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BTEC Higher Nationals

Guidance and units

Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction


August 2003

London Qualifications is one of the leading examining and awarding bodies in the UK and throughout the world. It incorporates all the qualifications previously awarded under the Edexcel and BTEC brand. We provide a wide range of qualifications including general (academic), vocational, occupational and specific programmes for employers. Through a network of UK and overseas offices, our centres receive the support they need to help them deliver their education and training programmes to learners. For further information please call Customer Services on 0870 240 9800, or visit our website at www.edexcel.org.uk

References to third-party material made in this specification are made in good faith. London Qualifications does not endorse, approve or accept responsibility for the content of materials, which may be subject to change, or any opinions expressed therein. (Material may include textbooks, journals, magazines and other publications and websites.)

Authorised by Peter Goff Publications Code B013362 All the material in this publication is copyright London Qualifications Limited 2003

EDEXCEL LEVEL 4 BTEC HIGHER NATIONALS IN CONSTRUCTION

BTEC Higher National Certificate in Construction BTEC Higher National Diploma in Construction

Contents

Qualification titles covered by this specification Edexcel qualifications in the National Qualifications Framework Introduction Structure of the qualifications
BTEC Higher National Certificate BTEC Higher National Diploma

1 2 3 3
3 3

Key features
Professional body recognition Occupational Standards Qualification Requirement Higher level skills and abilities BTEC Higher National Certificate BTEC Higher National Diploma

6
7 7 8 8 9 10

Teaching, learning and assessment


Unit format Learning and assessment Grading Higher National units Grade descriptors Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)

10
11 12 12 14 16

Quality assurance of BTEC Higher Nationals


Centre and programme approval Monitoring centres internal quality systems Independent assessment: the role of the external examiner

16
16 17 17

Programme design and delivery


Mode of delivery Resources Delivery approach Meeting local needs

18
19 19 19 20

Locally-devised specialist units Limitations on variations from standard specifications

20 20

Access and recruitment


Balancing studies Restrictions on learner entry Learners with particular requirements

20
21 21 22

The wider curriculum Useful publications


Professional body contact details How to obtain CISC Occupational Standards and NVQ Standards

22 22
23 23

Professional development and training Further information Core Units


Unit 1: Unit 2: Unit 3: Unit 4: Unit 5: Unit 6: Design Principles and Application Science and Materials Analytical Methods Management Principles and Application Group Project Health, Safety and Welfare

24 24 25
27 33 39 45 53 59

Specialist Units
Unit 7: Unit 8: Unit 9: Technology A Technology B Law and Contract

65
67 73 81 87 95 103 109 115 121 127 133 139

Unit 10: Building Services Engineering Technology Unit 11: Contractual Procedures Unit 12: Refurbishment and Adaptation Unit 13: Environment Unit 14: Construction Economics Unit 15: Individual Student Project Unit 16: Production Management Unit 17: Tendering and Estimating Unit 18: Project Management

Unit 19: Measurement A Unit 20: Building Control and Inspection Unit 21: Supply Chain Management Unit 22: Technology C Unit 23: Specification and Contract Documentation Unit 24: Structural Behaviour and Detailing Unit 25: Measurement B Unit 26: Design Procedures Unit 27: Design Technology Unit 28: Materials Properties and Performance Unit 29: Site Surveying Procedures Unit 30: IT Applications General Unit 31: IT Applications Surveying and Measuring Unit 32: IT Applications Computer Aided Design Unit 33: IT Applications Project Management Unit 34: Work-based Learning A Unit 35: Work-based Learning B

145 151 157 163 169 175 183 189 195 201 207 215 221 227 233 239 245

Annex A
Qualification codes QCA codes Edexcel codes QCA and Edexcel codes

251
251 251 251 251

Annex B
Representation by Professional Bodies Recognition by Professional Bodies BTEC Higher National Certificate and Diploma in Construction BTEC Higher National in Construction for Building Surveying and Quantity Surveying Disciplines

253
253 254 256 258

Annex C
Mapping of BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction to CISC Occupational Standards (based on 1998 CISC CD-Rom)

260
260

Annex D
Summary of links between BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction units and the Evidence Requirements of Level 4 NVQs Construction Industry Council Learning Outcomes

267
267 269

Annex E
BTEC Environmental Initiative Guidance for the incorporation of environmental components into BTEC programmes

271
271

Annex F
Higher level skills and abilities

273
273

Annex G
Wider curriculum mapping

275
275

Annex H
Qualification Requirement

277
277

Annex I
Summary of support materials (all units)

287
287

Qualification titles covered by this specification


Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher National Certificate in Construction Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher National Diploma in Construction These qualifications have been accredited to the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). The Qualification Accreditation Numbers (QANs) for these qualifications are listed in Annex A. These qualification titles are as they will appear on the learners certificate. Learners need to be made aware of this when they are recruited by the centre and registered with Edexcel. Providing this happens, centres are able to describe the programme of study leading to the award of the qualification in different ways to suit the medium and the target audience.

B013362 Guidance and units Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction Issue 1 August 2003

Edexcel qualifications in the National Qualifications Framework


NQF level
BTEC Professional Award, Certificate, Diploma Key skills level 5 NVQ level 5

BTEC Higher National Diploma BTEC Higher National Certificate BTEC Professional Award, Certificate, Diploma BTEC National Diploma BTEC National Certificate BTEC National Award BTEC Diploma in Foundation Studies (Art and Design) BTEC Award, Certificate, Diploma BTEC First Diploma BTEC Award, Certificate, Diploma Level 2 Certificate in Adult Numeracy Level 2 Certificate in Adult Literacy Level 1 Certificate in Adult Numeracy Level 1 Certificate in Adult Literacy Entry Level Certificate in Adult Numeracy Entry Level Certificate in Adult Literacy

Key skills level 4

NVQ level 4

Key skills level 3

GCE A Level GCE AS Level VCE AEA

NVQ level 3

Key skills level 2

GCSE (A* C) GCSE (Double Awards) (A* A* CC) GCSE (Short Courses) (A* C) Intermediate GNVQ GCSE (D G) GCSE (Double Awards) (DD GG) GCSE (Short Courses) (D G) Foundation GNVQ Entry Level Certificates

NVQ level 2

BTEC Introductory Certificate BTEC Introductory Diploma BTEC Award, Certificate, Diploma Entry Level Certificate in Skills for Working Life Entry Level Certificate in Personal Skills

Key skills level 1

NVQ level 1

B013362 Guidance and units Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction Issue 1 August 2003

Introduction
This document contains the units and associated guidance for the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction. Each unit sets out the required outcomes and content and includes advice regarding appropriate delivery and assessment strategies. The guidance contains further details of the teaching, learning, assessment and quality assurance of these qualifications. It includes advice about Edexcels policy regarding access to its qualifications, the design of programmes of study and delivery modes.

Structure of the qualifications


BTEC Higher National Certificate
The BTEC Higher National Certificate in Construction is a 10-unit qualification of which six units are core units. The BTEC Higher National Certificate programme must contain a minimum of five units designated at H2 level.

BTEC Higher National Diploma


The BTEC Higher National Diploma in Construction is a 16-unit qualification of which six units are core units. The BTEC Higher National Diploma programme must contain a minimum of eight units designated at H2 level.

B013362 Guidance and units Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction Issue 1 August 2003

Overall unit structure for suite of the BTEC Higher Nationals in the Construction and Built Environment Sector
Construction
H1 H1 H1 H2 H2 H2 Design Principles and Application Science and Materials Analytical Methods Management Principles and Application Group Project Health, Safety and Welfare H1 H1 H1 H2 H2 H2

Civil Engineering*
Design Principles and Application Science and Materials Analytical Methods Management Principles and Application Group Project Health, Safety and Welfare H1 H1 H1 H2 H2 H2 H2 H2 H1 H2 H2 H1 H1 H1 H2 H2 H1 H2 H2 H2 H1 H2 H2 H1 H1 H1 H2 H1 H2 H2 H2 H2 H2 H2

Building Services Engineering**


Design Principles and Application Services Science Analytical Methods Management Principles and Application Group Project Health, Safety and Welfare Services Project Management Engineering Mathematics Quality Assurance and Control Individual Student Project Thermofluids and Acoustic Criteria Air Conditioning A Heating A Electricity and Lighting Air Conditioning B Heating B Piped Distribution Services Energy Utilisation and Efficiency Plumbing Technology Refrigeration Technology Refrigeration Electrical Technology Advanced Refrigeration Systems Electrical Theory Electrical and Electronics Control Principles [0.5 unit] Electrical Installation A [0.5 unit] Lighting Applications Power Supplies to Buildings Building Fire Protection and Security Electrical Installation B Building Management Systems Refrigeration Applications Refrigeration Design and Plant Selection Work-based Learning A Work-based Learning B

Core Specialist units


* **

H1 Technology A H1 Geology and Soil Mechanics H2 Technology B H1 Civil Engineering Construction A H1 Law and Contract H2 Site Surveying Procedures H1 Building Services Engineering Technology H2 Structural Analysis and Design H2 Contractual Procedures H2 Individual Student Project H2 Refurbishment and Adaptation H1 Design and Production Computer Analysis H1 Environment H2 Engineering Mathematics H2 Construction Economics H2 Civil Engineering Construction B H2 Individual Student Project H2 Fluids and Hydraulics H2 Production Management H2 Project Management H1 Tendering and Estimating H2 Advanced Structural Analysis and Design H2 Project Management H2 Transportation H1 Measurement A H1 Law and Contract H2 Building Control and Inspection H1 Tendering and Estimating H2 Supply Chain Management H2 Contractual Procedures H2 Technology C H2 Work-based Learning A H1 Specification and Contract Documentation H2 Work-based Learning B H1 Structural Behaviour and Detailing H2 Measurement B H1 Design Procedures H2 Design Technology H2 Materials Properties and Performance H2 Site Surveying Procedures H1 IT Applications General [0.5 unit] H2 IT Applications Surveying and Measuring [0.5 unit] H1 IT Applications Computer Aided Design [0.5 unit] H2 IT Applications Project Management [0.5 unit] H2 Work-based Learning A H2 Work-based Learning B Civil Engineering } Building Services Engineering } Guidance and units contained within separate specifications

B013362 Guidance and units Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction Issue 1 August 2003

BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction Qualification structures and routes for Occupation Disciplines
Core units Common to all routes of HNC and HND
H1 H1 H1 H2 H2 H2 Design Principles and Application Science and Materials Analytical Methods Management Principles and Application Group Project Health, Safety and Welfare

Specialist units Production and Management


H1 H2 H1 H1 H2 H2 H1 H2 H2 H2 H1 H2 H1 H2 H2 H2 H1 H1 H2 H2 H1 H2 H1 H2 H2 H2 Technology A Technology B Law and Contract Building Services Engineering Technology Contractual Procedures Refurbishment and Adaptation Environment Construction Economics Individual Student Project Production Management Tendering and Estimating Project Management Measurement A Building Control and Inspection Supply Chain Management Technology C Specification and Contract Documentation Structural Behaviour and Detailing Materials Properties and Performance Site Surveying Procedures *IT Applications General (0.5) *IT Applications Surveying and Measuring (0.5) *IT Applications Computer Aided Design (0.5) *IT Applications Project Management (0.5) Work-based Learning A Work-based Learning B H1 H2 H1 H1 H2 H2 H1 H2 H2 H2 H1 H2 H1 H2 H1 H2 H2 H1 H2 H1 H2 H2 H2

Quantity Surveying
Technology A Technology B Law and Contract Building Services Engineering Technology Contractual Procedures Refurbishment and Adaptation Environment Construction Economics Individual Student Project Production Management Tendering and Estimating Project Management Measurement A Supply Chain Management Specification and Contract Documentation Measurement B Site Survey Procedures *IT Applications General (0.5) *IT Applications Surveying and Measuring (0.5) *IT Applications Computer Aided Design (0.5) *IT Applications Project Management (0.5) Work-based Learning A Work-based Learning B H1 H2 H1 H1 H2 H2 H1 H2 H2 H2 H1 H2 H1 H2 H2 H1 H1 H1 H2 H1 H2 H2 H2

Building Surveying
Technology A Technology B Law and Contract Building Services Engineering Technology Contractual Procedures Refurbishment and Adaptation Environment Construction Economics Individual Student Project Production Management Tendering and Estimating Project Management Measurement A Building Control and Inspection Technology C Specification and Contract Documentation Structural Behaviour and Detailing *IT Applications General (0.5) *IT Applications Surveying and Measuring (0.5) *IT Applications Computer Aided Design (0.5) *IT Applications Project Management (0.5) Work-based Learning A Work-based Learning B H1 H2 H1 H1 H2 H2 H1 H2 H2 H2 H2 H1 H1 H1 H2 H2 H1 H1 H2 H2

Architectural Design
Technology A Technology B Law and Contract Building Services Engineering Technology Contractual Procedures Refurbishment and Adaptation Environment Construction Economics Individual Student Project Building Control and Inspection Technology C Specification and Contract Documentation Structural Behaviour and Detailing Design Procedures Design Technology Materials Properties and Performance *IT Applications General (0.5) *IT Applications Computer Aided Design (0.5) Work-based Learning A Work-based Learning B

HNC = 6 core + 4 specialist units

HND = 6 core + 10 specialist units

Note: * IT Applications half units may be taken in any combination, subject to H1 and H2 requirements for a programme. Programmes must have a minimum of 50% of units designated at H2 level. See Annex B for Qualification Structures recognised by BIAT, CIOB, and RICS.

B013362 Guidance and units Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction Issue 1 August 2003

Key features
The BTEC Higher Nationals are designed to provide a specialist vocational programme, linked to professional body requirements and National Occupational Standards where appropriate, with a strong work related emphasis. The qualifications provide a thorough grounding in the key concepts and practical skills required in their sector and their national recognition by employers allows progression direct into employment. The BTEC Higher Nationals offer a strong emphasis on practical skills development alongside the development of requisite knowledge and understanding in their sector. Learners are attracted to this strong vocational programme of study that meets their individual progression needs whether this is into employment or to further study on degree or professional courses. The key progression path for BTEC Higher National Certificate and Diploma learners is to the second or third year of a degree or honours degree programme, depending on the match of the BTEC Higher National units to the degree programme in question. The BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction have been developed to focus on: national qualifications, with detailed common standards, learning outcomes and unit grading recognisable to centres, learners, employers and professional bodies recognition by appropriate professional bodies a common core of study applicable to the whole industry a choice of optional curriculum appropriate to the main career disciplines within construction a flexible approach to curriculum content within a nationally recognised framework changing training and educational needs relevant to construction disciplines progression to degree programmes and progression to professional institution membership a contribution to the skills, knowledge and understanding required to underpin relevant occupational standards and NVQs at level 4 providing opportunities for learners to focus on the development of higher level skills in a technological and management context a focus on the development of learners practical knowledge, skills and understanding that underpins performance in the workplace preparation for employment and further training and professional development. preparing learners for a range of technical, professional and management career disciplines in construction and the built environment by providing specialised studies which are directly relevant to individual occupations and professions in which learners are currently working or in which they intend to seek employment enabling learners to make an immediate contribution in employment in construction and the built environment sector providing learners with flexibility, knowledge, skills, understanding and motivation as a basis for progression to graduate and postgraduate studies

This qualification meets the needs of the above rationale by:

B013362 Guidance and units Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction Issue 1 August 2003

developing a range of skills and techniques, personal qualities and attitudes essential for successful performance in working life providing further study, career development and progression from a Technician Technical Certificate at level 3 within an Advanced Modern Apprenticeship (AMA) providing a significant basis for progression to membership of professional institutions in construction and the built environment.

Professional body recognition


The BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction have been developed with career progression and recognition by professional bodies in mind. It is essential that learners gain the maximum benefit from their programme of study. Consequently we have added value to the qualification by securing recognition for these qualifications. The following is an indication of relevant professional bodies who recognise or are likely to recognise these BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction and their recommended unit structure, as a qualification contributing towards their requirements: The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) The British Institute of Architectural Technologists (BIAT).

In addition to individual recognition by the main professional bodies, the NQF BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction have also been validated and approved by the Construction Industry Council Standards Panel (CICSP) which represents all the main professional bodies, NTOs (SSCs), employer bodies and key employers for higher level qualifications in the Construction and Built Environment Sector. Further details of professional body recognition and exemptions of BTEC Higher Nationals are contained in the publication BTEC Professional Recognition which is available on Edexcels website (www.edexcel.org.uk). See Annex B for details of professional bodies and recognition arrangements.

Occupational Standards
BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction are designed to relate to the Occupational Standards in the Construction Sector, which in turn form the basis of the Construction National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) at Level 4. BTEC Higher Nationals do not purport to deliver occupational competence in the sector, which should be demonstrated in a work context. However, the qualifications provide underpinning knowledge for the Occupational Standards, as well as developing practical skills in preparation for work and possible achievement of NVQs in due course. As part of the development process the content in these qualifications has been mapped to the 1998 Construction Industry Standing Conference (CISC) Occupational Standards (OS) and also the relevant NVQ at level 4. Through the study of the core units and specialist units, learners will cover much of the underpinning knowledge, skills and understanding that will contribute to the evidence required for the NVQ level 4 units in: Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Site Management 7

B013362 Guidance and units Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction Issue 1 August 2003

Conservation Control Construction Contracting Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Quantity Surveying Spatial Data Management Town Planning Valuation.

See Annex D for a summary of mapping links between the core units and specialist units and these NVQs. There are good links between the curriculum content of the BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction and the QAA Building and Surveying threshold benchmark standards, albeit that the BTEC Higher Nationals are normally only two year programmes and the QAA benchmark standards, which are set at honours degree level, are normally three years of study.

Qualification Requirement
Edexcel has published Qualification Requirements as a part of the revision of the BTEC Higher Nationals. Qualification Requirements set out the aims and rationale of the qualifications and provide the framework of curriculum content. They also identify the higher level skills associated with the qualifications and any recognition by the relevant professional bodies. The Qualification Requirement for BTEC Higher Nationals Construction is given in Annex H. Edexcel standard specifications titles are developed from the Qualification Requirements. Licensed centres comply with Qualification Requirements when developing BTEC Higher Nationals under these standard titles. Qualification Requirements provide consistent standards within the same vocational area and clearly identify the skills and knowledge that can be expected of any holder of an identical BTEC Higher National. This will allow higher education institutions, employers and professional bodies to confidently provide progression opportunities to successful learners.

Higher level skills and abilities


Learners studying for the BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction will be expected to develop the following higher level skills during the programme of study: locate, extract, read and use appropriate literature drawn from multiple sources with a full and critical understanding design, plan, conduct and report investigations and research to solve problems and communicate the results of their study accurately and reliably seek solutions to routine and unfamiliar problems through the analysis and synthesis of a range of concepts, knowledge and skills to formulate evidence-based arguments and evaluate and summarise information critically analyse and interpret data and present quantitative and qualitative information, together with analysis, argument and commentary, in a form appropriate to the intended audience; using appropriate quantitative techniques, relevant IT software and media

B013362 Guidance and units Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction Issue 1 August 2003

relate academic knowledge, skills and understanding to skills in the workplace and where appropriate, demonstrate their integration through workplace experience and activities think independently and apply complex theories to practical realistic work situations, some requiring innovation and creativity apply their subject-related and transferable skills in contexts where the scope of the task and the criteria for decisions are generally well defined but where some personal responsibility and initiative are required recognise the moral and ethical issues of construction, sustainability, the environment, scientific enquiry and experimentation appreciate the need for ethical standards and professional codes of conduct and apply insight and judgement in relation to the margins and consequences of error develop an understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of construction, and of the skills required to work in non-adversarial integrated teams with other professions in construction take responsibility to manage and direct their own and where appropriate, the activities of others identify and address their own learning needs within defined contexts, recognise their own learning style and undertake further guided learning in new areas.

The Construction Industry Council has an agreed set of Common Learning Outcomes for all sub-degree and degree level courses, these are summarised in Annex D.

BTEC Higher National Certificate


The 10-unit BTEC Higher National Certificate in Construction provides a specialist workrelated programme of study that covers the key knowledge, understanding and practical skills required in the construction sector and also offers particular specialist emphasis through the choice of specialist units. BTEC Higher National Certificates provide a nationally recognised qualification offering career progression and professional development for those already in employment and opportunities to progress in higher education. The qualifications are mode free but they are primarily undertaken by part-time learners studying over two years. In some sectors there are opportunities for those wishing to complete an intensive programme of study in a shorter period of time. The specification provides centres with a framework to develop engaging programmes for higher education learners who are clear about the area of employment that they wish to enter. Their access to suitable work situations may allow learners to achieve an NVQ at level 4 see Annex D. The BTEC Higher National Certificate in Construction provides four main discipline progression routes: production and management; quantity surveying; building surveying; and architectural design. Within each of these four main discipline progression routes, there is a range of specialist units that enable programmes to be designed and focused on the more specific needs of learners and employers. The choice of appropriate specialist units should ensure adequate coverage of the technology units required for the discipline progression route being followed. It should also provide a good balance and integration of theory and practice to ensure that the qualification supports both employer related and academic progression and the unit structures recognised by professional bodies see Annex B.

B013362 Guidance and units Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction Issue 1 August 2003

BTEC Higher National Diploma


The 16-unit BTEC Higher National Diploma provides greater breadth and specialisation than the BTEC Higher National Certificate. BTEC Higher National Diplomas are mode free but are followed predominately by full-time learners. They allow progression into or within employment in the construction sector, either directly on achieving of the award or following further study to degree level. The BTEC Higher National Diploma in Construction also provides for an opportunity for suitable work-experience in order for learners to apply their knowledge and practical skills in the workplace during their study. Full-time learners have the opportunity to do this through formal work placements or their part-time employment experience. Work-based learning units are provided so that this can be formally assessed. The qualification prepares learners for employment in the construction sector and will be suitable for 18+ year olds who have already decided that they wish to enter this area of work. Some adult learners may wish to make the commitment required by this qualification in order to enter a specialist area of employment in construction or progress into higher education. Other learners may want to extend the specialism that they followed on the BTEC Higher National Certificate programme. Progression from this qualification may well be into or within employment in the construction sector where learners may work towards membership of CIOB, RICS, BIAT or other relevant professional bodies. The BTEC Higher National Diploma in Construction provides four main discipline progression routes: production and management; quantity surveying; building surveying; and architectural design. Within each of these four main discipline progression routes, there is a range of specialist units that enable programmes to be designed and focused on the more specific needs of learners and employers. The choice of appropriate specialist units should ensure adequate coverage of the technology units required for the discipline progression route being followed. It should also provide a good balance and integration of theory and practice to ensure that the qualification supports both employer related and academic progression and the unit structures recognised by professional bodies see Annex B.

Teaching, learning and assessment


Learners must pass all 10 units on their programme of learning to be awarded a BTEC Higher National Certificate and all 16 units to be awarded a BTEC Higher National Diploma. However, professional bodies may recommend additional units to meet their requirements and facilitate progression see Annex B. The assessment of BTEC Higher National qualifications is criterion-referenced and centres are required to assess the learners evidence against published learning outcomes and assessment criteria. All units will be individually graded as pass, merit or distinction. To achieve a pass grade for the unit learners must meet the assessment criteria set out in the specifications. This gives transparency to the assessment process and provides for the establishment of national standards for each qualification. The units in BTEC Higher National qualifications all have a standard format which is designed to provide clear guidance on the requirements of the qualification for learners, assessors and those responsible for monitoring national standards.

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B013362 Guidance and units Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction Issue 1 August 2003

Unit format
Each unit is set out in the following way. Unit title, learning hours and NQF level The unit title is accredited by QCA and this form of words will appear on the learners Notification of Performance. In BTEC Higher National qualifications each unit consists of 60 guided learning hours. Each unit is assigned a notional level indicator of H1 or H2, indicating the relative intellectual demand, complexity and depth of study, and learner autonomy. At H1 level the emphasis is on the application of knowledge, skills and understanding, use of conventions in the field of study, use of analytical skills and selection and organisation of information. At H2 level the emphasis is on application and evaluation of contrasting ideas, principles, theories and practices, greater specialisation in the field of study, and an increasing independence in systematic enquiry and analysis. Description of unit A brief description of the overall purpose of the unit is given, together with the key areas of study associated with the unit. Summary of learning outcomes The outcomes of the unit identify what each learner must do in order to pass the unit. Learners must achieve all the outcomes in order to pass the unit. Content This section picks up highlighted words from the outcomes and amplifies the content coverage required when addressing the outcomes. The content section will often provide lists of topics. Please note all aspects of the listed topics should be covered, except those that begin with eg, where items listed are merely indicative. Outcomes and assessment criteria Each unit contains statements of the evidence that each learner should produce in order to receive a pass. Guidance This section is not prescriptive but provides additional guidance and amplification related to the unit to support teachers/deliverers and assessors. Its subsections are given below. Only those subsections which apply to the unit will appear. Delivery offers guidance about possible approaches to delivery. This advice is based on the more usual delivery modes and is not intended to rule out alternative approaches. Assessment provides advice about the nature and type of evidence that learners are likely to need to produce. This subsection should be read in conjunction with the assessment criteria and the generic grade descriptors. Links sets out the links between units. Provides opportunities for integration of learning, delivery and assessment. Any links to the National Occupational Standards will be highlighted here.

B013362 Guidance and units Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction Issue 1 August 2003

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Resources identifies the specialist resources likely to be needed to allow learners to generate the evidence required by each unit. The centre will be asked to ensure that this requirement is in place when it seeks approval from Edexcel to offer the qualification. Support materials identifies, where appropriate, textbooks, videos, magazines, journals, publications and websites that may support the delivery of the unit.

Learning and assessment


The purpose of assessment is to ensure that effective learning of the content of each unit has taken place. Evidence of this learning, or the application of the learning etc, is required for each unit. The assessment of the evidence directly relates to the assessment criteria for each unit, supported by the generic grade descriptors. The process of assessment can aid effective learning by seeking and interpreting evidence to decide the stage that learners have reached in their learning, what further learning needs to take place and how best to do this. Therefore, the process of assessment should be part of the effective planning of teaching and learning by providing opportunities for both the learner and assessor to obtain information about progress towards learning goals. The assessor and learner must be actively engaged in promoting a common understanding of the assessment criteria and the grade descriptors (what it is they are trying to achieve and how well they achieve it) for further learning to take place. Therefore, learners need constructive feedback and guidance about how to improve, capitalising on strengths, with clear and constructive comments about weaknesses and how these might be addressed. Assessment instruments are constructed by centres. Assessment instruments should collectively ensure coverage of all assessment criteria within each unit and should provide opportunities for the evidencing of all the grade descriptors. It is advised that assessment criteria and contextualised grade descriptors are clearly indicated on each assessment instrument to provide a focus for learners (for transparency and to ensure that feedback is specific to the criteria) and to assist with internal standardisation processes. Tasks/activities should enable learners to produce evidence that relates directly to the assessment criteria and grade descriptors. When centres are designing assessment instruments, they need to ensure that the instruments are valid, reliable and fit for purpose, building on the application of the assessment criteria. Centres are encouraged to place emphasis on practical application of the assessment criteria, providing a realistic scenario for learners to adopt, making maximum use of work-related practical experience and reflecting typical practice in the sector concerned. The creation of assessment instruments that are fit for purpose is vital to achievement and their importance cannot be over-emphasised.

Grading Higher National units


The assessment of BTEC Higher National qualifications will be at unit level and there will be no overall grade for either the Certificate or the Diploma. This means that learners are able to access the qualification through a unitised approach. Each unit will be graded as a pass, merit or distinction. A pass is awarded for the achievement of all outcomes against the specified assessment criteria. Merit and distinction grades are awarded for higher-level achievement. The generic merit and distinction grade descriptors listed on pages 1415 are for grading the total evidence produced for each unit and describe the learners performance over and above that for a pass grade.

