile, as many as 1 million
Californians who buy individual policies
are having their coverage discontinued
despite President Barack Obamas promise
that it wouldnt happen.
If healthy people avoid buying insurance
on the exchanges, it will undermine insur-
ers business models and ultimately force
premiums higher.
If those signing up trend to the elderly and
sickly your insurance is going to cost
more and that will discourage those younger
people from coming in, warned Lisa
Folberg, a vice president with the
California Medical Association. Theres
still a lot of enrollment and outreach work
that needs to be done.
Wednesdays Health and Human Services
report provided the first glimpse into
enrollment operations at Covered
California, which faces a monumental task
to reach millions of people without insur-
ance and sway them to sign up under the fed-
eral Affordable Care Act.
The report, covering the start of open
enrollment on Oct. 1 through Nov. 2, also
showed that about 80,000 lower-income
people would be eligible for expanded
Medicaid coverage under another prong of
the overhaul.
California counts nearly 7 million people
without health coverage.
Agency ofcials described the rst enroll-
ment figures as encouraging, but
Republican state Assemblyman Dan Logue,
who represents a district north of
Sacramento, predicted a troubled start.
Covered California is giving you the
best-case scenario, but wheres it going to
be 12 months from now? he said. Im
pretty sure its going to be unsustainable.
The 35,000 gure was dened in the feder-
al report as the number of people who have
selected a plan through the insurance
exchange. According to HHS, that means
the number of people who have chosen a
specic insurance plan, whether or not they
have actually followed through and begun
paying the premium for it.
Covered California said sign-ups have
accelerated since then, to about 2,400 peo-
ple a day so far this month.
The gures show momentum and very
high consumer interest, Peter Lee, the
exchanges executive director, said in a
statement.
Younger and healthier people who use
fewer services are needed by insurance com-
panies to balance the cost of treating those
who are sicker and more expensive to cover.
In addition to the state-by-state numbers,
the Health and Human Services report also
provided the overall figure for national
enrollment under President Barack Obamas
national health reforms.
It said that fewer than 27,000 people
managed to enroll for health insurance last
month in the 36 states relying on the prob-
lem-lled federal website. States running
their own websites, including California,
did better than the federal government,
together reporting more than 79,000 sign-
ups.
Even so, total private insurance enroll-
ment after the rst month of the health care
rollout was only about one-fth what the
administration had expected during that
time period.
Enrollment numbers nationwide totaled
106,185. ASept. 5 administration estimate
had projected that 494,620 people would
enroll in the rst month.
During a Wednesday news conference, Lee
said Covered California will have a break-
down of its enrollees next week.
The launch of the Affordable Care Act,
also called Obamacare, has been plagued
by technical problems with the federal gov-
ernments website. Several states that run
their own exchanges, including Oregon and
Hawaii, also have experienced signicant
technical setbacks that have prevented peo-
ple from signing up.
At the same time, millions of Americans
who buy individual policies are receiving
notices from their insurance companies
saying their policies will be discontinued
because they do not meet the higher stan-
dards of the federal law. That is despite
Obamas promise that people could keep
their current policies if they were happy
with them.
Most Americans receive health insurance
through their workplace and are largely
unaffected by the new health care
exchanges.
Under the presidents program, people
without access to coverage through their
jobs can shop for subsidized, private insur-
ance in the state marketplaces, or
exchanges. The benets begin Jan. 1.
Another major piece is a Medicaid expan-
sion to serve more low-income people. Not
all states have accepted the expansion, part-
ly because of concerns over the future cost.
The problems with the exchange websites
and confusion over the law led Obama
administration and state ofcials to lower
expectations for the early enrollment num-
bers.
We were always expecting October would
be a month when people would do some
comparative shopping but not necessarily
go through the entire process, said
Anthony Wright, executive director of
Health Access California, an advocacy
group for the needy working closely with
Covered California. You dont necessarily
buy a car on the rst trip to the lot.
Continued from page 1
NUMBERS
By Rob Giles
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TORONTO Toronto Mayor Rob Ford
admitted during a heated City Council debate
Wednesday that he bought illegal drugs
while in ofce, but adamantly refused to step
down despite calls from nearly every coun-
cilor to take a leave of absence and get help.
Im most denitely keeping this job,
the 44-year-old Ford said, insisting he was
a positive role model for kids.
The mayor made the admission under ques-
tioning by a former ally, Councilor Denzil
Minnan-Wong. Ford publicly acknowledged
last week that he smoked crack cocaine
while in a drunken stupor last year, but his
comments Wednesday marked the rst time
he admitted buying illegal drugs.
Ford paused for a long time after Minnan-
Wong asked him if he had bought illicit nar-
cotics in the past two years.
Then he replied, Yes I have.
I understand the embarrassment that I
have caused. I am humiliated by it, Ford
said.
But he then turned deant, saying he was
not an addict and rebufng suggestions from
council members that he seek help.
I am not leaving here, Ford said. Im
going to sit here and going to attend every
meeting.
Moments earlier, all but two of the 43
councilors present for the debate voted to
accept an open letter asking Ford to step
aside. Most of them also stood up to urge the
mayor to take a leave of absence.
Although it was a stark demonstration of
his political isolation, the vote was merely
symbolic because the City Council does not
have the authority to force the mayor from
ofce unless he is convicted of a crime.
Together we stand to ask you to step aside
and take a leave of absence, Councilor Jaye
Robinson said, reading the open letter.
The packed council chamber erupted with
applause when Robinson ended her speech,
saying Lets get on with city business.
Ford later tried to move a motion directing
all council members to undergo hair drug
and alcohol testing by Dec. 1, but the coun-
cil chair quickly ruled the motion out of
order.
Toronto mayor admits he has bought illegal drugs
REUTERS
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford wipes his face during council at City Hall.
18
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Instead of that dust-collecting desk,many families are seeking creative ways to turning ofces into game rooms,dressing rooms,
small theaters and more.
By Ellen Gibson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The home ofce, it seems, is going
the way of the fax machine.
Interior designers say families are
nding more inventive uses for their
homes extra little rooms optimisti-
cally called bonus rooms by real
estate agents.
With the spread of wireless Internet
and portables devices such as tablets,
its common now to send spreadsheets
and emails from any room in the
house, not to mention the nearest cof-
fee shop. In fact, among major home-
renovation projects, home-office
improvements provide the puniest
return on the investment when a home
is resold, according to Remodeling
magazines 2013 cost vs. value
report.
So instead of that dust-collecting
desk, many families are seeking cre-
ative ways to customize these alcoves
as game rooms, dressing rooms, small
theaters and more.
I get this question a lot, says
Elizabeth Cb Marsh, an associate inte-
rior designer at Jenkins Baer
Associates in Baltimore. Especially
in large, new-construction homes,
there are these bonus rooms that are
just there.
When her clients make over a pre-
existing office, she usually recom-
mends trying to preserve any built-in
features, such as shelving or cabinetry.
If the space is large enough, she says,
one option is to create a billiards
room. Find a small (7-foot) pool table
to place in the center of the room. If
theres a wood counter, retrot the top
with a waterproof material such as
stone for an elegant wet bar, and if you
have the budget, install plumbing for a
small sink. Add barstools, a high-top
cocktail table and a pendant lamp over
the pool table.
A smaller ofce can have a second
life as a luxe dressing room, according
to Marsh. Whether you draw inspira-
tion from Downton Abbey or certain
Beverly Hills housewives, the first
step is to install a wall of shelving for
shoes and clothes. Keep the decor min-
imalist, she advises, with a neutral
paint color, a pair of sconces, and a
tufted ottoman in the center of the
room. Add a oor mirror and a vanity,
and accessorize with vintage hatbox-
es, a dress form or an antique trunk. If
the room has windows, be sure to hang
light-ltering curtains to protect your
clothing.
Families with children have even
more options for converting an ofce
space. These days, it is common to
transform a dull study into a kids
homework hub, says Pam Ginocchio,
co-founder of the childrens design
blog Project Nursery.
