You are on page 1of 150

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

 When Love for the Prophet Becomes Art 17. a cultural center which has an important role in Western painting tradition. The art of Hilye. 112. is currently going through a renaissance with original interpretations by contemporary calligraphers. Hilyes from the Collection of Mehmet Cebi 105. We also think that exhibiting this collection of charming contemporary examples of classical Hilye. based in Istanbul. Biographies of the Calligraphers 9. The Hilye is a popular form of classic calligraphic art which describes some physical and spiritual attributes of Prophet Mohammad. there are classical and contemporary examples of Islamic prayer beads art. We think that the prayer beads collection of Mehmet Çebi will arouse interest and awake special attention in Vatican as well. Islamic prayer beads. which in a sense can be compared to icons in European art. along with the examples of Hilyes from the collections of Mr. Examples of Turkish art of Hilye­Şerif and Rosary Tuğrul Tuna As the Association of International Art and Culture. It is interesting to see how the original works today reflect the modern concept of traditional abstract Turkish art. five of which date back to Ottoman period. we place great importance on spreading different culture and arts in our country. Hilyes from the Libraries & Museums Directorate of Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality 40. In this exhibition.When love for the Prophet becomes art UKSD Istanbul September 2011 When love for the Prophet becomes art 9. In collaboration with the Turkish Embassy in Vatican. The art of rosary. considered cultural objects. is meaningful. Examples of Turkish art of Hilye­Şerif and Rosary 13. 1 . The Noble Hilye or Felicitous Hilye 32. born in Istanbul in the seventeenth century.. Mehmet Çebi and Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality. has developed greatly over time. Rosaries from the Collection of Mehmet Cebi 169. as well as promoting Turkish arts and culture in other countries and geographies through original examples. Beads of Remembrance: Notes on Prayer Beads. The Association of International Art and Culture has organized the exhibition "Classic and contemporary examples of Turkish art Hilye­i Şerif and Tesbih" to be held between 1 and 19 October 2011 in Rome. coming straight from the religious practices. The aim of this exhibition is to arouse a serious and expansive interest towards Turkish art and culture throughout the cultural centers in Europe. We believe that development of a multi­lateral cultural exchange is uniting for humanity rather than dividing. as well as an original Turkish art form. are exhibited along with some examples of tesbih. in Rome. Examples of original classical and contemporary calligraphy can be seen in this exhibition: 30 Hilyes. a special art of Islamic calligraphy describing some physical and spiritual attributes of Prophet Muhammad..

 Uğur Derman. With the hope that wherever it's present. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art. the Hilye­i Şerif is the best example of this devotional art form. 17. İstanbul: Antik A. one of the most prestigious and historical places in Rome: Firstly. Mehmet Çebi. read in Egypt and written in Istanbul" all around the world . Hilyes are concrete representations of love towards the Prophet. pp. After the Quran. Türk Hat Sanatının Şaheserleri [Masterpieces of Turkish Calligraphy]. unforgettable patron and collector of contemporary Hilye and tesbih; Mr. When Love for the Prophet Becomes Art Mehmet Lüfti Sen Exhibition of Hilye­i Şerif (a special art of Islamic calligraphy describing some physical and spiritual attributes of Prophet Muhammad) and Tesbih (Islamic prayer beads). 72­74; M.1  Thought to have been designed by Hafiz Osman Efendi 1  For more information about the Hilye. with whom we have collaborated from the day we have jointly defined the concept of the exhibition. It is the first time that an exhibition of Hilye­i Şerif takes place in Europe. confirm the saying "The Quran has been revealed in the Hijaz. he supports contemporary artists and encourages them to create new original pieces. 34­37; M. trans. Mehmet Çebi. The pieces of calligraphy done by Turkish people with love and devotion towards God. beginning its journey in Rome. it will convey this beauty. the first Hilye was created by master calligrapher Hafiz Osman in the seventeenth century. the lines of this art — which spring from the love for the Prophet ­ create an indestructible bridge between cultures. Ş. Muhammed'in Özellikleri / Hilye­i Şerife in Calligraphic Art: Characteristics of the Prophet Muhammed. Today there is a great interest and much variety in Hilye­i Şerif arts and Islamic prayer beads. This exhibition presents art lovers with a selection of masterpieces: classical and contemporary Hilye­i Şerif and Islamic prayer beads. 1982. in the same way that in European paintings icons are sacred images. In this way. for having made available the classic examples of Hilye through his help and concern; and Turkish Airlines. On Hâfiz Osman Efendi. whose collection of recent works we can admire in this exhibition. see M. see Derman. 19. Turkish Ambassador to Vatican Prof. 1998. Turkish calligraphy has had a pioneering role in its genre throughout history. Mohamed Zakariya. İstanbul. 47 and 49; Faruk Taşkale and Hüseyin Gündüz. The Art of 2 . According to historical sources. Letters in Gold: Ottoman Calligraphy from the Sakip Sabanci Collection. Kenan Gürsoy. Uğur Derman. Ramazan Minder. The catalog in your hands is made up of works. has encouraged this renewed interest. Hat Sanatında Hilye­i Şerife: Hz. Letters in Gold. 2006. [Ankara]: Kültür Bakanlığı Yayınları. Kültür Yayınları. for offering his endless help and patronage; Mr. Director of Libraries and Museums of Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality. which then spread throughout the Islamic world and continues to do so to this day. With his commitment to this art. 42. 13. Dr. plates 18. pp. Uğur Derman. Turkish Ministry of Culture and Avea for their contributions at various levels. The Noble Hilye or Felicitous Hilye Irvin Cemil Schick Among the most popular works in the Ottoman calligraphic tradition is the genre known as Hilye­i Şerife (Noble Hilye) or Hilye­i Saadet (Felicitous Hilye). created with the goal of reaching a higher degree of beauty each time.We wish to thank those who have allowed for this exhibition to take place in Palazzo della Cancelleria.

