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Syllabus JOHNSON STATE COLLEGE EXTERNAL DEGREE PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Summer 2012 SYLLABUS EDU-3020-JY01 QE:

Syllabus JOHNSON STATE COLLEGE

EXTERNAL DEGREE PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Summer 2012 SYLLABUS EDU-3020-JY01 QE: Educational Psychology (Online)

Summer online dates are May 21 to August 10

Location: Online (http://myjsc.jsc.edu)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will introduce students to major theories as they apply to education, human development and human needs. Likewise, students will become familiar with educational terminology, language and methodologies relevant to the educational field. Given this basis of introductory knowledge, students will begin to reflect and apply principles of best practice in structuring learning opportunities for all students. This course will be completed on line using Moodle. A favorite variety of methods will be used, that are not listed in the syllabus, which will be introduced for this course.

Please note: This syllabus is subject to change at the discretion of the instructor.

INSTRUCTOR: Coleen H. Krauss, MA. Educational Leadership

E-mail address: cxr11280@jsc.vsc.edu

Home e-mail

Home phone: 802-585-5882

Home address:

154 Sparrow Farm Road.

East Montpelier, VT 05652

Educational Psychology: Theory and Practice, Tenth Edition Robert E. Slavin Publisher: Allyn & Bacon Copyright

Educational Psychology: Theory and Practice, Tenth Edition

Robert E. Slavin

Publisher: Allyn & Bacon

Copyright year: © 2012 Pages: 608

eText ISBN-10 0-13-703475-X ISBN-13 978-0-13-703475-8

Print

ISBN-10 0-13-703435-0 ISBN-13 978-0-13-703435-2

Texts are available through the JSC Bookstore. Call 802-635-2503 or go to www.jsc.bkstr.com.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1. The student will identify research methods used in educational psychology and the role of

research in educational psychology.

2. The student will show evidence of familiarity with theories of cognitive, social

and moral development.

3. The student will describe characteristics of child development for the comprehensive span of

early childhood through adolescence.

4.

The student will demonstrate understanding of the components of culture and the

impact upon the individual student’s identity and learning.

5. The student will reference behavioral learning theories and explain key principles

associated with behavioral learning.

6. The student will apply information processing and cognitive theories of learning as he/she

reflects upon metacognitive, study and memory strategies that enhance learning.

7. The student will list and explain the components of direct instruction and the role

of discussion as a learning tool.

8. The student will describe several student-centered and constructivist approaches

to instruction.

9. The student will demonstrate their knowledge of key programs and best practices

that enable individualization of instruction and accommodations as per

individual student needs.

10. The student will discuss theories of motivation and note how he/she may act to

increase student motivation.

11. The student will describe an effective learning environment and list specific

interventions noted to assist with behavior challenges categorized as routine

and more serious.

12. The student will demonstrate understanding of types of student exceptionalities

(definition and characteristics of) as well as key principles of special education

(Individual with Disabilities Education Act).

13. The student will describe manners of student evaluation and assessment utilized

currently in Vermont public school systems.

14. The student will demonstrate understanding of kinds of standardized tests

including such test usage and interpretations.

Educational Psychology prepares teachers as no other text does. It teaches them to think about how students develop and learn, to make decisions before and during instruction, and to consider what constitutes evidence that their students are learning and succeeding.

Educational Psychology takes a serious look at pertinent research and focuses on what works and how a reflective, intentional teacher can apply it in the classroom. Reflective questions, vignettes, and self-checks challenge students to think about and make decisions that drive successful instruction. The new edition builds on these established features and adds an emphasis

on media effects on Learning, NCLB and the Achievement Gap, Neuroscience, and more interactive and engaged learning opportunities for students.

COURSE SCHEDULE & REQUIREMENTS

May 21August 10

Before class begins: Before May 21

Buy your book- E-books are acceptable

Week 1

May 21 May 27

1)

Educational Autobiography: (Due Week one- 10 Points) Students will compose their own Educational Autobiography. An educational autobiography summarizes and reflects upon the experiences and events in a person's life up to the present time. Topics to be addressed in an educational autobiography could be your favorite subjects or teachers in school, what kind of awards you won or why you chose a particular college.