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B013362 Guidance and units Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction Issue 1 August 2003

The merit and distinction grade descriptors can be achieved in a flexible way, eg in a sequential or holistic mode, to reflect the nature of the sector concerned. Each of the generic merit and distinction grade descriptors can be amplified by use of indicative characteristics. These give a guide to the expected learner performance and support the generic grade descriptors. The indicative characteristics should reflect the nature of a unit and the context of the sector programme. The indicative characteristics shown in the table for each of the generic grade descriptors are not exhaustive. Consequently, centres should select from the list or may construct other appropriate indicative characteristics for their sector programme which may be drawn from the appropriate higher-level skills. It is important to note that each assessment activity does not need to incorporate all the merit and/or distinction grade descriptors. Contextualising the generic grade descriptors The generic merit and distinction grade descriptors need to be viewed as a qualitative extension of the assessment criteria for pass within each individual unit. The relevant generic grade descriptors must be identified and specified within an assignment and the relevant indicative characteristics should be used to place the required evidence in context.

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Grade descriptors
Pass grade A pass grade is achieved by meeting all the requirements defined in the assessment criteria for pass for each unit. Merit grade Merit descriptors In order to achieve a merit the learner must: identify and apply strategies to find appropriate solutions Indicative characteristics: The learners evidence shows: select/design and apply appropriate methods/ techniques present and communicate appropriate findings effective judgements have been made complex problems with more than one variable have been explored an effective approach to study and research has been applied relevant theories and techniques have been applied a range of methods and techniques have been applied a range of sources of information has been used the selection of methods and techniques/sources has been justified the design of methods/techniques has been justified complex information/data has been synthesised and processed appropriate learning methods/techniques have been applied appropriate structure and approach has been used coherent, logical development of principles/concepts for the intended audience a range of methods of presentation have been used and technical language has been accurately used communication has taken place in familiar and unfamiliar contexts the communication is appropriate for familiar and unfamiliar audiences and appropriate media have been used

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B013362 Guidance and units Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction Issue 1 August 2003

Distinction grade Distinction descriptors In order to achieve a distinction the learner must: use critical reflection to evaluate own work and justify valid conclusions Indicative characteristics: The learners evidence shows: take responsibility for managing and organising activities demonstrate convergent/lateral/ creative thinking conclusions have been arrived at through synthesis of ideas and have been justified the validity of results has been evaluated using defined criteria self criticism of approach has taken place realistic improvements have been proposed against defined characteristics for success autonomy/independence has been demonstrated substantial activities, projects or investigations have been planned, managed and organised activities have been managed the unforeseen has been accommodated the importance of interdependence has been recognised and achieved ideas have been generated and decisions taken self evaluation has taken place convergent and lateral thinking have been applied problems have been solved innovation and creative thought have been applied receptiveness to new ideas is evident effective thinking has taken place in unfamiliar contexts

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Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)


Edexcel encourages centres to recognise learners previous achievements and experience through the Accreditation of Prior Learning. Learners may have evidence that has been generated during previous study, in their previous or current employment or whilst undertaking voluntary work that relates to one or more of the units in the qualification. Assessors should assess this evidence against the BTEC Higher National standards in the specifications in the normal way. As with all evidence, assessors should be satisfied about the authenticity and currency of the material when considering whether or not the outcomes of the unit have been met. Full guidance about Edexcels policy on APL is provided on our website (www.edexcel.org.uk).

Quality assurance of BTEC Higher Nationals


The quality assurance system for BTEC Higher National qualifications, as higher-level vocational qualifications at Level 4 on the NQF, will comprise three main components. approval process a control measure to confirm that individual centres (and programme teams) are appropriately resourced and competent to deliver a BTEC Level 4 programme of study. monitoring of centres a method of monitoring centres internal quality systems to ensure ongoing fulfilment of initial requirements and, where appropriate, enhancement of those requirements to accommodate new qualifications. independent assessment a measure that provides independence within the assessment process, so that the certificated outcomes for each learner are not reliant on determinations by individuals or groups with a vested interest in the outcome. This measure should be consistent and reliable over time, and should not create unnecessary barriers.

Centre and programme approval


Approval to offer the BTEC Higher National qualifications will vary depending on the status of the centre. Centres that have a recent history of delivering BTEC Higher National qualifications and have an acceptable quality profile in relation to their delivery will be able to gain approval through an accelerated process. Centres that are new to the delivery of BTEC Higher National qualifications will be required to submit evidence to demonstrate that they: have the human and physical resources required for effective delivery and assessment understand the implications for independent assessment and agree to abide by these have a robust internal assessment system supported by fit for purpose assessment documentation have a system to internally verify assessment decisions to ensure standardised assessment decisions are made across all assessors and sites.

Such applications have to be supported by the head of the centre (principal, chief executive, etc). We communicate all approvals in writing to the head of centre in the form of a qualification approval letter. The approval letter will also contain a programme definition for each qualification approved. The programme definition clearly states to the centre all units that comprise the qualification for which the centre is approved.

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Monitoring centres internal quality systems


Centres will be expected to demonstrate ongoing fulfilment of approval criteria across all programme areas. This should include the consistent application of policies affecting learner registrations and appeals, together with the effectiveness of internal examination and standardisation processes. Centres may opt for a review of their provision under the quality verifier/quality reviewer arrangements, which already apply to all further education centres. Alternatively, centres may present evidence of their operation within a recognised code of practice, such as that of the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. Edexcel reserves the right to confirm independently that these arrangements are operating to our satisfaction.

Independent assessment: the role of the external examiner


Supporting consistency and appropriateness of centre assessor decisions For all BTEC Higher Nationals accredited at Level 4 on the NQF, Edexcel will appoint appropriately qualified subject-specific external examiners to the programme in each centre. Edexcel will define the selection, appointment and training process, together with the roles and responsibilities of the external examiners and will communicate the details to centres in a centre handbook. The function of the external examiner will be to review and evaluate objectively the assessment process and standards of learner attainment by independently reviewing, in the first year of the programme, a sample of learner work (including the centre-designed assignments on which the samples are based) selected by the external examiner, from across the programme. When they visit centres, external examiners must be afforded reasonable access to the assessed parts of the programme, including evidence of learner performance on placement. They are required to: verify that standards are appropriate for the award and its elements assist institutions in the comparison of academic standards across similar awards nationally.

Should any disparity occur between the judgement of centre assessors and that of the external examiner, this will be reported to the centre and to Edexcel by the external examiner. The centre will be required to agree appropriate corrective action as a result of this report. Independence in confirmation of certificated outcomes In the final year of the programme, the external examiner will revisit the centre in order to independently assess learner work and to evaluate centre assessor decisions on final outcomes. This process of evaluation may focus upon work in units, selected by the external examiner, that present the most appropriate evidence for this exercise. The work of all learners not already sampled in the first year of the programme will be reviewed. Resolution of assessments will normally be handled at the centres final programme review board. The external examiner will be expected to endorse the outcomes of assessment before certification can be authorised. Should the external examiner be unable to provide such endorsement, certification will be withheld until appropriate corrective action has taken place. (The senior subject examiner may become involved in such instances.) The external examiner will be required to prepare a written report after each visit. The report will include comments from the external examiner upon: academic standards and programme specification academic standards and learner performance academic standards and assessment

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the assessment process assessment meetings physical resources comments of learners meetings with staff external examiner practice issues arising from previous reports details of sampling general points, areas of good practice and major issues action points.

The external examiner report provides the mechanism by which the external examiner independently verifies learner ability, endorses the validity of the assessment process and releases certification for a cohort. The report is a confidential document between Edexcel, the appointed external examiner, and the centre to use for internal/external quality assurance processes. It provides the centre with feedback on the external examining process and on the judgements that determine the external examiners decisions on endorsement, or otherwise, of learner outcomes.

Programme design and delivery


The qualifications consist of core units (which are mandatory) and specialist units. These specialist units will be mostly optional and are designed to provide a specific focus to the qualification. Some combination of specialist units may be required if recognition is being sought from a professional body and these are set out in relation to each qualification in the defined structures provided in this specification see Annex B. In BTEC Higher National qualifications each unit consists of 60 guided learning hours (within these qualifications, there are four half-units of 30 hours which should normally be studied in pairs in order to provide a value of one whole unit). The definition of guided learning hours is a notional measure of the substance of a qualification. It includes an estimate of time that might be allocated to direct teaching, instruction and assessment, together with other structured learning time such as directed assignments or supported individual study. It excludes learnerinitiated private study. Centres are advised to consider this definition when planning the programme of study associated with this specification. Programmes should develop the learners knowledge, understanding, skills and awareness necessary to provide them with the potential to progress to technical, supervisory and managerial positions in construction and the built environment. Programmes should make provision for: sufficient time to achieve consistency of outcome standards both breadth and depth of coverage to meet the needs of industry in technical and personal skills the foundation for subsequent study and developing a commitment to lifelong learning and Career Professional Development (CPD).

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Mode of delivery
Edexcel does not define the mode of study for BTEC Higher National qualifications. Centres are free to offer the qualifications using any mode of delivery that meets the needs of their learners. This may be through traditional classroom teaching, open learning, distance learning or a combination of these. Whatever mode of delivery is used, centres must ensure that learners have appropriate access to the resources identified in the specifications and to the subject specialists delivering the units. This is particularly important for learners studying for the qualification through open or distance learning. Full guidance on Edexcels policies on distance assessment and electronic assessment are provided on our website. Learners studying for the qualification on a part-time basis bring with them a wealth of experience that should be utilised to maximum effect by tutors and assessors. Assessment instruments based on the learners work environment should be encouraged. Those planning the programme should aim to enhance the vocational nature of the BTEC Higher National qualification by: liaising with employers to ensure that the course is relevant to the specific needs of the learners accessing and using non-confidential data and documents from learners workplaces including sponsoring employers in the delivery of the programme and, where appropriate, in the assessment linking with company-based/workplace training programmes making full use of the variety of experience of work and life that learners bring to the programme linking the assessment evidence for level 4 NVQs with the evidence requirements and assessment of these qualifications.

Resources
BTEC Higher National qualifications are designed to prepare learners for employment in specific sectors. Physical resources need to support the delivery of the programme and the proper assessment of the outcomes and, therefore, should normally be of industry standard. Staff delivering programmes and conducting the assessments should be fully familiar with current practice and standards in the sector concerned. Centres will need to meet any specialist resource requirements when they seek approval from Edexcel. Specialist resources should generally include case study materials, real resources acquired from commercial operations, videos and documented examples of current practice, eg reports from the construction industry. Please refer to the resources section of each unit for detailed resource requirements.

Delivery approach
It is important that centres develop an approach to teaching and learning that supports the specialist vocational nature of the BTEC Higher National qualifications. The specifications contain a balance of practical skill development and knowledge requirements, some of which can be theoretical in nature. Tutors and assessors need to ensure that appropriate links are made between theory and practice and that the knowledge base is applied to the sector. This will require the development of relevant and up-to-date teaching materials that allow learners to apply their learning to actual events and activity within the sector. Maximum use should be made of the learners experience.

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Meeting local needs


Centres should note the qualifications set out in these specifications have been developed in consultation with centres, employers, CIOB, RICS, BIAT, together with support from the Sector Skills Councils for the construction and built environment sector. The units are designed to meet the skill needs of the sector and the specialist units allow coverage of the full range of employment. Centres should make maximum use of the choice available to them within the specialist units in these specifications to meet the needs of their learners, as well as the local skills and training needs identified by organisations such as Regional Development Agencies and Local Learning and Skills Councils. Centres may not always be able to meet local needs using the units in this specification. In this situation, centres may seek approval from Edexcel to make use of units from other standard NQF BTEC Higher National specifications. Centres will need to justify the need for importing units from other specifications and Edexcel will ensure that the vocational focus of the qualification is not diluted.

Locally-devised specialist units


There may be exceptional circumstances where even the flexibility of importing units from other specifications does not meet a particular local need. In this case, centres can seek permission from Edexcel to develop a unit with us to meet this need. The cases where this will be allowable will be very limited. Edexcel will ensure that the integrity of the qualification is not reduced and that there is a minimum of overlap and duplication of content of existing units. Centres will need strong evidence of the local need and the reasons why the existing standard units are inappropriate. Edexcel will need to validate these units.

Limitations on variations from standard specifications


The flexibility to import standard units from other BTEC Higher National specifications and/or develop unique locally devised specialist units is limited to a maximum of four units in a BTEC Higher National Diploma qualification and a maximum of two units only in any BTEC Higher National Certificate qualification. The use of these units cannot be at the expense of the core units in any qualification. In making such proposals, centres should also be cognisant of those units and programme structures recommended/required to satisfy the professional institutions and progression requirements. Learners must be advised of the value of any revised programmes and the progression opportunities they provide.

Access and recruitment


Edexcels policy regarding access to its qualifications is that: the qualifications should be available to everyone who is capable of reaching the required standards the qualifications should be free from any barriers that restrict access and progression there should be equal opportunities for all wishing to access the qualifications.

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Centres are required to recruit learners to BTEC qualifications with integrity. This will include ensuring that applicants have appropriate information and advice about the qualifications and that the qualification will meet their needs. Centres should take appropriate steps to assess each applicants potential and make a professional judgement about their ability to successfully complete the programme of study and achieve the qualification. This assessment will need to take account of the support available to the learner within the centre during their programme of study and any specific support that might be necessary to allow the learner to access the assessment for the qualification. Centres should also show regard for Edexcels policy on learners with particular requirements. Centres will need to review the profile of qualifications and/or experience held by applicants, considering whether this profile shows an ability to progress to a Level 4 qualification. For learners who have recently been in education, the entry profile is likely to include one of the following: a BTEC National Certificate or Diploma qualification in Construction or a related vocational area a BTEC National Award in Construction (used as a bridging programme for mature entrants) an AVCE/Advanced GNVQ in Construction and the Built Environment or a related vocational area a GCE Advanced level profile which demonstrates strong performance in a relevant subject or an adequate performance in more than one GCE subject. This profile is likely to be supported by GCSE grades at A * to C related work experience other related level 3 qualifications.

Mature learners may present a more varied profile of achievement that is likely to include extensive work experience (paid and/or unpaid) and/or achievement of a range of professional qualifications in their work sector. In these circumstances, a programme of balancing studies may be needed to bring learner to the required standard for entry to a BTEC Higher National programme.

Balancing studies
In preparation for any BTEC Higher National Construction programme, and particularly for a BTEC Higher National Diploma, learners with a variety of background experience and qualifications, such as a craft background, may need to be given support and access to learning. Centres could use balancing studies, covering any necessary level 3 outcomes that would normally have been covered in a GCE A level programme, an Advanced VCE in Construction and the Built Environment or in a BTEC National in Construction programme, for example Mathematics, Science and Materials, Technology, etc. The BTEC National Award may provide the basis for these studies and may be supplemented by other appropriate specialist units from the BTEC Nationals.

Restrictions on learner entry


The majority of BTEC Higher National qualifications are accredited on the NQF for learners aged 16 years and over. Learners aged 15 and under cannot be registered for a BTEC Higher National qualification.

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Learners with particular requirements


Edexcel recognises that some learners, when studying vocationally-related qualifications, will have coped with the learning demands of a course but may find the standard arrangements for the assessment of their attainment presents an unfair barrier. This would apply to learners with known and long-standing learning problems and to learners who are affected at, or near to, the time of a time-constrained assessment. Edexcel will seek to approve alternative arrangements that: meet the needs of learners with particular requirements do not confer advantage over other learners are commensurate with the proper outcomes from the qualification.

Details of the allowable arrangements for such learners are given in Assessment of Vocationally Related Qualification: Regulations and Guidance relating to Learners with Special Requirements (Edexcel, 2002).

The wider curriculum


The study of the BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction provides opportunities for learners to develop an understanding of spiritual, moral, ethical, social and cultural issues and an awareness of environmental issues, health and safety considerations, and European developments. These wider curriculum opportunities are integrated within the units as appropriate. Mapping of wider curriculum opportunities issues is provided in Annex G.

Useful publications
Further copies of this document and related publications can be obtained from: Edexcel Publications Adamsway Mansfield Nottinghamshire NG18 4FN Tel: 01623 467 467 Fax: 01623 450 481 Email: publications@linneydirect.com Related publications include: the current Edexcel publications catalogue and update catalogue Edexcel publications concerning the quality assurance system and the internal and external verification of vocationally-related programmes may be found on the Edexcel website and in the Edexcel publications catalogue.

NB: Most of our publications are priced. There is also a charge for postage and packing. Please check the cost when you order.

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Professional body contact details


British Institute of Architectural Technologists (BIAT) 397 City Road London EC1V 1NH Telephone: 020 7278 2206 Email: info@biat.org.uk Website: www.biat.org.uk The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) Englemere Kings Ride Ascot Berkshire SL5 7TB Telephone: 01344 630713 Fax: 01344 630777 Email: reception@ciob.org.uk Website: www.ciob.org.uk Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) Surveyor Court Westwood Way Coventry CV4 8JE Telephone: 0870 3331600 Email: contactrics@rics.org.uk Website: www.rics.org.uk

How to obtain CISC Occupational Standards and NVQ Standards


Construction Industry Council (CIC) 26 Store Street London WC1E 7BT Telephone: 020 76378692 Email: cic@cic.org.uk Website: www.cic.org.uk NVQ Standards for Construction may be obtained from: Edexcel Publications Adamsway Mansfield Nottinghamshire NG18 4FN Telephone: 01623 467467 Fax: 01623 450481 Website: www.edexcel.org.uk Please note that some NVQs are not awarded by Edexcel.

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Professional development and training


Edexcel supports UK and International customers with training related to BTEC qualifications. This support is available through a choice of training options offered in our published training directory or through customised training at your centre. The support we offer focuses on a range of issues including: planning for the delivery of a new programme planning for assessment and grading developing effective assignments building your team and teamwork skills developing learner-centred learning and teaching approaches building key skills into your programme building in effective and efficient quality assurance systems.

The national programme of training we offer can be viewed on the Edexcel website (www.edexcel.org.uk). You can request customised training through the website or by contacting one of our advisers in the Professional Development and Training team on telephone number 020 7758 5620 to discuss your training needs. The training we provide: is active ideas are developed and applied is designed to be supportive and thought provoking builds on best practice.

Our training will also underpin many areas of the HESDA/FENTO standards for tutors and lecturers working towards them.

Further information
For further information please call Customer Services on 0870 240 9800, or visit our website at www.edexcel.org.uk.

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Unit 1:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Design Principles and Application


60 BTEC Higher National H1

Description of unit
This unit provides the learner with a fundamental understanding of the design process and of how the planning and design phases are co-ordinated and managed. This unit forms the design base for the study programme. The unit has been devised to enable learners studying Construction, Civil Engineering or Building Services Engineering programmes to demonstrate both knowledge and understanding of design considerations and the design process. It is intended that this unit will help learners develop the ability to apply, analyse and evaluate design in terms of the production and cost implications for construction projects. The content can be contextualised in terms of the discipline being followed so as to relate to a particular building, civil engineering or building services project.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 Differentiate between the planning, design and production phases of the construction process and describe the co-ordination and management of each phase Analyse the various factors that affect the selection of materials, systems and equipment and evaluate the environmental impact of energy and other constraints on the planning, design and construction processes Describe the roles, responsibilities and obligations (including liability for health, safety and welfare) of all parties to a construction project Describe how technology affects the design of a construction project and also the design processes and procedures used in the production phase.

3 4

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Content

Planning, design and production phases Planning and design of a project: the clients brief, aesthetics of the project and the process, influence of shape, size and proportion, position, location and structural considerations of a building, an engineering project or a plant system, content of the project Land issues: effects of green/brown and reclaimed land on a project Health, safety and welfare: issues in design, maintenance and demolition, Construction, Design and Management (CDM) Regulations Financial considerations: financial implications and sources of funding, financial planning including the cost of building, the cost of commissioning, costs in use, life cycle costing, cost modelling and facilities management Planning and control considerations: legal restraints, town and country planning, building regulations and European legislation Design considerations: designing for planned use, designing for inclusivity, for change of use, for versatility, designing for disability, relevant legislation

Selection of materials, systems and equipment, and environmental impact Environmental planning: the selection of materials and the form(s) of construction, use of new and renewable resources, use of recycled materials where appropriate Energy efficiencies: production of materials, processing of materials and services within the building or project Services required: into and out of the building or project, disposal of waste materials from the construction process, disposal of waste materials from the use of the building or project, availability of services to a building or project, services used by a building or project

Roles, responsibilities and obligations Construction team: their roles and responsibilities at various stages for planning and development, design, surveying, construction, maintenance and facilities management. An understanding of the roles of and activities undertaken by each party to the process Obligations and responsibilities: of each party to the process, liabilities of each party to the process (including both corporate and personal responsibility for health, safety and welfare)

How technology affects design Affect on design of technological advances in construction: level of technology available at the time of design, how this affects the design and construction processes, development of new materials, more advanced methods, more powerful construction plant, new systems and services, Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Differentiate between the planning, design and production phases of the construction process and describe the co-ordination and management of each phase

identify the planning processes for each type of project compare and contrast the design process for building, civil engineering and/or building services projects describe the main stages of the production phase of the construction process compare the co-ordination and management of each phase of the design and construction process interpret the clients brief and the other factors that may effect the selection of materials, systems and equipment; analyse how these factors may effect the aesthetics of a project assess the need for services required for or by a project and how these may be integrated into the overall design compare the financial implications of a project in terms of sourcing, funding, planning and maintenance costs evaluate the need for environmental efficiencies and in planning the selection, use and recycling of materials identify the environmentally safe methods for the disposal of waste materials assess the design factors that influence energy saving measures describe the roles of all the parties involved in the design and planning processes identify the responsibilities of all the parties involved in the design and planning processes assess the particular responsibilities and liabilities of all parties concerned in terms of health, safety and welfare issues and CDM Regulations analyse important technological advances in construction and evaluate the effect of developing software applications and new ways of building produce sketch plans and detailed drawings using both manual and CAD packages

Analyse the various factors that affect the selection of materials, systems and equipment and evaluate the environmental impact of energy and other constraints on the planning, design and construction processes

3 Describe the roles, responsibilities and obligations (including liability for health, safety and welfare) of all parties to a construction project

Describe how technology affects the design of a construction project and also the design processes and procedures used in the production phase

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Guidance

Delivery Since it is important that learners have a sound understanding of the principles that underpin the planning and co-ordination of design of a construction project, this unit should be studied early in the first year of a two-year programme in parallel with related technology. Case studies should be used in order to develop a working knowledge of the design and planning processes used in the construction industry. The unit might usefully involve practitioners to deal with some aspects of the curriculum. Where appropriate, role-play should be encouraged to develop a better understanding of the application and the difficulties that are encountered in the design and the planning of a construction project. Learners may be encouraged to provide oral presentations from their own studies or experiences. During a role-play, learners should normally work in groups to present scenarios for discussion. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units, particularly technology units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching and assessment programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links This unit provides the learner with the basic knowledge and understanding of the design and planning processes of a construction project. Attention should be paid in the delivery of this unit to the syllabus content of the other units in the programme, particularly those related to the technology units of the main discipline covered by the programme. This unit links with Unit 5: Group Project, Unit 7: Technology A, Unit 8: Technology B, Unit 15: Individual Student Project, Unit 26: Design Procedures and Unit 27: Design Technology.

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The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Conservation Control Construction Contracting Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Quantity Surveying Spatial Data Management Town Planning Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to a wide range of library resources, including textbooks and journals, government and industry wide publications, BRE Digests, professional journals, the internet and other research materials. Support materials Textbooks Ashworth, A Pre-Contract Studies: Development Economics, Estimating and Tendering (Longman, 1996) Everett, A Materials 5th Edition (Longman, 1994) McMullan, R Environmental Science in Building 5th Edition (Palgrave, 2001) BRE Digests Guidance notes on Town and Country Planning Act, Health and Safety at Work Act, CDM Regulations, and other relevant legislation Papers from ABE, ASHRAE, BRE, CIBSE, CIOB, ICE, RICS, RICS BCIS, VALUER, etc Papers from BIAT, RIBA and RTPI Papers from Cement and Concrete Association Papers from TRADA

Other publications

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Unit 2:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Science and Materials


60 BTEC Higher National H1

Description of unit
This unit provides the learner with an introduction to the scientific principles and a basic knowledge of the properties of materials needed to successfully complete the other core and specialist units. The unit has been designed to enable learners studying Construction, Civil Engineering or Building Services Engineering programmes to analyse, apply, investigate and evaluate scientific principles and the properties and behaviour of materials in construction related situations. It is intended that the unit be contextualised for construction, civil engineering or building services engineering and that the delivery and assessment be tailored to the particular vocational needs of the individual learner.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Investigate and apply scientific principles to construction, structural, environmental and services operations and determine comfort levels in the design and use of buildings Investigate and evaluate the characteristics, properties and use of materials Analyse the effects of structural behaviour on construction components Use experimentation to model scientific problems and analyse results.

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Content

Apply scientific principles and determine comfort levels Principles and factors affecting comfort levels: thermal properties of materials, heat losses and heat gains, heating and ventilating, illumination (natural and artificial, sound transmission, refrigeration and air conditioning, fluid flow (hydrostatics and fluid dynamics) Provision of services: water supply and distribution, gas supply and distribution, electrical supply and distribution, chemicals, fluids and oil distribution, safe and effective disposal of waste products, environmental issues relating to all of the above

Characteristics, properties and use of materials Properties, design criteria, specifications and uses: concrete, metals and alloys including, amongst others, iron, steel, zinc, copper, brass, aluminium and lead, timber and timber products, clay products such as bricks and tiles, plastics and other man-made materials, coatings and finishes including paints, insulation materials, vapour barriers and dampproofing barriers Specification of materials: need for maintenance and eventual replacement, energy efficiency, environmental issues, renewable resources and sustainable construction

Structural behaviour on construction components Structural behaviour of materials: structural behaviour depending on use, loading and the inherent properties of the material. Good working knowledge of how materials are used in terms of behaviour when formed in beams, columns, structural frames, pads and machine bases, floors, timber, steel and concrete, bridging brackets, supports to equipment, tanking and pressure vessels, machinery bases

Model scientific problems Experiments: associated with scientific principles and services Calculations: associated with these experiments and conclusions about the results

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Investigate and apply scientific principles to construction, structural, environmental and services operations and determine comfort levels in the design and use of buildings

relate scientific principles to the specification of construction components and services installations having regard to factors affecting comfort levels describe the control of components and services installations in a variety of environments through the selection of materials and construction techniques explain the effects that the provision of services and the safe disposal of waste products have on the structural design of a building calculate and determine levels of thermal transmission, heat loss, lighting and illumination, sound transmission, heating and ventilation, refrigeration and air-conditioning describe the properties of materials justifying the reason for their selection and describing their effect on the design of buildings and installations apply standard methods to predict the structural behaviour of materials explain how the basic principles of structural mechanics and fluid mechanics affect the design of structural members and services installations perform a range of experiments associated with the scientific principles and services covered in this unit record the results of the experiments perform any necessary calculations associated with the experiments analyse the results of the experiments justify conclusions from the experiments performed

Investigate and evaluate the characteristics, properties and use of materials Analyse the effects of structural behaviour on construction components

Use experimentation to model scientific problems and analyse results

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Guidance

Delivery Since it is important that learners have a good understanding of the principles of construction and the industry, it is recommended that this unit should be studied with these subjects in the first year. Case studies should be used extensively with a current working knowledge and practice of the construction industry. The unit might usefully benefit from the involvement of practitioners to enhance the learning process. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, practical laboratory work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work or experiments may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links This unit provides the learner with an introduction to the knowledge and understanding needed to complete other units in the programme, no matter which discipline learners are following. Learners should be encouraged to use their wider knowledge and experience gained from other units and/or from practice. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQ: Building Control. See Annex D for summary of mapping information.