To begin, she recommends giving
each kid a workspace: a small metal
desk in a fun color with a clip-on lamp
and a comfy swivel chair. Create a
Home office gathering dust?
Consider your other options
See OFFICE, Page 22
Dayflowers are pretty
but recall something sad
By Lee Reich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The cheery blue color of dayflowers (Commelina com-
munis) so named because each flower lasts but a day
does nothing to dispel some pity I feel for them.
Not that the petals cry out for sympathy. You have to
get fairly close to the plant, or really stop and look at it,
to even see its blossoms. Its stems and leaves, though,
are bold, seemingly ready to gobble up any piece of
ground they can grab with their succulence and lushness.
Aggressive growth coupled with almost inconspicuous
flowers could categorize any plant as a weed. And many
species of dayflower are considered just that, especially in
parts of the South and Southwest. But name calling is not
what stirs up my sympathies for this plant.
THE BROTHERS COMMELINA
Take an even closer look at a dayflower. Zoom in on the
flower, and below the two prominent, azure petals youll
see a third petal, pale compared to the other two and much
smaller.
The petals are what give dayflower its botanical name.
Carl von Linnaeus, the founder of our system of plant
nomenclature, gave dayflowers the botanical name
Commelina to honor two 18th century Dutch brothers
who were stars in botany at the time. But there was a third
brother too, less successful than the other two and repre-
sented by the dayflowers pale, relatively inconspicuous
See FLOWER Page 22
SUBURBAN LIVING 20
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
E V E RY T HI NG MARKE D DOWN!
We Dont Meet
Our Competition,
We Create It!
601 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Hours: Mon.- Sat. 10am to 7pm
Sun. Noon to 6pm
Phone: 650.588.0388
Fax: 650.588.0488
Grand
Opening Sale
By Sean Conway
TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY
Between the months of
November and March, many
houseplants slow down their
growth and cease owering. This
leaves most gardeners longing for
a glimpse of something in bloom
to tide them over until spring
arrives. Forced bulbs, are the per-
fect solution for brightening up
your winter windowsill.
With some planning and a little
work invested upfront, you can
keep your windowsills lled with
pots of colorful bulbs for most of
the winter.
Avariety of bulbs can be coaxed
into bloom indoors. Some, like
the popular large-owered amaryl-
lis, can be kept from year to year,
while others such as pots of daf-
fodils or tulips are best thought of
as annuals and discarded once they
nish blooming.
Spring blooming bulbs adapted
to cool climates such as crocus,
hyacinths, tulips and muscari need
periods of chilling after being pot-
ted up. Some require 8 to 12 weeks
of cold temperatures for their roots
to grow before they can be brought
indoors and coaxed into ower.
I begin my bulb-growing season
about the end of October. I plant a
variety of spring bulbs in shallow
plastic pots, water them well and
place them in the back of my
unheated barn. I check on them
periodically over the winter,
watering them as needed so they
dont dry out.
I start bringing a few pots at a
time inside sometime after New
Years. It is best to bring cold-
forced bulbs into as cool a room in
your house as possible so they can
wake up slowly. Place the potted
bulbs in as much sun as you can to
keep the foliage from stretching,
and be sure to keep the soil in the
pots moist.
Other bulbs native to warmer
climates, such as amaryllis or nar-
cissus (often called paperwhites),
dont require a chilling period.
These bulbs can be kept in a paper
bag out of direct light for as long
as four to six weeks until you are
ready to plant them.
About six weeks before
Thanksgiving I begin potting up
paperwhite bulbs.
Paperwhites are among the easi-
est of bulbs to force into bloom.
Provided their roots are kept moist
and they are given adequate light,
they will bloom about four to six
weeks after planting.
Paperwhites are not fussy about
what their roots are growing in as
long as they have access to mois-
ture. They can be grown in shal-
low bowls filled with gravel,
stones or even marbles. Simply
push the bottom third of the bulb
down into the gravel and ll the
bowl with water up to the bottom
of the bulb. Do not let the fat
part of the bulbs sit in water or
they will rot. For best results,
place four to six bulbs in each
bowl.
Paperwhites can also be grown
in pots lled with soil too. I nd
that the flowers will last a bit
longer when soil is used instead of
stones. If you plant in soil, be
sure to use a container with
drainage holes.
After planting, place your bulbs
in a cool but bright spot. They
should show signs of growth with-
in a week or two.
Once they get started, they will
grow very quickly. Keep in mind
that a warm room will cause rapid
growth with weak stems, while a
cool room will keep the growth
shorter and the stems sturdier.
The same holds true for the
amount of light the bulbs receive
while they are growing. The more
sun they receive, the sturdier the
stems will be.
The best scenario is a cool room
with lots of sun. I nd my paper-
whites grow best in our spare bed-
room, which is kept at 50 degrees.
Once they are in bloom, I place
the pots throughout the house.
After the blooms fade, I toss the
bulbs, soil and all into the com-
post pile and start a new batch.
By the time the last of my pot-
ted bulbs finish blooming
indoors, spring is on my
doorstep, and the worst of winter
is over.
Force bulbs for floral color all winter long
Bulb of amaryllis, a large owered plant ideal for forcing indoors.
SUBUBAN LIVING 21
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Lee Reich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Outside my window is a large, rounded
shrub with leaess branches suffused in a
golden haze. That haze is actually hundreds
if not thousands of golden berries clustered
tightly along the thin stems.
This shrub asked nothing more from me
than planting and care in the form of
water and mulch for only its rst year in
the ground.
Although not considered so years ago
when I planted it, the shrub known as
autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) is
now considered dangerous, an invasive
species. It was brought over from Asia in
the 1830s, and found the soils and climates
here much to its liking. With the help of
birds, which gobble down the fruit and sub-
sequently eject the seeds, autumn olive has
spread far and wide. There are dozens of wild
autumn olives within a short bicycle ride of
my garden.
AUTUMN OLIVE HAS ITS VIRTUES
Beyond its fecundity, adaptability and
that golden haze, autumn olive offers more
pluses. The berries are preceded, in spring,
by owers that exude a sweet perfume. The
wavy leaves are ecked with silver and are
practically white on their undersides, so the
whole plant is transformed into a shimmer-
ing globe in summer breezes. And the adapt-
ability that makes this shrub weedy also
means it can be used to re-clothe ground
trashed by construction projects or mine
spoils. The roots even harbor microorgan-
isms that convert atmospheric nitrogen
into a form that plants can use, thus build-
ing soil fertility.
But back to those golden berries: Most
autumn olive shrubs actually bear crimson
berries, which by now have been stripped
from the stem. What a sight my ducks made
through autumn, waddling over in a bee-line
every morning to gobble up fallen and low
hanging fruit from my crimson-berried
autumn olive bushes.
The fruit, if picked at the right moment,
also taste good fresh to us humans, a feature
that won autumn olive a mention in my
book, Uncommon Fruit for Every Garden
(Timber Press, 2004). Autumn olive fruit
have been eaten in Japan, with whole
branches lopped off and sold on the streets
with their fruit attached. The Japanese name
for autumn olive is aki-gumi, meaning
autumn silverberry, and it refers to the
ripening period and the silvery ecking
found also on the fruit.
Incidentally, autumn olives are rich in
lycopene, a natural compound that offers
protection against certain types of cancers.
ENJOY, BUT IN MOST
PLACES DO NOT PLANT
Afew varieties of autumn olive have been
selected for their dazzling shows of fruit.
One, Brilliant Rose, is also my favorite for
eating, if picked during that narrow window
of time when the berries have lost their
astringency but have not yet started to
shrivel. Charlies Golden autumn olive
fruit, responsible for that golden haze,
only rarely get sweet enough for me. The
birds evidently agree, or more probably
bypass them because they are not red.
Charlies Golden, then, perhaps will not
contribute to the invasive spread of autumn
olive, yet can provide a visual treat.
Because of its invasiveness, autumn
olive should not be planted wherever it is
considered so; check with your state depart-
ment of environmental conservation to
determine whether or not it is invasive in
your state.