 nor was it fleshy.' May God bless him and grant him peace. This is the Caliph ‘Ali’s description of the Prophet as recorded in Abu Isa Muhammad al­Tirmidhi’s al­Shamail al­Nabawiya wa al­Khasail al­Mustafawiya. And sometimes a Hadith or Hadith Qudsi may appear in its place. Sometimes another verse also concerning the Prophet is substituted. 'Umar. these panels describe the physical and personal attributes of the Prophet Muhammad in a relatively fixed composition. if it were not for you. Below the central medallion. Anyone who described him would say ‘I never saw the like of him. or character. He was large­boned and broad­shouldered. İstanbul: IRCICA. His complexion was rosy white. and etek (skirt). and the noblest in companionship. the truest of people in his words." The last part of the Hilye contains the continuation of the Caliph Ali's description of the Prophet: He was the most generous of men. 'Uthman. Calligraphy in the Islamic Heritage. His torso was hairless except for a thin line that stretched down his chest to his belly. göbek (belly). he would lean forward as if going down a slope. His hands and feet were rather large. Sometimes their cognomens also appear (such as 'Umar al­Faruq and 'Uthman Dhi­Nurayn). I would not have created the heavens. the phrase "In the name of God. From top to bottom. When he looked at someone. 3 .(1052­1110/1642­1698). kuşak (belt). When he walked. p. the components of the panel are named başmakam (head station). the Compassionate. the Merciful. nor was he too short. and his eyelashes were long. yet it was somewhat circular. At the top of the panel is the Basmala. he would turn his entire body towards him. His hair was not short and curly. the central medallion contains the following text: [It is related] from ‘Ali (may God be pleased with him) that when he described the attributes of the Prophet (may prayers to God and peace be upon him)." With slight variations. It is customary to place the names of the four Rightly­Guided Caliphs at the four corners of the central medallion: Abu Bakr. such as "If it were not for you. such as "Indeed you stand on an exalted standard of character" (al­Qalam 68:4). His eyes were large and black. 1998. Often a prayer is written next to these names (such as "may God be pleased with him"). countenance. Therefore the term "Noble Hilye" may be interpreted as a description of the Prophet. portraits made up of words. nor was it lank. and 'Ali. The word hilyah is Arabic and signifies ornament. trans. either before or since. and those who knew him personally loved him. the most mild­mannered. Indeed. His face was not overly plump. in the area known as the belt. he was of medium height amongst the nation. image. Those who first saw him would be awed. Between his two shoulders was the Seal of Prophethood. it is customary to write the following Qur'anic verse: "And we have only sent you as mercy to the worlds" (al­Anbiya 21:107). a watershed in the history of calligraphy. it would hang down in waves. 221. he said: He was not too tall. and he was the last of the prophets. these panels are. in a certain sense. Mohamed Zakariya and Mohamed Asfour.