Week 2

May 28-June 3

Read Chapter 1 and respond to Chapter 1 Journal Reflection. Check in to Discussion Board. Read Chapter 2 and respond to Chapter 2 Journal Reflection. Check in to Discussion Board.

It is expected that all students will comment on at least two journals from other students for each chapter. You will be graded for participation.

Week 3

June 4-June 10

Read Chapter 3 and respond to Chapter 3 Journal Reflection. Check in to Discussion Board. Read Chapter 4 and respond to Chapter 4 Journal Reflection. Check in to Discussion Board.

Week 4

June 11-17

Read Chapter 5 and respond to Chapter 5 Journal Reflection. Check in to Discussion Board. Observing Behaviors- Behaviorism Experiment (75 points). (QR)

Week 5

June 18-24

Read Chapter 6 and respond to Chapter 6 Journal Reflection. Check in to Discussion.

Week 6

June 25-July 1

Read Chapter 7 and respond to Chapter 7 Journal Reflection. Check in to Discussion Board.

Observing Behaviors- Behaviorism Experiment (75 points). (QR)

Week 7

July 2- July 08

Read Chapter 8 and respond to Chapter 8 Journal Reflection. Check in to Discussion Board.

Critical Reflection Analysis Week 7

Week 8

July 09-15

Read Chapter 9 and respond to Chapter 9 Journal Reflection. Check in to Discussion Board. Read Chapter 10 and respond to Chapter 10 Journal Reflection. Check in to Discussion Board.

Week 9

July 16-22

Read Chapter 11 and respond to Chapter 11 Journal Reflection. Check in to Discussion Board. Read Chapter 12 and Respond to Chapter 12 Journal Reflections.

Check in to Discussion Board. Observing Behaviors- Behaviorism Experiment (75 points). (QR) Paper Due

Week 10

July 23-JULY 29

Chapter 13 and Respond to Chapter 13 Journal Reflection.

Check in to Discussion Board.

Week 11

July 30- August 5

Read Chapter 14 and respond to Chapter 14 Journal Reflection. Check in to Discussion Board. Final Paper Due

Last week

August 6- 10 ***********Final Paper due ******************

All Grades submitted to Registrar- August 11

Grading Policies

Grade A 90% or above for exceptional work that evidences excellent mastery of course material. Student work will evidence excellent understanding, application/analysis/synthesis of concepts, creativity, and critical thinking skills.

Grade B 80% or above for work that evidences a high standard and good mastery of course material. Student work will evidence a high degree of understanding, application/analysis/synthesis of concepts, originality and critical thinking skills.

*Note: Students majoring in Elementary Education or seeking secondary licensure must earn a grade of B- or better in this class for it to apply as meeting a requirement.

ACADEMIC HONESTY Students are responsible for knowing the definitions and policies regarding academic honesty. Refer to the college catalog for details or access the Office of External Degree Programs at JSC.

ASSIGNMENT GUIDELINES AND CRITERIA

COURSE SCHEDULE & REQUIREMENTS:

Please note- These dates are not SET IN STONE! - The MOODLE will give the exact Due dates for each assignment. This is only a guide for what path the class will take. Summer online dates are May 21 to August 10.

A mandatory check in to the Discussion Board for each week of this course. Please reflect upon your views, opinions, reactions, attitude, and recollections- what are you thinking as you read and process this new information? Active involvement in the discussion board is a crucial part of this course.

1) Educational Autobiography: (Due Week one- 10 Points) Students will compose their own Educational Autobiography. An educational autobiography summarizes and reflects upon the experiences and events in a person's life up to the present time. Topics to be addressed in an educational autobiography could be your favorite subjects or teachers in school, what kind of awards you won or why you chose a particular college.