On the other hand, if you come upon
some wild shrubs of autumn olive, enjoy
the plants beauty and, after denitive iden-
tification, the berries. Eating them will
make some small contribution to throt-
tling the plants spread.
Enjoy this olive thats not an olive
Beyond its fecundity,adaptability and that golden haze,autumn olive offers more pluses.The
berries are preceded, in spring, by owers that exude a sweet perfume.
By Melissa Kossler Dutton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Washing clothes in the bedroom. Sending
email from the laundry room.
Busy Americans are demanding more from
each room in the house, and spaces designed
for multiple functions are popping up all
over oor plans, design blogs and maga-
zine spreads.
People multitask all the time. There is a
denite correlation and carry-over in the
home, said Wendy Danziger, owner of
Danziger Design in Bethesda, Md. She has
helped clients create rooms for eating and
watching television; housing guests and
working from home; sleeping and doing
laundry.
Some homebuilders have added space
for seating, desks and charging stations
in the laundry room.
Its happening all over, Danziger said.
Theres a lot of strategy that goes on a
lot of compromise.
Furniture manufacturers, too, are helping
to make every square inch count, said Pat
Bowling, spokeswoman for the American
Home Furnishings Alliance in High Point,
N.C. Modern pieces include end tables that
double as le cabinets, coffee tables with
adjustable heights to accommodate working
at a computer or eating, and chests with
docking stations for electronics.
The portability of laptops, tablets and
other devices means you dont need a dedi-
cated home ofce to work at home. People
can and do use electronics in the fam-
ily room, bedroom and kitchen.
Todays furniture is multi-tasking furni-
ture that can help you stay organized, stay
connected and keep clutter at bay, said
Kim Shaver of Hooker Furniture in
Martinsville, Va. In versatile styles and
silhouettes, these pieces fit any room
from the kitchen to the bedroom and from
the family room to the entry hall or foyer
and provide multiple functions in each
room.
Danziger says a console table with
hinged leaves is a good option for a TV
room that sometimes needs to become a din-
ing room: When guests come for dinner,
just slide the table away
from the wall under the tele-
vision and extend the leaves
to create a table that seats up
to six people.
Nesting tables stacking
tables of different sizes
also help increase the func-
tionality of a space, she said. She often puts
them on wheels so they can easily be rolled
to another area of the room for another use.
She has worked with retirees downsizing
to a smaller home and with young profes-
sionals squeezed into urban apartments.
Once home ofces were the rage, she
said. Now, it is not unusual to see living
spaces where people eat, sleep, work and
play games just for the sake of living in a
city where one can walk to everything,
including their ofce.
Multitasking homeowners demand more of their space
SUBURBAN LIVING
22
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
comfortable reading nook on the floor
with beanbags. Then mount floating
shelves from floor to ceiling and display
books with the covers facing out to
entice young readers. Appoint one wall as
a place for scribbling ideas or displaying
schoolwork by applying a layer of mag-
net paint and then chalkboard paint from
floor to ceiling.
Consider allowing a computer for older
kids homework, but try to banish video
games and other distractions, says Project
Nursery co-founder Melissa Fluhr, who
stresses the value of a quiet, contempla-
tive space.
If contemplative is not your familys
speed, Fluhr suggests using the bonus
room as an off-off-off-Broadway theater.
For a kid who likes to perform skits, play
songs and choreograph dances, build a
basic plywood stage in the corner of the
room. Above that riser, hang a rounded
shower-curtain rod and a pair of dark, tab-
top curtains. Hang costumes and dress-up
clothes in a cubby, and store puppets,
musical instruments and other props in a
toy chest. Finish by hanging a mirror at
tyke height so children can watch them-
selves rehearse, and dont forget to add a
few comfy chairs for the audience.
If your child has another obsession,
turn an undersized room into her special
hangout. For example, if she is into outer
space, turn it into a mini planetarium with
a dark-painted ceiling and a night-sky
projector. Just be prepared to update the
theme in a year or two when your childs
interests inevitably leap to something
else.
Having this little bonus room almost
gives you the excuse to go wild,
Ginocchio says.
You dont have to spend a ton of money
or think, whats going to be my return on
investment? Its a chance to have fun.
Continued from page 19
OFFICE
petal. More generous accounts say the
third brother died young, before he was
able to leave his mark on botany. At any
rate, what a sad thing to be immortalized
for ones deficiencies.
GOOD KIN FOR DAYFLOWER
Despite being called a weed and memori-
alizing someones lack of accomplish-
ment, dayflowers keep good company.
Among their kin is the popular houseplant
called wandering Jew, appreciated for the
way its drooping, purple-tinted stems
impart a tropical lushness to heated homes
in the winter.
Another dayflower relative is Moses-in-
a-boat, with lurid purple, spiky leaves.
The name comes from the fat flowers that
nestle down in the folds of the leaves.
Moses-in-a-boat is sometimes grown as a
houseplant, but my favorite sight of it was
outdoors in the tropics, grown as ground-
cover to create swathes of purple that con-
trasted with adjacent beds plush with lime
green babys-tears.
Among outdoor plants in colder regions,
dayflowers best known relatives are spi-
derworts. Spiderworts look much like
dayflowers, except the flowers are larger
and have only two petals.
AND SOME MORE MEMORABLE KIN
Linnaeus named spiderworts for other
prominent botanists, the Tradescants.
Naturalist and plant collector John
Tradescant I, often referred to as the
father of English gardening, was head
gardener to King Charles I. His equally
accomplished son, a royal gardener as
well, was among the first European plant
explorers to the New World. Like dayflow-
ers, spiderworts can spread aggressively.
Im not going to call dayflowers weeds
in my garden. Their lush greenery is wel-
come and so far under control. And a close,
close look at any of the green-hooded
flowers reveals hidden beauty. From the
base of the two prominent, blue petals
arise three tiny sepals (modified petals),
each like a flower itself with three yellow
lobes and a dark maroon center. From
below these sepals swoop forward two
anthers, behind which and not to be
missed is that third, pale petal.
Continued from page 19
FLOWER
DATEBOOK 23
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, NOV. 14
HICAP Program on Medicare:
Overview of Medicare and
Prescription Part D. 1 p.m. Millbrae
Library, 1 Library Ave., Millbrae. The
HICAP (Health Insurance Counseling
and Advocacy Program) provides
free and objective information and
counseling about Medicare.
Information will be provided and
questions will be answered. Free. For
more information call 697-7607.
Off the Grid: Burlingame. 5 p.m. to
9 p.m. Broadway Caltrain Station on
California Drive and Carmelita
Avenue, Burlingame. There will be a
10-vendor lineup. For more informa-
tion call (415) 274-2510.
An Evening with Author John
Christgau. 7 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. John Christgau will read
from his new book, Michael and the
Whiz Kids: A Story of Basketball, Race
and Suburbia in the 1960s. Free. For
more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Pacica Spindrift Players presents
Social Security, a comedy by
Andrew Bergman. 8 p.m. Muriel
Watkin Gallery, 1050 Crespi Drive,
Pacifica. Tickets are $10. Through
Nov. 24. For tickets call the reserva-
tion line at 359-8002.
FRIDAY, NOV. 15
Patricia Jenkins, Director of
CuriOdyssey at Coyote Point. 7:30
a.m. Crystal Springs Golf Course,
6650 Golf Course Drive, Burlingame.
Sponsored by San Mateo Sunrise
Rotary Club. $15, includes breakfast.
For more information call 515-5891.
Senior Showcase Information Fair.
9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Foster City
Recreation Center, 650 Shell Blvd.,
Foster City. Senior services and
resources from all of San Mateo
County with more than 40
exhibitors. Refreshments, goody
bags, health screenings. Free servic-
es include kidney screening, flu
shots, document shredding (free for
seniors) and more. Presented by
Health Plan of San Mateo and the
Daily Journal. Free. For more infor-
mation call 344-5200.
Flu shots for seniors over 65. 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m., Foster City Recreation
Center, 650 Shell Blvd., Foster City.
Get your u shot for free, even if you
don't have any insurance. (Kaiser and
other HMO members excluded.
Kaiser and other HMOs require you
to go to their specied providers.)