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Resources Learners should have access to a wide range of library resources, including textbooks and journals, government and industry wide publications. It is important that learners have access to a variety of materials and to adequate laboratory facilities and that they use these where appropriate. Support materials Textbooks Everett, A Materials 5th Edition (Longman, 1994) McMullan, R Environmental Science in Building 5th Edition (Palgrave, 2001) RIBA Plan of Work for Design Team Operation (RIBA, 1973) ASHRAE Guide BRE Digests British Refrigeration Association papers Cement and Concrete Association papers Copper Development Association papers Lead Development Association papers Technical journals, professional journals and trade literature should be used where appropriate TRADA papers

Other publications

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Unit 3:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Analytical Methods
60 BTEC Higher National H1

Description of unit
This unit provides the learner with the fundamental mathematical knowledge and analytical techniques needed to successfully complete the core and specialist optional units in this qualification. This unit has been designed to enable learners to use fundamental mathematical processes in the solution of Construction, Civil Engineering or Building Services Engineering problems. It is also intended as a base for further study of analytical methods and engineering mathematics needed for those engaged in the Civil Engineering and Building Services Engineering disciplines.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Apply analytical methods to the management and production of construction, civil engineering or building services installation processes and operations Apply analytical methods to surveying, testing and control problems in the construction, civil engineering or building services engineering process Analyse and solve problems using statistics and probability Apply analytical methods to analyse structural, building or building services engineering systems and provide appropriate solutions.

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Content

The content comprises all the mathematics needed to achieve the outcomes. The various topic areas should be addressed as and when they are needed to analyse problems in the discipline the learner is following. There is therefore no requirement for the content to be covered in its entirety and the content can be taken as a guide. For example, it is not necessary for construction learners to use calculus to satisfy assessment requirements but those studying civil engineering and building services engineering units should do so to ensure they meet the wider needs of their programme. 1 Analytical methods to the management and production Algebra: linear, simultaneous and quadratic equations, laws of indices and logarithms, common and Naperian logarithms, indicial equations, direct and inverse proportion, inequalities, functional notation and manipulation of algebraic problems Graphical representation: functions, points of intersection between two graphs, graph sketching (straight line, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic), fit lines to experimental data using least squares method Space, time and motion: plot space/time and velocity/time diagrams, determine displacement, velocity and acceleration. Laws of motion, momentum, impulse and projectiles Matrices: multiplication, transposition and inversion, applications 2 Analytical methods to surveying, testing and control problems Trigonometry: basic trigonometric ratios and their inverses, trigonometric ratios for the four quadrants, solution of triangles, calculation of areas and volumes of solids Determine co-ordinates: in 2-D and 3-D geometry Other functions: trapezoidal and Simpsons rule 3 Statistics and probability Tabular and graphical form: data collection methods, histograms, bar charts, line diagrams, cumulative frequency diagrams, scatter plots Central tendency and dispersion: introduction to the concept of central tendency and variance measurement, mean, median, mode, standard deviation, variance and interquartile range, application to construction, civil engineering, and building services engineering Probability: interpretation of probability, probabilistic models, empirical variability, events and sets, mutually exclusive events, independent events

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Analytical methods to analyse structural, building, or building services engineering systems Trigonometric methods: to solve problems such as static forces, relative motion, frameworks, metrology, friction torque, electrical and mechanical energy problems Calculus: to differentiate and integrate simple equations and demonstrate applications of calculus (refer to Delivery guidance on delivering calculus to construction disciplines)

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Apply analytical methods to the management and production of construction, civil engineering or building services installation processes and operations

determine manpower, materials and equipment requirements on a day to day basis, and/or produce appropriate long term plans and cost analyses to meet particular situations, and/or compare and contrast the effectiveness and efficiency of solutions to construction situations in terms of use of manpower, equipment, and materials apply mathematical and trigonometrical functions to surveying problems and evaluate results, and/or represent construction/engineering data in tabular and graphical form and analyse the results, and/or use sinusoidal functions and radian measures to solve construction/engineering problems, and/or use trigonometric and hyperbolic identities to solve trigonometric equations and to simplify complex trigonometric expressions apply statistical techniques to issues of quality and safety, and/or apply probability techniques to issues of reliability and quality in the construction/engineering process use trigonometric functions to solve problems such as static forces, relative motion, frameworks, metrology, friction torque, electrical and mechanical energy problems, and/or use the principals of calculus to solve problems appropriate to construction, civil engineering and building services engineering

Apply analytical methods to surveying, testing and control problems in the construction, civil engineering or building services engineering process

Analyse and model construction situations using statistics and probability

Apply analytical methods to analyse structural, building, or building services engineering systems and supply appropriate design solutions

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Guidance

Delivery This unit may be delivered as a stand-alone unit, or partially integrated into other appropriate units. Centres should contextualise the analytical methods in the content and design a teaching process applicable to their programme. For those parts that are to be delivered in a completely integrated way, care must be taken to provide tracking of evidence of outcomes. The aim of this unit is to provide the minimum mathematical knowledge, skills and understanding to successfully complete a BTEC Higher National programme of study. Some disciplines require further study of mathematics to underpin particular areas of civil engineering and building services engineering and this unit provides the learning that supports this progression. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work and/or assignments designed to apply the analytical methods to the modelling and solution of realistic problems. Assessment may be either formative or summative and either may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace may also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and can be authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links This unit is intended to underpin and link with those units, which are analytical in nature. Entry requirements are at the discretion of the centre. However, it is strongly advised that where learners cannot provide evidence of previous mathematical study sufficient to successfully follow this unit, additional balancing studies should be incorporated in the learners individual learning plan.

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The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Spatial Data Management.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources The use of mathematical software packages is strongly recommended, wherever appropriate, to help learners understand and model scientific and engineering problems. Support materials Textbooks Greer, A and Taylor, Mathematics for Technicians (Stanley Thomas, 1994) Stroud, K Engineering Mathematics 4th Edition (Macmillan, 1995)

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Unit 4:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Management Principles and Application


60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit provides the learner with an introduction to the principles and application of management as they relate to the technical and professional disciplines of Construction, Civil Engineering or Building Services Engineering. It is also founded on the principles of the Latham report, which advocates non-adversarial multi-discipline team working. It enables a flexible approach to the delivery of the content that can take account of the prior knowledge of the learners at entry and their choice of discipline and choice of units being studied. Learners will gain an understanding of management principles and their relevance to the processes of design, construction and maintenance of the built environment. They will also learn how these principles may be applied to the management of construction, civil engineering or building services engineering installation activity through the application of recognised management techniques.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 Develop an understanding of the principles of management, the work of pioneers and founders of management, their evolution and application to modern day practice Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the Industrys markets and activities, the roles of the professions/disciplines in project teams and the management principles appropriate to organisations within the industry Demonstrate an understanding of the application of management techniques to organisation, work planning, co-ordination, control of resources, cost control, quality, communications and client/customer liaison involved in the design and construction processes Determine methods of procurement and contracting and their implications for risk, performance, best practice, sustainability and the environment.

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Content

Principles of management, the work of pioneers and founders of management Management: established definitions of management, an understanding of the principles and processes of management, namely: forecasting, planning, organising, motivating, controlling, co-ordinating and communicating Management of human resources: individual and group motivational needs, leadership, concepts of team behaviour

Markets and activities, roles of the professions/disciplines and management principles, management principles Overview of the markets: activities and services provided by Construction, Civil Engineering and Building Services Engineering and the role of the professions that form the project team(s) Principles of organisation structure: direct line, lateral, functional and staff relationships, chain of command, span of control. Concepts of responsibility, duty, authority, accountability and delegation Corporate organisation: mission, strategy, corporate planning, policy and objective. Centralised versus decentralised organisation(s). Project based organisation. Job design, team structures and team working Influence of scale and size of contract(s): project/contract procurement and contractual method and the role of the organisation, ie designer, main contractor, sub-contractor, supplier, etc on the way an organisation is organised and managed

Application of management techniques Organisation: structure, charts, project organisation, layout and accommodation, method statements and plan of work, links with CDM Safety Plan and risk assessments Planning: co-ordination, monitoring and control using Gantt charts, critical path arrow or precedence diagrams, line of balance (manual and computer based) and other methods Budget/cost control: related to estimated cost, planned performance cost, actual cost, and cash flow Procurement, scheduling and control: of materials, and plant, supply-chain management, JIT, waste management, recycling and safe disposal of demolished or waste materials. Scheduling, resourcing/utilisation of sub-contract and direct labour Control of quality: audit and inspection, statutory liaison Management of: liabilities, risks, security and insurance requirements Other significant aspects that require managing: such as; recruitment, training and assessment of competence of workforce, equal opportunities, information verification and control, site meetings communications and reporting, client liaison, public liaison, Respect for People initiative

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Methods of procurement and contracting Types of procurement methods: management and operational structures used by clients and to achieve project objectives. Traditional methods of tendering, Partnering and PFI type contracts Law and contract: what constitutes a contract, forms of a contract, stages of a contract Obligations and rights of parties: meeting contractual obligations of performance, in particular: time, cost and quality Risk: insurance and warranty arrangements Construction team: concepts of multi-discipline non-adversarial working identified in the Latham report, integrated teams Best practice: Benchmarking, Performance Indicators (PIs) Sustainability and environmental management: issues both statutory and ethical to a project/organisation.

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Develop an understanding of the principles of management, the work of pioneers and founders of management, their evolution and application to modern day practice

define and attribute three established definitions of management explain the principles and processes of management: forecasting, planning, organising, motivating, controlling, co-ordinating and communicating explain the motivational needs of individuals and groups, leadership styles and concepts of team working describe in outline the main markets, activities and services provided by the construction and built environment sector describe the roles of the different professions/disciplines within the design, construction and installation team and the main cycle of work activity produce an organisation structure that incorporates examples and explanations of direct line, lateral, functional and staff relationships and also explain with examples, span of control, chain of command centralised versus decentralised, and job design compare project based organisational structures define and explain the purpose of a mission statement, strategy, corporate planning, policy and objectives to the activities of a practice or firm evaluate the influence of the scale and size of contract, type of client, project/contract procurement method, and function of the organisation, ie main contractor/sub-contractor, designer, supplier, etc on the way business is organised and managed

2 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the Industrys markets and activities, the roles of the professions/disciplines in project teams and the management principles appropriate to organisations within the industry

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Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

3 Demonstrate an understanding of the application of management techniques to organisation, work planning, co-ordination, control of resources, cost control, quality, communications and client/customer liaison involved in the design and construction processes

describe how the techniques used to organise the layout, resourcing and accommodation contribute to the management of a project describe, with examples, how methods of work planning, monitoring and progress control using Gantt charts, CPA and precedence networks, and LOB techniques control purposes determine the difference between estimated cost and actual cost, and explain the application of cost planning, cost control, cash flow and monitoring of construction and installation work describe with examples the methods employed to plan, schedule and manage the supply and utilisation of resources, viz materials, plant and labour/subcontractors determine how quality standards and statutory compliance are achieved describe other aspects of communication and liaison activity that need to be organised and managed in a project describe the main types of procurement methods and management structures used by clients and developers and evaluate different methods of tendering define what constitutes a contract and briefly explain the rights and obligations of the main parties in relation to performance, (time, cost and quality) and stages of contract evaluate what is meant by multi-discipline nonadversarial working in project teams, Latham Report evaluate the concept of sharing Best Practice and Benchmarking the performance of a practice/firms activities evaluate how Sustainable Construction and Environmental Management/Conservation issues impact on the organisation and operation of a project/organisation

4 Determine methods of procurement and contracting and their implications for risk, performance, best practice, sustainability and the environment

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Guidance

Delivery As a core unit, the depth of treatment required will depend on the background of the learners entering the programme and the choice of units within it. Time given to this unit may need to be increased for learners that have little or no prior knowledge of these subjects or where they will have only limited opportunity to develop and apply their skills in specialised units later in their programme. It may even be appropriate for this unit to be delivered over the two years of the programme in order to allow for co-teaching in parallel with other units and to combine assessment requirements with project units or other specialised units. Learners should be encouraged to read an appropriate range of textbooks and library/internet source material relating to the content of this unit and the Industrys activity. Case study material should also be available to deliver and reinforce management concepts both for formative and summative learning/assessment through group and individual work. The content allows for a range of management pioneers and thinkers to be studied to develop an understanding of the principles of management covered in this unit. Learners should be encouraged to gain sufficient knowledge and understanding of recognised management principles and thinking to meet the assessment criteria and support the application of techniques in this unit, and other related units in their programme. This list of management pioneers and thinkers is not exhaustive but serves to cover the more commonly recognised ones: Fayol, Taylor, Gantt, Gilbreth, Weber, Follett, Argyris, Mayo, Mcgregor, Maslow, Herzberg, Drucker, Likert, Blake and Mouton, Adair, Peters, Handy, Kanter, Belbin, Hammer, Denning, Juran, Recans, McClelland. If learners are also undertaking related specialist units, their reading, study and assessment activities can be integrated to increase the relevance and effectiveness of the learning process. The Group Project can also provide a focus towards the end of the programme for the application of the management techniques informed by input from design, technology and other specialist units. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process including analysis of application. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme.

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Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links Management principles and application of management techniques will underpin and is closely linked with specialised units such as Unit 18: Project Management that provide more depth of treatment and an opportunity for learners to actually apply techniques rather than simply learn about their application. Both Unit 5: Group Project and Unit 15: Individual Student Project will provide opportunities for learners to develop and apply management principles and techniques to a project in a formative and summative context. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Construction Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Site Management Conservation Control Construction Plant and Equipment Management Quantity Surveying Spatial Data Management Town Planning Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Access to appropriate ICT, library and internet resources, case study material and where possible examples of actual organisations in various sectors of the Industrys operations using different types of contract/procurement arrangements.

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Support materials Textbooks Ashworth, A Pre-Contract Studies: Development Economics, Estimating and Tendering (Longman, 1996) Cooke, B and Williams, P Construction Planning, Programming and Control (Macmillan, 1997) Fryer, B The Practice of Construction Management (Blackwell, 1997) Harvey, R and Ashworth, A The Construction Industry of Great Britain (Oxford, 1997) Oxley, R and Poskitt, J Management Techniques Applied to the Construction Industry (Blackwell Science, 1996) Egan, J Rethinking Construction-A Consultation paper by the Strategic Forum for Construction (DETR, 2002) Egan, J Rethinking Construction (DETR, 1998) Joint Contracts Tribunal Joint Contracts Tribunal Forms of Contract Latham, M Constructing the Team (The Stationary Office Books, 1994)

Other publications

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Unit 5:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Group Project
60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit develops the learners ability to evaluate and resolve realistic practical problems and work as part of a team. The unit aims to apply the skills and knowledge developed in other units of the course (and where possible experiences from work) within a major piece of work that reflects the type of performance expected of construction technologists. It is designed to bring small groups of learners together into teams so that they can co-ordinate their individual skills and abilities. The scheme of work should allow the individual learner an opportunity to take responsibility for his/her own contribution to the outcome and to demonstrate his/her ability to work as part of a team. The brief will include an agreed timescale for the staged development of the overall plan of work within given defined constraints, with the team working towards an acceptable and viable solution to the agreed brief.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Select and agree the extent of the study and agree specifications and procedures and initiate feasibility studies Implement the scheme of work within the agreed procedures, to specification and to time scale Evaluate intermediate and final outcomes and the teams performance in working to the final solution Present a project evaluation.

Note: These outcomes will be achieved whilst working as a member of a team.

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Content

Extent of the study, specifications and procedures Specification: establish a list of technical and non-technical specifications to be met and allocate priorities and roles within the team. Identify external constraints to be imposed on the teams activities in terms of an appropriate design to meet client specification, materials and components, environmental constraints, operational constraints, cost and time constraints, legislation. British Standards and Codes of Practice, quality control, health and safety Feasibility: formulate an initial solution, appraise its feasibility in terms of the constraints identified above, carry out an environmental impact analysis if this is applicable and a critical analysis of the outline specifications. Agree the roles and responsibilities within the team. Initiate a record log book and agree how the assessment criteria will be met at the various stages of development by both the team and individuals

Implement the scheme of work Initial stage: finalise an agreed approach to the project solution within the agreed specifications and provide evidence on how decisions were reached within that process. This could include drawings, statistical evidence, feasibility of design, estimated costs, timescale and quality Developmental stage: work towards the agreed final solution within the identified constraints to meet pre-established limits. Produce documentary evidence of this development. This could include recorded measurements, statistical data, drawings, graphical displays, records of meetings, ongoing cost control techniques and feasibility analysis Record: maintain log book entries and minute team meetings

Evaluate outcomes Procedures: a method of measuring the feasibility of the solution at each stage of its development is to be agreed against the specifications and records produced to identify this process. Overall documentation of the development work needs to be maintained as well as the presentation of the final solution

Present a project evaluation Records and documentation: the records of developmental work as well as the final documentation will be used for overall evaluation and assessment Final presentation: to include written reports, minutes of meetings, individual log books, drawings, technical reports, use of computer techniques Oral presentation: the team should expect to give an oral presentation of their work and should develop the final documentation to meet this requirement

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Select and agree the extent of the study and agree specifications and procedures and initiate feasibility studies

record and establish specifications and other constraints determine possible solutions for given construction/ engineering schemes of work and carry out feasibility studies identify the factors that contribute to the process of the selection of the agreed solution select and implement the chosen option to meet the agreed specification record and collate relevant data produce a final solution to the agreed scheme working to specification and within agreed constraints maintain documentary evidence of the development determine the procedures to be adopted in order to meet the required specification describe and use appropriate evaluation techniques justify the solution in terms of the original specifications present the solution of the project in a suitable format, using a appropriate media produce records of project development in the form of log books, reports, minutes, calculations, initial drawings and designs

2 Implement the scheme of work within the agreed procedures, to specification and to time scale

3 Evaluate intermediate and final outcomes and the teams performance in working to the final solution 4 Present a project evaluation

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Guidance

Delivery It is recommended that this unit is delivered in the second year of the programme. Tutors should ensure that the roles and responsibilities of the individuals within the group are understood and agreed by the participants. It is intended that this unit should reflect work/commercial practices and that the learners should undertake schemes of work that use their experiences and individual knowledge base. The tutors should ensure that while the activity has a proper practical application it should also be achievable within the unit time scale. Once the initial brief has been clarified the tutors role is of a consulting rather than a directing nature. CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills will feature strongly throughout the development, implementation and presentation stages and the learners must be aware how and where these will be assessed. There should be a feedback or plenary session after the final presentation so the learners can benefit from critical comment. The involvement of practising professionals in this process would be of benefit. Centres should try to involve industry organisations/projects to provide relevance and additional learner support when required. Assessment Tutors should ensure that the assessment programme is understood by the team and that assessment techniques are in place to measure the individual learners contribution as well as team activities. Tutors should also ensure that the scope of work enables the individual contribution of each learner in the team to generate sufficient evidence to meet the learning outcomes and assessment criteria for this unit. Evidence of outcomes should be available for scrutiny at each stage of development and may be in a variety of forms eg written, graphical, computer based, log books, minutes of meetings and trade literature. There should be a final presentation of each teams solution during which all members of the team participate. It is recommended that fellow learners, tutors and outside professionals attend this presentation and contribute to any further discussions. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for the Project should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated with in the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the project work. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F.

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Links This unit may be linked with core Unit 1: Design Principles and Application. The unit is intended to integrate knowledge and skills, which are developed in many of the other units across the programme. CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills will feature strongly throughout the development, implementation and presentation stages of the unit, and learners should be made aware of the significance of knowledge and experience gained from earlier work. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Site Management Conservation Control Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Quantity Surveying Spatial Data Management.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to a library and IT resources and a wide variety of physical resources provided either by the college or the learners work place. Support materials Textbooks Bland, J Statistics for Construction Learners (Construction Press, 1985) Fink, A and Kosecoff, J How to Conduct Surveys (Sage, 1998) Howard, K and Sharp, J et al The Management of a Learner Research Project 3rd Edition (Gower Aldershot, 2002) Norton, P and Allinson, L Asking Research Questions (University of Humberside, 1994) Engineering Council Project Guidelines

Other publications

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Unit 6:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Health, Safety and Welfare


60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit covers the knowledge and skills needed to identify hazards in the workplace, assess the level of risk, make recommendations to control the risk and review the results. This must be considered along with relevant safety legislation. This unit is applicable to all learners studying the BTEC Higher National programmes, although the forms of risk assessment and their technical bases will be different for each programme. The unit will contribute to health and safety plans within project work and help learners to formulate safety policy and the arrangements and carry out risk assessment in the workplace.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 5 Define the main health, safety and welfare legislation in the construction sector and the implications of non compliance Explain the main requirements of an effective health and safety policy along with the organisational arrangements necessary for its implementation Demonstrate an understanding of hazard and risk identification in design and construction Undertake risk assessment and formulate control measures to prevent ill health and injury Review, revise and monitor assessments as required.

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Content

Main health, safety and welfare legislation Health and Safety at Work Act 1974: legislation as it applies to construction work, including the Construction Design and Management (CDM) Regulations, status and role of Codes of Practice and guidance notes, legal duties for health, safety and welfare in the workplace, responsibility for risk and other assessment as required by the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations, penalties and implications of non compliance with legislation

Policy and organisational arrangements Health and safety policy: the associated organisation arrangements required to implement policy, setting objectives to ensure a healthy and safe workplace, development of procedures which meet legal requirements, identification of individuals to whom accidents and safety risks must be reported, measures used to check effectiveness of health and safety procedures, identification of training needs to meet health and safety objectives, induction training and CSCS arrangements; statutory requirements for inspection of plant and equipment, recording of health and safety data to meet legal requirements, methods of communicating procedures to all in the workplace

Hazard and risk identification Hazards and risks: methods of hazard identification including direct observation, examining records or conducting interviews, selection of a method to identify hazards which is appropriate to the workplace, identification of hazards which might cause serious harm, recording hazards in a way which meets legal requirements, identification of hazards which cannot be eliminated, define clearly why and where risks assessment will be carried out

Risk assessment and control measures Risk assessment: identify those aspects of risk assessment where specialist knowledge is required, identify possible outcomes from hazards that cannot be eliminated, consider procedures which might minimise hazards, assess the effects of hazardous substances used, assess the need for manual handling assessments, assess the likely severity and likelihood of injury, use of risk rating systems, personal protective equipment as a control measure, produce a risk assessment in an appropriate format

Review, revise and monitor assessments Review and revise: changes in legislation, changes in workplace practice, impact of accidents and ill health and their subsequent investigations, feedback from employees on unsafe conditions, dangerous occurrences or near misses, sources of further information and advice, recording of revised risk and other assessments following a review, alerting employees of the new procedures, monitoring the effectiveness of new procedures

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Define the main health, safety and welfare legislation in the construction sector and the implications of non compliance

specify the legal responsibilities of the parties involved in a given construction site situation summarise and explain the main provisions of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 and CDM Regulations evaluate the penalties for non compliance with the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 specify responsibilities for providing welfare facilities on site analyse typical organisational policy and procedure documents and identify the roles of various individuals determine training needs from a range of supplied risk assessments including induction training on site and CSCS describe methods of recording health and safety inspections and data select a method of hazard identification using data supplied identify hazards by observing a construction process record the hazards relating to a process and/or environment in a suitable format identify significant hazards that will require risk assessments to be carried out assess the likely harm relative to the identified workplace hazards evaluate the severity and likelihood ratings for identified work processes and/or environments select and formulate appropriate control measures review a risk assessment in the light of a change in circumstances implement a change in procedure or policy monitor the effectiveness of implemented changes

2 Explain the main requirements of an effective health and safety policy along with the organisational arrangements necessary for its implementation

3 Demonstrate an understanding of hazard and risk identification in design and construction 4 Undertake risk assessment and formulate control measures to prevent ill health and injury 5 Review, revise and monitor assessments as required

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Guidance

Delivery Case studies and individual assignments are an essential part of the delivery. Where possible standard formats for risk assessments should be encouraged. A range of policy and arrangement documents could be critically analysed as part of an assignment and learners encouraged to explore methods of communicating health and safety in organisations or various sizes. Assessment The main focus of the assessment in this unit must be the ability to carry out credible risk assessment and demonstrate how this is used in managing health and safety. It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Performance evidence should include hazard identification at the workplace or through the vehicle of case studies. Topics for hazard identification might include use of plant/equipment or hazardous substances and working practices or workplace layout etc An assignment, which involves carrying out a risk assessment, should be an essential part of performance assessment with a review component due to changes in circumstances or working practice. Knowledge evidence should mainly relate to legal provisions and the general structure of policy and arrangement documents. Part time learners may be able to submit a risk assessment carried out at the workplace provided that this is verified and witnessed as their own work. Full time learners might wish to use their work experience to form the basis of a risk assessment example. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Valuable guidance is contained in the Association of Colleges Best Practice Guide to Incorporating Health and Safety into the Construction Curriculum and this should form the basis of the teaching strategy adopted for health and safety in this unit and the qualification as a whole.

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Links Learners may have already studied the Health, Safety and Welfare unit in the BTEC Nationals at level 3 and will therefore have a basic understanding of the hazards and their recognition. This unit moves on to analyse and quantify the risks and deals with the mechanics of risk assessment. It is important that learners have a good understanding of construction and installation processes and their potential to cause harm. Studying the specialist units either prior to or concurrently with this unit is therefore desirable. The technical knowledge required will vary between a learner on a Building Services Engineering programmes to those on Civil Engineering or Construction programmes. It is vital that safety thinking be integrated into other units and awareness of safety at design and planning stages be emphasised. Group integrative assignment work should, where possible, contain a health and safety task that contributes to the overall assessment. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Site Management Conservation Control Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Spatial Data Management Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Videos of construction sites would help in identifying hazards and building up risk assessments. Learners should be encouraged to use CD-Rom packages to familiarise themselves with safety legislation or use computers to store risk assessments in a standard format for later use or review. Support materials Other publications Health and Safety Commission A Guide to the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 Health and Safety Commission Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1992 Health and Safety Commission Successful Health and Safety Management

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Unit 7:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Technology A
60 BTEC Higher National H1

Description of unit
This unit provides the learner with an introduction to the fundamental aspects of construction technology needed to successfully complete the other units of a programme. The unit has been designed to enable learners studying construction related programmes to understand, apply, analyse, investigate and evaluate the standard design forms, site evaluation methods and methods of construction used in the modern construction industry. With opportunities to analyse the ways in which decay, pollution and dilapidations may affect construction projects.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 Analyse and compare site evaluation techniques, site investigation techniques and the methods used to classify soils Analyse and produce details of how site evaluation and site investigation techniques influence the various forms of sub-structure used in low-rise and medium-rise buildings and the methods used to construct such sub-structures Analyse the various forms of superstructure design and construction used in low-rise and medium-rise buildings and produce details of the methods used to construct such superstructures Investigate the various causes of decay and deterioration of buildings.