2) Students are required to write brief journals as a reaction to chapter readings, so it is in each student’s best interest to read the required readings, participate in the discussions, and think critically about the topics. After each chapter readings, you will write a brief reaction journal entry (1-3 paragraphs typed in moodle). In this journal, you should analyze what you learned from the reading and other student’s journal posts. (e.g., what is your opinion on the topic, did it change as a function of the discussion, and so on) and how you can apply this knowledge to your everyday life (e.g., after discussing the psychological ramifications of a topic, how will this affect how you would structure a classroom?). These reaction journals MUST reference the text failure to do so will result in ½ credits for the given assignment. This reference does not need to be elaborate; rather, it should simply indicate that you read and understood the issue. Each reaction journals will be graded (they are worth up to 10 points each: 5 points for style & 5 points for content. Reaction journals are due at week’s end- SUNDAY AT MIDNIGHT! For each day that the journal is late, 2 points will be deducted from your final grade for that particular assignment (so if you're late the week that your journal isn't being graded, you receive zero points).

Mandatory check in to the Discussion Board for each week of this course. A list of questions will be posted for each chapter. You will need to respond to them according to your knowledge, past experiences and what you have read in the chapter. Please reflect upon your views, opinions, reactions, attitude, and recollections- what are you thinking as you read and process this new information? Active involvement in the discussion board is a crucial part of this course.

Total Points Possible = 10

Journal Reflection: Please reflect upon your views, opinions, reactions, attitude, and recollections. Journal sets (your thoughts, feelings, reactions, experiences, etc.) for EACH OF THE CHAPTERS will be required by all students participating in this course. These will indicate what the student is thinking while reading the assigned chapters of the text. Students will post onto the discussion board to discuss their reactions, questions, pro and con statements, and personal experiences.

JOURNAL SETS ARE NOT CHAPTER SUMMARIES start each new entry with:

Journal #

Date

JY01 Summer 12:

Educational Psychology

Ima A. Student

The first line of type on each new entry will give the above information to receive credit; you must have at least 1 per chapter. Each entry must describe your personal reaction (PR) and interpretation of significant events, and explanations about how what you saw or did relates to, or differs from points & concepts covered in this class and other classes. This is the critical

thinking component of the journal --you must professionally apply, analyze, and evaluate based on what you are learning. Total Points Possible per assignment = 10

3) Behaviorism Experiment (75 points). (QR) Students will conduct a mini-experiment applying concepts of behaviorism to a real-life situation. Through this activity, students will also be introduced to basic elements of Quantitative Reasoning. This activity will be guided by detailed log that will be posted after week 4 on Moodle and several 'milestone' deadlines, as indicated on the course schedule. With the final report/ Analysis (2-3 pages) due on Week 11 details on

each component will be provided on Moodle. Students in this segment of the course will complete a log that gathers noninvasive behavioral data and information and their perspective using BF Skinners theory based upon the idea that learning is a function of change in overt behavior. As a class we will use the logs to create a data base. We will then conduct two and three variable sets of analysis on the data. Students then will use the data to complete a set of analysis independently as an element of a paper that examines attempts to provide behavioral explanations for a broad range of cognitive phenomena and behavior. Weeks 4, 6 and 9 potions will be due. Plan on two behavior observations on or before weeks 4 and 6. And your final analysis will be due week 9.

4) Critical Reflection Analysis 2 Reflections on Class/Course content (10 points each). These are 2 short journal-like2-page papers that will be turned in over the course of the semester. Students may choose to assess, critique, reflect etc. on a specific topic, class discussion, readings or may review the information covered thus far in the course in an effort to make connections between ideas. The primary goal of this assignment is to demonstrate critical thinking and insights with regard to the course material. These assignments are due on: week 7 of class and Week 10.

5) Research Project (Due Week 12) (100 Pts)

SUGGESTED TOPICS (Choose one or submit your own)

1. Read and review a book or article related to educational psychology. Evaluate the work by utilizing

writings on the same topic, personal insights and experiences, and related material from class.