Provided by the San Mateo County
Pharmacists Association during the
Senior Showcase Information Fair.
Other free health services include
blood pressure check and consulta-
tion with pharmacists. For more
information call 344-5200.
Free kidney screening. 9 a.m. to 1
p.m., Foster City Recreation Center,
650 Shell Blvd., Foster City. The
Kidney TRUST will be providing free
screening for chronic kidney disease
(CKD) during Senior Showcase
Information Fair. The CKD screening
will be part of a health and wellness
fair being held for the local commu-
nity. Free. For more information call
(877) 444-2398.
Document shredding event. 9
a.m. to 1 p.m., Foster City Recreation
Center, 650 Shell Blvd., Foster City.
Miracle Shred will help protect your
identity. Shredding takes place at
the Senior Showcase Information
Fair. Shredding is free for seniors
over 62. All others $5 per bankers
box. For more information call 455-
1820.
San Mateo Harvest Festival. 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. San Mateo Event
Center, 2495 S. Delaware St., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
go to www.harvestfestival.com.
Obamacare and You. 1 p.m. to 2:30
p.m. 800 Middle Ave., Menlo Park.
There will be a Q&A session to dis-
cuss the details of Obamacare. For
more information email
nlei@menlo.edu.
San Carlos Fine Art Association
Festival. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. San Carlos
Adult Community Center, 601
Chestnut Ave., San Carlos. Original
fine art by award-winning local
artists. Enjoy refreshments and bev-
erages while you browse. For more
information contact Alisan Andrews
at alisanandrews@yahoo.com or call
400-8623.
Peninsula Rose Society Meeting.
7:30 p.m. Veterans Memorial Senior
Center, 1455 Madison Ave., Redwood
City. Consulting Rosarian Jan
Hedman will discuss how to take
more beautiful rose photographs at
the next meeting of the Peninsula
Rose Society. Free. For more informa-
tion call 465-3967.
Salsa Spot with Orq Salson. 8 p.m.
Club Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood
City. $15. For more information call
(877) 435-9849 or visit www.club-
foxrwc.com.
Broadway by the Bay presents
Guys and Dolls. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre,
2215 Broadway, Redwood City.
Through Nov. 17. Tickets are $35 to
$55 per person plus ticket fees. For
more information call 579-5565.
Pacica Spindrift Players presents
Social Security, a comedy by
Andrew Bergman. 8 p.m. Muriel
Watkin Gallery, 1050 Crespi Drive,
Pacica. Tickets are $25 for adults
and $20 for seniors. Runs through
Nov. 24. For tickets call the reserva-
tion line at 359-8002.
SATURDAY, NOV. 16
Oil Seascape Demonstration by
Will Maller. SWA Headquarters
Gallery, 2625 Broadway, Redwood
City. Will has done television seg-
ments, been published in several art
magazines and has been shown in
many juried venues. Free. For more
information call 737-6084.
Food Addicts in Recovery
Anonymous. 8 a.m. Central
Peninsula Church, 1005 Shell Blvd.,
Foster City. Weekly meetings that
walk participants through a 12-Step
recovery program for food obses-
sion, overeating, under-eating or
bulimia. Free. For more information
go to www.foodaddicts.org.
EWaste Fundraising Drive. 9 a.m.
to noon. Highlands Elementary
School, 2320 Newport St., San
Mateo. Bring your electronic waste
items.
Native Plant Sale. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The Mission Blue Nursery, 3401
Bayshore Blvd., Brisbane. For more
information call (415) 467-6631.
Save a Life. Take CPR. 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Foster City Fire Department,
1040 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
$25. For more information call 286-
3350.
Flu shots. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Free. For more information
call 591-8286.
Tree Pruning Workshop: How, Why
and When to do it. 9:30 a.m.
Millbrae Library Community Room, 1
Library Ave., Millbrae. A tree care and
maintenance workshop will begin
with a brief presentation from the
Parks Superintendent followed by a
live tree trimming demonstration on
a sycamore tree in west lawn of the
Library. Learn techniques, rules and
tools for proper tree trimming. Free.
For more information call 259-2440.
Ride up and around Black
Mountain. 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monte
Bello Open Space Preserve, Palo Alto.
Three-and-a-half hour bicycle ride
with docents Linda and Glenn
Wegner. Faster riders may leave with
Glenn at 9:45 a.m. for a quick ascent
up to Monte Bello Preserve. Free. For
more information go to www.open-
space.org/activities.
Handbell Workshop. 10 a.m. to
Noon. 2145 Bunker Hill Drive, San
Mateo. The class is for beginners and
there is no requirement to read
music. Open to all ages. Free. For
more information call 345-2381.
Sante Cresto Sale. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
41 Oak Ave., S. San Francisco. Funds
will be raised to x the building.
Handmade4handcup Craft Fair.10
a.m. to 4 p.m. 2890 Middleeld Road,
Palo Alto. Arts and crafts will benet
Freedom House. Booth space is $25.
For more information call 391-9360.
Orchard Valley Ceramic Arts Guild
Art in Clay Sale. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Lucie Stern Community Center, 1305
Middleeld Road, Palo Alto. For more
information visit www.ovcag.org.
San Mateo Harvest Festival. 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. San Mateo Event
Center, 2495 S. Delaware St., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
go to www.harvestfestival.com.
Cat Appreciation and Adoption
Day: Childrens craft hour. 10:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Millbrae Library, 1
Library Ave., Millbrae. For children
ages seven and up or with assistance
from an adult. Sponsored by
Millbrae Library and Homeless Cat
Network. For more information call
Ginny McLain at 697-7607 ext. 223.
HEART First Time Homebuyer
Workshop. 10:30 a.m. to noon.
Tanforan shops, 1150 El Camino
Real, San Bruno. Find out how you
can qualify to buy a home in San
Mateo County with only 5 percent
down and no PMI. Free. For more
information call 872-4444 ext. 4.
Art When East meets West. 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. NanHai Art, 510
Broadway, Millbrae, Suite 301.
NanHai Art is presenting a free sem-
inar series on art exchange between
the East and West on the following
Saturdays: Nov. 2, Nov. 9 and Nov. 16.
Free. For more information and to
RSVP visit
www.nanhaiart.com/news. For ques-
tions, call 259-2100 or email
art@nanhai.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Cohen has 2,040 votes. Both have 15.5
percent of the vote. Two other candi-
dates already decisively won. Mayor
Ann Keighran got 23 percent of the vote
while Councilman Michael Brownrigg
took 20.4 percent of the vote.
Cohen said he is disappointed and will
likely ask for a recount.
I think we will do our due diligence
most likely and request a recount
because its less than 10 votes, he said.
We will see if that changes the outcome
at all I owe that to all our volunteers
who worked so hard. I do have to give
kudos to Ricardo.
If Cohen does call for a recount, he
would be charged $956 per recount
board per day. Before a recount com-
mences, the person requesting the
recount will determine how many
recount boards are to perform the task
each day, what ballots and precincts are
to be recounted and if it is by hand,
manual, or machine, electronic. The
cost to recount by machine is $300 per
hour. There may also be administrative
costs added for preparing a recount. A
manual recount may last ve days or
more if a full recount is requested,
according to San Mateo County
Elections Manager David Tom.
Meanwhile, Ortiz, 50, said hes very,
very happy with the latest numbers.
Its a slim margin, so Im hoping
after certication it will still stand.
Meanwhile, another close race, for
the third and nal slot on the Belmont-
Redwood Shores Elementary School
District Board of Trustees, seems to be
settled with Amy Koo up 95 votes over
Herb Neuman after Election Day results
had her up 21 votes. Neuman could not
be reached for comment, but as of Friday
he had yet to concede.
Either candidate would ll the third
open seat on the board, as the other two
have already been lled by incumbent
Charles Velschow and Suvarna Bhopale,
who received 22.7 percent and 18 per-
cent of the vote, respectively, according
to the latest results released yesterday.
Naomi Nishimoto, Rakesh Hegde and
Kelly Redmon also ran. Incumbents
Andy Stulbarg and Brian Matthews did
not seek re-election.