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Content

Site evaluation and site investigation Analyse site evaluation and site investigation: the methods of site survey used, the classification of soils, methods of site investigation, chemical composition of soils, survey of existing buildings

Forms of substructure Forms of substructure: effect of water and chemicals in the soils together with their temporary or permanent treatment, soil type(s) and classification and characteristics, contaminated soils, their disposal and permanent or temporary control, form(s) of earthwork support required Foundations: their alternative forms, types and methods of selection, alternative forms, factors which influence the selection, control and regulations, including structural considerations

Forms of superstructure Forms of superstructure: domestic external and internal walls, domestic flat and pitched roof construction and coverings, medium and long span construction, industrial and commercial buildings Structural frames: types (steel, concrete, timber) and their selection Claddings: steel, plastic, concrete, glass, industrial and commercial roof construction and coverings, insulation, fire protection, corrosion and protection Finishes and services: internal and external joinery and ironmongery, internal structures, internal finishes, simple services installations

Decay and deterioration of buildings Analyse decay and deterioration of buildings: causes of deterioration and decay of buildings and their components, ie human, chemical, atmospheric, structural, thermal, movement and fire Faults in design: quality of work, materials, their selection and use, systems, vandalism Maintenance: routine maintenance works and adaptation works, conservation of scarce materials, routine cleaning, cyclical and preventative maintenance, cause and effect of dilapidations

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Analyse and compare site evaluation techniques, site investigation techniques and the methods used to classify soils

compare the methods of site survey techniques together with the survey of existing buildings and projects describe the various methods of site investigation analyse the classification of soils and their chemical composition determine the different soil classifications and their effects on the design of substructures describe the effects of water, chemicals and contaminated soils on the design and construction of a substructure compare and appraise by use of details the various types of substructure and their associated temporary works analyse and produce details of the different forms of construction for the structure of domestic buildings describe the different forms of construction for the structure of industrial and commercial buildings determine the differing forms of internal finishes and components that are used in domestic, industrial and commercial buildings identify simple services currently used in buildings determine the many causes of deterioration in buildings and their services compare the need for planned, cyclical and reactive maintenance works assess the relationship between design, construction, maintenance and the causes of dilapidations

Analyse and produce details of how site evaluation and site investigation techniques influence the various forms of sub-structure used in lowrise and medium-rise buildings and the methods used to construct such substructures Analyse the various forms of superstructure design and construction used in low-rise and medium-rise buildings and produce details of the methods used to construct such superstructures

4 Investigate the various causes of decay and deterioration of buildings

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Guidance

Delivery Since it is important that learners have a good understanding of the principles of construction and the industry, it is desirable that this unit should be studied in the first year of the programme. Case studies should be used extensively in order to develop a working knowledge and practice of the construction industry. The unit might usefully include the production of sketches and drawings [manually or using CAD] to enhance the knowledge gained. Where appropriate, roleplay should be encouraged to develop a better understanding of the application and difficulties that are encountered in applying the various techniques of construction. Learners will usually work individually and should be required to provide oral presentations from their own studies or experiences. During a role play, learners would normally work in groups to present scenarios for discussion. Consideration must be given to Sustainable methods of construction and Green issues in the selection and use of materials. Construction methods and practices must comply with health, safety and welfare legislation and practice. Particular attention should also be given to the implications that the site investigation and design of buildings has upon the safe construction, use and maintenance. CDM Safety Plans are an important process in linking these design and build aspects together and avoiding risk. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. The evidence should demonstrate the ability to draw detailed architectural style drawings both manually, and by using CAD and other current, modern, ICT facilities. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F.

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Links This unit complements the knowledge gained in previous core units, namely Unit 1: Design Principles and Application, Unit 2: Science and Materials and Unit 6: Health, Safety and Welfare, together with a working of the construction industry. It will contribute towards knowledge and skill required for the Unit 5: Group Project. Learners should be encouraged to use their wider knowledge gained from earlier units and from practice. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Site Management Construction Contracting Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Spatial Data Management Town Planning Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to a wide range of library resources, including textbooks and journals, government and industry wide publications, BRE Digests, professional journals, the internet and other research materials, and other associated documents. Support materials Textbooks Chudley, R Building Construction Handbook 2nd Edition (Butterworth-Heinemann, 1995) Everett, A Materials 5th Edition (Longman, 1994) McMullan, R Environmental Science in Building 5th Edition (Palgrave, 2001) BRE Digests Papers from Cement and Concrete Association Papers from RIBA Papers from TRADA Technical, professional and trade literature The Building Regulations

Other publications

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Unit 8:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Technology B
60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit builds upon the knowledge and understanding gained in Unit 7: Technology A but also has a different focus. It concentrates on the erection of complex multi-storey structures and the use of modern systems to create flexibility of internal space planning and design. This theme is developed to also investigate the ways in which the useful life of a building can be extended by modern alteration and repair techniques. The concept of buildability is defined and the basic principles analysed. The importance of developing and actioning sustainable construction techniques is emphasised and the processes and procedures involved in the safe demolition of buildings are explored.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 5 Analyse the range of materials and constructional forms available for the erection of multi-storey buildings Investigate and produce details of the range of systems currently used to provide sufficient flexibility of internal layout to meet both present and future design requirements Define and analyse through the use of diagrams and drawings the principles of buildability in terms of safety, efficiency, economy and quality standards Evaluate the potential for development of sustainable construction strategies Analyse the methods used and the contractual and legal responsibilities involved in the alteration, remediation and safe demolition of complex structures.

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Content

Range of materials and constructional forms Analyse constructional designs and techniques: structural frame, external envelope, structural floors, roofing, compatibility of materials and construction forms

Range of systems Functional requirements of modern buildings: demountable partitioning systems, infinite access floors, temporary room division, suspended ceilings, underfloor and vertical service ducting

Principles of buildability Principles and effects of buildability: dimensional co-ordination and standardisation, considerations of access, services co-ordination, specification of materials, components and assemblies, simplicity of construction, effective communications, CDM regulations

Sustainable construction strategies Need for sustainable construction strategies: environmental concerns, deforestation and manageable forestry, energy efficiency and insulation, alternative energy sources, embedded energy costs

Safe demolition of complex structures Refurbishment, adaptation and demolition processes: project feasibility, underpinning, temporary support, modern conversion, adaptation and refurbishment techniques, demolition processes and procedures, legal constraints including building control constraints, health and safety considerations, CDM requirements

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Analyse the range of materials and constructional forms available for the erection of multi-storey buildings

describe the various forms of structural design used for multi-storey buildings and evaluate the benefits and shortcomings of each analyse the constructional techniques used to achieve the designs justify the materials specification for a range of multi-storey designs describe, using appropriate details, the systems used to provide flexibility of spatial planning and evaluate the benefits and shortcomings of each analyse the constructional processes used in the installation of the above describe how such techniques impact on established building services define buildability and, with the aid of appropriate details, critically discuss the implications for the construction industry analyse the advantages and disadvantages of employing the concept of buildability in terms of the health and safety, efficiency, economy and quality of construction projects define the key principles of a sustainable construction approach analyse a range of modern and traditional construction methods and identify those that would benefit from a sustainable construction approach describe and evaluate the techniques used to erect multi-storey buildings and provide flexibility of spatial planning in terms of sustainable construction principles

Investigate and produce details of the range of systems currently used to provide sufficient flexibility of internal layout to meet both present and future design requirements Define and analyse through the use of diagrams and drawings the principles of buildability in terms of safety, efficiency, economy and quality standards Evaluate the potential for development of sustainable construction strategies

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Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Analyse the methods used and the contractual and legal responsibilities involved in the alteration, remediation and safe demolition of complex structures

plan for future occupier needs for a range of buildings and analyse the alteration and repair techniques used to meet such needs review the legal constraints on the above processes evaluate the construction methods associated with the demolition of a given structure, with particular reference to the associated documentation, and ensuring compliance with all relevant legal constraints including health and safety legislation, CDM requirements

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Guidance

Delivery A mixture of lectures, projects and presentations is recommended. Group work is seen as productive with each member of the group being given a particular issue to defend or support. The use of visiting lecturers is encouraged given the complicated and specialist nature of much of the work. The unit can be delivered in either year of a two-year course but delivery should be delayed until after the core units and Unit 7: Technology A have been completed. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. The evidence should demonstrate the ability to draw detailed architectural style drawings both manually, and by using CAD and other current, modern, ICT facilities. It is expected that any treatment of buildability and sustainable construction techniques will be informed by the latest thinking and practice. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. Construction methods and practices must comply with health, safety and welfare legislation and practice. Particular attention should also be given to the implications that the site investigation and design of buildings has upon the safe construction, use and maintenance. CDM Safety Plans are an important process in linking these design and build aspects together and avoiding risk. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F.

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Links This unit has clear links with Unit 6: Health, Safety and Welfare, Unit 7: Technology A, Unit 22: Technology C, Unit 16: Production Management and Unit 18: Project Management. It will also contribute towards the Unit 5: Group Project work. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Site Management Conservation Control Construction Contracting Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Quantity Surveying Spatial Data Management Town Planning Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Access to British and relevant European Standards, a range of design guides, manufacturers specifications, relevant legislation (including copies of the Building Regulations) and advanced construction textbooks will be required as will access to manual drawing equipment and, wherever possible, CAD systems. Support materials Textbooks Adams, S Practical Buildability (Butterworths, 1989) Chudley, R Building Construction Handbook 2nd Edition (Butterworth-Heinemann, 1995) Dean, Y Finishes 3rd Edition (Longman, 1996) Everett, A Materials 5th Edition (Longman, 1994) Ferguson, I Buildability in Practice (BT Batsford, 1989) Richardson, B Remedial Treatment of Buildings 2nd Edition (ButterworthHeinemann, 1995) Stephenson, J The Building Regulations Explained 6th Edition (E and FN Spon, 2000)

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Other publications BRE Digests Construction Best Practice Programme (DETR 1999/2001) Egan, J Rethinking Construction-A Consultation paper by the Strategic Forum for Construction (DETR, 2002) Egan, J Rethinking Construction (DETR, 1998) Latham, M Constructing the Team (The Stationary Office Books, 1994) TSO Building Regulations 1991

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Unit 9:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Law and Contract


60 BTEC Higher National H1

Description of unit
This unit is intended to provide learners with an introduction to the national legal system and the Law of Contract. It is also intended that learners will develop knowledge and understanding in those aspects of contractual administration relating to the common types of contract used in the industry for building or civil engineering works of various sizes.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Demonstrate an understanding of the nature and significance of the principles and procedures of law and legislation as applied to the construction process Describe the liabilities and responsibilities of parties to a contract Apply the principles and procedures of law to the effective organisation and practice of a company Explore the relevant legal principles and requirements when undertaking a construction contract in Europe.

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Content

Principles and procedures of law construction process Law relating to the construction process: broad understanding of the workings of the English legal system, the court system, principles of arbitration, alternative dispute resolution (ADR) and adjudication, Common Law, Industrial Tribunals, the nature of tort, the law of tort and its significance to the construction industry, negligence, nuisance, trespass, statutory duties, liability

Liabilities and responsibilities of parties Contract is an enforceable agreement: identification of the main parties to a contract, description of the responsibilities of the main parties, typical contractual liabilities of the main parties

Principles and procedures of law organisation and practice of a company Law relating to the organisation and practice of a company: detailed understanding of the English legal system, company law and legal status of companies, employment law, law of land and property, sale, purchase and rental of goods, health, safety and welfare, employer liability, subcontractor tax requirements

Legal principles and requirements in Europe European legal requirements: principal requirements of the European legal systems, tort, employment law, company law, contract law

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Demonstrate an understanding of the nature and significance of the principles and procedures of law and legislation as applied to the construction process

describe the various elements of the national legal system describe the court system and its procedures compare the methods of ADR and the Industrial Tribunal process using case studies describe the significance of common law within the construction process describe the effect of the law of tort on the construction industry using appropriate case studies determine the main parties to a contract describe the responsibilities of the main parties to the contract analyse typical contractual liabilities and responsibilities determine the prime requirements of company law and its effect on the legal status of companies in their operation describe, using case studies, how employment law, health, safety and welfare, the sale, purchase and rental of goods, and land law and property law relate to the operation of a company in construction describe, using examples and case studies, the effect of the European legal systems on related construction activities

Describe the liabilities and responsibilities of parties to a contract

Apply the principles and procedures of law to the effective organisation and practice of a company

Explore the relevant legal principles and requirements when undertaking a construction contract in Europe

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Guidance

Delivery Learners should have a good understanding of the construction process. It is recommended that the unit be studied in the first year of the course. Case studies should be used and should, where possible, involve practitioners as visiting speakers. Learners will usually work individually but role-play activities should be encouraged when relevant. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare legislation and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F.

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Links Consideration should be given to links with the outcomes covered in the units, Unit 6: Health, Safety and Welfare and Unit 11: Contractual Procedures. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Site Management Construction Contracting Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Quantity Surveying Town Planning Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to current publications, journals and libraries including electronic search facilities, the internet. Support materials Textbooks Dalby, J EU Law for the Construction Industry (Blackwell Science, 1998) Owen, S Law for the Construction Industry 2nd Edition (Longman, 1998) Turner, D and Turner, A Building Contract Claims and Disputes 2nd Edition (Longman, 1999) Current Forms of Standard Contracts Current Legislation relevant to the construction industry Technical and professional journals

Other publications

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Unit 10:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Building Services Engineering Technology


60 BTEC Higher National H1

Description of unit
This unit is intended to expand upon the scientific principles introduced in Unit 2: Science and Materials and to apply this knowledge to the practical aspects of building services planning and installation. This unit provides the learner with an understanding of the principal applications of building services to domestic, commercial and industrial buildings. It is intended that this unit should be integrated with the construction technology units and that it should reinforce the need for coordination of the building services installations within the overall construction process.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 Describe the principles and techniques used to co-ordinate the planning, design and installation of the plant and equipment used for space heating, ventilation and airconditioning Analyse the systems used to distribute services to a variety of buildings and describe their characteristics Analyse the systems used to provide disposal systems for a variety of buildings and describe their characteristics Review the design and installation requirements for lifts and escalators in a range of buildings Evaluate the problems associated with the integration, accommodation and access for maintenance of mechanical and electrical services into a variety of buildings.

2 3 4 5

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Content

Space heating, ventilation and air conditioning Space heating in buildings: need for space and water heating in buildings, types of system available, factors affecting selection and design in terms of user requirements, comfort or storage needs, the availability of plant space and the relationship to structure and finishes Design and installation considerations: the use of low, medium and high pressure hot water systems, steam, warm air, radiant tube systems, gas and electric local appliances. Implications of selecting different fuels, energy sources and controls, types of boiler and ancillary plant, space requirements, relationship of plant area to other parts of the building in terms of noise, loading, and heat gains Characteristics of ventilation and air conditioning systems: statutory and legal requirements relating to ventilation of buildings, comfort, health, safety and welfare requirements, their relationship to building design and user requirements, the range of natural and mechanical systems of ventilation, their application to a range of building types and situations, natural ventilation, the action of wind and thermal forces Mechanical extract, mechanical input and balanced systems: applications, associated plant and equipment, the relationship of natural input and extract points. Equipment used in fire venting, the relationship of the systems to the types of building, materials storage and the related fire risks Principles, systems and applications of air conditioning: commercial, industrial and public buildings, use and inter-relationship of components used in air conditioning systems for the control of temperature, humidity and the cleanliness of the air within defined spaces. Types of system and their application, plant and space relationships, distribution and recirculation systems, distribution systems, control mechanisms and fire dampers

Distribution of services Requirements for adequate and safe systems: piped, electrical and other utility services to meet the needs of a range of buildings, quality and characteristics of cold water supplies, by-law requirements, materials and components, special requirements for high-rise buildings, storage and related loadings on the structure Installation requirements of domestic hot water supplies: hot water generators, direct and indirect systems, pressurised systems and safety requirements Provision of fire fighting: alarm and detection systems, emergency lighting, the relationship of systems to other services and escape routes, components and equipment, selection according to the hazard Installation of a safe gas supply system: pipework, meters and associated controls, flues and ventilation requirements including balanced and fan diluted flues Electrical installations for single and three phase supply: power and lighting circuits, controls and cable systems, an appreciation of the IEE Regulations for the safe operation of installations, testing and inspection and temporary supplies on construction sites Provision for cables and equipment associated with communication: data handling and control systems and ICT systems including networking over a range of buildings

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Disposal systems Principles, provision and applications of sanitation, sewage and disposal systems: selection of sanitary appliances and appropriate layouts compatible with the type of building, associated services, special provision for disabled persons. Criteria for the selection and installation of above ground drainage with regard to more complex domestic and industrial/commercial buildings. Principles, applications and installation requirements for small sewage disposal systems Application of design principles and techniques for surface water drainage: flat and pitched roofs, design and installation considerations for surface and foul water drainage schemes for groups of domestic and small commercial buildings Identification of the problems associated with refuse disposal: domestic and commercial buildings, refuse handling, on-site storage and chute systems. Mechanical handling, maceration, incineration and problems related to materials separation and storage provisions for the purpose of recycling

Lifts and escalators Design and installation requirements for lifts and escalators: principles of operation, space, structural and builders work requirements with regard to the construction of shafts, pits, motor rooms for electrical and hydraulic lifts, and floor openings for escalators. Special requirements for safety during construction, replacement and maintenance

Integration, accommodation and access for maintenance Mechanical and electrical services: the need for integration at the design and installation stages with regard to services space requirements, sequencing of installations, access for installations, commissioning and testing. Processes of co-ordination and commissioning of building services at the design, project planning, hand-over of installation stages and the relationship of these to the construction process as a whole. Construction of ducts, holes and voids with regard to access and the safety and fire resistance of services installations. Access during maintenance, alteration or extension of services installations, and the effect on safety and fire resistance

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Describe the principles and techniques used to coordinate the planning, design and installation of the plant and equipment used for space heating, ventilation and airconditioning

explain the need to provide space and water heating systems in buildings and analyse the selection criteria for different forms of heating systems and equipment assess the choice of energy and fuels and their impact on the building and the environment and describe how heating integrates with other services within the building describe the need to provide ventilation and air conditioning and analyse the selection criteria for different forms of ventilation and air conditioning methods, systems and equipment describe how ventilation and air conditioning integrates with other services within the building determine the fire risks associated with ventilation and air conditioning describe the provision for the distribution of services within buildings, and storage space requirements analyse the selection criteria for different forms of hot and cold water supply systems analyse the selection criteria for electrical installations demonstrate an understanding of the safety requirements for the distribution of services determine the fire risks associated with buildings and the installations, passive and active, designed into buildings to control and prevent fire outbreak and spread describe the requirements of providing sanitation facilities to buildings analyse the design criteria for sanitary compartments determine the choices of discharge pipework systems and their design principles and practice describe methods used to dispose of foul and surface water from city and rural locations compare the methods of refuse removal and disposal from buildings

2 Analyse the systems used to distribute services to a variety of buildings and describe their characteristics

Analyse the systems used to provide disposal systems for a variety of buildings and describe their characteristics

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Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Review the design and installation requirements for lifts and escalators in a range of buildings

assess the need to provide mechanical circulation for people and goods around buildings analyse the design criteria and principles for lifts and escalators evaluate the health and safety risks associated with lifts and escalator installation and operation evaluate the need to integrate the design of buildings and their services as a complete package analyse the implications of health, safety and welfare aspects in the design and construction process CDM Safety Plan explain the need to commission all service installations justify the need to include the provision for the maintenance of the building throughout its life

Evaluate the problems associated with the integration, accommodation and access for maintenance of mechanical and electrical services into a variety of buildings

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Guidance

Delivery The use of site visits, video and practical scenarios should be used to reinforce the more formal learning process. The overall aim of this unit is to provide learners with a good understanding of the design and installation considerations construction professionals encounter in building services installations on a variety of project types and sizes. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links The unit should integrate with other units in the construction programme and ideally be programmed to have close links with the Construction Technology units in the first year of the study. Candidates should be encouraged to share in the classroom sessions their work based practical experience in dealing with building services contractors and professionals wherever possible. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Quantity Surveying.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information.

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Resources Access to design data, CIBSE guides, Building Regulations, IEE Regulations and BSI codes of practice along with research sources such as the Internet Barbour Index etc should be incorporated and used in the study programme. Support materials Textbooks Chadderton D Building Services Engineering 3rd Edition (E and FN Spon, 2000) Hall F Building Services and Equipment Volumes 1 and 2 (Pearson, 1994) Reid Understanding Buildings: A Multi-disciplinary Approach (The MIT Press, 1988) TSO The Building Regulations Various Professional and technical journals

Other publications

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Unit 11:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Contractual Procedures
60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit aims to develop a working knowledge of the nature and purpose of legal requirements and the type of procurement arrangements that are used in the construction industry. The unit has been designed to assist learners studying Higher National Programmes in Building, Civil Engineering or Building Services Engineering to demonstrate a knowledge, understanding and application of the various arrangements, options and strategies that are adopted in the procurement of projects. The varying procurement arrangements available will be considered throughout the design and construction periods from inception to the completion of the contract.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 Analyse the factors affecting the choice of different procurement and contractual arrangements Determine and apply current issues and best practice associated with the procurement of projects through reference to government and industry sponsored reports and recommendations Examine the roles and activities of the parties and organisations involved Analyse the forms of contract with particular reference to time, cost and quality Evaluate the forms of contract in respect of supply-chain management.

3 4 5

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Content

Procurement and contractual arrangements Procurement and contractual arrangements: clients requirements and priorities in project development, methods of procurement for projects, variable factors associated with procurement and contractual recommendations including time, cost, performance and risk, relationship between variable factors and procurement arrangements, surveys of the current use of procurement methods in practice Selection of forms of building contracts and procurement arrangements: distinctions between contract and non-contract documents, articles of agreement, conditions and appendices to the different forms of contract. Introduction to the forms of contract used on civil engineering projects

Current issues and best practice Issues associated with the procurement of projects: current issues associated with procurement and contractual arrangements, issues originating from government, professional, trade and statutory bodies and contracting organisations. Comparisons with practices in other similar industries. Recommendations from industry and government sponsored reports, developments and trends in practice. Aspects of practice from Europe and in other international markets

Parties and organisation Roles and activities of the parties and organisations involved in: pre-contract and postcontract activities, different project phases and the plan of work Duties and responsibilities: different specialists involved, planning, programming and progressing, on-site communications. Roles and contractual responsibilities of the different parties involved in a project. Role and activities of professional bodies, trade associations, government departments, statutory bodies

Time, cost and quality Forms of contract: with reference to time, cost, quality: commencement, completion, delays, extensions of time, postponement, phased completions, early commencement, optimum time scales, fast-tracking Price competition and negotiations: fixed-price arrangements, price certainty, price forecasting, contract sum, interim certificates, payments, cash flows, retention, cost penalties, variations, dayworks, provisional and prime cost sums, subcontractors and suppliers, claims, final costs, final certificate Quality of materials and goods: standards of workmanship, specification, statutory obligations, CDM Regulations, methods of working, testing, removal of defective work, quality assurance, other clauses from the forms of contract

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Supply-chain management Nominated and named subcontractors: contract conditions, tendering arrangements, information requirements, main contract implications, forms and agreements Other subcontractors: contract conditions, domestic, directly employed, tendering, criteria, information requirements, main contract implications, forms and agreements Suppliers: identify and compare contract conditions, nominated, named, direct, specialist

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Analyse the factors affecting the choice of different procurement and contractual arrangements

describe the needs of clients in both the public and private sectors analyse the different project variables relating them to a range of case studies analyse the choice of the different procurement arrangements by using case studies compare the main contractual arrangements between some of the common forms of contract explain and evaluate the current issues associated with procurement and contractual procedures describe trends in procurement practices by reference to current published research and Construction Industry Board publications differentiate international methods of procurement drawing outlining their advantages and disadvantages determine the sequence of events of the design and construction process to meet the requirements of an identified client describe the roles and principal contractual responsibilities of the parties involved in respect of a typical contract evaluate the purpose and activities of a number of different organisations who are involved in the construction industry evaluate the implications of being ahead of the programme or behind the scheduled time for completion compare the project costs in the context of precontract, tender and final account stages for a live construction project describe how quality is defined and the measures that are available within a contract to ensure its compliance analyse a selection of other clauses making reference to case law for their interpretation

Determine and apply current issues and best practice associated with the procurement of projects through reference to government and industry sponsored reports and recommendations Examine the roles and activities of the parties and organisations involved

Analyse the forms of contract with particular reference to time, cost and quality

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Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Evaluate the forms of contract in respect of supply-chain management

analyse the contractual differences between nominated and named subcontractors and other types of subcontractors evaluate the forms of contracts in respect of the requirements for suppliers

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Guidance

Delivery Since it is important that learners have a good understanding of the principles of construction and the industry, it is recommended that this unit should be studied with these subjects in the first year. It is important that learners have access to the main forms of building and engineering contracts and to use these where appropriate. These should be current or include amendments where necessary. Extracts from the forms should be provided where the unit requires. The emphasis between one form of contract and another will depend upon whether the learners are studying building, civil engineering or building services engineering. Case studies should be used extensively together with a current working knowledge and practice of the construction industry. The unit might usefully involve practitioners to deal with some aspects of the curriculum. Where appropriate role play should be encouraged to develop an understanding of the application and difficulties that are encountered in applying the contractual and procurement procedures. During a role-play, learners would normally work together in groups to present scenarios for discussion. Learners may also work individually and should be encouraged to provide oral presentations from their own studies or experiences. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links This unit has links with Unit 6: Health, Safety and Welfare and Unit 9: Law and Contract relies on a good knowledge and understanding of the construction industry processes. A range of CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills will feature strongly throughout the delivery and assessment phases. Learners should be encouraged to use their wider knowledge and experience gained from earlier units and from practice.

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The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Contracting Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Quantity Surveying Spatial Data Management Town Planning Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to a wide range of library resources, including textbooks and journals, government and industry wide publications and the different forms of contracts and associated documents. Support materials Textbooks Ashworth, A Civil Engineering Contractual Procedures (Longman, 1998) Ashworth, A Contractual Procedures in the Construction Industry 4th Edition (Longman, 2001) CIB Working Group 11 Towards a 30% Productivity Improvement in Construction (Thomas Telford, 1996) CIOB Constructing Success (Thomas Telford, 1997) CIOB Partnering the Team (Thomas Telford, 1997) Egan, J Rethinking Construction-A Consultation paper by the Strategic Forum for Construction (DETR, 2002) Egan, J Rethinking Construction (DETR, 1998) Joint Contracts Tribunal JCT Forms of Contract [latest revisions/editions] Latham, M Constructing the Team (The Stationary Office Books, 1994) The Aqua Group Contract Administration for the Building Team (Blackwell Science, 1996)

Other publications

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Unit 12:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Refurbishment and Adaptation


60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit enables learners to develop their knowledge and understanding of building alteration and adaptation work and is designed to support the successful completion of other units in the construction the programme. Learners will examine the feasibility of modifying existing buildings, the requirements of the design brief and the preparation of design and specification to meet planning and building control requirements. They will also prepare a construction plan for the execution of works.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Evaluate the feasibility of modifying existing buildings for new situations and use Analyse the requirements of a design brief and plan the modification of an existing building to conform to the design brief Analyse drawings and specification for the modification of an existing building Evaluate and explain the alteration design and produce a construction plan for the execution of the work.