 Occasionally Hilyes were written in order to receive a calligrapher's license (ijaza). The Prophet says he will not be hurt.3 If Hafiz Osman did indeed draw his inspiration from the Hilye­i Hakānî.. vol. 1987. see EJ. 171­172. while this is perfectly possible. in one or more cartouches.2  This poem is based upon the following saying. And this is indeed how they have been perceived. Osmanlı Müellifleri [Ottoman Authors]. Hakānî's stanzas on this saying are as follows: The important meaning of this Hadith is (God — may He be exalted — knows best) That having spoken many pure words.” to appear in Studies in Islamic Art and Architecture in Honor of Filiz Çağman. if he comes to love my beauty. and he will not experience the trials of the grave." paper read at the 21st Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies on "The Byzantine Eye: Word and Perception. [İstanbul: Tabhane­i Âmire]. Then he will be spared the fire of Hell And will enter Heaven by the grace of God. pp.After this would usually come the calligrapher's signature. "From Text to Art Form in the Ottoman Hilye. ed. vol. but at the very bottom. that is. Fikri Yavuz and İsmail Özen. a more likely source of inspiration for these calligraphic panels is the celebrated poem of the sixteenth­century Ottoman poet Hakānî Mehmed Bey (d. 2. In short. And he will be among those on whom He has mercy. Londra: Luzac & Co. H. And God will not drive him naked. then he created his Hilye not only as a calligraphic panel. 1606). 4 . that Godly man Will be free until the Day of Judgement. According to Tim Stanley. İstanbul: Meral Yaymevi. the work would not be signed. and therefore text would have been substituted for pictures. 3. If he desires to see my face. Of the trials of the grave. A History of Ottoman Poetry. which is attributed to the Prophet: Whoever sees my Hilye after me is as though he has seen me. as a "graduation thesis. to occasion a nexus with the Prophet. 12­13. Hilye­i Hakānî. If the ecstasy of God grows in his heart. On the poet Hakānî Mehmed Bey (d. 3  [Hakānî Mehmed Bey]. If he becomes passionate the more he sees it. March 21­24. written. drawing a picture of the Prophet would not have been tolerated within the Sunni tradition. Gibb. 1900­1909. 1015/1606) known as Hilye­i Hakānî (the Hilye of Hakānî). to clear the way for believers in the Afterlife. See also his "Sublimated Icons: The Hilye­i Şerife as an Image of the Prophet. The Pride of the Universe [the Prophet] said: After me Whoever sees my pure Hilye Will be as though he has seen my beautiful countenance. Some have claimed that the genre was inspired by Orthodox Christian icons: although Muslims in Ottoman Istanbul would have been quite familiar with such works. and he will not be driven naked on the Day of Judgment. and visited for centuries." In such cases. 1972?­1975).W. but also as a devotional object to be visited by believers. pp. where the poet's name is given as Kháqání; also Bursalı Mehmed Tâhir Bey. For example. 1264 [1848]. While the general form of the Hilye is as described above. would be the teacher's or teachers' attestation. Little is known about the invention of the Hilye. A. a variety of experiments were performed throughout history. pp. And if a mortal should cast a spell upon him. And whoever is true to me. 193­198. God will spare him the fire of Hell." University of Birmingham. This account of many blessings Was transmitted by [the Caliph] 'Ali himself. the central medallion was sometimes shaped as a rhombus instead of a 2  Tim Stanley.