In the Burlingame race, Nirmala
Bandrapalli, Steve Duncan, Alexander
England Kent, Andrew Peceimer and
Robert Schinagl also ran. Incumbent
Cathy Baylock opted not to run again.
Of the 15,857 people registered to vote
in Burlingame, 5,095 cast ballots in the
election, meaning voter turnout was
around 32.1 percent.
The Elections Ofce will begin its 1
percent manual tally today in anticipa-
tion of certifying the results in early
December. The tally conrms that the
election was properly conducted. More
information can be found at shapethefu-
ture.org.
Continued from page 1
ELECTION
Preparation begins on Jan. 1 of each
year and work on decorations and other
planning starts in August.
Six or seven entertainment groups
perform daily, including school choirs.
There are more local schools that
want to perform than we can accommo-
date, said Filoli spokeswoman
Christina Syrett, Filolis media and
public relations associate. Its an
immense team effort.
Buffet lunches and evening bistro
dining are available at select times dur-
ing the holiday celebrations with
advance reservations. There will also
be a childrens luncheon party on
Saturday, Dec. 7. It is designed espe-
cially for children 5 to 10 years old and
includes food, a visit with Santa and
childrens entertainment.
Filolis 654-acre property includes a
36,000-square-foot residence fur-
nished with an extensive collection of
17th and 18th century English
antiques and 16 acres of English
Renaissance gardens. Established as a
private residence in 1917, it was
opened to the public in 1976 to pro-
mote cultural and horticultural endeav-
ors.
Non-members may purchase tickets
by mail, at loli.org or by calling 364-
8300, ext. 508. The order form can be
faxed to 503-2090 or mailed to: Attn:
Holiday Traditions at Filoli, 86 Caada
Road, Woodside, CA 94062. Ticket
prices vary by event, but non-member
prices range from $30 to $85 and $25
to $75 for members.
Continued from page 1
FILOLI
referendum to the voters if the San
Carlos City Council approved the orig-
inally proposed project of 280 units
over eight buildings with some up to
four stories. But just before Tuesday
turned into Wednesday, the council
voted 4-1, with Vice Mayor Mark
Olbert dissenting, in favor of a plan
that slashes the height to no more than
three stories and 233 units. The council
also voted 3-2 to waive its standard
below-market rate requirements and
allow Legacy Partners to build 10 per-
cent of units with half each for moderate
and low affordability.
We might not even win a referendum
under these circumstances, Fuller said.
I dont want to ght just for the sake of
a ght.
The effort now, he said, is resolving
the remaining issues like expansion of
Laureola Park using park in-lieu fees
from the developer and cementing the
move of taxis and shuttles to the west
side. The city effort isnt finished
either, as the project must still now go
through design review to approve the
architectural components.
Although there are still details to
work out, Fuller said he and like-minded
residents are happy with the unbeliev-
able accomplishment of getting the
project reduced.
The sun will still shine. It will just
be covered up 15 to 30 minutes earlier,
Fuller said.
Continued from page 1
PLAN
up for health care coverage either
through expanded Medi-Cal or the subsi-
dized programs effective Jan. 1 that have
been taking most of the heat as critics
take aim at costs and enrollment glitch-
es.
Residents have two enrollment
options contacting health exchange
Covered California directly or the county
center where a worker can process both
Medi-Cal and other plan applications.
The center, which has zero wait times
for both direct calls and transfers from
Covered California, has received 5,332
calls related to health insurance,
Verducci said.
The local center received more than
2,200 health insurance applications in
October of which most were for Medi-
Cal. Approximately 50 applications
were submitted for the applied premium
tax credit, otherwise known as the sub-
sidized program. Approximately 230
applications were for the modified
adjusted gross income Medi-Cal.
Locally, the enrollment expectation
is up to 51,000 under Medi-Cal in the
next 12 to 15 months and serving up to
38,000 families who qualify for subsi-
dies.
The ACA expansion of Medi-Cal
made an estimated 13,000 new county
residents eligible for Covered
California exchange plans and about
4,000 enrollees in ACE the countys
low-income health coverage program
Access and Care for Everyone are
also eligible. Of those, the Health
System expects about half to switch in
the rst year.
Information on enrollment is avail-
able at www.coveredca.com,
www.mybenefitscalwin, (800) 223-
8383 or any of the Human Services
Agency regional ofces. The Covered
California phone hours through March
are 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday to Friday
and 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday.
Continued from page 1
LOCAL
COMICS/GAMES
11-14-13
WEDNESDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Barge pusher
4 Groaner, maybe
7 Yellow vehicles
11 Yon maiden
12 ... sting like
14 xe
15 Meat go-with
17 Pro (in proportion)
18 Cascade Range peak
19 Arcade classic
21 After taxes
22 Actor Brynner
23 Sniffed at
26 Mum
29 Assert
30 Adoring
31 Yahoo! rival
33 Part of mpg
34 Cherry variety
35 Excited
36 Just about
38 Roosters pride
39 Research site
40 kwon do
41 Gasoline rating
44 Natural
48 Church service
49 Alleviated
51 Ms. Dinesen
52 High schooler
53 A Gershwin
54 Rhetts hangout
55 Sonnet kin
56 Vigors partner
DOWN
1 Bakers meas.
2 Oops! (hyph.)
3 grip!
4 Reassured Rover
5 German sub (hyph.)
6 Social Register word
7 Ring
8 Economist Smith
9 Frat letter
10 Connery of Dr. No
13 Glimpsing
16 Emmy-winning Ed
20 lang syne
23 Carpet pile
24 Pizzeria must
25 Dry and withered
26 Panasonic rival
27 Title
28 Sleep tfully
30 Hazelnut
32 Parcel of land
34 Type of mufn
35 Dancer Castle
37 Nome home
38 Hound
40 Like some showers
41 Fail to include
42 Hombres abode
43 1917 abdicator
45 Tel
46 Garr or Hatcher
47 Wax-coated cheese
50 Fair hiring letters
DILBERT CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
GET FUZZY
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Hunker down and
learn all you can. What you observe will spark your
imagination, allowing you to come up with bold
concepts that complement your talents.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Interesting
alternatives will arise at home. Dont let someone
pressure you into passing on an opportunity that
you really want to pursue. Your heart will lead you
in the right direction.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Offer an unusual
solution at work, and you will gain respect. Expect
someones insecurity to cause friction. Handle this
person with care.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Dont let someone
dictate your options. You have to be your own boss
and make the decisions that best suit your needs. If
you want to remain emotionally sound, you need to
make a change.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) Take on a challenge
and show everyone how adaptable and knowledgeable
you are. Your ideas will spark personal and professional
interest in you. Partnerships are favored.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) Youll have trouble
making up your mind between work and getting
to know an interesting acquaintance better. Tread
carefully, assume nothing and dont step on
anyones toes.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Fix up your place
and prepare to do a little entertaining. Time with
friends and family will bring out the best in you
and will encourage interesting offers that could
brighten your day.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Before someone
forces you in a direction that leaves you feeling
uncertain, you need to initiate change. Taking
control will give you the upper hand and leave you
some wiggle room to reach your goals.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) Volatile emotions
will surface if you think someone is taking
advantage of you. Put more emphasis on the
projects you are working on and less on the
demands that someone is making.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Tread carefully. Not
everyone will agree with the choices you make.
Get as much accomplished as possible before you
decide to share what you are doing.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Interacting with others
will lead to plenty of give-and-take, with a positive
plan ultimately resulting. Romance should be on your
mind, and a celebration should be planned.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Problems at home or in
a personal relationship can be expected. Listen to any
complaints being made, but dont give in to unrealistic
demands. Keep a low prole.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Thursday Nov. 14, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journals readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNAS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
DISHWASHER WANTED
New San Carlos Restaurant, Johnstons
Saltbox email Max@johnstonsaltbox.com
Call (512)653-1836
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have.Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
Saturday 7am to 4pm. Counter, must
speak English Apply LaunderLand, 995
El Camino, Menlo Park.