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Content

Feasibility Feasibility of modifying existing buildings: environmental requirements/considerations, ie the contribution any building alteration will make to the physical and social environment, alternative uses to which the building could be put. Use of internal space to meet clients needs, economic implications, structural implications Condition surveys: in terms of building state, shape, services situation and associated health, safety and welfare requirements

Design brief Requirements of a design brief: building layout and access, structural form and limitation to modification. Services; location, scope, limitation and the need for modification or replacement Building control: planning, listed building status, building regulations, fire regulations etc Health, safety and welfare requirements for alterations

Drawings and specification Production drawings and specifications: outline drawings, sketch design, production drawings. Specification outlines detailed for a typical scheme

Construction plan Definitions and descriptions of alteration designs and construction plans: method of carrying out the work, plant and labour intended, temporary works, possible time duration, CDM requirements, safety plans

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Evaluate the feasibility of modifying existing buildings for new situations and use

undertake a condition survey and an analysis of a given existing building to enable conclusion to be reached on the feasibility of conversion evaluate the process of conversion feasibility for given details of an existing building produce an appropriate design from an analysis of the given design brief for the conversion of an existing building (this will include taking into account the requirements of the conversion as indicated in the content) prepare appropriate drawings and specifications which clearly communicate the design and details of the conversion scheme for given details of an existing building produce an appropriate specification for this scheme produce a relevant and detailed construction plan which covers the main outline of the conversion scheme, for given details of an existing building (this will include taking into account the requirements of the conversion as indicated in the content) evaluate how the construction plan meets CDM Regulations requirements and minimises risk

2 Analyse the requirements of a design brief and plan the modification of an existing building to conform to the design brief. Prepare drawings and specifications for the modification of an existing building Evaluate and explain the alteration design and produce a construction plan for the execution of the work

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Guidance

Delivery As this unit is concerned with much of the skills, knowledge and understanding gained from previous units, it is recommended that the unit should be studied in the second year of a two year programme. Learners should have access to resources concerned with all aspects of constriction industry that will cover the syllabus topics. Assessment It is recommended that evidence of learners achievement of learning outcomes be in the form of an assignment concerned with the modification of an existing building. A full scenario should be given which covers the syllabus content. The building for alteration/modification must have scope for major alteration work including some demolition and reconstruction and should involve the change of use of the building. It may be an existing relevant local building but a hypothetical building could be used providing it covers the above criteria and also has a full set of drawings and a feasible scenario provided for the learners. It is suggested that learners work in groups on the assignment and may form small development teams to produce the design and construction details between them. Each team will be expected to give an oral presentation of their approach and their solution to the scenario problem in addition to the physical evidence. The assignment could be a phased hand-in throughout the year. For example: feasibility content, outline proposals, detailed scheme including construction method. The learners may also be required to sit an end of module timed-controlled assignment to verify their individual performance. This could consist of a small modification scheme with the scenario given to the learners beforehand. The learners will have the opportunity of planning for this assignment and may bring into the assignment room any resource they think necessary for its completion. The team assignment and the end of unit timed assignment should be given approximately equal value when determining the overall grade. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. At all times construction practices and methods must comply with health, safety and welfare legislation and practice and learners should have completed the core unit, Unit 6: Health, Safety and Welfare before undertaking the physical condition survey. The CDM Safety Plan must demonstrate that, where possible, risks have been designed out and/or managed for construction, use and maintenance. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F.

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Links This unit relies upon a sound knowledge of the working of the design and construction process. Learners should be encouraged to use their wider knowledge and experience from other units particularly Unit 26: Design Procedures and Unit 27: Design Technology and from their own experience in practice. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Conservation Control Property Management Spatial Data Management Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources In addition to resources required for assessment, learners should have access to a wide range of resources both in a library format and access to the internet to consider information from wider sources. Support materials Textbooks Brand, S How Buildings Learn Revised Edition (Orion, 1997) Noy Building Survey and Reports 2nd Edition (Blackwell Science, 1995) Nutt, B and Kincaid, P et al Adapting Buildings for Changing Uses (Spon, 2002) Sharpe, G A Contractors Guide to Conservation (CIOB, 1997) Sharpe, G Works to Historic Building: A Contractors Manual (Pearson, 1999) TSO BSI Codes of Practice TSO Statutory regulations Various Professional and technical journals

Other publications

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Unit 13:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Environment
60 BTEC Higher National H1

Description of unit
The environment we all inhabit is a life-protection system that provides us with water, shelter, food and air. Until very recently it was commonly believed that the earth was large enough for the effect we have on the environment to be considered negligible. We now know that relentless growth in human population and increasing levels of human activity threaten the environment upon which we all depend. The construction industry, in common with many others, impacts on the environment in a variety of positive and negative ways. This unit investigates the potential benefits and threats to the environment posed by the construction of the built environment, explains the mechanisms involved in each and evaluates the constructional, technical and legislative processes and procedures used to eliminate or minimise their consequences and achieve sustainable construction.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 5 Explore the variety of ways in which the construction process impacts upon the environment Describe the global environmental issues of concern to the construction industry and the ways in which such issues are addressed Investigate and describe the local environmental issues of concern to the construction industry and the ways in which such issues are addressed Analyse indoor environmental effects and present recommendations on how these effects can be minimised Evaluate the environmental assessment systems in common use.

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Content

Ways in which the construction process impacts upon the environment Environmental impact of a construction project: location, extraction, transportation and refinement of raw materials. Manufacture of construction materials and components. Noise from construction sites, dust, dirt and disturbance from construction sites and health risks they present. Increased pressure upon existing services, increased pressure upon existing infrastructure. Increased consumption of energy, increased production of greenhouse gases, indoor effects

Global environmental issues Environmental concerns and international co-operation is required to address the major issues, such as: sustainable construction, bio-diversity, global warming, deforestation, depletion of the ozone layer, acid rain, the finite availability of fossil fuels

Local environmental issues Environmental issues addressed at national or local level: air pollution, water pollution, increased water abstraction, noise pollution, contaminated land, remediation, land-fill waste management

Indoor environmental effects Factors affecting internal environment: modern artificial lighting, noise, electromagnetic fields, environmental tobacco smoke, radon, legionellosis, carbon monoxide, house dust mites, volatile organic compounds, sick building syndrome

Environmental assessment systems Environmental assessment systems: Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM), construction, maintenance, use and demolition of buildings. Global issues, neighbourhood issues and indoor effects. Materials, services and techniques used to construct buildings, height and shape of buildings, characteristics of the site

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Explore the variety of ways in which the construction process impacts upon the environment

describe the ways in which the construction process impacts upon the environment in the preconstruction stage describe the ways in which the construction process impacts upon the environment during construction describe the ways in which the construction process impacts upon the environment in the postconstruction stage explain global environmental issues of concern to the construction industry describe the characteristics of the global environmental issues of concern and the mechanisms by which they occur evaluate the ways in which technology and legislation have developed to address these issues investigate the local environmental issues of concern to the construction industry describe the characteristics of the local environmental issues of concern and the mechanisms by which they occur evaluate the ways in which technology and legislation have developed to address these issues describe the indoor environmental effects commonly referred to as Sick Building Syndrome evaluate and recommend the processes and procedures used to minimise low levels of wellbeing caused by Sick Building Syndrome describe the environmental assessment systems in common use evaluate such environmental assessment systems in terms of relevance, accuracy, reliability and validity

Describe the global environmental issues of concern to the construction industry and the ways in which such issues are addressed

3 Investigate and describe the local environmental issues of concern to the construction industry and the ways in which such issues are addressed

4 Analyse indoor environmental effects and present recommendations on how these effects can be minimised Evaluate the environmental assessment systems in common use

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Guidance

Delivery A mixture of lectures, case studies, practicals, projects and presentations is recommended. Group work is seen as productive with each member of the group being allocated a specific role such as property developer, planning officer, environmental health officer, contractor and so forth. The use of visiting lecturers is encouraged given the complicated and specialist nature of much of the work. The important, enduring effect of the unit should be that the learner thinks in more environmentally aware terms upon completion of the unit and delivery should be tailored to this end. Given the above it is appropriate for the unit to be delivered early in a course of study and certainly in the first year of a two-year programme. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme and their relationship to environmental issues. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare implications throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links This unit has strong links with BTECs Environmental Initiative Guidance for the Incorporation of Environmental Components in BTEC programmes at Annex E. This unit has links with all other units in the sense that all the activities of the construction industry impact on the environment in some way. This is particularly true of the Technology units and Unit 16: Production Management and Unit 18: Project Management units. Although not compulsory, this unit is seen as essential in fostering the right approach to these other specialist units (Unit 7: Technology A, Unit 8: Technology B and Unit 22: Technology C).

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The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Conservation Control Town Planning Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Some of the issues dealt with in this unit are global in nature and the relevant measuring equipment is not readily available. Relatively cheap and accurate equipment is however available to measure the parameters associated with local environmental issues, such as air pollution and water pollution, and sound level meters are generally available in most centres. Local Authority Environmental Services departments may be prepared to assist with guest lectures or equipment on loan. Copies of BREEAM, at least, and other environmental assessment methods should be made available. A great deal of useful source material is available, in bulk and at a reasonable cost, from the National Society for Clean Air. Both Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth offer a similar resource. Support materials Textbooks Brown, A The UK Environment (The Stationery Office, 1992) McMullan, R Environmental Science in Building 5th Edition (Palgrave, 2001) Health and Safety Executive Sick Building Syndrome (HSE Books, 1995) National Society for Clean Air The Pollution Handbook 2001 (National Society for Clean Air)

Other publications

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Unit 14:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Construction Economics
60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit provides an introduction to the ways in which the economic environment affects the construction industry. The unit has been designed to enable learners studying the BTEC Higher National in Construction to investigate, analyse and evaluate the implications of various economic theories on the construction industry and demonstrate knowledge and understanding of economics.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Demonstrate an understanding of the methods of allocation of scarce resources and the determination of price Demonstrate an understanding of the factors affecting the economics of an organisation Evaluate the size and economic significance of the work carried out by different sectors of the construction industry Evaluate government economic activity and how it affects the construction industry.

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Content

Allocation of scarce resources and determination of price Factors that affect the allocation of scarce resources: comparison of the free market and planned economies, operation of the price mechanism. Analysis of supply and demand, effects of elasticity, taxes and subsidies on the equilibrium price. Operation of cost benefit analysis

Economics of an organisation Factors that affect the economics of an organisation: perfect, imperfect and monopolistic competition. Scale of production, internal and external economies of scale, increasing and decreasing returns to scale. Sources of finance for the construction industry

Economic significance of the work carried out by sectors of the construction industry Size and economic significance of the construction industry: different sectors of operation, size and number of organisations within each sector, volume of work carried out by the different sectors. Client base of the construction industry

Government economic activity Affects of government activity: fiscal policy, monetary policy. International trade, balance of payments and exchange rates, private and public expenditure

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Demonstrate an understanding of the methods of allocation of scarce resources and the determination of price

analyse the fundamental differences between the theoretical operation of free market and planned economies explain, with the aid of an example, the operation of the price mechanism draw examples of supply and demand curves from given data, some of which include taxes and subsidies and determine equilibrium points draw conclusions from the results obtained by carrying out a cost benefit analysis utilising information given explain the differences between perfect, imperfect and monopolistic competition discuss how economies of scale can affect probability within the construction industry determine the levels of output from given data, illustrating different volumes or mixes of inputs within the same business and explain whether these are increasing or decreasing returns of scale select and describe suitable sources of finance for given projects and business types likely to be found within the construction industry analyse information derived from charts produced, using recent data concerning the different sectors, size and number of organisations and volumes of work completed, within the construction industry propose possible economic reasons for results shown on the charts produced summarise the different forms of direct and indirect taxation operating within the United Kingdom at the present time, giving examples of their implications for construction evaluate how government policy can affect the operation of the construction industry analyse the consequences of varying exchange rates on the levels of international trade

Demonstrate an understanding of the factors affecting the economics of an organisation

Evaluate the size and economic significance of the work carried out by different sectors of the construction industry

Evaluate government economic activity and how it affects the construction industry

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Guidance

Delivery This unit can be studied in either the first or the second year of the programme. In general, learners should produce work individually although group discussion should be encouraged. Case studies should also be used where appropriate. Use should also be made of past, current and future economic events to stimulate discussion and aid understanding of concepts under discussion. To encourage this, learners should endeavour to increase their knowledge of the subject by careful reading of relevant material, not only from textbooks but also from good quality newspapers and professional journals. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links This unit is generally free standing, but may be linked with some outcomes within the core unit, Unit 4: Management Principles and Application. There will be ample opportunity for CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills to be developed and assessed within this unit. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQ: Spatial Data Management. See Annex D for summary of mapping information.

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Resources Learners should have access to a wide range of library resources, including textbooks and journals, government fiscal and monetary statistics, with specific reference to analysis of construction activities, and industry wide publications. Support materials Textbooks Hillebrandt, P Economic Theory and the Construction Industry 3rd Edition (Palgrave, 2000) Shutt R, Economics for the Construction Industry 3rd Edition (Longman Scientific and Technical, 1995) Quality newspaper and magazine articles on economic issues Technical and professional journals on economic issues TSO Housing and Construction Statistics TSO Annual Abstract of Statistics TSO UK National Accounts

Other publications

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Unit 15:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Individual Student Project


60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit develops the learners ability to record activities, to collect, analyse and apply data, find and use sources of information and to develop solutions. The unit aims to apply the skills, knowledge and understanding developed in other units of the course within a major piece of work that reflects the type of performance and level of ability expected of professional project personnel. It is intended that the learner will work individually on a project that meets the demands of the programme within which the learner is working.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Select and determine the extent of the study and determine methods and procedures Carry out practical activities and investigative work Evaluate observations and results and determine the final outcome Produce a final report for presentation and evaluation.

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Content

Extent of the study Investigate background information: identify relevant source materials and plan practical activities. Establish a list of technical and non-technical sources of information, identify the practical needs of the project, and produce a planned approach Produce a plan: for the completion of the project, including the time scale for each stage, resource requirements and required support links

Investigative work Identify sources of information: background material and supporting information, support the observational phase, development of the final conclusions Carry out planned investigations: record observations in an acceptable method, systematic interpretation and scrutiny

Observations and results Interpretation of observations: identify the final conclusions and identify the method of interpretation and reasoning behind conclusions

Report for presentation Final report: summary of outcomes, analysis and record of the initial stage of project development, analysis and record of the observational stage, interpretation of the results of the study presented in an agreed form with stated conclusions

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Select and determine the extent of the study and determine methods and procedures

determine an overall plan for carrying out the project including a schedule for completing the various stages determine an approach to carry out the various stages of the project identify the background and source material, resource requirements and other support as required to achieve each stage of the project select and carry out appropriate observational/collective techniques record and present relevant data in a standard or agreed format describe and use appropriate evaluation techniques interpret and justify the solution in terms of the original specifications present the report in an agreed format discuss the operation of the project and justify the conclusions in front of peers and assessors

Carry out practical activities and investigative work

Evaluate observations and results and determine the final outcome Produce a final report for presentation and evaluation

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Guidance

Delivery It is intended that the project could draw on areas to meet the demands of the subject matter such as the learners work place, laboratory or ICT Centre. The tutor should agree with the learner the means by which the aims of the project are to be met and how assessment will be undertaken. Evidence of outcomes should be available for scrutiny at each stage of development and may be in a variety of forms. Learners will in general work individually. It is imperative that the learner receives adequate and appropriate support from tutors throughout the projects process and programme. It is recommended that the learner present his/her final report. Other learners, tutors and outside professionals should attend this presentation and contribute to the process. Assessment The focus of the project should reflect the discipline that the learner is following and should be designed to build on the learners academic and industrial experience. It should promote the learners ability to research background source material, observe and record data and analyse the results. Information sources should reflect the area of study and could include published information, textbooks, magazine articles, research and scientific papers. Professional institution publications, British and relevant European Standards, trade information, library resources, computer and internet sources of information should also be utilised. Industrial processes, records and databases, health, safety and welfare, legal and environmental constraints and issues of quality control need to be incorporated in the project. It is intended that the subject of the project will be drawn from a variety of aspects of the construction environment eg project management, the use of materials, construction activities, contractual applications, planning, costing and financial issues as well as incorporating issues relevant to health, safety and welfare, CDM, sustainability and environmental considerations. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F.

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Links This unit may be linked with all other units in the learners chosen programme or employment. The unit is intended to integrate skill, knowledge and understanding that are developed in many of the other units across the programme. CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills will feature strongly throughout the development, implementation and presentation stages of the unit. See Annex D and Annex F. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQ: Spatial Data Management. See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to a wide variety of physical resources provided either by the college or the learners work place. Use of computer applications should be encouraged. Support materials Textbooks Bland, J Statistics for Construction Learners (Construction Press, 1985) Fink, A and Kosecoff, J How to Conduct Surveys (Sage, 1998) Howard, K and Sharp, J et al The Management of a Learner Research Project 3rd Edition (Gower Aldershot, 2002) Norton, P and Allinson, L Asking Research Questions (University of Humberside, 1994) Engineering Council Project Guidelines

Other publications

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Unit 16:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Production Management
60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit will develop the application of management principles and techniques at site management level. The unit will provide learners studying a BTEC Higher National programme with knowledge of the management of construction sites and will develop an appreciation of the interface between management, technology and productivity.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 5 Develop an understanding of the principles and application of effective site management Investigate the importance of effective communication, the use of ICT and the essentials of planning and resource management Analyse and apply cost forecasting, control and reporting techniques Demonstrate expertise in the planning and programming of construction projects and in the design of systems for production control, co-ordination and monitoring Evaluate the implications of quality, environmental considerations, health, safety and welfare arrangements and image within the production process.

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Content

Effective site management Principles and application of effective site management: forecasting, planning, organising, motivating, controlling, co-ordinating, communicating Leadership: of teams, management of the workforce and subcontractors, site induction, training and competence

Effective communication Importance of effective communications: forms of communication; written, visual, oral, information and communication technology; use and application, developments. Barriers to communications, physical, psychological, intellectual. Site information, site meetings, site diaries. Planning, programming and progressing

Cost forecasting, control and reporting techniques Forecasting, control and reporting: site cost control and cost forecasting, cash flow, profit, return, cost, value. Liquidity, borrowing, working capital, profitability, cost and value reconciliation, value-time and cost-time relationships. Variance analysis, unit costing, marginal costing, variable costs, standard costing, absorption costing. Break-even analysis, estimated, target and actual costs

Planning and programming Planning and programming of building projects: design of systems for production control and co-ordination Planning: reasons for planning, method statements, pre-contract, pre-tender, project, short and long term Programming: bar charts, linked bar charts, network analysis, precedence diagrams, line of balance, time-change diagrams Progressing: control, implementation, control and co-ordination of subcontractors

Quality, environmental considerations, health, safety and welfare arrangements and image Quality control and quality assurance standards: samples, testing of materials and workmanship, supervision. Environmental impact of construction, materials manufacture, on-site construction, buildings in use Environmental assessment: law, policies, strategies Environmental economics: cost-benefit analysis, social costs, sustainable development Health, safety and welfare at work: first aid, hazards, risk assessments. CDM Safety Plan, health and safety management, regulations.

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Develop an understanding of the principles and application of effective site management

describe, using case studies, how the principles of site management are applied on construction sites apply these principles against a range of different examples from site practice compare the different forms of communication by reference to an individual case study apply information and communication technology to a range of different applications review and evaluate the different types of planning systems that are used in the construction industry measure cash flow, profit, return cost and value using site data and contractors annual reports prepare a cost and value reconciliation statement for an individual work section apply the different forms of costing systems and evaluate their usefulness prepare a programme of activities using at least two different forms of planning tool (one to determine the critical path) demonstrate how progress is measured and explain how remedial action is implemented in the case of a mismatch between plan and progress explain how subcontractors are incorporated into the overall programme describe how quality is assured on construction sites by reference to case studies and worked examples prepare and evaluate a simple environmental assessment for a project evaluate hazards on construction sites and how the dangers can be minimised

Investigate the importance of effective communication, the use of ICT and the essentials of planning and resource management

Analyse and apply cost forecasting, control and reporting techniques

Demonstrate expertise in the planning and programming of construction projects and in the design of systems for production control and coordination

5 Evaluate the implications of quality, environmental considerations, health, safety and welfare arrangements and image within the production process

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Guidance

Delivery Since it is important that learners have a good understanding of the principles of construction and the industry, it is desirable that this unit should be studied in the second year of a two year programme. Case studies should be used extensively together with a current working knowledge and practice of the construction industry. The unit might usefully involve practitioners to deal with some aspects of the curriculum particularly those that are being introduced into practice. Where appropriate, role play should be encouraged to develop a better understanding of the difficulties that are encountered in applying the various techniques and procedures. Learners will usually work individually and should be required to provide oral presentations from their own studies or experiences. During a role-play, learners would normally work together in groups to present scenarios for discussion. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. Issues of on site training and assessment and competence should feature in the learners work. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F.

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Links This unit relies on a good knowledge and understanding of the construction industry and will draw on knowledge gained in Unit 4: Management Principles and Application. This unit also has strong links with Unit 6: Health, Safety and Welfare and Unit 18: Project Management. Some CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills will feature strongly throughout the development and assessment phases. Learners should be encouraged to use their wider knowledge and experience gained from earlier units and practice. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Site Management Construction Contracting Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Spatial Data Management.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to a wide range of library resources computer software, including textbooks and journals, government and industry wide publications and the different forms of construction programme and associated documents. Support materials Textbooks Ashworth, A Contractual Procedures in the Construction Industry 4th Edition (Longman, 2001) Cooke, B and Williams, P Construction Planning Programming and Control (Macmillan, 1998) Forster, G Construction Site Studies 2nd Edition (Longman, 1989) Fryer, B The Practice of Construction Management (Blackwell, 1997) Oxley R, and Poskitt, J Management Techniques Applied to the Construction Industry (Blackwell, 1996) CIOB Code of Estimating Practice 6th Edition (Addison Wesley Longman, 1997)

Other publications

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Unit 17:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Tendering and Estimating


60 BTEC Higher National H1

Description of unit
This unit provides the learner with a fundamental understanding and application of tendering procedures and the principles and methods of estimating, which form an integral part of the tendering process. This unit will also enable learners to develop a commercial awareness of tendering and estimating and to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the commercial aspects of the Industry.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Demonstrate knowledge of the information required to produce a tender Apply the principles and techniques of estimating Analyse and apply methods of pricing to determine and formulate an estimate for construction operations Evaluate different tendering procedures and contractual arrangements in common use.

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Content

Produce a tender Collection of tendering information: the types of client for which tenders are required, the clients objectives and constraints, the scope of contract documentation required eg bill of quantities, drawings, specifications, conditions of contract etc, an investigation of the nature, source and validity of information provided, collection of additional data as and when required

Techniques of estimating Processes and procedures used to build up an estimate: characteristics of, factors affecting prime costs, collection of data on labour and plant rates, costs of materials including terms of supply, handling, wastage and conversion, method statements and their effect on estimating, use of standard reference documents or company data on output levels, examination of coverage rules for a unit of work using SMM7 or CESMM, calculation of unit rates

Formulate an estimate Commercial and operational factors: effect on final estimate and tender price, preliminaries consistent with tender documentation data, factors which might affect profit margin, determination of on-costs and overheads, all items in the Bill of Quantities incorporated, items required from the health and safety plan clearly shown, commercial awareness of potential competition

Tendering procedures, contractual arrangements Contractors activities associated with the preparation of a tender: considerations which affect a contractors decision to tender, tender preparation strategy, types of contract used including term, schedule of rates, lump sum, design and build etc, open and selective tendering, procedures used to formulate select lists, procedures used in receiving and opening tenders, DBFO schemes and their operation

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Demonstrate knowledge of the information required to produce a tender

specify typical clients for which tenders are required determine the constraints which may apply to the tender process describe the scope of contractual documentation required for tendering collect data required to build up unit costs use standard data document and measurement systems produce a method statement suitable for building a unit cost calculate a unit cost for identified items demonstrate how the bill of quantities format may be used to build up estimates determine critical factors which might affect the profit margin evaluate the effect of health, safety and welfare plans on the tender calculate on-costs and overheads using data supplied describe the stages in both open and selective tendering specify the factors which are used to formulate select lists select forms of contract for a variety of construction applications

Apply the principles and techniques of estimating

Analyse and apply methods of pricing to determine and formulate an estimate for construction operations

Evaluate different tendering procedures and contractual arrangements in common use

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Guidance

Delivery Benefit would be derived from the use of computer packages in the production of estimates. Group work could be used where such an approach would be found in practice such as the information gathering exercise leading to the preparation of the estimate. Role-play and discussion may be considered in relation to planning procedures undertaken during the tender period. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F.

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Links Full time learners would find it useful to study this unit concurrently with units covering building technology, plant and equipment and methods of building procurement. Group work during the in course assessment would help in developing and assessing CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills particularly if integrative assignments are used to link with other units such as Unit 11: Contractual Procedures. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Contracting Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Quantity Surveying Town Planning Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to a library, journals, digests and data base material as part of their self directed study. Access to IT equipment is required for estimating packages. Support materials Other publications CIOB Code of Estimating Practice 6th Edition (Addison Wesley Longman, 1997)

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Unit 18:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Project Management
60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit is designed to provide knowledge and understanding of the principles and application of project management in the construction industry. It will enable learners studying higher national programmes in building or civil engineering to demonstrate both knowledge and understanding of project management. Learners will have the opportunity to apply, analyse and evaluate the effects of project management in the improved management of resources and performance on a construction project.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 5 Define and appraise the concepts and practice of project management Evaluate the requirements of a project manager in the construction industry Analyse the duties and responsibilities of a project manager Evaluate how the clients objectives of time, cost, quality and performance can be improved Describe how the project management process can manage a changing industry by adding value to the project.

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Content

Practice of project management Concepts and practice: definition of project management, historical developments of project management, comparison with project management in other industries. Advantages and disadvantages of project management in practice, review of current literature and research, identification of trends in Europe and the USA

Requirements of a project manager Identification of key requirements: managerial skills, technical knowledge and abilities, personality and psychological factors, leadership, delegation, negotiation, decision-making and clarity of thinking, education and training for project managers, use of internal teams and external consultants

Duties and responsibilities Identification of the clients main objectives: understanding the clients brief, appointing the design team, involvement with the main contractor, reports and recommendations Design process management: co-ordination and control during construction on site contractual relationships of the project manager, powers, responsibilities, authority and accountability, fees

Clients objectives Objectives: the methods used to improve productivity and performance in terms of meeting the clients objectives in development and construction Time: management and control Cost: predictions, certainty and risk Standards and quality: improving standards and achieving quality in building, getting it right first time Communication: information management and communication systems Client influence: clients charter and influence on performance, value for money and best practice

Manage a changing industry by adding value Change: factors that affect the ways in which the project management process can manage a changing industry. Change management in the construction industry. Evaluating change and developing best practices and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), culture of construction best practice, Respect for People Performance indicators: benchmarking project management against other systems and practices, use of KPIs, best practice projects Added value: the importance of adding value to the construction product Productivity: doing more for less

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Define and appraise the concepts and practice of project management

describe project management within the construction industry evaluate the role and work of a project manager within the construction industry compare role of project management in construction with that in other industries and in other countries describe the key characteristics of a project manager explain the type of education, training and occupational standards that are required for project managers compare the advantages and disadvantages of using internal teams or external consultants as project managers and evaluate the benefits to the client analyse the duties and responsibilities of project managers define the contractual implications of using project managers compare the relationships of project managers with the design and production teams describe the role of clients in the construction process and the advantages of them using project management to secure their aims and objectives evaluate ways in which quality and standards are improving in the construction industry and the influence of clients in the process describe the reasons why the construction industry is changing and will continue to change in the foreseeable future explain the concept of best practices in project management and its use to develop benchmarks and KPIs for the construction industry evaluate the ways in which a project manager is able to add-value to the construction process and product

Evaluate the requirements of a project manager in the construction industry

Analyse the duties and responsibilities of a project manager

Evaluate how the clients objectives of time, cost and performance can be better achieved

Describe how the project management process can manage a changing industry by adding value to the project

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Guidance

Delivery This unit is best studied in the second year where learners will already have gathered some understanding of the nature of the construction industry and the general principles and techniques of management. It is important that learners have access to current information from industry regarding the use and development of project management in practice. Case studies should be used extensively together with a current working knowledge of business practices in the construction industry to identify best practices. The teaching of the unit would benefit from the involvement of project manager/practitioners. Where appropriate, role-play should be encouraged to develop an understanding of the application of management techniques and difficulties that are encountered. Learners may also be required to provide oral presentations from their own studies or experiences. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links This unit relies on a good knowledge and understanding of construction technology and the construction industry. It links with Unit 4: Management Principles and Application that should be studied prior to this unit. Learners should be encouraged to use the knowledge and experience gained from earlier units and from practice. It also has links with Unit 16: Production Management. A range of CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills will feature strongly throughout the development and assessment phases.