 calligraphers from Turkey and other Muslim countries have added elements like dotted exercises (mashq). his large three­dimensional letters. Abdullah Güllüce's and Avni al­Naqqash's concentric circles. Under the patronage and encouragement of Mehmet Çebi. and Muhammad Javadzade's square frame have moved away somewhat from the classical norm. certain Hilyes by Fehmi Efendi decorated with ghubari script (microcalligraphy). Ferhad Kurlu. some may wonder if Gürkan Pehlivan's Kaaba constructed with countless copies of the name Allah in jali naskh. and Javad Khuran. many Hilyes in this exhibition differ from the traditional forms. there are others in jali thulth and thulth by Ali Hüsrevoğlu. and Said Abuzeroğlu are unusual. Ihsan Ahmedi. Javad Khuran. Calligraphers who have added texts to their Hilyes. and Hasan Riza Efendi. thulth. Said Abuzeroğlu's stork­shaped Basmalas. Ihsan Ahmedi's dual central medallions. but he is not like other harbingers; he is like a ruby among stones" is a welcome novelty that does not in any way violate the spirit of the Hilye. thulth. and naskh by Said Abuzeroğlu; though these differ from classical practices.circle; sometimes the text was written inside the name of the Prophet; in some cases. Fatih Özkafa. such as Abdullah Güllüce's use of the first two verses of Sura al­Fath and verse 128 of Sura al­Tawba. Eyüp Kuşçu's mosque­shaped ma’qili inscription. Even Eyüp Kuşçu's addition of the Arabic text "Muhammad is a harbinger. And indeed. though the works exhibited here contain the same text as the original Hilyes designed by Hâfiz Osman Efendi. Gürkan Pehlivan. or of the ninety­nine beautiful names by Fevzi Günüş. The text of Ahmed Falsafi's Hilye in ta’liq script is in the Turkish language. Fehmi Efendi. and jali diwani. Likewise. and Bilal Sezer. and used unusual scripts like thulth (for the actual text). and in dimensions never before tried. but here they are in the good company of such great calligraphers as Mustafa Râkim Efendi and Şeyh Azîzü'r­Rıfâî. and his Basmala in the shape of a stork. and those by Savaş Çevik. it is still close to tradition in terms of form. and Tahsin Kurt that are laid out in classical compositions but written in ta’liq script. as is the custom in Turkey). others by Mustafa Râkim Efendi and Şeyh Azîzü'r­Rıfâî written in a variety of scripts—these are all works that pushed the envelope and are now considered priceless. but though this makes it interesting. and especially writing the text of the Hilya as a calligrapher's exercise (tamrin) in the case of Levent Karaduman and "blackened scribbles" 5 . in jali diwani and diwani by Muhammad Jallul and Ashraf Karkuki. inscriptions of ma sha’ Allah (forty­one times. Gürkan Pehlivan's repeated use of la and ma sha' Allah. Levent Karaduman. On the other hand. Next to the classical thulth­naskh Hilyes by Hasan Çelebi. Muhammad Javadzade. According to Çebi. thus opening new doors for artists. Habib Ramazanpur. ma’qili. some differ markedly in their forms. and the ninety­nine beautiful names of God (al­asma al­husna). the addition of the Profession of Unity by Levend Karaduman and Gürkan Pehlivan. Large­sized Hilyes by Kādi Asker Mustafa İzzet Efendi. pictorial calligraphies. Karim Arbili. the determining characteristic of these works is that they take classical elements and organize them in modern compositions. Gürkan Pehlivan's use of the words Nurun 'ala Nurin from verse 35 of Sura al­Nur. the names of the four Rightly­Guided caliphs were replaced by the Prophet's names; the names of the Prophet's companions were occasionally written in small medallions; and there are even cases where stanzas from the Hilye­i Hakānî or other poems in Ottoman were written below the Hilye. in jali diwani. writing the text on an inscribed background. and naskh by Avni al­Naqqash. and in jali thulth. Levent Karaduman's repeated huwas. entirely in jali diwani by 'Adnan Karkuki. they do so only moderately.

Abu Hurayra. Made of every precious material. 32. 50. The phrases Subhanallah. and prayer. Prayer beads are "counting tools" born of Man's desire to be close to the Creator. and means "God is exempt from any deficiencies or imperfections. 108. they consist of 33. With his bold designs and by giving maximum freedom to calligraphers. what came before them as well as what came after. after the five daily prayers. and most Muslims repeat them. The phrase Subhanallah is said in praise of the Creator's absolute greatness. and when has one gone too far? This issue has elicited a fair amount of debate over the years. this is in fact a useful debate. all your sins will be forgiven." It is the origin of the word for prayer beads. large or small. Alhamdulillah. depending on the religion. saying "what a good way to remember. 500. even if they are as numerous as foam in the sea. H) encouraged its use. There are sayings attributed to the Prophet Muhammad about the tesbih or misbaha. and no satisfactory answer has been given to date. if they take believers to His lofty presence. debates continued for a long time on the question of whether or not free verse was really poetry; and as it was in the case of poetry. 100. After all. siyah mashq) in the case of Said Abuzeroğlu have not left behind the form of the Hilye to such an extent as to have moved into a different genre. Hilyes from the Libraries & Museums Directorate of Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality 40. Beads on a string are often used to count these phrases as they are repeated. secret or open. dhikr. then.. and Allahu Akbar occur frequently in the Qur'an. Time will show which of these dishes will gain favor. While 6 . and so we call such strings of beads tesbih or misbaha.. How far may one venture from past examples in the traditional arts. thirty­three times each. and taqdis your practice. b. tesbih or misbaha. Beads of Remembrance: Notes on Prayer Beads. related that he said: After tasbih. And in a way there is no answer. shall be forgiven through those pure prayers fluttering upon the lips. because this determination can only be made by time. tahlil. The Prophet Muhammad (P. 99. and that he admonished the women of Madina as follows: Make tasbih. all sins. for fingers will be called to render accounts. Mehmet Çebi has placed a richly laid table before the future. Such beads are known as Gebetskette in German and chapelet in French. It is related that he used date pits and small pebbles for keeping count.(karalama. and count them with your fingers. Intentional or not. Hilyes from the Collection of Mehmet Cebi 105." If these beads symbolize the ninety­nine Beautiful Names (al­Asma al­Husna) of the Creator. or even 1000 beads. one of the Prophet's companions. as the Prophet of Islam said. u.