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
SEWER AUTHORITY MID-COASTSIDE
Collection Maintenance
Worker I/II D.O.Q.
(Salary: $3947 -$4798/mo. for Collection
Maintenance Worker I D.O.Q.)
(Salary: $4930- $5992/mo. for Collection
Maintenance Worker II D.O.Q.)
Sewer Authority Mid-Coastside (SAM),
located in the City of Half Moon Bay,
is accepting applications for the posi-
tion of Collection Maintenance Worker
I or II (depending on qualifications).
The Collection Maintenance Worker I is
an entry level maintenance position.The
Collection Maintenance Worker II is a
journey level maintenance position.
MININUM QUALIFICATIONS: Educa-
tion: Equivalent to completion of the 12th
grade. License: Possession of a valid
State of California Class C Drivers Li-
cense. 6 months previous sewer collec-
tions systems experience desired.
APPLICATION DUE DATE: November
15, 2013 by 3:00 pm. Applications may
be submitted online, via email, delivered
in person, or via US Postal Service (must
be postmarked November 15, 2013).
HOW TO OBTAIN AN APPLICATION
AND JOB DESCRIPTION:
For an application and complete job de-
scription please visit SAMs website:
www.samcleanswater.org, click on the
link to the left, Employment Opportuni-
ties, or you may phone 650-726-0124.
TAXI & LIMO DRIVER, Wanted, full
time, paid weekly, between $500 and
$700 cash, (650)921-2071
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258077
The following person is doing business
as: Be Prepared First Aid, 723 Cuesta
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Marita
Nickison, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Marita Nickison /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523423
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Ryan Francis Rovai-Pickett
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Ryan Francis Rovai-Pickett
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Ryan Francis Rovai-Pick-
ett
Proposed name: Ryan Francis Pickett
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 3,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/22/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/22/2013
(Published, 10/24/13, 10/31/2013,
11/07/2013, 11/14/2013)
The Redwood City School
District and partners will
submit a Request for Appli-
cation for 21st Century
Community Learning Cen-
ters Programs proposing to
Serve Elementary and Mid-
dle/Junior High School Stu-
dents. For more information
regarding this application,
please contact Sandra Por-
tasio, Director of School-
Community Partnerships at
650.423.2268 or at sporta-
sio@rcsdk8.net
26 Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
The San Mateo Daily Journal,
a locally owned, award-winning daily newspaper on the
Peninsula has an opening for a Account Executive.
The position is responsible for developing new business
opportunities and maintaining those customers within the
San Mateo County and Santa Clara County area.
The candidate will develop new business through a
combination of cold calling, outdoor canvassing, net-
working and any other technique necessary to achieve
his or her goals
The candidate will effectively, professionally and
accurately represent the Daily Journals wide range of
products and services which include print advertising,
inserts, internet advertising, social media advertising,
graphic design services, event marketing, and more.
The candidate will manage their clients in a heavily
customer-focused manner, understanding that real
account management begins after the sale has been
closed.
A strong work ethic and desire to succeed responsibly
also required.
Work for the best local paper in the Bay Area.
To apply, send a resume and follow up to
ads @ smdailyjournal.com
Immediate
Opening
for
Account
Executive
Job Requirements:
8ell print, digital and other mar-
keting solutions
B2B sales experience is preferred
hewspaper and other media
sales experience desired but not
required
Work well with others
Excellent communication, pre-
sentation, organizational skills are
required
A strong work ethic and desire to
succeed responsibly also required.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 524322
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Christie Ann Ariate
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Christie Ann Ariate filed a peti-
tion with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Christie Ann Ariate
Proposed name: Christie Ariate Parsons
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 4,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/18/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/10/2013
(Published, 10/24/13, 10/31/2013,
11/07/2013, 11/14/2013)
CASE# CIV 524636
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Olga Sergeyev
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Olga Sergeyev filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Olga Sergeyev
Proposed name: Olga Mescherskaya
Miller
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December
11, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/23/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/18/2013
(Published, 10/31/13, 11/07/2013,
11/14/2013, 11/21/2013)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 524921
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Alfred Teja Tjakradisurya
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Alfred Teja Tjakradisurya filed
a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Alfred Teja Tjakradisurya
Proposed name: Alfred Tio
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December
20, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 11/04/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/31/2013
(Published, 11/14/13, 11/21/2013,
11/28/2013, 12/05/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257948
The following person is doing business
as: Seven Day Creation, 355 Gellert
Blvd., Ste 200, DALY CITY, CA 94015 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Jeromy Hogue, and Bethany Hogue 12
Ida Dr. South San Francisco, CA 94080 .
The business is conducted by a Married
Couple. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Bethany Hogue /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258057
The following person is doing business
as: Parthenon Properties, 540 Elm St.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070, is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: 540 Elm
Associates, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ John Gerontides /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258148
The following person is doing business
as: Pacific Residential Realty, 118 Ascot
Ct., Apt. F, MORAGA, CA 94556 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Keith Miller, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Keith Miller /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258189
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Sunny Ridges Joint Venture,
185 Ridgeway Rd., Hillsborough, CA
94101 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Naomi Sobocinski, same ad-
dress and Robert Balopole, 1650 Borel
Pl., Ste. 224, San Mateo CA 94402. The
business is conducted by a Joint Ven-
ture. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Naomi Sobocinski /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258203
The following person is doing business
as: 8 Sushi, 2470 Skyline Blvd., PACIF-
ICA, CA 94044 is hereby registered by
the following owner: My Ocean 8 Incor-
poration, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Tracy Mok /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257935
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Rumi, 1179 Laurel St., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owners: Andrew Joseph
Gambardella and Sharon Lee Gambra-
della, 2747 Hallmark Dr. Belmont, CA
94002. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Andrew Gambardellal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258302
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Superior Landscaping Service,
3945 Branson Dr., SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Sergio Martinez, and Laura
A. Martinez, 3945 Branson Dr., San Ma-
teo, CA 94403. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Sergio Martinez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258298
The following person is doing business
as: Drewsco Consulting & Marketing
Services, 988 San Felipe Ave., SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Andrew G. Daly,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Andrew G. Daly /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257966
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Lolita, 650 El Camino Real, #B,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Lolita,
650 El Camino Real, #B, MENLO PARK,
CA 94025. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Paulina Kanbar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258371
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Hero International, 1375 Burlin-
game Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Onyx Style, Inc, DE. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Adil Waliuddin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258092
The following person is doing business
as: Tokyo Sushi & Bar, 2278 Westbor-
ough Blvd, Ste. 201B, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: New
Shanghai Restaurant, Inc, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Cindy Zhu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258368
The following person is doing business
as: Green Acres Express Market and
Produce, 3800 El Camino Real, 3800 El
Camino Real SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Gary and Evlin, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Gabriel Kholry/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258314
The following person is doing business
as: Veggiebellie.com, 137 15th Ave. SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Mary McInnis,
same address and Maggie Foard, 265
Portola St. Pk. Rd., La Honda, CA 94020
. The business is conducted by a Gener-
al Partnership. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/30/13.
/s/ Mary McInnis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258184
The following person is doing business
as: Diva Chic Salon, 4060 S. El Camino
Real, Ste A, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Melissa B. Dunlap, 304 Castilian Way,
San Mateo, CA 94402. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Melissa B. Dunlap /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258401
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Realty World, 2) Gold Leaf Real
Estate, 724 B Linden Ave., BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Linda D. Lowe,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Linda D. Lowe /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258119
The following person is doing business
as: Alanas Cafe, 1408 Burlingame Ave.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Too Tarts,
LLC. The business is conducted by a
Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 12/05/2002.
/s/ Teresa Lindhartsen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258490
The following person is doing business
as: Rodriguez Auto Mechanic, 1034 S.
Claremont St., SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Arsenio I. Rodriguez, 2727 Edi-
son St., Apt. 217, San Mateo, CA 94403.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
11/13/2013.