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The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Site Management Conservation Control Construction Contracting Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Quantity Surveying Spatial Data Management.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to ICT applications and a range of library resources including the annual reports of construction companies, recent government publications and trade and professional literature on which to base knowledge and case studies and to use for assignment purposes. Support materials Textbooks Ashworth, A and Hogg, K Added Value in Design and Construction (Longman, 2000) Bennett, J Construction Project Management (Butterworths, 1985) McGeorge, D and Palmer, A Construction Management: New Directions (Blackwell Science, 1997) Morris, P The Management of Projects New Edition (Thomas Telford, 1997) Rougvie, A Project Evaluation and Development (Batsford, 1988) Walker, A Project Management in Construction 4th Edition (Blackwell Science, 2002) CIOB Code of Practice for Project Management for Construction and Development (Longman, 1996) CIOB Project Management in Building 2nd Edition (CIOB, 1989) Parsloe, C and Wild, L Project Management Handbook for Building Services (BSIRA, 1998)

Other publications

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Unit 19:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Measurement A
60 BTEC Higher National H1

Description of unit
This unit introduces the learner to the measurement of buildings, civil engineering and building services work. The unit has been designed to enable learners studying Construction, Civil Engineering or Building Services Engineering programmes, to apply, analyse and measure a range of components and elements found in buildings and structures.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of measurement techniques and their application Undertake measurement tasks and apply mathematical calculations to the measurement process Produce bills of quantities of measured works using manual techniques Analyse standard method(s) of measurement and codes.

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Content

Measurement techniques Use of measurement during the design, construction and production phases of a project: initial and/or approximate estimating techniques, production of contract documentation, measurement of variations, sub-contract and supply chain packages, final account procedures, maintenance and refurbishment works

Measurement tasks Taking off of measurements and production of quantities: sections of a simple construction project, foundations and substructures, superstructure, including external and internal walls, flat and pitched roof construction and coverings, internal and external finishes, internal components such as doors, windows and staircases and floors, simple mechanical engineering services including plumbing and below ground drainage Compare different standard methods of measurement: used in building, civil engineering and building services engineering

Bills of quantities Production of Bill of Quantities: traditional, cut and shuffle and computer aided systems, working up processes involved with these methods, production of a bill of quantities for a simple work section or trade section of a construction project

Method(s) of measurement Bill format: analyse different formats of bills of quantities, codes and other contract documentation and their use

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of measurement techniques and their application

emonstrate the different uses of measurement and apply the technique to differing situations on a construction project ~ssess the relationship between measurement and the different parties involved in the design, production and maintenance of a construction project apply mathematical and/or mensuration techniques in order to assist the measurement process apply mensuration and mathematical techniques in order to obtain quantities of work take-off and produce quantities for the work sections in accordance with the requirements of the standard method(s) of measurement process and produce simple bills of quantities determine the measurement technique and process to suit the particular situation produce appropriate preliminary and preamble clauses explain the uses of prime cost and provisional sums analyse the different forms of bills of quantities and contract documents determine the correct form of contract documentation for a given particular purpose or situation

Undertake measurement tasks and apply mathematical calculations to the measurement process

Produce bills of quantities of measured works using manual techniques

Analyse standard method(s) of measurement and codes

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Guidance

Delivery The use of a small project or development should be used to assist in the understanding of measurement in all its forms and for all professionals involved in the construction process. Since it is important that learners have a good understanding of the principles of construction and the industry, it is recommended that this unit is studied in the first year of the programme. It is important that the learners have access to the main standard methods of measurement and to use them where appropriate. These should be current or include amendments where appropriate. The emphasis on one method of measurement or another will depend on whether the learners are studying the Construction or Civil Engineering programmes. Simple construction or development projects should be used extensively, together with a current working knowledge and practice of the construction industry. Learners may be required to provide oral presentations from their own studies or experiences. During a role-play, learners should normally work together in a group to present scenarios for discussion. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F.

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Links This unit relies on a good knowledge and understanding of the construction technology, as well as the industry itself. Learners should be encouraged to use their wider knowledge and experience gained from earlier units and from practice. Some CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills feature strongly throughout the development and assessment phases. See Annex D and Annex F. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQ: Quantity Surveying. See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to a wide range of library resources, including textbooks, professional and technical journals, government and industry wide publications, copies of previous bills of quantities where appropriate, and the different methods of measurement and associated documents. Ideally, learners should have access to relevant ICT facilities and software packages that have been developed to assist the measurement process. Support materials Textbooks Hore, A and Kehoe, J et al Construction 1 Management, Finance and Measurement (Macmillan, 1997) Seeley, I Building Quantities Explained 5th Edition (Palgrave Macmillan, 1998) Seeley, I Civil Engineering Quantities 5th Edition (Palgrave Macmillan, 1993) Willis, A and Trench, W Williss Elements of Quantity Surveying 9th Edition (Blackwell Science, 1998) ICE Civil Engineering Standard Method of Measurement 3rd Edition (Thomas Telford, 1991) National Building Agency National Building Specification 4 Vols (RIBA, 1973) RICS SMM7 The Standards Method of Measurement of Building Works Revised Edition (RICS, 1998)

Other publications

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Unit 20:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Building Control and Inspection


60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit provides learners with a fundamental knowledge and understanding of the statutory building control process and the application of the Building Regulation requirements. Learners will interpret and apply planning and building control requirements to a range of different types of buildings.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of the building control system and the primary legislation Determine the origins of statutory regulations and controls in England and Wales Analyse the legal issues related to enforcement of the statutory regulations and controls Analyse and evaluate the issues involved in interpretation of the various statutory controls and regulations and apply the knowledge gained to a range of construction situations.

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Content

Principles of the building control Structure and system of building control in England and Wales: the current system of Local Authority and Private Approved Inspectors, primary legislation, the role of central government in the making of the legislation

Origins of statutory regulations and controls Modern building control: the building design and construction process, a brief history of building control in England and Wales, the process of notification of a building control activity

Enforcement of the statutory regulations Enforcement of building control legislation: applied to the construction process, dangerous structures and demolition. Enforcement of the building regulations through the magistrates court, enforcement of the building regulations through the service of notices, enforcement of dangerous structure legislation, the control of demolition work to protect the public safety, listing of building

Interpretation of the various statutory controls Application and enforcement of the building regulations and approved documents: the building regulations and the approved documents, primary legislation requiring basic provisions and minimum standards

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of the building control system and the primary legislation Determine the origins of statutory regulations and controls in England and Wales

compare the two systems of control of a construction project describe the role of government in producing legislation for building control describe the application of the primary legislation explain the significant developments in legislation over the years that has resulted in the current system describe the various processes of submission and notification to a building control authority (ie full plans, building notice, initial notice) evaluate the uses and limitations of the above systems determine the appropriate legislation for different situations describe the process of taking a case to court evaluate the process of serving a formal notice analyse the application of the Building Regulations to a range of developments up to and including medium rise commercial, industrial and residential developments describe and evaluate the requirements of primary legislation to control aspects such as provision of drainage, water supply, building over sewers etc

3 Analyse the legal issues related to enforcement of the statutory regulations and controls Analyse and evaluate the issues involved in interpretation of the various statutory controls and regulations and apply the knowledge gained to a range of construction situations 4

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Guidance

Delivery A mixture of lectures, projects and presentations is recommended. Group work is seen as productive with each member of the group being given a particular point to argue or support. The use of visiting lecturers is encouraged given the specialist nature of much of the work. The unit can be delivered in either year of the two year programme. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links This unit has strong links with Unit 1: Design Principles and Application, Unit 7: Technology A, Unit 8: Technology B, Unit 22: Technology C and Unit 27: Design Technology. Its content is relevant throughout the design of any programme designed from this suite of units. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Conservation Control Property Management Town Planning Valuation.

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Resources Access to the Building Regulations, approved documents, British and relevant European Standard Specifications, a range of design guides, manufacturers specifications, relevant legislation and advanced construction textbooks will be required. Support materials Textbooks Clarke, H Knights Building Control Law (Tolley, 1995) Davis, L Guide to the Building Regulations 1991 for England and Wales (Butterworth Architecture, 1992) Downward, A Building Control: A Guide to the Law (College of Estate Management, 1992) Stephenson, J The Building Regulations Explained 6th Edition (E and FN Spon, 2000) TSO The Building Regulations and the Approved Documents TSO The Building Act 1983

Other publications

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Unit 21:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Supply Chain Management


60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit provides the learner with an introduction to supply chain management within the construction industry. The unit is intended to enable learners studying BTEC Higher National programmes in Construction, Civil Engineering or Building Services Engineering to demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of supply chain management. The unit has been designed to identify the roles and responsibilities of manufacturers, material and component suppliers, direct and nominated subcontractors and the companies that are frequently employed by the building owner/client direct in order to complete the construction works to satisfactory hand-over.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 Evaluate the various types of supply chain management organisations, identifying their range of activities and functions and their effects on the construction process Describe the size and scope of subcontractors, material suppliers and component manufacturers and trends in the development of technologies and in the management and organisation of construction works Evaluate the different kinds of supply chain management arrangements and analyse the procurement and contractual implications with the main contractor using the different forms of subcontract Analyse the work of the main contractor in respect of supply chain management, determining methods of planning, purchasing, programming, progressing and payments.

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Content

Supply chain management organisations Types of supply chain management organisations: contractor employed subcontractors, specialist subcontractors, nominated subcontractors, named subcontractors, labour only, artists and tradesmen, suppliers, manufacturers, prime cost sums Classification: by activities and functions, types of organisations, work carried out, specialisation, trends and developments in practice, effects such as efficiency, effectiveness and economy of the construction process

Size and scope of subcontractors Suppliers and component manufacturers: subcontractors: types and functions, specialist and non-specialist firms, suppliers, size, scope, types, products, goods, materials, components, availability of raw materials, labour only firms Off-site manufacture: products, trends, development, innovation; work on site, effects of off-site manufacture, assembly on-site, quality, precision Skill requirements: labour needs, materials handling and equipment, training and development, research and innovation practices

Contractual implications Different kinds of suppliers: nominated and named subcontractors, contractor employed subcontractors, labour only firms, directly employed firms on behalf of the employer, suppliers: nominated, named, direct, builders merchants Procurement methods and arrangements: contractual conditions, tendering arrangements, main contract implications, forms and agreements, intentions of parties, commencement and completion, control of the works, payments, insurance, determination Planning: programming, progressing and control, work packages Legal requirements: and responsibilities, within the contract and at common law

Work of the main contractor Planning: incorporation of supply chain management within the contractors overall contract programme, preplanning, short term planning, stages in the planning process, value chains and their importance in the construction process Purchasing: selection, orders, specification, quality, goods received, standards, ownership of goods and materials, maintenance Programming: techniques used, bar charts, linked bar charts, network analysis, precedence diagrams, line of balance, co-ordination of firms on site Progressing: review, recording against the programme, delays, interim payments, cash and trade discounts, retention, final payments, set-off, provisions in the main and subcontract conditions

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Evaluate the various types of supply chain management organisations, identifying their range of activities and functions and their effects on the construction process

determine and classify the different supply chain management organisations evaluate the contribution that these firms make to the construction process and their effects generally on the project assess trends in practice regarding supply chain organisations describe the type and range of suppliers of building materials, goods and components and manufacturers of goods and components determine trends and developments in the off-site manufacture or prefabrication of construction products assess the effects of off-site manufacture on site operations evaluate the procurement and contractual implications associated with subcontractors and those directly employed by the client and suppliers differentiate the advantages and disadvantages of the different procurement and contractual relationships describe how case law applies directly to supply chain management assess the effects of supply chain management on the organisation and work of the main contractor calculate payments to supply chain management firms in accordance with contractual practices evaluate value chains in the construction industry with value chains in any other industry

2 Describe the size and scope of subcontractors, material suppliers and component manufacturers and trends in the development of technologies and in the management and organisation of construction works Evaluate the different kinds of supply chain management arrangements and analyse the procurement and contractual implications with the main contractor using the different forms of subcontract

Analyse the work of the main contractor in respect of supply chain management, determining methods of planning, purchasing, programming, progressing and payments

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Guidance

Delivery Since it is important that learners have a good understanding of the principles of construction, it is recommended that this unit should be studied in the second year of a two year programme. Learners should have access to the main standard forms of building contract together with a range of forms of subcontract and agreements. These should be current or include amendments where necessary. Extracts from the forms should be provided where the unit requires. Case studies should be used extensively together with a current working knowledge of their application in the construction industry. The unit might usefully involve practitioners to deal with some aspects of the curriculum. Where appropriate role play should be encouraged to develop an understanding of the application and difficulties that are encountered in applying the contractual and procurement procedures. Learners may be required to provide oral presentations from their own studies or experiences. During such role plays learners would normally work together in groups to present scenarios for discussion. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links A comprehensive range of CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills will feature strongly throughout the development and assessment phases. Learners should be encouraged to use their wider knowledge and experience gained from earlier and concurrent units and from practice.

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The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Site Management Construction Contracting Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Quantity Surveying Town Planning Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to contract documents, a range of ICT and library resources including annual reports of construction companies on which to base knowledge and case studies and to use for assignment purposes. Support materials Textbooks Ashworth, A Contractual Procedures in the Construction Industry 4th Edition (Longman, 2001) Cooke, B and Williams, P Construction Planning, Programming and Control (Macmillan, 1997) The Aqua Group Tenders and Contracts for Building 3rd Edition (Blackwell Science, 1999)

Other publications

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Unit 22:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Technology C
60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit provides the learner with an opportunity to explore, to a greater depth, the current issues of importance in construction. This will enable the learners to further enhance their skills in reasoning, analysis and communication and so improve their study of the other units in the programme. The unit will provide learners with the opportunity to develop their communication skills (oral, graphical and written) and is particularly relevant to learners following the design discipline.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must be able to: 1 2 3 4 Evaluate current construction issues and practices Analyse the various forms and methods of special construction Explore the use of research and analytical techniques to support the design process and selection of the solution Undertake a presentation of the chosen design solution, using oral, graphical and written communication.

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Content

Current construction issues and practices Knowledge and understanding of current construction issues: concept to reality, application to buildability, sustainable construction, lean construction, fast track construction, green field versus brown field developments, refurbishment, conversion and adaptation

Methods of special construction Forms and methods of special construction: energy saving construction, recycled building, alternative technology buildings, various cultural buildings, tall structures, large span structures, hi-tec construction forms, applied engineering constructional forms

Research and analytical techniques Research analysis: understanding of the main theories, methodologies, practices and skills associated with research and analysis, current issues or practices, special forms or method of construction, hi-tec engineering constructional forms

Presentation of the design solution Oral presentation: understanding of the main theories, practices, level of competence typical of industrial practice, together with graphical and written communications

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Evaluate current construction issues and practices

determine current issues and practices which will be presented in the form of portfolio and oral presentation demonstrate knowledge of the subject, from original research describe the implications of issues and practices for the built environment and the construction process analyse and compare the benefits of green field versus brown field development analyse and compare the benefits of redevelopment versus development explain and analyse special forms of construction which will be presented in a portfolio and oral presentation evaluate the benefits of hi-tec constructional methods explain how applied engineering construction methods affect the traditional design process analyse and extract information and knowledge required to demonstrate an understanding of the current issues and practices and methods of special construction apply analytical techniques to given methods of construction present and effectively communicate, in graphical and written form, the solution to given design problems and their processes

2 Analyse the various forms and methods of special construction

3 Explore the use of research and analytical techniques to support the design solution

4 Undertake a presentation of the design solution, using oral, graphical and written communication

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Guidance

Delivery This unit is concerned with a large amount of knowledge and understanding from previous units. It is recommended therefore that the unit should be studied in the second year of a two year programme. Case studies should be used extensively together with learners being given time and resources to carry out their wide-ranging research. The unit might usefully involve practitioners to deal with some aspect of the curriculum. Learners will usually work individually on their portfolio and presentations. Where possible, learners should also be encouraged to converse with practitioners and others on the internet. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, particularly for outcome 4, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. The evidence should demonstrate the ability to draw detailed architectural style drawings both manually, and by using CAD and other current, modern, ICT facilities. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F.

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Links This unit relies upon a sound knowledge of the working and technology of construction gained from other units in the programme. Learners should be encouraged to use their wider knowledge and experience from these other units. In particular Unit 1: Design Principles and Application, Unit 7: Technology A, Unit 8: Technology B, Unit 12: Refurbishment and Adaptation, Unit 26: Design Procedures and Unit 27: Design Technology as well as the learners own experiences gained in practice. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Site Management Conservation Control Construction Contracting Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Spatial Data Management Town Planning Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to design and CAD facilities and a wide range of resources both in a library format and access to the internet to consider information from a wider source. Support materials Textbooks Edwards, B Green Buildings Pay (Spon, 1998) Gauld, B Structures for Architects 3rd Edition (Longman, 1994) Lawson, B How Designers Think 3rd Edition (Butterworth Architecture, 1997) Scott, A Dimensions of Sustainability (E and FN Spon, 1998) Thomas, R Environmental Design (E and FN Spon, 1995) Various Professional and technical journals

Other publications

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Unit 23:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Specification and Contract Documentation


60 BTEC Higher National H1

Description of unit
This unit provides an introduction to the preparation and application of contract documents within the construction industry. The unit has been designed to enable learners studying construction programmes to demonstrate a skills, knowledge and understanding of the production of contract documents, and to be able to apply, analyse and evaluate their effects and outcomes on the successful awarding and completion of construction projects.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Describe the various types of contract documents that are required on a construction project Demonstrate an understanding and application of how construction works are specified in respect of standards and quality Analyse the contractual provisions of the various contract documents and their relationship to each other Evaluate and apply the contract documents to all stages of a construction project.

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Content

Types of contract documents Drawings: layout, content, evolution through the design process, priority of drawings, ownership, return of drawings Forms of contract: types, articles of agreement, conditions of contract, appendices, priority of information Bills of quantities: purpose, preparation, uses, contents, types, bills of approximate quantities Specification: project specification, performance specification, schedules of rates, National Building Specification Schedules: for internal finishings, doors and widows, inspection chambers, drainage, etc Master programme: its preparation by the contractor, information requirements Co-ordinated Project Information (CPI): common arrangements for production information

Standards and quality Specification: purpose and use, as a basis for tendering, in ordering materials, goods and components, on-site by the contractor, clerk of works and others Contents: quality of materials, standards of work, samples of materials and workmanship, testing of materials and work, description of the work to be executed, pricing by the contractor, materials quality: use of British Standards, workmanship standards: use of Codes of Practice, National Building Specification. Eurocodes and other international comparisons

Contractual provisions Issues relating to contract documents: different forms of contract relevant to the programme, issues relating to contract documents within the different forms of sub-contract Contractual requirements: copies of contract documents, availability of documents on site, discrepancies between documents, ownership of design, other information, priority information. Disputes and how they may arise, use of contract documents and the methods used for resolving them

Apply the contract documents Application of contract documents to construction projects: pre-contract and post-contract phases, drafting of specifications through clear, concise and accurate descriptions of materials, workmanship, work to be executed, use of information technology and specialist computer software Drafting of specification clauses: understanding of the clients brief, liabilities of the parties involved, user needs and requirements. Legal rights and responsibilities, statutory controls imposed on the project, factors relating to the environment, planning and building control requirements

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Describe the various types of contract documents that are required on a construction project

explain the various contract documents required in the different forms of contract procurement arrangements describe the relationship between the various contract documents making use of the principles outlined in Co-ordinated Project Information (CPI) review the purpose of specification writing and its use and relevance within the construction industry by the different parties involved write for major work sections, typical and appropriate clause contents of a specification incorporate within these work sections, reference to national and international quality and standards determine the occurrence of contract documents within the forms of contract analyse the inter-relationship of the different documents within the forms of contract describe how disputes arising from poorly prepared and deficient contract documents are able to be resolved prepare a complete specification from drawings for a domestic building, simple industrial or commercial building or a small engineering project apply valid specification clauses to communicate design information to clients and other members of the design and construction team, including the use of sketches, schedules and drawn information

Demonstrate an understanding and application of how construction works are specified in respect of standards and quality

Analyse the contractual provisions of the various contract documents and their relationship to each other

Evaluate and apply the contract documents to all stages of a construction project

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Guidance

Delivery Learners will require a good understanding of the principles of construction including the properties of materials and an understanding of the contractual implications of construction projects. It is important that learners have access to the main forms of building contract and the associated contract documents, such as architectural drawings and specifications that might be used. Case studies should be used extensively together with a current working knowledge of the construction industry. The unit might usefully involve practitioners, such as architects or surveyors, to deal with certain aspects of the curriculum. A large proportion of the unit will involve learners in analysing and preparing materials and workmanship specification clauses appropriate to specific projects depicted in working drawings. Learners will normally work individually and it may be desirable to provide learners with individual projects to reduce the amount of collusion. Wherever possible learners should be encouraged to explore their own work situations as a further source of information. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, some group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links This unit relies on a good understanding of construction technology and the construction industry. The unit has links with Unit 2: Science and Materials, Unit 7: Technology A, Unit 8: Technology B, Unit 19: Measurement A and Unit 25: Measurement B. It is important to utilise as far as possible the kinds of information encountered and used by practitioners, including the use of information technology software and systems. A range of common skills will feature strongly throughout the development and assessment phases. Learners should be encouraged to use their wider knowledge and experience gained from earlier units and from practice.

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The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Site Management Conservation Control Construction Contracting Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Quantity Surveying Town Planning.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to a wide range of ICT and library resources, including textbooks and journals, government and industry wide publications including forms and conditions of construction contracts and previously prepared drawings and specifications that have been used in practice. Support materials Textbooks Ashworth, A Contractual Procedures in the Construction Industry 4th Edition (Longman, 2001) Wills, C J and Willis, J A Specification Writing for Architects and Surveyors 11th Edition (Blackwell Science, 1997) BSI British Standards Codes of Practice Latest Editions BSI National Building Agency Specification Latest Editions Building Project Information Committee Common Arrangement of Work Sections for Building Work (Building Project Information Committee, 1987) Co-ordinating Committee for Project Information A Guide with Examples Joint Contracts Tribunal JCT Forms of Contract Latest Revisions/Editions The Aqua Group Pre-Contract Practice for the Building Team 8th Edition (Blackwell Science, 1992)

Other publications

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Unit 24:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Structural Behaviour and Detailing


60 BTEC Higher National H1

Description of unit
This unit is designed to help learners develop the skills and knowledge needed to apply the scientific principles associated with the properties and behaviour of structures, imposed loading on structures and load transference to individual elements. The various factors that affect structural behaviour and underpin the design of simple structural elements are explored both in theory and through the use of physical models. Standard design calculations and codes of practice are investigated, as is the subsequent translation of the results of such calculations into detailed drawings for the purpose of fabrication and construction. This unit will also include the preparation of schedules and cutting lists. The emphasis is on the standard methods of design and detailing used for a variety of structural elements constructed in a variety of structural materials. This unit also provides an introduction to the use of contemporary computer software as an aid to the design process.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 5 Investigate the strength and elastic properties of typical structural materials Determine the loading conditions for simple structures and show an appreciation of the performance and behaviour of the structure down to foundation level Analyse statically determinate structures, including simple frames, and calculate the stress in individual elements of that structure Design elements of a structure using manual methods and also with the aid of computer software Detail elements of a structure both by manual methods and by using computer assisted drawing (CAD) in a variety of structural materials.

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Content

Strength and elastic properties of typical structural materials Basic principles that underpin structural design to include: the concept of structure and structural response including the use of physical models to demonstrate non-standard structural situations, the concept of structure and structural response including the use of physical models to demonstrate non-standard structural solutions, types of forces experienced by structural elements, compression, tension, shear and bending Response of structural materials: forces according to material classification (malleable, ductile, brittle, soft, strong). Elastic and plastic deformation, limits of proportionality and modulus of elasticity, permissible stress, factors of safety (including partial safety factors in limit state design)

Loading conditions for simple structures The cause of loading on structures and the principles, methods, practices and procedures used to assess their effects to include: dead, imposed and wind loading on a structure. British Standard Codes of Practice on loading, including wind loading, definition and application of limit states and load factors, basic factors affecting load transference at joints, both restrained and unrestrained, transfer of loading from superstructure to foundation and safe ground bearing pressure

Statically determinate structures The stressing of structures and an appreciation of the principles, methods, practices and procedures: assess the effects of such stresses, the concept of structure, the elements that comprise a structure Forces and reactions: caused by direct loading, assumptions made when analysing simple structural elements such as beams, cantilevers, columns, walls and framed structures, compressive, tensile, shear and bending stresses as found in structural elements under load, shear force and bending moment diagrams and the relationship between them

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Design elements of a structure Selection of the appropriate factors affecting the design of structural elements: what is being loaded, how it is being loaded, how it is being supported etc, sectional properties of simple beam sections determined from the use of standard formulae or manufacturers published tables (Ixx, Iyy, Zxx, Zyy) Variation in bending stresses: across a section for simply supported beams and cantilevers, axial stress and bending stress on a column due to simple concentric and asymmetrical loading Combinations of axial and bending stresses: on a column cross-section to ascertain maximum stress, section sizes for simply supported beams subject to both point and uniformly distributed loads Section sizes and tensile reinforcement: requirements for simply supported reinforced concrete beams and one-way spanning concrete floor slabs, basic factors affecting the design of plain masonry columns and walls, design of timber floor joists to carry a given load over a simply supported span

Detail elements of a structure Manual and CAD techniques: used to produce working drawings (in compliance with standard practice and including all required schedules and cutting lists) for the purposes of production, fabrication and erection. Roof trusses, portal frames, plate girders in structural steel including details of node arrangements, cleats, shear plates, bolts, welding requirements and any external fittings Simple elements of a structure: column foundations, stair flights and landings, continuous beams, continuous one-way spanning floor slabs, columns and column/floor intersections in in-situ reinforced concrete including chairs for top steel, cut-off points for reinforcement, distribution reinforcement, cover distances, main bars, distribution bars and links, shear reinforcement, starter bars and kickers for column shutters Simple elements of structural timber: joist to joist and joist to support connections. Timber connectors, bolts, plates, gang-nail connectors, cleats, shear rings and hangers. Suspended timber floors including strutting, lateral restraint into walls and trimming of openings including grade and type of timber, nominal and actual sizes, sawn, planed and prepared components

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Investigate the strength and elastic properties of typical structural materials

produce models of structural situations and describe the outcome for different materials under applied loading conditions calculate stresses and strains for simple elements and ascertain the modulus of elasticity of the material use permissible stress to calculate permissible loads identify loading conditions for a simple structure and apply load factors in appropriate situations calculate ground-bearing pressures beneath foundations due to loading from superstructure and determine appropriate foundation size for allowable ground bearing pressure determine reactions for simply supported beams and cantilevers subject to point and distributed loads produce diagrams to represent the variation in bending moment and shear force for simply supported beams and cantilevers subject to point and distributed loads demonstrate the relationship between loading intensity, shear force, bending moment and deflection at any section for a simply supported beam under various loading conditions determine the force acting in members of a statically determinate frame

2 Determine the loading conditions for simple structures and show an appreciation of the performance and behaviour of the structure down to foundation level Analyse statically determinate structures, including simple frames, and calculate the stress in individual elements of that structure

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Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Design elements of a structure using manual methods and also with the aid of computer software

determine the required section size for structural steel beams and cantilevers subjected to point and distributed loads using manual, published data and computer software methods determine the required section size and tensile reinforcement requirement for in-situ reinforced concrete beams, one way spanning floor slabs and cantilevers subjected to point and distributed loads using manual, published data and computer software methods determine the design of plain masonry columns and walls determine timber floor joist section sizes over simply supported spans for given loading conditions draw manually and using CAD elements of structural steelwork including fabrication details and produce bolt schedules and cutting lists draw manually and using CAD various elements of an in-situ reinforced concrete structure showing all reinforcement referencing and construction detail including reinforcement schedules draw manually, and using CAD, elements of structural timber showing connection details and interaction with supports and openings

5 Detail elements of a structure both by manual methods and by using computer assisted drawing (CAD) in a variety of structural materials

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Guidance

Delivery It is envisaged that 30% of the unit is devoted to detailing of structural elements. Learners should be encouraged to work through problems related to real life situations so that they become familiar with the application of calculations to real structures. Once the design for an element of a structure has been clarified, the tutors role should be of a counselling rather than directing nature. The learner should be encouraged to study recent completed drawings and designs so that he/she becomes familiar with current practice and standards of presentations. Physical modelling and testing is best accomplished in small groups. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Learners evidence may be in the form of manual calculations with computer-based output, supplementing the numerical content. Drawings should indicate manual drafting abilities and knowledge of CAD. At least one drawing should be taken to completion with full construction details for a complete element of a structure. The presentational aspects of the evidence need to be carefully considered. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links This unit builds upon the knowledge gained in construction and materials related units and is linked to Unit 2: Science and Materials, Unit 3: Analytical Methods, Unit 7: Technology A and Unit 8: Technology B. Entry requirement for this unit should include some knowledge of Science, Materials, Mathematics and Mechanics at National or Advanced level. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Conservation Control Spatial Data Management.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information.