2. Discuss the opposing views regarding heredity and IQ scores.

3. Describe and evaluate "time-out" and other methods for controlling behavior in the classroom.

4. Trace the history of compensatory education programs and evaluate their effectiveness.

5. Present guidelines and techniques for designing good achievement tests.

6. Explore the issues surrounding grading in schools.

7. Discuss teaching strategies for a particular educational environment of your choice.

8. Explore the influence of the courts on the schools.

9. Explore desegregation issues and the busing issue.

10. Discuss the effects of the "changing American family" on education.

11. Demonstrate or experiment with Piagetian methods of evaluating cognitive development.

12. Explore special educational issues or problems, which tend to be associated with a particular age

group (e.g. adolescence).

13. Discuss relevant issues regarding the culturally different child in the classroom.

14. Interview schoolteachers, counselors, administrators, etc. to find their current roles in education.

15. Present information on cognitive styles and their effects on learning.

16. Describe and evaluate non-traditional and alternative education programs.

17. Compare education in the United States with education in another country.

18. Describe education of gifted and talented students.

CURRENT ISSUES IN EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

19. Describe the current level of violent acts committed in schools and efforts to stop them.

20. Explore the role of sex and AIDS information or drug information in the classroom.

21. Discuss the current state of education in the United States and the outlook for the future.

22. Explore the effects of technology on education.

23. Examine the teacher's role in the diagnosis, treatment, and education of the child with attention

deficit hyperactive disorder.

24. Present strategies for adapting the classroom to meet the needs of the exceptional student.

25. Examine the controversy concerning various inclusion and mainstreaming programs underway in

public schools.

26. Analyze the effectiveness of various initiatives to improve education such as "No Child Left Behind."

27. Define critical thinking and explain its importance in education.

28. Present an overview of the diagnosis and treatment of various learning disabilities.

29. Present arguments pro and con concerning the acceptance of Ebonics as a separate language.

30. Evaluate research on the "Gender Gap" in Education.

Projects may be written papers (5-6 pages) Presentation Outlines must be typed, double-spaced using a standard word processor application

FORMAT FOR WRITTEN RESEARCH PROJECT (5-6 pages typed, double-spaced)

1. Clearly identify your reference sources in both the text of your paper and on the reference list or

bibliography. Any name that appears in the reference section or bibliography must also appear in the text of your paper (if you use APA style) or in the footnotes. Your textbook can serve an excellent example of proper writing and clear reference citations. If a reference is not cited anywhere in your paper, then you either didn't use any information from that source (in which case it should be removed from the list) or you used the information without giving credit. Always identify the source of any information used in the paper that is not your own. Using another person's work without giving credit is plagiarism. Examples Correct: Several studies have shown a relationship between self-esteem and school success (Purkey, 1970; Metcalfe, 1981; Reynolds, 1980). [Assuming that you found all three studies and that they are listed in your reference section] Correct: According to Borich and Tombari (1997), several studies show that self-esteem is related to school success. [Assuming that the Borich and Tombari book is listed in your reference section]

Incorrect: Studies show that self-esteem is related to school achievement. [A statement of this kind on your paper with no reference would be considered plagiarism] Incorrect: Mason (1998) reported that self-esteem is related to school achievement. [A statement of this kind on your paper with no listing for Mason (1998) in your reference section would be considered plagiarism] Reminder: Do not put any source on your reference list that does not appear in the text of your paper.

2. Limit the use of direct quotations. Put reference material in your own words and credit the source.

The purpose of this research project is to help you develop communication skills in the topic area of

Educational Psychology. A “cut and paste” paper is extremely uninteresting and even difficult to read because the writing style will change every time the reference source changes. Unless you have a

particularly memorable quote the caliber of “Ask not what your country can do for you

reference material in your own words. And remember, whenever you use information from any publication, you must identify the source, even when you put it in your own words. Plagiarism will result in a failing grade on this assignment.

put the

3. Try to find original sources of information; but if you can't, be sure to clearly indicate when you are

using a secondary source.