/s/ Arsenio I. Rodriguez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13, 12/05/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258254
The following person is doing business
as: Changes in Latitude Travel, 780 Sea
Spray Ln., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Michelle Smith-Ong, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Michelle Smith-Ong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13, 12/05/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258255
The following person is doing business
as: Cardinal Associates/ Larson Tax
Service, 1799 Bayshore Hwy., Ste. 200,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Christo-
pher Ong, 780 Sea Spray Ln., #312,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94010. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Christopher Ong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13, 12/05/13).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
MAIZIE UNG
(Lost Will)
Case Number: 123879
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Maizie Ung. A Petition
for Probate has been filed by Tyman Ung
in the Superior Court of California, Coun-
ty of San Mateo. The Petition for Pro-
bate requests that Tyman Ung be ap-
pointed as personal representative to ad-
minister the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedents will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
bale for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: November 25, 2013
at 9:00 a.m., Dept. Probate, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Thirkell Law Group, (State Bar# 47192)
Thirkell Law Group
181 2nd Ave., Ste 625, Po Box 190
SAN MATEO, CA 94401
(650)348-1016
Dated: November 6, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on November 8, 12, 14, 2013.
SCHOOL BOARD
OPENING
As of December 1, 2013, the
South San Francisco Unified
School District will have one
vacancy on the Board of
Trustees. The Board has
approved a provisional ap-
pointment. Persons inter-
ested in applying should
note the following timeline:
Friday, December 6, 2013, 4
p.m. - deadline to submit an
application; Monday, De-
cember 9, 2013 - interviews
will be conducted in the Dis-
trict Office Board room be-
ginning at 6:30 p.m. For ap-
plications and criteria infor-
mation please visit the Dis-
tricts website at
www.ssfusd.org.
27 Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
203 Public Notices
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CLJ512083
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): Jean P Barba, aka Jean Z
Barba, aka Jean Paul, an Individual; and
Does 1-100 inclusive
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): PerSolve,
LLC, a limited liability company, dba Ac-
count Resolution Associates
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
courts lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo Superior Court
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiffs attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Alaine Patti-Jelsvik, SBN 194748, Edit
Alexander Ryan SBN 249323
PerSolve, LLC a limited Liability Compa-
ny, dba Account Resolution Associates
9301 Winnetka Avenue, Ste. B
CHATSWORTH, CA 91311
(866)438-1259
Date: (Fecha) Feb. 24, 2012
John C. Fitton, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
November 14, 21, 28, December 5,
2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardis market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
210 Lost & Found
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND IN BURLINGAME CALL
TO IDENTIFY (description) Foster City
Police Department Property Section
FOUND
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
HIGH CHAIR by Evenflo. Clean, sturdy,
barely used. $20 (650)726-4985
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
ART: 5 charcoal nude figures, unframed,
14 x 18, by Andrea Medina, 1980s.
$40. 650-345-3277
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24x24x24, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. SOLD!
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1953 CHEVY Bel Air Convertible model.
Sun Star 1:18 scale.Blue. Original box.
$20 cash. (650)654-9252
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
2003 AMERICAN Eagle silver proof dol-
lar. Original velvet box and COA. $70
Cash. (650)654-9252
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
298 Collectibles
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $75 San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$5.00, Steve, SC, 650-255-8716
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 SOLD!
300 Toys
66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, SOLD!
LEGO - unopened, Monster truck trans-
porter, figures, 299 pieces, ages 5-12.
$27.00 (650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $10.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$60 OBO. Steve, 650-255-8716.
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 SOLD!
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 SOLD!
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72 x 40 , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27 SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
APPLE Harmon Kardon speakers, sub-
woofer, one side rattles. In San Carlos,
$40, 650-255-8716.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER, mint condition, Photo
Smart, print, view photos, documents,
great for cards, $25.00 (650)578-9208
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20 color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
303 Electronics
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, 2/3 speakers boxes, $50
650-430-6046
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(650)345-3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
bankers rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 SOLD!
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31x 61 x 18 , $45. (650)592-2648
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53 x 78 wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelves $95 OBO
SOLD
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50, (650)592-2648
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
END TABLES 2 Cabinet drum style ex-
cellent condition $90 OBO (650)345-
5644
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258246
The following person is doing business
as: Empowered Presence Coaching, 221
S. Fremont St.,Apt 312,SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Lauri Smith, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN om
09/21/2010.
/s/ Lauri Smith /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/14/13, 11/21/13, 11/28/13, 12/05/13).
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
HEADBOARD, QUEEN-SIZE,HALF-
MOON shape,decorated with small
stones,very heavy. Free to take away!
(650-342-6192)
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KING SIZE Brass bed frame. $350 OBO
(650)368-6674
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41 in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
304 Furniture
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owners
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, (650)245-5118
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
ROUND DINING table, by Ethan Allen,
sturdy good cond. $95 (650)726-4985
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA EXCELLENT CONDITION. 8FT
NEUTRAL COLOR $99 OBO (650)345-
5644
SOFA PASTEL Strips excellent
condition $99 (650)701-1892
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK BASE and glass cover cheese
holder. Great for holidays. $18.
(650)341-6402
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV CABINET, brown wood, 3 shelves, 2
doors, brass hardware, 34 3/8wx20
1/2dx28 3/8h good condition. $35
(650)347-5104
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS (3) with lids: 21/2 gal,
4 gal, 5 gal $20 for all. (650)574-3229
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
(650)520-3425
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
STANDARD BATHROOM SET beige lid,
cover and mat. $10 (650)574-3229
306 Housewares
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN beige /coral
/white floral on ivory, $10 (650)574-3229
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40 for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman, 10, 4 long
x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 SOLD!
PROFESSIONAL MORTAR BOX Like
New $25 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
FILING CABINET, 4-drawer, letter $25
(650)341-8342
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
28 Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Molls leg
4 Word after fire or
power
9 Like some
wedding dresses
13 Biblical priest who
trained Samuel
14 Zellweger et al.
16 Together, in
music
17 Architects add-on
18 *Make it not hurt
so much
20 Tre times due
21 Bark relative
22 IHOP array
23 *Marching order
26 Type of cranial
nerve
28 Role for John Cho
in Star Trek
29 Jets and others
31 __ nutshell
32 Mex. neighbor
34 Motor extension?
35 At any time
36 *Has unfinished
business with the
IRS
40 Spot on the tube
41 Good buddy
42 Play about
Capote
43 Ran across
44 Film critic Jeffrey
46 Long haul
49 __ de Chine: light
fabric
51 *Entice with
54 Eggheads
56 Govt. surveillance
group
57 PTA meeting site
58 *Sagacious
60 __ out: barely
make
61 Aleutian island
62 Faunae
counterparts
63 Grassy area
64 Harness part
65 Yeats The Wild
__ at Coole
66 Many AARP The
Magazine
readers: Abbr.
DOWN
1 Silly sorts
2 Strike zones?
3 Social setting
4 Mr. Holland
portrayer
5 Put on again
6 Hip joint
7 Author Harper
8 Conversation
opener
9 Drink la Fido
10 Capable of change
11 Cookbook
categories
12 Nikkei Index
currency
15 Lacking the
required funds
19 Winged god
24 Turned around
25 Opponents of the
60s-70s New
Left
27 Golf, for one
30 Simpsons creator
Groening
33 Eight Is Enough
wife
35 Bedroom
community
36 Orthodontic
concern
37 Ride the wake,
say
38 Awakenings
39 Some auction
transactions
40 Movies for movie
lovers network
44 Arent you a little
short for a
Stormtrooper?
speaker
45 Isabel Allende
title
47 Stands for things
48 Any of the top 25
NFL career
scoring leaders
50 Song of praise
52 Egyptian dam
53 MLB team,
familiarly (and
whats missing
from the
sequence found
in the answers to
starred clues?)
55 Bad check letters
58 Card game for
two, usually
59 What are you
waiting for?!
By Mark Bickham
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
11/14/13
11/14/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
BABY BJORN Little Potty Ideal 4
travel/early training,(650)595-3933
BLUE/WHITE DUCK shaped ceramic
teapot, hand painted, made in China.