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Resources Learners should have access to experimental and modelling equipment for the production and testing of structural models. Design and drafting equipment and appropriate computer software with at least A2 size plotting facilities. Support materials Textbooks Boughton, B Reinforced Concrete Detailers Manual 3rd Edition (Crosby Lockwood Staples, 1979) Cainl J and Hulse, R Structural Mechanics 2nd Edition (Palgrave, 2000) Draycott, T Structural Elements Design Manual (Heinemann Professional, 1990) Durka, A and Morgan, W et al Structural Mechanics 6th Edition (Pearson, 1996) Newton, P Structural Detailing 2nd Edition (Macmillan, 1991) Rossow, E Analysis and Behaviour of Structures (Prentice Hall, 1996) Westbrook, R and Walker, D Structural Engineering Design in Practice 3rd Edition (Longman, 1996) British Standards Institute BS 6399-1:1996 Loading for Buildings. Code of Practice for Dead and Imposed Loads (British Standards Institute, 1996)

Other publications

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Unit 25:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Measurement B
60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit aims to extend the skills gained in Unit 19: Measurement A by developing the composite measurement of more complex elements, components and building services to nondomestic and large scale buildings. The unit has been designed to enable learners studying Construction, Civil Engineering and Building Services Engineering to apply, analyse and measure a range of components and elements found in large scale buildings or structures, and to produce approximate quantities.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Apply measurement techniques to a range of more complex situations Produce measured quantities for a range of elements and components to large scale (nondomestic) structures Prepare relevant preamble and preliminary items to given situations Produce measured bills of quantities and schedules using both manual and computer aided systems, including interim certificates and final accounts.

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Content

Measurement techniques Standard techniques applied to the measurement of large-scale projects or developments: production of bills of quantities, measurement of variations, production of sub-contract and supply side packages, production of final accounts, maintenance and refurbishment works

Measured quantities Take-off measurements and produce quantities for the following elements or work sections: complicated foundations and substructures including brick and concrete basement, sloping site excavations and underpinning, superstructure including complicated external and internal walls Elements of a building: concrete and steel framed buildings; in-situ, pre-cast and prestressed concrete structures; brick and masonry structures; complex flat and pitched roof construction and coverings with metal coverings; internal and external finishes and treatments; internal components such as doors, windows, panelling staircases and kitchen units; differing types of floor systems Building engineering services: plumbing, heating and ventilating, electrical installations and above and below ground disposal systems Measurement techniques: payments, final account work, different forms of procurement and different types of contractual arrangement

Preamble and preliminary items Preamble clauses: as required by the Standard Method of Measurement, writing preliminary items/clauses for inclusion in a bill of quantities

Bills of quantities Traditional, cut and shuffle and computer aided systems: working up processes as appropriate to such methods, production of bills of quantities for a major work section or trade section of a construction project, different formats of bills of quantities and other contract documentation and their effect on the construction team Payment: production of interim and final accounts

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Apply measurement techniques to a range of more complex situations

compare the different uses of measurement apply the technique of measurement to differing situations on a complex construction project assess the role of measurement in the design, production and maintenance of a construction project apply appropriate techniques in order to obtain quantities of work for types of contractual arrangements take-off and produce quantities in accordance with the requirements of the standard method(s) of measurement determine the measurement technique and process to suit the particular situation produce appropriate draft preliminary items/clauses for inclusion in a bill of quantities produce specific and appropriate draft preamble clauses, as specifically required by the SMM, for inclusion in the bill of quantities process and produce bills of quantities for more complex work sections, using at least one of the standard methods for producing bills of quantities apply different methods of producing bills of quantities analyse the reasons for using different formats for bills of quantities generate a variety of appropriate interim certificates and final accounts for a variety of end-users

Produce measured quantities for a range of elements and components to large scale (non-domestic) structures

3 Prepare relevant preamble and preliminary items to given situations

Produce measured bills of quantities and schedules using both manual and computer aided systems, including interim certificates and final accounts

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Guidance

Delivery Large-scale projects or developments should be used to assist in the understanding of the measurement of complex elements in the construction process. Since it is important that learners have a good understanding of the principles of construction, the content of Unit 19: Measurement A and the industry itself, it is recommended that this unit is studied in the second year of a two year programme. It is important that the learners have access to the appropriate standard methods of measurement. These should be current or include amendments where appropriate. The emphasis of this unit is for those learners who are studying the construction programmes. Construction or development projects of a more complex nature should be used to extend the knowledge gained by the learner, together with a current working knowledge and practice of the construction industry. Learners should work individually, but they could be required to provide oral presentations from their own studies or experiences. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links This unit relies on a good knowledge and understanding of the construction technology and is designed to build on the previous knowledge gained in Unit 19: Measurement A as well as experience of the industry itself. Learners should be encouraged to use their wider knowledge and experience gained from earlier units and from practice. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQ: Quantity Surveying. See Annex D for summary of mapping information.

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Resources Learners should have access to a wide range of library resources, including textbooks, professional and technical journals, government and industry wide publications, copies of previous bills of quantities where appropriate, and the different methods of measurement and associated documents. Learners should have access to relevant ICT facilities and software packages developed to assist the measurement process. Support materials Textbooks Barnes, M Civil Engineering Standard Methods of Measurement Handbook 2nd Edition (Thomas Telford, 1992) Seeley, I Advanced Building Measurement 2nd Edition (Palgrave Macmillan, 1989) Seeley, I Building Quantities Explained 5th Edition (Palgrave Macmillan, 1998) Barbour Index (CD-Rom) or equivalent Barbour Index Code of Procedure for the Production of Drawings RICS/CCPI Code of Procedure for Specifications RICS/CCPI Common Arrangement of Work Sections (CAWS) RICS/CCPI National Building Agency National Building Specification 4 Vols (RIBA, 1973) RICS SMM7 The Standard Method of Measurement of Building Works Revised Edition (RICS, 1998)

Other publications

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Unit 26:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Design Procedures
60 BTEC Higher National H1

Description of unit
This unit builds upon the fundamental understanding of design provided by Unit 1: Design Principles and Application and outlines the broad modern role of the design technologist within the construction industry. It forms the basis for the successful completion of the cognate design units. The unit encourages learners to examine the essential principles and procedures that underpin design. There is an opportunity to use these principles and procedures to create design solutions that meet the needs and requirements of owners, clients, occupiers and society in general.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Describe the nature of design and its attendant methods, technologies, processes and procedures in terms of design practice Describe the nature of the roles and responsibilities of the design technologist in terms of design practice Evaluate the roles and responsibilities of the design technologist during the contract phase of the construction process Analyse the roles and responsibilities of the design technologist during the project management phase of the construction process.

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Content

Design practice Historic role of the designer: identify the pattern of evolution and emerging modern practice forms including group and multi-disciplinary approaches, identify various members of a design team and the contribution of the design technologist to the delivery of successful design Legal relationship: of the designer, client and other members of the design team: the concept of negligence and indemnity insurance, examine the RIBA Plan of Work and develop the organisational framework used as a basis of design team communication and production of design briefs showing their relationship to customer requirements

Roles and responsibilities design practice Principles of successful design: how current technology can assist and influence the designer, historic developments in building design and resultant terminology of design, basis of design concepts and their communication within the design team, need to freeze design to enable design development Economics of design and production: appropriate information, specifications writing and their influence on design, specialist design requirements for the handicapped and disabled

Roles and responsibilities contract phase Responsibilities of the members of the design team during the contract period: methods and tools of quality control and the responsibility of the designer, inspection and certification of work including analysis and evaluation of administrative and contract documents, information co-ordination with specialists and consultants, contract completion, hand-over defects liability and final certification

Roles and responsibilities project management phase Responsibilities of the project management team: drawing office programmes, time sheets, stages of fees and effective leadership and personnel management, standard contract documents, CAD and information retrieval systems

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Describe the nature of design and its attendant methods, technologies, processes and procedures in terms of design practice

generate a consolidated design brief as an outcome of a role play exercise demonstrate the ability to illustrate an appropriate design team that would develop the design describe the organisation and allocation of responsibilities within this team eg as per the recommendations of the RIBA Plan of Work produce specification clauses for various materials and performances generate a conceptual design to meet the requirements of an established design brief describe successful aspects of a design using appropriate design terminology correctly determine the effectiveness of various tools for quality control on and off site demonstrate use of the certification process to guide and monitor a project generate and interpret drawing office programmes use time sheets to work out hourly rates describe the project management role in leading the team and managing people recognise and understand the interrelationship of standard documents and retrieval systems

Describe the nature of the roles and responsibilities of the design technologist in terms of design practice

Evaluate the roles and responsibilities of the design technologist during the contract phase of the construction process Analyse the roles and responsibilities of the design technologist during the project management phase of the construction process

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Guidance

Delivery In order to permit the learners to apply the knowledge gained on this unit to other units, it is recommended that this unit be studied in the first year of a two year programme. Various case studies, documentation and projects should be used to assist and enhance the understanding and learning on the unit. Where practical, site visits of successful projects should be incorporated as part of the study. The centre may also find it useful to include guest speakers and independent assessors at presentations as part of the delivery of this unit. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. The evidence should demonstrate the ability to draw detailed architectural style and/or structural drawings both manually, and by using CAD and other current, modern, ICT facilities. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links This unit relies on the inputs of various other allied units such as Unit 1: Design Principles and Application as well a sound understanding of construction technology and the industry as a whole. Knowledge, skills and understanding gained on other units should be invoked in this unit in order to encourage the wider understanding of the principles of design.

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The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Conservation Control Property Management Spatial Data Management Town Planning Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to design facilities and to a wide range of ICT and library resources, including textbooks and journals, government and industry wide publications, BRE Digests, professional journals, Codes of Practice etc, the internet and other research materials, previously prepared specifications that have been used in practice, and other associated documents. Support materials Textbooks Adler, D Metric Handbook 2nd Edition (Butterworth Architecture, 1999) Thompson, A Architectural Design Procedures 2nd Edition (Arnold, 1998) RIBA Architects Handbook of Practice Management 5th Edition (RIBA, 1991) RIBA Plan of Work for Design Team Operation (RIBA, 1973)

Other publications

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Unit 27:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Design Technology
60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit links with Unit 1: Design Principles and Application and explores the complex interrelationship of building components and assembly required to satisfy user needs and design solutions. The unit is intended to inform learners of essential design aspects that must be provided for by the construction process. It equips learners with the technical knowledge to realise the design solution and it complements the other design units.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Determine the specification of materials, systems and methods used to realise a design solution and apply appropriate procedures to guarantee quality control Predict the mechanisms by which construction materials fail in use and propose preventative and remedial measures to deal with these Propose and evaluate the ways in which the concept of buildability and sustainability addresses the important issues confronting the construction industry Produce a comprehensive range of graphical communication techniques to support proposals.

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Content

Specification and quality control Selection of materials and methods of use: apply appropriate techniques for the preparation of specification documents, specifying items with reference to the British Standards, Codes of Practice, Agrment Certificates and trade associations, examine and apply the criteria used for inspecting quality of materials and workmanship

Material failure, preventative and remedial measures Common building defects: preventive techniques used to address defects, remedial techniques used to address defects, planned maintenance and repair programmes in terms of life-span and cost-in-use issues, legal and design aspects and associated health and safety issues

Buildability and sustainability Recognise, describe and apply the principles of buildability and sustainability: apply economic criteria to design solutions with reference to buildability and sustainability, appreciate a range of design methods including matrices, network and gaming as problem solving techniques

Graphical communication Apply a range of techniques: sketching, both conceptual and technical, measured drawing, manual drawing techniques, CAD documentation, filing and retrieval systems

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Determine specification of materials, systems and methods used to realise a design solution and apply appropriate procedures to guarantee quality control Predict the mechanisms by which construction materials fail in use and propose preventative and remedial measures to deal with these

produce a specification for various materials and construction processes to different formats explain the procedures for quality control of various materials/items on and off site extract appropriate information from major British Standard Specifications and Codes of Practice determine the sources of common building defects assess and monitor damage and suggest remedial action detail effectively parts of buildings to avoid defects generate a scheme for planned maintenance and log books analyse and evaluate the effectiveness of the technical design of a successful commercial project demonstrate in a case study, proposals for the application of principles of buildability and sustainability to a recent new building evaluate environmental factors and conditions that influence design demonstrate fundamental yet effective drawing skills through the production of different forms of graphical details to communicate proposals examine the ways that electronic computing and communication techniques can assist the modern designer

Propose and evaluate the ways in which the concept of buildability and sustainability addresses the important issues confronting the construction industry

4 Produce a comprehensive range of graphical communication techniques to support proposals

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Guidance

Delivery In order to permit the learners to apply the knowledge gained on this unit to other units, it is recommended that this unit be studied in the first year of a two year programme. Various case studies, documentation and projects should be used to assist and enhance the understanding and learning on the unit. Where practical, site visits of successful projects should be incorporated as part of the study. It may also be useful to include guest speakers and independent assessors at presentations as part of the delivery of this unit. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes are achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. The evidence should demonstrate the ability to draw detailed architectural style and/or structural drawings both manually, and by using CAD and other current, modern, ICT facilities. Assessment may be both formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F.

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Links This unit relies on the inputs of various other allied units as well a sound understanding of construction technology and the industry as a whole. Knowledge, skills and understanding gained on other units should be invoked in this unit in order to encourage the wider understanding of the principles of design. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control Conservation Control Property Management Spatial Data Management Town Planning Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have access to a wide range of ICT/CAD facilities, documentation and library resources, including textbooks and journals, government and industry wide publications, British Standard Specifications, Codes of Practice, BRE Digests, professional journals, the internet and other research materials, and other associated documents. Support materials Textbooks Neufert, E and Neufert, P Architects Data 3rd Edition (Blackwell Science, 2000) Zunde, J Design Technology (Sheffield Hallam University Press, 1989) BRE Digests and publications British Standards Department of the Environment Defects in Buildings (HMSO, 1989) Papers from RIBA RIBA Architects Handbook of Practice Management 5th Edition (RIBA, 1991) Technical, professional journals and trade literature

Other publications

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Unit 28:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Materials Properties and Performance


60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit builds upon the knowledge and understanding gained in Unit 2: Science and Materials. In that unit the focus was mainly upon the characteristics, properties and uses of the commonly encountered materials including concrete, metals, timber, plastics, clay products and coatings and finishes. This unit develops the learning contained in the above to investigate the physical and chemical mechanisms that underpin the properties of the common structural materials. Particular emphasis will be paid to how and why such materials fail and how such failures can be avoided or prevented. The properties and performance of modern composite materials are analysed in terms of their relevance to the construction industry. The environmental issues that link energy efficiency and the embodied energy cost of materials are analysed in some detail.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 Describe the failure mechanisms of the common structural materials in terms of their physical and chemical structure and propose methods to prevent or minimise such failures Analyse the properties of modern composite materials and analyse why such materials can be much more than the sum of their parts Evaluate the embodied energy costs associated with the common construction materials and compare such costs with potential energy savings in use.

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Content

Failure mechanisms of the common structural materials Evaluate failure characteristics of structural materials in common use: fracture, in terms of strain energy, fracture energy and the Griffith crack theory Fatigue: in terms of stress concentrations, corrosion, residual stresses, surface finish and temperature Creep: in terms of stress, temperature and modulus of elasticity Corrosion of metals: in terms of dry oxidation and wet corrosion Chemical degradation: of cements and concrete by sulphates, sea water, acids and alkalisilica reactions Physical degradation: of materials by changes in temperature or moisture content, frost and fire, degradation of materials by biological agencies such as fungi and insects

Properties of modern composite materials Composition of two or more materials: examine the advantage of composite materials such as, asbestos cement, glass-reinforced cement, polymer-fibre-reinforced cement and concrete, natural-fibre reinforced concrete, steel-fibre concrete

Embodied energy costs Evaluate modern energy-saving methods: evaluation to compare the cost of purchase and installation against the time taken to recover the cost in saved energy terms. Locating supplies of raw materials, extracting raw materials, refining raw materials, manufacturing building elements from raw materials, transporting building elements to place of use, working building elements on site

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Describe the failure mechanisms of the common structural materials in terms of their physical and chemical structure and propose methods to prevent or minimise such failures

describe the principal modes of failure for a range of at least four common structural materials and evaluate the methods devised to prevent such failure. The evaluation should address material properties at the: molecular level, in terms of atoms, molecules and/or aggregations of molecules structural level, in terms of how different phases such as cells in timber or grains in metals interact engineering level, in terms of the total material and its overall properties as visible to the naked eye

Analyse the properties of modern composite materials and analyse why such materials can be much more than the sum of their parts

explain, with the use of examples, how two or more materials can be combined together to produce a material with properties superior to its constituent parts analyse the physical and chemical factors that affect the strength, hardness and durability of a range of composite materials describe the various factors contributing to embodied energy costs and estimate their contribution to total energy costs for a range of materials analyse and evaluate the total embodied energy costs associated with the use of energy-efficient methods in building construction against the potential energy savings over the lifetime of a building

Evaluate the embodied energy costs associated with the common construction materials and compare such costs with potential energy savings in use

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Guidance

Delivery This unit is intended primarily for those learners following the Design programme and should increase their understanding of how materials behave. It is designed to enhance the learners ability to specify materials appropriately and confidently. Subject to the links below, the unit can be delivered at any point in the course and would benefit from a reasonably rigorous scientific approach. It follows that structured delivery in the form of a course of lectures must form the early part of the delivery. Project work, either individual or group-based, related to specific materials and how they will behave under specified conditions would seem to offer the most relevant form of assessment. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links The link with the Unit 2: Science and Materials has been noted previously. Important links can be made with other units such as Unit 10: Building Services Engineering Technology. Also, Unit 7: Technology A, Unit 8: Technology B, Unit 22: Technology C, Unit 24: Structural Behaviour and Detailing, Unit 26: Design Procedures and Unit 27: Design Technology in a more general sense. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Architectural Technology Building Control.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information.

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Resources The unit could be delivered without extensive testing apparatus but the following equipment should be utilised where available: compression, tension and flexural testing apparatus, creep, fatigue, hardness and impact testing apparatus, drying kilns and accelerated testing rigs. Support materials Textbooks Alexander, W and Street, A Metals in the Service of Man 11th Edition (Penguin, 1998) Couzens, E and Yarsley, V Plastics in the Modern World (Penguin Pelican, 1968) Gordon, J The New Science of Strong Materials (Penguin, 1991) Illston, J and Dinwoodie, J et al Concrete, Timber and Metals (Chapman and Hall, 1979) Illston, J Construction Materials 2nd Edition (Spon, 1993) Illston, J Construction Materials: Their Nature and Behaviour 2nd Edition (E and FN Spon, 1993) Taylor, G Materials in Construction 3rd Edition (Pearson, 2000)

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Unit 29:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Site Surveying Procedures


60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit builds upon the theory and practice of surveying introduced in the BTEC Nationals in Construction at Level 3. It is designed to enhance the learners ability to use modern surveying equipment to undertake a range of site surveying procedures typical of todays construction industry. This unit provides an opportunity for the learner to undertake setting out and control of alignment of construction work and develops the knowledge needed to perform surveying calculations. It is intended that both semi-manual and standard computer software be used in performing the procedures outlined in the specification. The skills required to produce cartographic details from survey information using a manual approach is developed alongside an exploration of the uses and benefits of computer-aided plotting.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 5 Demonstrate the ability to use a range of instruments pertinent to the surveying and setting out process Demonstrate a detailed understanding of the principles of surveying and setting out Calculate from raw data the information required for cartographic detailing and setting out of construction works Describe the use of electronic and laser instruments in the construction industry Apply and evaluate computer software to calculate and produce surveying solutions.

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Content

Range of instruments The selection of appropriate instruments for a given job: linear measuring instruments such as steel bands, sonic measuring devices and Electromagnetic Distance Measuring (EDM) instruments Levels: to include optical (automatic and tilting), water level, general construction laser, pipe alignment laser, electronic/optical Angular measuring instruments: optical and electronic theodolites, magnetic compasses and compass attachments to theodolites. Combined theodolites and EDMs (Total Station instruments). Vertical alignment instruments such as plumb bob, spirit level, optical plumb, laser alignment

Principles of surveying and setting out Linear measurement: errors in using steel tapes, corrections for tension, sag, temperature, change of standard length. Semi-permanent adjustments to EDMs for temperature, pressure and the curvature of the earth Levelling: sources of errors in levelling and compensation methods adopted, reciprocal levelling, flying levels, location of Ordnance Bench Mark (OBM), principle and practice of setting up a Temporary Bench Mark (TBM), levelling large areas using grid and radial methods, application of tachometric methods, direct and indirect methods of contouring Angular measurement: sources of errors and methods for reducing errors, reduction of angular measurement, horizontal and vertical angles, computation of true horizontal length from slope distance and angle of inclination Distinction between open, link and closed traverse: use of traverse for area control, factors affecting choice of traverse stations, bearings (whole circle and quadrant), distinction between grid, true and magnetic north, co-ordinate system, Ordnance Survey (OS) grid references, angular closing error and correction, Bowditch correction for misclosure errors Setting out: principles, control of spread of error by working from the whole to the point, procedure for co-ordinated setting out, appropriate accuracy, procedures and practices for setting out ground works, upper floors, road construction, drainage and sewerage works, embankments and cuttings

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Cartographic detailing and setting out Analysis of raw data and translation for cartographic detail and/or setting out procedures: levelling, plotting contours by graphic interpolation, plotting of cross-sections from contoured plans, area measurement by manual, mechanical/electronic methods, computation of volumes from spot heights, ground sections and contours, calculations of volumes of cut and fill on a straight road with transverse sloping ground Angular measurement: correction to measured angles, distances, bearings and co-ordinates for a closed traverse, manual and electronic plotting of traverse and building surveys, survey symbols Setting out: computation of deflection angles and distances for co-ordinated setting out, computation of deflection angles and chord lengths for horizontal circular curves

Electronic and laser instruments Application of modern surveying instruments and procedures: electronic reading levels, electronic logging of field data, laser construction levels, laser alignment levels. EDMs, Total Station instruments, Global Positioning Satellites (GPS), digital terrain modelling

Produce surveying solutions Application of dedicated surveying computer software: software for capturing data in the field, dedicated software for setting out information, built-in capabilities of Total Station instruments, commercial software and programmed spreadsheets to facilitate repetitive surveying calculations, Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and OS digital data

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Demonstrate the ability to use a range of instruments pertinent to the surveying and setting out process

set up, complete all temporary adjustments and use the appropriate instrument including taking and recording all necessary readings in accordance with recognised surveying practice for a range of typical surveying and setting out tasks perform checks on each instrument to ensure that they are in adjustment select the appropriate instrument for a particular job use a variety of methods to set out and/or check horizontal and vertical controls, including sight rails, for level ground work and work at a gradient explain the procedure for setting out and levelling of foundations for steel framed and pre-cast concrete buildings and check the verticality of the frame describe the procedure and instrumentation for transferring control points to upper floors of multistorey in-situ reinforced concrete frames set out small radii horizontal curves using various instruments and describe the procedure for larger horizontal curves for road construction record all readings necessary to produce a contoured plan of an area record all readings necessary to produce a traverse survey of an area plot contours and ground sections for an area of ground from raw survey data calculate areas and/or volumes of cut and fill as appropriate from contours, spot heights, ground sections and co-ordinates apply corrections and compute co-ordinates for traverse stations from raw traverse data calculate and tabulate setting out data for coordinated points and for horizontal circular curves

2 Demonstrate a detailed understanding of the principles of surveying and setting out

3 Calculate from raw data the information required for cartographic detailing and setting out of construction works

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Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Describe the use of electronic and laser instruments in the construction industry

explain and compare the use of a variety of modern electronic surveying instruments and their application to construction and civil engineering work describe how a GPS system operates and how it can be applied to construction and civil engineering work use total station instruments built in programming as an aid to setting out use and evaluate the benefits of computer software to solve typical surveying problems extract and apply appropriate survey information from digital mapping database

Apply and evaluate computer software to calculate and produce surveying solutions

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Guidance

Delivery It is intended that this unit will consist of at least 50% practical work with 30% devoted to calculation examples and 20% to descriptive work. Practical work should be completed in groups of two or three as a maximum with each individual learner having independent use of instruments and related equipment and IT. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner and group work activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and CDM Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. This includes the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPEs) when undertaking practical activities. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links This unit may be linked to Unit 3: Analytical Methods and to the specialist unit, Unit 32: IT Applications Computer Aided Design. Entry requirement for this unit should ideally include knowledge of mathematics at level 3. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Building Maintenance and Estates Service Spatial Data Management Town Planning.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information.

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Resources Learners should have access to a wide range of instruments and become familiar with the more common instruments used on construction sites. Surveying software and spreadsheet programs should be readily available to learners. Manual drawing and CAD should be an integrated part of this unit. Access to ancillary equipment and carpenters workshops to aid the production of sight rails and other setting out items should also be made available. Support materials Textbooks Brighty, S revised by Stirling, D Setting Out: A Guide for Site Engineers 2nd Edition (BSP Professional, 1989) Irvine, W Surveying for Construction 4th Edition (McGraw Hill, 1995) Schofield, W Engineering Surveying 5th Edition (Butterworth-Heinemann, 2001)

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Unit 30:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

IT Applications General
30 (Half Unit) BTEC Higher National H1

Description of unit
This unit develops the skills and knowledge of Information Technology that will enable the learner to use popular word processing, spreadsheet and database software. It is intended that a Windows or similar graphical user interface be used. The expertise to use this interface is developed so that the skills and knowledge acquired may easily be transferred to other software packages. Formatting and manipulating text and images are practised enabling the learner to produce reports and assignments that are professional in appearance. Knowledge is gained of simple programming of spreadsheets to manipulate numbers and their usefulness to deal with repetitive calculations. The automatic chart and graph plotting capability of spreadsheets are explored. The learner will gain an appreciation of the data manipulation power of databases and the skill to produce simple outputs from data lists.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Use standard information manipulation software to edit, save, retrieve and printout files making effective use of the system controls Manipulate and format text and images in standard word processing applications Produce simple spreadsheet formulae to aid repetitive calculation and display the results in graphical format Extract information from a database application using the softwares built in query and report system.