 buffalo. horn. Next to the greatness achieved by calligraphy. having different textures that give different pleasurable sensations. and Allahu Akbar. Materials used to make prayer beads include amber. and thus they are. we are now living in the era of "illumination" of prayer beads. oltu taşi (jet). Ottoman İstanbul became a center for this art as well. In addition. agarwood. and the soul begins. However. immortalized. Jerusalem. snakewood. moulded into round drops and pierced to make the first prayer beads; these were known as turbat. ruby. agate. It is said that the development of the art of making rosaries in Turkey goes back to the sixteenth century. Hard woods were carved and turned into various shapes. walrus tusk. ironwood. in a way. Somewhat later. coral. but we have no evidence prior to the seventeenth century. turquoise. in a state of faithful contemplation. capturing the body and the mind. it is clear that in two centuries. The aesthetic development of prayer beads is thought to have begun in the fourteenth or fifteenth centuries. ambergris. mother­of­pearl. Eventually. tortoiseshell; rhinoceros. and deer horn; camel bone. The race has now begun. thirty­three times each. The habbs (beads) were likened to the congregation praying behind the prayer leader (imam); therefore. the act of moving the fingers along the beads sometimes turns into a kind of meditation. emerald. teeth. Alhamdulillah. Let us note that animals are no longer killed for this purpose; the materials used are obtained from dead animals. and tamarind. amber. and the Kaaba. A wide variety of raw materials were once brought from all around the world. şahmaksut (Afghan stone). the dhikr of the tongue. Any material hard enough to endure the lathe can be used in the making of prayer beads. Turning every beautiful thing in Islam into an artform. illumination and miniature the lathes in the rosaries shops of Istanbul started making masterpieces of "prayer beads" that were sent from Istanbul to sultan's palaces. and diamonds; all kinds of inscriptions have been written onto the beads. they were sold for high prices. Urartian. And thus an artistic competition in the field of prayer beads was launched. date and olive pits. bead tree. bloodwood. earth was collected from holy places such as Karbala. Brazilian rosewood. tiger claw. pearl. mammoth tusk. bull. The imâmes are harmoniously aligned. and mother­of pearl began in the sixteenth century. 7 . the piece that marks the beginning of the string of beads. pearl. after the third or fourth century of Islam. they were strung around the imâme. jade. Roman. In short. sandalwood. or Byzantine origin. vested with rings and coins; thousands of gold or silver pins have been nailed into a single string of beads; they are studded with rubies. lapis lazuli.worshipping. private collections or simply to lovers of rosaries throughout the Islamic world. pebbles. rock crystal. ebony. jades. the manufacture of rosaries turned from handicraft into a veritable form of art . the heart. Thus. The use of such materials as bone. ivory. Phoenician. rosewood. still during the same period. and knotted ropes were used for this purpose. prayer beads were fashioned out of the ceramic or glass beads of antique necklaces of Hittite. The Prophet Muhammad is related to have prescribed the repeated utterance of the phrases Subhanallah. Accordingly. whalebone. Initially it was the fingers' duty to keep count.