If you reference an author's name in your paper and that author's name is not in your reference section,

then the information is suspect. If you obtain information from a secondary source, (e.g. one author's report of another author's findings), you must accurately and honestly indicate where you got the information. So if you report Anderson and Watley’s findings based on information obtained in a book by Bormann, you must use a secondary source citation.

Example:

In your paper you would write: According to Bormann (1996), Anderson and Watley's study showed that

children in Asia develop conservation skills earlier than children in the United States. Your reference section would have Bormann, but not Anderson and Watley.

4. Include at least four reference sources.

One of the key objectives of this course is to expose you to research in the field of Educational Psychology. Even if you opt to interview individuals in the field of education, you will need to survey some published research in order to interpret and evaluate the interview data. All reports must have at least four references including at least two from scholarly publications.

5. Proof read your written paper carefully to be sure it is clear and contains no grammar, spelling, or

typing errors.

If you find any errors in your final draft, correct them by hand before you submit the paper. If the corrections are legible and the number or errors is small, no points will be deducted. However, uncorrected errors will result in a loss of points.

6. Put yourself into the paper.

A research paper is a chance for you to collect, organize, and interpret information from a variety of

sources so that the final product is unique and personal. Your own opinions, interpretations and experiences will help to make your paper more interesting and meaningful to the reader/evaluator. Just

please make sure that you provide some support for the opinions expressed in the paper.

7. Be resourceful.

In past semesters, students have interviewed a school superintendent, a recipient of a teacher of the year award and other individuals who provided profound insights on Education. Other students have utilized surveys, the Internet, educational films and other unique sources of information to bolster their papers. Be creative in your information gathering.

8. Avoid general encyclopedias.

Encyclopedias provide general information on all topics. In fact, they can be described as collections of

research papers on every imaginable topic. This information can help to provide background on a topic,

but for a research paper, you should be finding the original articles and studies on which the encyclopedia entries were based. There are, however, some specialized encyclopedias related to Educational Psychology that would be appropriate to utilize for a research paper reference. See the librarian for these items.

9. Limit the use of popular magazines. Popular magazines such as Time and Newsweek often have very useful information that can enhance a research paper; however you must be aware that reporters have varying levels of expertise and cannot be expected to provide information as accurately as scholars in a particular field of study. The librarian or Library web site can help you find scholarly journals that provide up-to-date and accurate information in the field of Educational Psychology.

10. When in doubt, ask the instructor. Avoid the anguish of having to redo a paper by submitting your rough draft.

REFERENCE FORMATTING INFORMATION FOR ALL RESEARCH PROJECTS Written Projects Must Have Reference Lists. See Examples for each type of reference. Please note that the focus is on clarity and completeness--not the form. You may use either APA or MLA format. See the examples below of Works Cited entries that contain the necessary information.

Journal Article [Author][Title][Journal Name][Year] [Volume Number][Issue Number][Page Numbers] Ziemann U, Paulus W, Rothenberger A. Decreased motor inhibition in Tourette's disorder: evidence from transcranial magnetic stimulation. American Journal of Psychiatry 1997; 154 (5): 1277-84.

Book [Author] [Title] [City of Publication] [Publisher] [Year] Hollander E. Obsessive-compulsive related disorders. Washington DC: American Psychiatric Press, 1993.

Article Within A Book [Author] [Year][Article Title] [In][Editors’ Names][Title of Book] [City of Publication] [Publisher] Archan, E. (1989). Lecture preparation guidelines. In R.E. Slavin, C.J. Whitehouse, & N.J. Nance (Eds.), Teaching in a college setting. Boston: Allyn & Bacon

Unpublished Paper [Author] [Year, Month] [Title] [Presentation Information] Alexander, P.A. (1994, April). Classroom strategies for students with learning disabilities. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Baltimore.

Organizational Document With No Specific Author Listed [Organization Name] [Year] [Title] [Location of Publication] American Psychiatric Association, (1994), Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.). Washington, DC

Pamphlet Published By An Organization [Organization Name][Year] [Title] [Location of Publication] United Cerebral Palsy Association. (1993). Cerebral Palsy: Facts and figures. Washington, D.C.