$18. (650)341-6402
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BREVILLE JUICE Maker multi speed
(Williams Somoma) never used $90
(650)994-4783
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
COPPERLIKE CENTERPIECE, unused
oval, 18 inches high, x 22 x 17,$10.00
(650)578-9208
DOLLS: NEW, girl and boy in pilgrim
costume, adorable, soft fabric, beautifully
made. $30. 650-345-3277
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 SOLD!
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
310 Misc. For Sale
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT SANDWICH maker elec, perfect,
$9.95 (650)595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JAPANESE SAKE Set, unused, boxes,
Geisha design on carafe and 2 sake
cups, $7.00 (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9 tall, 11 diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 SOLD!
LUGGAGE, BLACK Samsonite with roll-
ers, 3 compartments, condition clean,
never used. makeshift handle, $40
(650)347-5104
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX TOWEL SET (bath, hand,
face) - gold-colored - $15 (650)574-3229
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
310 Misc. For Sale
MARTEX TOWEL SET (bath, hand.
face) - clay-colored - $15 (650)574-3229
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12Lx
5W , $12. both, SOLD!
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MENS LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. SOLD!
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6,
$60., (650)294-9652
310 Misc. For Sale
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10. (650)574-3229
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
USB VEHICLE charger any mini USB
device $20 (650)595-3933
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$40. (650)873-8167
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
XMAS DECORATIONS: 6 unique, hand
painted, jointed new toy soldiers, holding
musical instrument. $34. 650-345-3277
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap
$75.(650)367-8146
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 (650)348-6428
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56 square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
316 Clothes
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5x34.5 made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMAN;S LEVI'S Jacket Pristine cond.,
faded Only $29 (650)595-3933
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1 x 8 for 8
foundations. $25. SOLD
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all SOLD
ONE BOX of new #1 heavy CEDAR
SHAKE shingles $14.00. SOLD!
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
USED LUMBER pieces 5 2x4's, 2 2x6's,
3 plywood sheets ALL $30.00
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057.
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
YARD SALE
Saturday & Sunday
Nov. 16th & 17th
1058 Bermuda Dr,
(Fiesta Gardens)
San Mateo
Womens clothing & shoes,
arts & crafts, household
goods, picture frames,
knick-knacks, mattress,
brass headboard, & Much
More!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
29 Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
620 Automobiles
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD 93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUVs
GMV 03 .ENVOY, SLT , 4x4, excellent
condition. Leather everything. 106K
miles. White. $7,800 (650)342-6342
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a 96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
670 Auto Parts
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
Windows Doors
Cabinets Casing
Crown Moulding
Baseboards
Mantels Chair Rails
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Carpets
COLEMAN'S
CARPET SERVICE
Green, Soap free,
Detergent Free Carpet Cleaning!
Dry in a few hours! $99.00!
2 Room minimum!
Call Gisele (510)590-7427
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
ANGELICAS HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
House Cleaning Move In/Out
Cleaning Janitorial Services
Handyman Services
General Errands Event Help
$15 off when mention this ad
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Concrete
Construction
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
OSULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
VICTORS FENCES
and House Painting
Interior Exterior
Power Wash
Driveways Sidewalk Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
RAIN GUTTERS
Gutters and downspouts,
Rain gutter repair,
Rain gutter protection (screen),
Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
30 Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Gutters
GUTTER
CLEANING
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs Maintenance Painting
Carpentry Plumbing Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance
Clean Ups Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof
Repair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chriss Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
Yard c|ean up - att|c,
basement
Junk meta| remova|
|nc|ud|ng cars, trucks and
motorcyc|es
0emo||t|on
0oncrete remova|
Fxcavat|on
Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
0omp|ete |andscape
ma|ntenance and remova|
Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
8eta|n|ng wa||s
0rnamenta| concrete
Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming Pruning
Shaping
Large Removal
Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tree Service
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
Tile Mosaics
Natural Stone Countertops
Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
CUBIAS TILE
Entryways Kitchens
Decks Bathrooms
Tile Repair Floors
Grout Repair Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
BANKRUPTCY
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
GRAND OPENING
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
Food
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
WORLD 31
Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Ries
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certied Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certied Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
Insurance
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benet packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert ne watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specic direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Massage Therapy
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
By Kristen Gelineau and Jim Gomez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TACLOBAN, Philippines A run-down,
single-story building with lthy oors at
Taclobans ruined airport has become the
areas main medical center for victims of
last weeks powerful typhoon. It has little
medicine, virtually no facilities and very
few doctors.
What it is not short of are patients.
Hundreds of injured people, pregnant
women, children and the elderly have
poured into the squat, white building behind
the control tower since Typhoon Haiyan
ravaged the eastern Philippines on Friday,
killing thousands. Doctors who have been
dealing with cuts, fractures and pregnancy
complications said Wednesday they soon
expect to be treating more serious problems
such as pneumonia, dehydration, diarrhea
and infections.
The medical woes add to the daunting
tasks for authorities, including dealing with
looters and clearing the bottlenecks hold-
ing up thousands of tons of aid material
from coming in.
The priority has got to be, lets get the
food in, lets get the water in. We got a lot
more come in today, But even that wont be
enough, We really need to scale up opera-
tion in an ongoing basis, U.N. humanitar-
ian chief Valerie Amos told reporters after
touring Talcoban, the capital of Leyte
province. Her ofce has released $25 mil-
lion in emergency relief fund, accounting
for a chunk of the millions of dollars
pledged by countries around the world.
The World Food Program distributed rice
and other items to nearly 50,000 people in
the Tacloban area Wednesday, U.N.
spokesman Martin Nesirky said.
While the cogs of what promises to be a
massive international aid effort are begin-
ning to turn, they are not quick enough for
the 600,000 people displaced, many of
them homeless, hungry and thirsty.
With the Tacloban airport battered and
roads made impassable by debris, very little
aid has arrived in the city. Most of it is
stuck in Manila and the nearby airport of
Cebu, a 45-minute ight away.
Many among the desperate residents have
resorted to raiding for food. Mobs overran a
rice warehouse on Leyte, collapsing a wall
that killed eight people. Thousands of
sacks of the grain were carted off. Also
Wednesday, security forces exchanged gun-
re with an armed gang.
Tacloban Mayor Alfred Romualdez urged
residents to flee the city because local
authorities were having trouble providing
food and water and maintaining order, The
New York Times reported. He said the city
desperately needed trucks to distribute relief
shipments accumulating at the airport as
well as equipment to pull decaying corpses
from the rubble.
Despite those incidents, police said the
situation was improving.
We have restored order, said Carmelo
Espina Valmoria, director of the Philippine
National Police special action force. There
has been looting for the last three days, but
the situation has stabilized.
Clinic in typhoon-hit city overrun with patients
REUTERS
A woman undergoes a surgery on her foot which sustained an injury when Typhoon Haiyan
struck ve days ago, inside a makeshift clinic run by volunteers in downtown Tacloban City,
in central Philippines.
By Sarah El Deeb
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO Egypts ousted President
Mohammed Morsi accused the military
chief who deposed him of treason in a mes-
sage from prison read by lawyers on
Wednesday, saying the country cannot
return to stability until the coup is
reversed and those behind it are tried.
The statement was part of a bid by Morsi to
rally his supporters since his emergence
from the secret military detention where he
had been held, with virtually no contact with
the outside world since his July 3 ouster.
Morsi was moved to a high security civil-
ian penitentiary last week after the rst ses-
sion of his trial on charges of inciting mur-
der. There, he had his rst extensive meeting
with a team of lawyers from his Muslim
Brotherhood and other allies on Tuesday,
outlining to them his message to the
Egyptian people.
But he is emerging to a dramatically
changed situation from four months ago.
Since then, a erce crackdown by security
forces has crippled the Brotherhood, several
thousand members have been arrested, and
hundreds have been killed. The group has
been banned by a court order and a govern-
ment-appointed committee is reviewing its
nancial assets with an eye to seize them.
The new military-backed government is
pushing ahead with a transition plan aiming
for new presidential and parliamentary elec-
tions early next year.
Morsi: No stability in Egypt unless coup reversed
32 Thursday Nov. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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