 Later he moved to Baghdad and began training in naskh script with the calligrapher Nabil Al Sharifi. Güllüce practices calligraphy in İstanbul. After moving to Istanbul he began to study calligraphy first with Burdurlu Hafiz Vahdeti Efendi. he sent him to Enderun to complete his studies. language and literature. jali jali and thulut ta'liq scripts. Mehmed Efendi Rashid is known for his works written in thuluth. naskh and riq'a scripts. Master calligrapher Kazasker Mustafa Izzet Master calligrapher and composer Mustafa Izzet Efendi was born in 1801 in Tosya. Güllüce moved to İstanbul following his high school graduation and pursued his studies in naskh and thulth scripts with the calligrapher Hasan Çelebi. He began his studies with the master calligrapher Saadeddin Efendi of Bursa. 8 . died in 1876 at the age of 75 years. He carried out his studies at a Quranic school. he also gave calligraphy lessons. He died on April 13th. He made the acquaintance of the calligrapher Mümtaz Durdu in Erzurum in 1995. he moved to Istanbul where he attended the Fatih Quranic school and began studying calligraphy with Komurcuzade Hafiz Efendi. who died in 1913. After studying naskh script with him for one and a half years. and later with master calligrapher Sami Efendi. Ahmad Al Umari Born in 1985 in Iraq. Abdullah Güllüce graduated from Erzurum İmam Hatip High School in 1999. he continued his training via correspondence due to his master's relocation to İstanbul. Mustafa Izzet received his calligraphy diploma from Yesarizade. Abdullah Güllüce Born in 1980 in Erzurum. In 1892 he was hired as a calligrapher by the Erkânı Dâiresi Harbiye. 1925. taught many important master calligraphers. As Sultan Mahmut II liked his voice. He is known for being the creator of the impressive medallions of Hagia Sophia.112. After his father's death. calligraphy. as well as for having written more than two hundred Hilyes. author of works in naskh. Starting in 1869. The master calligrapher. Till 1852 he held several important positions in the Sultan's Palace. Presently. thuluth. There he studied for six years music. Mehmet Nazif. Ahmed Al Umari started studying calligraphy in 1996 in Samarra with Abdul Aziz. he would go every year to Istanbul where he was able to study with Sefik Bey. He obtained his license in May 2003. Employed by the cartography office of the military. Biographies of the Calligraphers Master calligrapher Mehmed Rashid Efendi Mehmed Rashid Efendi was born in Bursa in 1849. Master calligrapher Mehmet Nazif Master calligrapher Mehmet Nazif was born in 1846 in Rusçuk. Rosaries from the Collection of Mehmet Cebi 169. He continued his studies in naskh and thulth scripts with the calligrapher Abbas Al Baghdadi and obtained his license.

Javad Khuran Born in 1977 in Iran, Javad Khuran studied in thulth script with the calligrapher Hakim Ghannam in Iran between 1998­2002. Later he came to İstanbul to continue his training with the calligrapher Mehmed Özçay. He completed his basic training in thulth script in one year and advanced his studies in jali thulth script with Özçay. He obtained his license from Özçay in thulth script in a ceremony held in November 2005 at IRCICA. Khuran currently practices calligraphy in İstanbul. Awards 1. 2004 Istanbul 6th International Calligraphy Competition, first prize in thulth style. 2. 2004 Istanbul 6th International Calligraphy Competition, first prize in jali thulth style. 3. 2005 Antik A.Ç. Hilye Competition, first prize in jali­thulth, thulth­naskh style. 4. 2005 Albaraka Turk International Calligraphy Competition, special prize. 5. 2005 Albaraka Turk International Calligraphy Competition, second prize in thulth style.

Amir Ahmad Falsafi Born in 1959 in Tehran, Amir Ahmad Falsafi began studying calligraphy in 1965. He continued by taking lessons from master Sayed Hassan Mirkhani in 1976. He advanced his art working with master Ghulam Hossain Amirkhani in 1981. He has been teaching at the Iranian Society of Calligraphers for thirty years. Falsafi participated in over 250 group exhibitions in USA, UK, France, Germany, Italy, India, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, and China. Falsafi has also held seven solo exhibitions. His published works include Divan­i Khvajah Shams al­Din Muhammad Hafiz Shirazi and Muraqqa­i Gulistan.

Eyüb Kuşçu Born in 1971 in Karkuk, Iraq, Eyüb Kuşçu started studying calligraphy with Avni Al Naqqash in Karkuk in 1994 and currently continues with the calligrapher Davut Bektas in Istanbul. He won second prize in Albaraka Türk International Calligraphy Competition in thulth style.

