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The University of Sydney School of Mathematics and Statistics

Solutions to Tutorial 12 (Week 13)


MATH3969: Measure Theory and Fourier Analysis (Advanced)
Web Page: http://www.maths.usyd.edu.au/u/UG/SM/MATH3969/ Lecturer: Daniel Daners

Semester 2, 2009

Questions to complete during the tutorial


1. Let X : R be a random variable on the probability space (, A, P ). (a) Prove that 1 1 |X |p dP p E[|X |p ] P [|X | ] p [|X |] for all > 0 and 1 p < . Solution: Note that for [|X | ] = { : |X ( )| } we have 1 |X ( )|p /p . Hence P [|X | ] =
[|X |]

1 dP
[|X |]

|X |p dP p |X |p dP
[|X |]

= (b) Prove Chebychevs inequality

1 p

1 p

|X |p dP =

1 E[|X |p ]. p

P [|X | ] for all > 0, where := E[X ].

1 Var(X ) 2

Solution: By the previous part applied to X and p = 2 we get P [|X | ] as claimed. 2. Let (, A, P ) be a probability space and A0 a -algebra with A0 A. Let X L1 (, A, P ) be a random variable. (a) Let : R R a convex function. If X L1 (, A, P ), prove that E[X |A0 ] E[ X |A0 ]. (This generalises Jensens inequality.) Solution: If : R R is convex, then according to lectures we can write (s) (t) m(t)(s t) for all s, t R if we set m(t) = sup
s<t

1 1 E[|X |2 ] = 2 Var(X ) 2

(s) (t) . st

Then m : R R is an increasing function and therefore Borel measurable. Since is convex it is also continuous and therefore Borel measurable as well. In what follows equality always means equality almost everywhere (with probability one). We rst assume that X L (, A, P ). Set X0 := E[X |A0 ] and A := { : X0 ( ) > X }. By denition of conditional expectation A A0 and X
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P (A)

X0 dP =
A

X dP = 0.

Hence X0 X almost everywhere. Similarly we show that X0 X almost everywhere, so that X0 X . From the above we have X X0 (m X0 )(X X0 ). From the construction of conditional expectation we know that E[Y |A0 ] 0 whenever Y 0. We also know that taking conditional expectation is a linear map. Hence E[ X |A0 ] E[ X0 |A0 ] E[(m X0 )(X X0 )|A0 ]. Since X0 is A0 -measurable we have E[ X0 |A0 ] = X0 . Moreover, since X0 L (, A0 , P ) and m() is an increasing function mX0 L (, A0 , P ). By the properties of conditional expectation from lectures E[(m X0 )(X X0 )|A0 ] = (m X0 )E[X X0 |A0 ] = (m X0 ) E[X |A0 ] E[X0 |A0 ] = (m X0 ) X0 X0 = 0 Putting everything together we get E[ X |A0 ] X0 = E[X |A0 ] for all X L (, A, P ) as claimed. Assume now that X, X L1 (, A, P ). Let An := { : |X0 ( )| < n}. From what we proved above we have E[ (1An X )|A0 ] E[1An X |A0 ] (1)

Since An A0 we have E[1An X |A0 ] = 1An E[X |A0 ] and by the continuity of we have E[1An X |A0 ] = (1An E[X |A0 ]) E[X |A0 ] pointwise. Now clearly (1An X ( )) = (X ( )) if An and (1An X ( )) = (0) if Ac n and so (1An X ) = 1An X + 1Ac (0). n Since 1An , 1Ac L (, A0 , P ) we have n E[ (1An X )|A0 ] = E[1An X |A0 ] + E[1Ac (0)|A0 ] = 1An E[ X |A0 ] + 1Ac (0) n n for all n N. Note that An An+1 for all n N and set A := nN . Hence 1An 1A and 1Ac 1Ac pointwise as n . Since X0 L1 (, A, P ) we have P (A) = 1 and n therefore E[ (1An X )|A0 ] = 1An E[ X |A0 ] + 1Ac (0) E[ X |A0 ] n almost everywhere (with probability one). Hence we get the required inequality almost everywhere by passing to the limit in (1). (b) Use the above to show that the linear map X E[X |A0 ] is continuous from Lp (, A, P ) to Lp (, A0 , P ) if 1 p < . Solution: Since t |t|p is convex for 1 p < we conclude from (a) that |E [X |A0 ]|p E [|X |p |A0 ] almost everywhere. Hence by denition of conditional expectation E [X |A0 ]
p

|E [X |A0 ]|p dP

1/p

E [|X |p A0 ] dP

1/p

|X |p dP

1/p

= X

p.

By the linearity of the map X E[X |A0 ] continuity follows. 2

3. Let (, A, P ) be a probability space and A0 a -algebra with A0 A. Then clearly L2 (, A0 , P ) is a closed subspace of L2 (, A, P ) and therefore, by the projection theorem in a Hilbert space, for every random variable X L2 (, A, P ) there exists X0 L2 (, A0 , P ) such that X X0 is orthogonal to L2 (, A0 , P ). Prove that X0 = E[X |A0 ] almost everywhere. Solution: By the properties of conditional expectation proved in lectures (X X0 )Y dP =

XY dP

X0 Y dP =

XY dP

XY dP = 0

For all Y L (, A0 , P ). By density of L (, A0 , P ) in L2 (, A0 , P ) it follows that X X0 is orthogonal to L2 (, A0 , P ) as claimed.

Extra questions for further practice


4. Let = [0, 1] and P = m the Lebesgue measure. Then [0, 1] is a probability space. Give examples of two distinct random variables which have the same distribution. Solution: Clearly X ( ) := and Y ( ) := 1 have the same distribution. 5. Let be the space obtained by coin tossing countably many times. Such coin tosses can be represented as innite sequences of the form := {(a0 , a1 , a2 , . . . ) : ak = 0 or 1}. A zero means head and a one means tail for instance. Such sequences can be interpreted as binary expansions ak of the number = k =1 2k which is between zero and one. With that identication we can set = [0, 1). (a) Denote by Ak := {(a0 , a1 , . . . ) : ak = 1}. Using that = [0, 1) sketch A1 , A2 , A3 and then describe the sets Ak for general k. What is the probability of Ak , and how does it compare to the Lebesgue measure of Ak ?
j a1 1 1 1 + Solution: If a1 = 1, then = 2 j =1 2j 2 , so A1 = [ 2 , 1). If k = 2, then = 2 + a j 1 1 1 3 1 1 3 1 5 3 7 j =1 2j , so we have A2 = [ 4 , 2 ) [ 4 , 1) and similarly A3 = [ 8 , 4 ) [ 8 2 ) [ 8 , 4 ) [ 8 , 1). 4 The Lebesgue measure of each of the sets is clearly 1/2. A sketch of A1 , A2 and A3 is as follows: 0 1

0 0

1 1

(b) Show that every interval of the form In,j = [j/2n , (j + 1)/2n ) (j = 0, . . . , 2n1 ) can be written as a nite intersection of the sets Ak and their complements. Solution: First note that In,j Ak or In,j Ac k for all k = 1, . . . , n. Hence, for k = n c 1, . . . , n we let Bj,k := Ak if In,j Ak and Bj,k := Ac k =1 Bj,k . k if In,j Ak . Then In,j = (c) Argue why the probability measure in the above situation is the Lebesgue measure on [0, 1). Solution: Every interval (a, b) [0, 1) can be written as a disjoint union of countably many intervals of the form [j/2n , (j + 1)/2n ) and therefore the measure is equal to b a. This induces Lebesgue measure.