Web Page Article - Note: An Internet index or contents page (e.g. www.time.com) is not acceptable. [Author/editor] [Year] [Title] [Type of Medium, e.g., “Online” or “CD-ROM”][Site/Path/File Name] [Date You Accessed the Page] Sanders, A. J. (1998). An Early fragment from central Nepal [Online]. http://www.ingress.com/~astanart/pritzker/pritzker.html [1995, June 8].

Research Project Scoring Guide: (100 Points) Written Project

Content (60 Points) Title The title was relevant and consistent with the material presented.

Introduction of Topic The topic was introduced in an effective manner. The opening generated interest, provided adequate background for understanding the material, and clearly indicated the direction of the research.

Presentation of Key Points The author presented evidence to support claims made. Reference material was credible and clearly interpreted. The paper was logical and organized. The presentation was balanced and contained opposing views where appropriate. Personal opinion was delivered appropriately and supported by the information presented. The author presented information of local interest if pertinent. Personal experience, if applicable, was also used effectively. Course concepts were utilized where appropriate.

Closing The paper came to a logical conclusion based on the material presented. Major points were summarized effectively. The final part of the paper gave the reader a sense of closure. Form (40 Points)

Writing Style Language use was accurate, concise and grammatically correct. Sentences were well constructed and paragraphs were well developed. The author captured and maintained the reader's attention.

Use of Sources In text citations were clear. Source material was effectively paraphrased and direct quotations were kept at a minimum. The Works Cited page contains all of the necessary information. All in text citations had a corresponding entry on the Works Cited page. All entries on the Works Cited page had at least one corresponding in text citation. The paper contained at least four reference sources including two from peer-reviewed scholarly publications. Please note that plagiarism will result in a failing grade on this project.

Revision and Response Project topic and preliminary reference list were completed and submitted on time. The sample draft and revised reference list were submitted on time. The final project and reference list were completed and submitted on time. Font size (10-12 Pt.) and margins (1-1.25 in.) were appropriate.

6) Self Evaluation (5 points) - Due Last Week of Class

Purpose/Rationale

Students will self assess to gain insight into their own learning styles and determine areas of personal challenge and strength Evaluate your work in the Educational Psychology course using the following questions:(5 points) - Due Last Week of Class Purpose/Rationale Describe your contribution and participation in the

Describe your contribution and participation in the course. Consider your role in both the small group and the large group activities. In what ways was your participation collegial? Supportive and instructive to the group?Educational Psychology course using the following questions: In what ways did group work benefit your learning?

In what ways did group work benefit your learning?collegial? Supportive and instructive to the group? Evaluate the quality of the written work you have

Evaluate the quality of the written work you have completed.group? In what ways did group work benefit your learning? Evaluate the effort and thought you

Evaluate the effort and thought you have put forth regarding the reading.Evaluate the quality of the written work you have completed. Of what in the course are

Of what in the course are you most proud? Why?effort and thought you have put forth regarding the reading. What grade do you think you

What grade do you think you deserve? Why?the reading. Of what in the course are you most proud? Why? Total Assessments Educational Autobiography

Total Assessments

Educational Autobiography

5 Points

Behaviorism Experiment

75 points

Critical Reflection Analysis

20 points

Research Project

100 points

Journal Logs/Questions

100 points

Self Assessment

5 points

Total

300 Points

*Note: Students majoring in Elementary Education or seeking secondary licensure must earn a grade of B- or better in this class for it to apply as meeting a requirement.

ACADEMIC HONESTY Students are responsible for knowing the definitions and policies regarding academic honesty. Refer to the college catalog for details or access the Office of External Degree Programs at JSC.

ADA STATEMENT Students with disabilities who believe that they may need accommodations in this class are encouraged to contact JSC’s Learning Specialist in Academic Services, as soon as possible to ensure that accommodations, if needed, are implemented in a timely fashion. Please call 802-635-1264.