Fevzi Günüç Born in 1956 in Konya, Fevzi Günüç began working on thulth­naskh scripts with Hüseyin Kutlu in 1982 and obtained his license in 1993. He became an assistant professor in Selçuk University's Department of Turkish Islamic Arts in 1993, associate professor in the Department of Traditional Turkish Handicrafts, Chair of Arabic Script, and professor in the same department in 2007. Günüç served as deputy dean at Selçuk University Faculty of Fine Arts between 2003­2005. He has been the head of the Faculty of Fine Arts, Department of Traditional Turkish Arts since 2005, and the dean of the Faculty of Fine Arts since 2007. Günüç has participated in solo and group exhibitions both inside and outside Turkey and has published 9

books and articles in his field.

Ferhat Kurlu Born in 1976 in Fatsa, Ferhat Kurlu made the acquaintance of Muzaffer Ecevit when he was a sophomore at the Ondokuz Mayıs University, Faculty of Religious Studies. He familiarized himself with arts and took his first lessons of riq'a script from Muzaffer Ecevit. In July 1996 he met master Hasan Çelebi and began studying in thulth­naskh style. Following four years of training, he obtained his license in a ceremony held in October 2000 at IRCICA. In 2001, Kurlu was appointed as an imam by the Directorate of Religious Affairs.

Gürkan Pehlivan Born in 1970 in Aksehir, Konya, Gürkan Pehlivan completed his primary and secondary education in Istanbul. He worked as a designer and stylist in the leather apparel industry and for twenty years he designed his own models. In 1999, Pehlivan met the calligrapher and marbling artist Fuat Başar and began studying calligraphy. His teacher considered him talented enough that, after a short period of four months, he began to teach as his teacher's assistant. He received his license from in 2003, and took part in many exhibitions across the country. Gürkan Pehlivan signs his works "Mahfi." He has taught calligraphy in several institutions, and has written the internal inscriptions at the Mosque of Kambur Mustafa Paşa, the foundational inscription of the Bostanali Mosque in Kadırga, and other architectural inscriptions in various mosques, fountains, and mausolea. His works are in private collections both within the country and abroad.

Habib Ramazanpur Born in 1976 in the Gilan Province of Iran, Habib Ramazanpur started studying calligraphy with Abbas Ahaveyn. He obtained his master's license from the Iranian Society of Calligraphers in 2009. Ramazanpur has won prizes in numerous international competitions. He currently practices calligraphy in Tehran.

Hasan Çelebi Born in 1937 in Erzurum, Hasan Çelebi served as imam in various mosques. He studied calligraphy with Halim Özyazici, Hamit Aytaç and Kemal Batanay as from 1964. He obtained his license in thulth and naskh from Hamit Aytaç in 1975, and in ta’liq and riq'a from Kemal Batanay in 1981. Çelebi was entrusted with the task of writing the architectural inscriptions at the Mosque of Atatürk University, Faculty of Religious Studies in Erzurum in 1977 and the Organization of the Islamic Conference in Jeddah in 1981 as well as the restoration of the inscriptions at al­Masjid al­Nabawi in Medina in 1983. He held his first solo exhibition in 1982 at IRCICA, Istanbul. Later on came the exhibitions in Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) in 1984, and in Amman in 1985, where he was invited by Prince Hassan bin Talal of Jordan. In 1987, he resided in Medina for a year to write the inscriptions in al­Masjid al­Quba. In 1992, he was invited to Kuala Lumpur by the Islamic Cultural Center of Malaysia. He organized the "30 Years in Calligraphy" 10

exhibition at IRCICA in 1994. Çelebi also participated in numerous group exhibitions of classical Turkish handicrafts both inside and outside Turkey. Hasan Çelebi has been teaching calligraphy since 1976 and has given licenses to a total of 52 students, domestic and foreign.

Ehsan Ahmadi Born in 1980 in Mashhad, Iran, Ehsan Ahmadi graduated from the Polytechnic University Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He studied in nasta'liq script with master Abbas Ahaveyn. He has won prizes in international competitions both inside and outside Iran. Presently, Ahmadi practices his art in Iran.

Karim Arbili Born in 1963 in Arbil, Iraq, Karim Arbili graduated from the University of Baghdad, Faculty of Fine Arts, Department of Ceramics. He began studying calligraphy in 1991. Arbili obtained his license in ta'liq script from Prof. Dr. Ali Alparslan, and thulth and naskh scripts from Hasan Çelebi. He was awarded honorable mention in naskh and riqa' styles at the 1993 International Calligraphy Competition organized by IRCICA, another honorable mention in naskh style in 1996, and won third prize in thulth style. Arbili also won an award at the Baghdad Calligraphy and Illumination Festival in 1995.

Levent Karaduman Born in 1978 in Bartın, Levent Karaduman moved to Istanbul after completing his primary education. He studied Islamic and Arabic sciences alongside his secondary education. He began examining the works of old masters in 1992 and started studying the thulth and naskh scripts with the calligrapher and marbling artist Fuat Başar in 1995. Karaduman obtained his license in 2003 and displayed his original artwork in exhibitions both inside and outside Turkey. He gave calligraphy lessons at various institutions and organizations, and is studying calligraphy from the aesthetic viewpoint as a science of the line. His works appear in many private collections. He has written numerous hilyes in many different forms, as well as compositions, single pieces, and panels. He works in Istanbul, producing modern works of art in the classical calligraphic tradition. Muhammad Jalul Born in 1957 in Aleppo, Syria, Muhammad Jalul began studying calligraphy with Muhammad Subari in 1975­1978. He won first and second prizes in various competitions. He currently practices calligraphy in Syria.

Muhammad Javadzadeh Born in 1971 in Tehran, Iran, Muhammad Javadzadeh started studying calligraphy with Abbas Ahaveyn. He obtained his instructor's license from the Iranian Society of Calligraphers. He has been teaching there since 1996. Javadzadeh has won first prizes in every competition he has participated in. Currently, he continues 11

Turan Sevgili Born in 1945 in Oltu. Said Abuzeroğlu completed his primary and secondary education in Ufa. The same year. He continues to produce classical calligraphic works as well as modern and original works in his own style. Savaş Çevik received his master's degree from the Istanbul State Academy of Fine Arts. Özdem graduated from the Atatürk University. He also worked on the diwani and jali diwani styles with Prof. Said Abuzeroğlu Born in 1980 in the city of Ufa in the Republic of Bashkortostan. Özdem's works appear in many private collections and he continues to work in Istanbul. Nurullah Özdem began his calligraphic studies with his grandfather the calligrapher Şevket Özdem (1926­2003) and later on resumed with Bilal Sezer. Faculty of Fine Arts. ta'liq. was presented with achievement awards at the 1999 and 2001 State Calligraphy Competitions organized by the Ministry of Culture. Department of Textiles. Sevgili started studying calligraphy with the late calligrapher Hamid Aytaç in 1963 and obtained his licenses for Kufi. He continued with Hasan Çelebi starting in 2003. He won awards at various competitions and participated in group exhibitions both inside and outside Turkey. Savaş Çevik Born in 1953 in Antalya. thulth. He graduated first from the Istanbul University. He received honorable mention in the ta'liq and jali ta'liq scripts at the 1997 International Calligraphy Competition organized by IRCICA. and won first prize in jali ta'liq script in the First Albaraka Turk Calligraphy Competition. He was accepted to Marmara University. Erzurum. Department of Turkish Education in 2001 and moved to Istanbul. Faculty of Religious Studies in 1967 and later from the Mimar Sinan University. he started studying the thulth. Turan Sevgili completed his primary and secondary education in Çorum. Ali Alparslan in 1987 and thulth script with the calligrapher Hüseyin Kutlu in 1994. Department of Painting in 2005. 12 . Dr. he became a lecturer in the same department as the assistant of professor Emin Barm. He obtained his license in the thulth script in 2001. diwani and jali diwani scripts. He obtained his license in thulth and naskh styles from Davud Bektaş in September 2007. Russia. Tahsin Kurt Tahsin Kurt began studying in ta'liq script with Prof. naskh and riq'a scripts with Mumtaz Durdu. Department of Graphic Arts in 1976. and Hamit Aytac in thulth and naskh scripts. Ali Alparslan.working on his calligraphy in Tehran. Abuzeroğlu currently practices calligraphy in Istanbul. He then began to study with Davud Bektaş in 2004. The same year. He began studying calligraphy in 1973 with Kemal Batanay in riq'a and ta'liq scripts. naskh. Faculty of Fine Arts. Nurullah Özdem Born in 1984 in Erzurum. and obtained his license in the thulth and naskh scripts in 2004.

 starting with the 1981­1982 academic year. he was a lecturer in calligraphy at the Bursa Faculty of Religious Studies. He also writes Turkish inscriptions for invitation cards and custom orders. 13 .For some years. Turan Sevgili's works can be seen in numerous mosques and private collections.