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Content

Standard software Application of standard software packages: switching on, accessing graphical user interface (GUI), word processing application (WP), spreadsheet application (SS) and database application (DB) via the desktop view, using shortcuts, start menu, file manager/explorer, closing down file, application and system Forming new files and folders/directories: accessing existing files, saving to appropriate locations, printing required files/parts of files, print preview, changing views, zooming in/out, viewing several files, format controls, toolbar buttons, drop down menus, customising toolbars

Word processing applications Use of dedicated work processing software: page layout, margins, headers and footers, line spacing and column layout, changing font appearance and type size, superscript and subscript, bullet points, inserting tables, tabs and page breaks. Inserting fields, auto page numbering and date, border and shading controls, paragraph controls, cut, copy and paste functions, moving and editing text. Using drawing toolbar, inserting pictures and objects, manipulating pictures, spelling and grammar check, thesaurus, finding and replacing words

Spreadsheets Use of dedicated spreadsheet software: cell reference, absolute and relative, worksheets and workbooks, text, number and formula entry, formatting cells, texts and numbers, fill, clear and delete functions, insert and delete rows and columns. Resizing cells, rows and columns, hiding and protecting cells, AutoSum, other built-in functions and conditional commands, sorting data, chart functions, manipulating charts, saving and printing charts, changing printable area, use of auditing tool

Database application Use of dedicated database software: planning prior to creating records, creating fields, list view, form view and form design. Search, sort, filter (query) commands, creating reports and printing. Mail-merge facility and printing multiple individualised mailshots

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Use standard information manipulation software to edit, save, retrieve and printout files making effective use of the system controls

open required WP, SS and DB files. Create new files and save in required locations, close the file, programme and system maintaining integrity of data print one or several copies of a file in each application open files in appropriate format. Access two files simultaneously customise toolbars and utilise format controls to change appearance of data use an applications help file to achieve full use of a programs capability produce a complex document with layout and formatting to required standards adapt the appearance of, and manipulate bodies of text apply and manipulate pictures and objects use the spelling checker and thesaurus functions produce a spreadsheet capable of accepting various input parameters, analyse the data and give an output table showing the results enter new input data to a programmed spreadsheet to determine results for a new scenario produce a programmed spreadsheet to facilitate input of data produce charts illustrating the results from analysis of input data print a table of results and the accompanying charts to illustrate a particular scenario plan information for creating a database create a database to enable input of data in form view use filtered information on a database printout reports of filtered information to a required format produce and print individualised mailshots

Manipulate and format text and images in standard word processing applications

Produce simple spreadsheet formulae to aid repetitive calculation and display the results in graphical format

Extract information from a database application using the softwares built in query and report system

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Guidance

Delivery Learners should be introduced to the basic functions of each section and then allowed to proceed through exercises at their own pace to cater for their varying keyboard skills. The tutor should facilitate the exploration of the application program on an individual basis. Where learners need this half unit, it is recommended that it be delivered at an early stage of the programme so that they can apply their learning to other units. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Evidence will generally be in the form of printed computer output, showing the various stages in achieving a particular criterion. The evidence produced for other units could also be utilised. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this half-unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and VDU Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links This unit will provide essential skills and knowledge to learners who have not previously acquired IT literacy. It is designed to support other units that require ICT reports, tabulated calculations or database searches. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Construction Plant and Equipment Management Spatial Data Management Valuation.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information.

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Resources Learners should have individual access to personal computer stations with a Windows environment or similar GUI and which have access to Microsoft Office and Microsoft Works or similar applications. Support materials Due to rapid changes in the development of software applications, it is not deemed appropriate to suggest text materials. Appropriate software producers and internet material should form the basis of support information for this unit.

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Unit 31:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

IT Applications Surveying and Measuring


30 (Half Unit) BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit provides the learner with the skills, knowledge and understanding required to use commercially available software packages as an aid to the study of measurement and estimating. The unit has been designed to enable learners studying Construction, Civil Engineering or Building Services Engineering to develop skills and expertise in the use of IT/software packages for measurement and estimating of construction works.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 Demonstrate an understanding of spreadsheet and database packages Demonstrate the ability to use commercially available measurement software packages and produce measured works in alternate formats Analyse and use estimating software models to produce comparative rates, and display the results graphically.

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Content

Spreadsheet and database packages Principles and techniques required to: Access spreadsheet and database software, use and adapt software packages, create, save to file, amend and/or print results

Measurement software packages Principles and techniques required to: access measurement packages, use measurement package, adapt the software as necessary to suit the particular situation, create files, save files to an appropriate folder/directory, view the draft results, then adapt, analyse and print the results, analyse and print the final Bill of Quantities (BQ) in a variety of formats

Estimating software Principles and techniques required to: access estimating packages, operate the software package(s), adapt the software as necessary to suit the particular situation, create files, save files to an appropriate folder/directory. View the draft results, adapt, analyse and print the rate, data and analyses in the required format

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Demonstrate an understanding of spreadsheet and database packages

use commercial software operate the software package(s) adapt the software as necessary to suit the particular situation create files, save files to an appropriate folder/directory analyse and print the results use commercial software operate the software package(s) adapt the software as necessary to suit the particular situation create files, save files to an appropriate folder/directory interpret the draft results adapt, analyse and print the results in the required variety or format use the commercial software operate the software package(s) adapt the software as necessary to suit the particular situation create files, save files to an appropriate folder/directory interpret the draft results adapt, analyse and print the results in the required format produce comparative rates and display the results graphically

Demonstrate the ability to use commercially available measurement software packages and produce measured works to alternate formats

Analyse and use estimating software models to produce comparative rates, and display the results graphically

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Guidance

Delivery Learners should be introduced to the basic commands and fundamentals of the chosen packages, and then allowed to proceed through exercises at their own rate to cater for the varying ability and keyboard skills. The tutor should facilitate the exploration of the application programme on an individual basis. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Evidence will be produced in the form of printed computer output, showing the various stages in achieving each particular criterion. The evidence produced for other associated or relevant units could also be utilised. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this half-unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and VDU Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links Entry requirements to this unit should include a general knowledge of IT applications and knowledge of measurement and construction technology level 3. This unit has strong links with other units that contain measurement, tendering and estimating. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQs: Building Maintenance and Estates Service Quantity Surveying.

See Annex D for summary of mapping information.

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Resources Learners should have individual access to personal computer stations with appropriate measuring, tendering and estimating software. Partial or demonstration software packages may be sufficient to cover this unit. Full copies of commercial packages are not necessary for this introductory unit. Suggested software packages Masterbill by Masterbill Vector for professional quantity surveyors by Snape or any other equal or similar software package systems

Support materials Textbooks Ashworth, A Cost Studies of Buildings 3rd Edition (Longman, 1999) Sher, W Computer-Aided Estimating: A Guide to Good Practice (Longman, 1996) Smith, R Estimating and Tendering for Building Work (Longman, 1986) CIOB Code of Estimating Practice 6th Edition (Addison Wesley Longman, 1997) Davis/Langdon and Everest Spons Architects and Builders Price Book 2000 125th Edition (Taylor Francis Books, 1999) RICS SMM7 The Standard Method of Measurement of Building Works Revised Edition (RICS, 1998)

Other publications

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Unit 32:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

IT Applications Computer Aided Design


30 (Half Unit) BTEC Higher National H1

Description of unit
This unit provides the learner with an introduction to the skills and knowledge required to use appropriate computer software as an aid to design for the construction industry. The difference in approach between manual and computer aided design (CAD) is explained. The production of two-dimensional drawings to introduce basic system commands is followed by the concept of three-dimensional modelling. This unit concentrates on CAD using software for the production of two and three-dimensional models of domestic and small industrial buildings. Industry standard layer convention and libraries of standard symbols along with system procedures and functions are used to speed up the drawing process. The three dimensional model is utilised to produce elevations and various views and perspectives of the project. Further levels are added to produce multi-storey projects. Text insertion and automatic dimensioning to a drawing are investigated.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 Demonstrate the knowledge and ability to save, retrieve and printout to scale a drawing file using industry standard CAD software Use industry standard design software to produce dimensioned ground floor and first floor plan of a building project Demonstrate the knowledge ability to utilise the systems commands to automatically produce elevations, 3D-views and perspective views of a project.

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Content

CAD software Access CAD software: loading architectural option, loading or creating new drawing, saving drawing to appropriate folder/directory, system preferences, drawing scales, drawing sheet size, borders, title block. View drawing using available techniques, zoom and pan commands, plot command, print preview, changing print area, orientation and scale, help system

Produce dimensioned floor plans Application of dedicated CAD software: CAD drawing and existing commands, architectural option, construct and modify commands, creating space diagrams, cavity walls, roofs, chimneys, structural elements, doors, windows and staircases. Inserting 2D and 3D symbols, layer convention and controls, level commands, status, set level, level copy, level move, freeze and thaw, text and dimensioning commands, editing text and dimensions

Produce elevations, 3D-views and perspective views Produce quick elevations and sections: 3D views, plan view, perspective view, walkthrough options

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Demonstrate the knowledge and ability to save, retrieve and printout to scale a drawing file using industry standard CAD software

use existing CAD files in any location open a new file with standard settings and change scale, paper size and orientation as required save a CAD file to appropriate folder/directory open files and navigate across the drawing print drawing file using an appropriate plotter print part of a drawing leave the file and application program maintaining integrity of files and operating system use the architectural option to produce a space diagram for the ground floor plan of a building project adapt the space diagram to cavity wall construction and add solid floors and ceiling grids, add further walls and trim/extend as necessary, insert and edit doors and window symbols use the architectural option commands to add further floors to the project incorporate roof structure and associated details to the project complete full dimensions of the ground floor plan and identify appropriate layer to control view of dimensions isolate upper floors to only display ground floor plan print separate drawings showing each floor level use the architectural option commands to produce quick elevations and sections display the project in 3D mode from various angles of view display a perspective view of the project set up and display walkthrough scenario across one floor of the project

Use industry standard design software to produce dimensioned ground floor and first floor plan of a building project

3 Demonstrate the knowledge ability to utilise the systems commands to automatically produce elevations, 3Dviews and perspective views of the project

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Guidance

Delivery Learners should be introduced to the basic commands and then allowed to proceed through exercises at their own pace to cater for their varying keyboard skills. The tutor should facilitate the exploration of the application programme on an individal basis. Where learners need this unit, it is recommended that it be delivered at an early stage of the programme so that they can apply their learning to other units. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes are achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Assessment may be both formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Evidence will generally be in the form of printed computer output, showing the various stages in achieving a particular criterion. The evidence produced for other units could also be utilised. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this half-unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and VDU Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F. Links Entry requirements to this unit should include a general knowledge of IT applications and knowledge of Building Technology at level 3. This unit has strong links with other units that require architectural detailing and building design. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQ: Architectural Technology. See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources Learners should have individual access to personal computer stations with appropriate CAD software. For example, AEC or Architectural Desktop from AutoCAD.

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Support materials Due to rapid changes in the development of software applications, it is not deemed appropriate to suggest text materials. Appropriate up to date software producers and internet material should form the basis of support information for this unit.

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Unit 33:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

IT Applications Project Management


30 (Half Unit) BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit provides the learner with an introduction to the skills and knowledge required to use of appropriate software as aids to the project management of construction projects. Whilst the focus of the unit will concentrate on commercially available project management software, learners will design tools, using generic spreadsheets and databases, in support of the project management role. A key aspect of this unit will be to develop the learners understanding and ability to use information technology at the centre of the communication and management systems for projects. Learners will also develop the ability to select appropriate software in support of the planning, monitoring and control aspects of projectsK

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 Demonstrate the ability to develop spreadsheet generated resource management models (manpower, plant, money etc) Appraise the benefits of selected software packages for the planning, monitoring and control of projects Demonstrate an understanding of how project information systems can be used to support the project managers role Establish criteria for the selection and application of appropriate information technology systems for a construction project.

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Content

Resource management models Establish criteria for the use of generic software packages: applied to resource management manpower, plant, money Spreadsheets: use spreadsheets to analyse resource needs and levels Database design: types of database and when and how to use (relational/hierarchical), using Microsoft Excel and Access as examples

Planning, monitoring and control Use application software to: plan, monitor and control projects, manpower planning and control, plant management Budgeting and costing: systems, cashflow modelling, networked applications for planning, monitoring and control Examples of applications software: include Artemis Active Alert; Project Commander Professional; Jobmaster; Micro Planner X-Pert; Power Project; Hornet Windmill; CascadePgM; Microsoft Project; CS Project Professional; Wessex Accounts; FBS

Project information systems Analyse and establish criteria for the selection and use of IT systems: commercial application software to support project management systems Selection criteria: develop selection criteria for a range of applications, programming/cost control and composite computer aided management packages (CAM) eg Microsoft Project, Power Project, CS Project Professional. Develop selection criteria for the acquisition of appropriate hardware to support operating systems

Information technology systems Apply communication systems effectively within a project management environment: communications and information management, email communications, verification and receipting methods, attachment management. Internet and intranet systems and management, networking

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Demonstrate the ability to develop spreadsheet generated resource management models (manpower, plant, money etc)

analyse resource needs and levels in resource management demonstrate the use of spreadsheets to analyse resource needs and levels demonstrate a working knowledge and the ability to use databases use and manipulate filtered information on a database demonstrate the ability to use software packages to monitor and control the projects needs for: manpower planning and control plant management budgeting/costing systems cash-flow modelling

Appraise the benefits of selected software packages for the planning, monitoring and control of projects

3 Demonstrate an understanding of how project information systems can be used to support the project managers role Establish criteria for the selection and application of appropriate information technology systems for a construction project

demonstrate an understanding of networked systems assess and review commercially produced ICT systems for project management produce selection criteria for a range of applications assess and review appropriate hardware needs to support the operating system(s) assess communications and information management use email communications including the transfer of attachments confirm the verification and receipting of electronic communications evaluate internet and intranet systems

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Guidance

Delivery It will be important for learners to have access to a range of hardware and software systems when studying this unit. They should also be given an opportunity to evaluate the systems in use in their own working environments. A workshop approach should be adopted, whereby learners can work in small groups, designing and using their IT tools in project scenarios/case studies provided by the lecturer. The involvement of IT specialists from industry will benefit learners learning greatly. Whilst learner assignments are individual, learners should nevertheless be encouraged to work within groups. It could also be beneficial to require learners to make oral presentations of their work to the group as a whole. Assessment It is recommended that evidence for learning outcomes be achieved through well-planned course work, assignments and projects. Evidence of achieving a learning outcome may be in the form of a disc containing a developed tool as an aid to a project manager, or a report identifying the analysis required to be carried out. In each case, a rationale for the development or conclusions drawn must be fully developed. Wherever possible suitable academic references must be provided to support the work. Assessment may be formative and summative and both may feature as part of the process. Although assessments must be focused on the individual achievement of each learner, group work and role-play activities may contribute to the assessment. Integrative assignments and project work will help to link this unit with other related units. Where available, evidence from the workplace can also be incorporated to enhance the learning outcomes, provided that this evidence is appropriate and authenticated as the learners own work. The volume of evidence required for each assessment should take into account the overall number of assessments being contemplated within this half-unit and the design of the overall teaching programme. Appropriate attention must be given to health, safety and welfare arrangements and VDU Regulations throughout the delivery of this unit. In designing the assessment instruments, opportunities may also be included to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills appropriate to the outcomes of this unit, see Annex D and Annex F.

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Links This unit has links with Unit 18:Management and relies upon a sound understanding of the way in which project management can be used to deliver the outcomes of a project for a client. In order to be selective in the selection of Information Technology solutions in support of the work of a project manager, learners will need to have developed a sound understanding of the management systems and procedures involved on a typical project. A range of IT skills will be developed throughout the study and assessment phases of the unit. Learners should be encouraged to draw upon their wider understanding and experience developed from units studied and from their experience in the workplace. The content of this unit has been designed and mapped against the 1998 CISC Occupational Standards and current NVQs at level 4. The mapping links indicate that the achievement of the learning outcomes of this unit will contribute skills, knowledge and understanding towards the evidence requirements of the following NVQ: Architectural Technology. See Annex D for summary of mapping information. Resources There are many general texts devoted to IT design and use, however learners should be encouraged to be selective in the choice of the reading they should carry out for this unit. The selected reading materials identified under the heading of Support materials in the unit descriptor should help in selecting appropriate additional reading materials. More importantly, learners should have access to hardware, which is up-to-date and can run industry specification software. In order to develop their analysis and selection skills, industry specification software must be available for learners to evaluate. Suggested software Learners should be encouraged to use the software packages mentioned below: spreadsheet application packages such as- Microsoft Excel and Access CAM (Computer Aided Management) packages such as Microsoft Project, Power Project, CS Project Professional applications packages such as Artemis Active Alert; Project Commander Professional; Jobmaster; Micro Planner X-Pert; Power Project; Hornet Windmill; CascadePgM; Microsoft Project; CS Project Professional; Wessex Accounts; FBS.

Support materials Other publications CIOB Construction Computing journal www.ctiweb.cf.ac.uk/ CTI Centre for the Built Environment is a very useful website for staff and learners to visit. Websites

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Unit 34:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Work-based Learning A
60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit is one of two specialist work-based learning units included in these qualifications. These two units serve a different purpose from the core Unit 5: Group Project and the specialist unit, Unit 15: Individual Student Project. This work-based learning unit is specifically designed to capture evidence of achievement arising out of naturally occurring work-based learning and assessment opportunities. It is therefore an assessed experiential learning tool. The onus is on the learner to identify and capture appropriate work-based learning and relevant assessment evidence to meet the outcomes of the unit. Centres will need to provide guidance, advice and support on the methodology and structure of this process. It is expected that learners will need to spend at least 240 to 300 hours of planned work-based learning in the workplace in order to achieve the outcomes of this unit. The health, safety and welfare aspects of the learners programme must be considered before a learner embarks on this unit. Unit 6: Health, Safety and Welfare provides a suitable basis to ensure learners are prepared for their work-based learning activities.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 5 Identify and describe naturally occurring relevant work-based learning opportunities Select and describe work-based techniques, methods and procedures relevant to the programme of learning Perform work-based activities and gather appropriate evidence Demonstrate continuous improvement in their work-based learning and performance Present a portfolio of appropriate evidence for assessment using a variety of formats.

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Content

Relevant work-based learning opportunities Diversity of work: includes architectural design, tendering and estimating, planning, construction, site engineering, land surveying, building surveying, quantity surveying, estate management, facilities management and maintenance Range of work: includes residential, commercial, retail, recreational and leisure, industrial, health, educational, agricultural and public buildings Roles at work: includes architect, architectural technologist, quantity surveyor, building surveyor, land surveyor, clerk of works, contract manager, site manager, estimator and buyer, planner, site engineer Knowledge, understanding and skills: learning outcomes, content of programme units, personal skills audit, higher level skills

Techniques, methods and procedures Selection: as appropriate to work-based learning and assessment opportunities Specifications: technical and non-technical Constraints: eg clients requirements, timescale, components, materials, technical, operational, legal, financial, environmental Key issues: eg health, safety and welfare (including CDM Regulations), sustainability, best practice, quality control, quality assurance, KPIs, equal opportunities and Respect for People Action plan: to address the content in 1 and 2, agreed with nominated parties in centre and workplace

Work-based activities Action: as appropriate to work-based learning assessment opportunities Working relationships: with subordinates, colleagues, line managers, clients, subcontractors, main contractor as appropriate, development of higher level skills

Improvement in work-based learning and performance Improvement in: personal development, career development, performance at work, skill development, breadth of learning strategies Enhanced skills in: communication, IT, research, negotiation, supervision, management, self-appraisal, higher level skills Techniques: target setting, action planning, progress monitoring, periodical reviews, evaluation, reflective practices, rescheduling, contingency planning, daily/weekly review and work log

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Portfolio of appropriate evidence Format: guidance on appropriate evidence, witness testimony, self-assessment, peer assessment, tutor-marked assignments and projects, line manager input to process, portfolio building, formal presentation Competence: practical assessment of professional competence in the workplace, links with the assessment of a NVQ

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Identify and describe naturally occurring relevant work-based learning opportunities

identify work-based learning opportunities relevant to their roles and responsibilities in the workplace describe the nature and extent of the knowledge, understanding and skills that can be evidenced by means of such assessment opportunities complete an initial personal skills audit using the learning outcomes and content of the programme including CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills select and describe the techniques, methods and procedures to be used to produce the necessary evidence for assessment evaluate the constraints and key issues associated with the selected techniques, methods and procedures formulate an agreed action plan in consultation with tutors and work-based mentor(s) or line manager(s) perform a range of relevant and complex workbased activities relating to knowledge, understanding and skills gained on the programme and gather appropriate work-based evidence for assessment work with others in a productive, professional and non-adversarial manner, practice and demonstrate CIC Common Learning outcomes and higher level skills identify and describe specific areas of personal, managerial and technical expertise to be developed generate evidence of improved performance use techniques of self-appraisal and reflection to inform further action produce evidence for assessment in a range of workbased skills use a variety of effective communication techniques to present evidence employ a variety of presentational formats to present evidence where relevant, link evidence for this unit with the assessment of a NVQ

Select and describe workbased techniques, methods and procedures relevant to the programme of learning

3 Perform work-based activities and gather appropriate evidence

Demonstrate continuous improvement in their workbased learning and performance

Present a portfolio of appropriate evidence using a variety of formats

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Guidance

Delivery It is expected that learners will need to spend at least 240 to 300 hours of planned work-based learning in the workplace in order to achieve the outcomes of this unit. It is recommended that this unit be undertaken towards the end of the first year or in the second year of a two year programme. Once the initial brief has been agreed with the tutor and line manager their primary role is to act as a mentor, advisor and counsellor. The tutor will need to maintain periodic contact with the line manager when reviewing the learners progress and achievement. Assessment Evidence of outcomes for assessment will be both formative and summative and should be available for scrutiny at each stage of development. This may be in a variety of forms eg written, graphical, IT-based, logbook, minutes of meetings, copies of emails, letters, faxes, tape recordings and videos. The development of an interdisciplinary approach to the construction and built environment process should be emphasised together with the need for a non-adversarial approach when dealing with other construction professionals. The development of the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills should also be a key feature of assessment. The approach taken to generating evidence must recognise that work-based learning: is not a subject for learning but a mechanism for learning is primarily intended for learners in full-time employment or for learners with access to a workplace for a reasonable period of time is about reflection on work practices and not merely about acquiring knowledge, understanding and skills arises from action and problem-solving within a work environment is centred on the learners work, live projects and challenges to individuals and organisations implies the creation of knowledge as a shared and collective activity, the discussion of ideas and the sharing of problems and solutions assesses not only the products of learning but also the processes of learning such as reflection, self-direction and improvement requires the learner to address fundamental issues including the rationale for undertaking work-based learning, the benefit to their employer(s), what they personally hope to achieve and how they will achieve their goals requires the learner to exercise appropriate judgement in a number of complex planning, design, technical, resource and management functions related to products, services, operations and processes requires the learner to produce evidence of their ability to communicate effectively with other members of the construction team in an appropriate and professional manner.

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In designing the assessment arrangement for this unit, opportunities should be taken to generate evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skill appropriate the work-based learning activities, see Annex D and Annex F. Links By definition, there are clear links with every other unit in these qualifications. To produce the required evidence, learners should be made aware of the importance of applying their prior experience and the knowledge, skills and understanding gained in the other units of their programme. CIC Common Learning Outcomes and higher level skills will feature strongly in this unit. Links to CISC Occupational Standards and NVQs at level 4 will be determined by the workbased learning activities selected. Where assessment evidence is also linked to an NVQ, the centre should map the learning outcomes and assessment criteria of the learners BTEC Higher National programme against the assessment requirements of the NVQ and identify those areas that require common evidence. Resources Given the work-based nature of this unit, the majority of resources will be those available to the learner in the workplace. Tutor support and guidance are essential and must be supported by a range of other support services and facilities necessary for the learner to achieve the outcomes of this unit. Support materials Textbooks Bell, J Doing your Research Project 2nd Edition (Open University, 1993) Boud/Keogh and Walker Reflection: Turning Experience into Learning (Kogan Page, 1985) Fink, A and Kosecoff, J How to Conduct Surveys (Sage, 1998) Moon, J Reflection in Learning and Professional Environment: Theory and Practice (Kogan Page, 1999) Norton, P and Allinson, L Asking Research Questions (University of Humberside, 1994) www.experienceworks.ncl.ac.uk www.prosper-group.ac.uk www.graduatecareersonline.com/workexperience www.feda.ac.uk/Pubssupport/LearningStyles.asp#Learningstyles http://rapid.lboro.ac.uk/ Centres wishing to use the RAPID Progress File as a possible means of recording learners progress, should contact Alan Maddocks at Loughborough University for details of centre licence arrangements, telephone 01509 227192.

Websites

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Unit 35:
Learning hours: NQF level 4:

Work-based Learning B
60 BTEC Higher National H2

Description of unit
This unit is one of two specialist work-based learning units included in these qualifications. These two units serve a different purpose from the core Unit 5: Group Project and the specialist Unit 15: Individual Student Project. This work-based learning unit is specifically designed to capture evidence of relevant workbased training and development that the learner has (or will) successfully complete during their programme, but which is not assessed and does not lead to a formally accredited qualification. Examples of such events include: company in-house training programmes (learning at work) work placement and work-shadowing (that can formally be recorded) continuing professional development (CPD) organised by professional bodies seminars and courses offered by commercial training organisations (where attendance can be evidenced) product-based and service-based training offered by vendors and suppliers of systems, components, hardware, software, materials and/or tools (where attendance can be evidenced).

This unit is designed to provide both a structure and an assessment regime that will enable learners to gain recognition for such training and development within the context of a BTEC Higher National qualification. This will enhance the learners overall experiences of training and development and bring added benefit to the learners programme of study. It is expected that learners will undertake at least 60 hours of relevant training and development in order to meet the outcomes of this unit.

Summary of learning outcomes


To achieve this unit a learner must: 1 2 3 4 5 Identify and describe a range of relevant training and development opportunities associated with their workplace Review the associated learning outcomes and describe the knowledge, understanding and skills required to achieve them Examine the assessment criteria and justify how this is met by their training and development Evaluate the benefits of the training and development undertaken Demonstrate continuous improvement in their work-based learning and performance.

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Content

Relevant training and development opportunities Personal goals: eg enhanced career opportunities, salary and job satisfaction; maintenance of up-to-date skills base; regular feedback on performance; opportunities for reflection, assumption of responsibility for own development Organisational goals: eg improved staff knowledge, understanding and skills; increased staff motivation and retention; analysis of future needs, perception of company as learning organisation, diagnosis of staff strengths and weaknesses; coherent policies on recruitment, selection, training and development of staff Range of teaching and development opportunities: including personal development in terms of time management and self-management; higher-level skills; business skills in finance, marketing, teamwork and negotiation; technical skills including IT and CAD; training in new techniques, new procedures and new legislation; health, safety and welfare, environmental and sustainability issues

Learning outcomes Outcomes: what the learner is able to do after training and development Content: the knowledge, understanding and skills required to achieve the outcomes of their programme (this may only focus on certain units or parts of the programme relevant to the training and development) Evidence: the essential aspects of performance that were assessed to decide whether the outcomes have been achieved

Assessment criteria and justify how this is met Assessment and grading criteria: the standard of evidential response required to achieve a given assessment grade Scope: of the techniques, methods and procedures used to produce the relevant evidence Evidence: the material produced during training and development that was (or will be) used to demonstrate achievement of the grading criteria, confirmation of attendance

Benefits Personal: eg improved knowledge and understanding; enhanced practical, cognitive transferable and intellectual skills; higher level skills; increased confidence and job satisfaction; awareness of future training and development needs Organisational: work-based evidence demonstrating how training and development has translated into improved performance at work, awareness of learners (employees) future training and development needs

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Improvement in work-based learning and performance Improvement in: eg personal development, career development, performance at work, skill development, breadth of learning strategies Enhanced skills in: eg communication, IT, research, negotiation, supervision, management, self-appraisal Techniques: eg target setting, action planning, progress monitoring, periodical reviews, portfolio building, evaluation, reflective practices, rescheduling, contingency planning

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Outcomes and assessment criteria

Outcomes

Assessment criteria for pass To achieve each outcome a learner must demonstrate the ability to:

Identify and describe a range of relevant training and development opportunities associated with the workplace

identify and describe their personal training and development needs identify and describe training and development needs in relation to the organisation compile a portfolio of training and development opportunities accessed through work identify the learning outcomes associated with training and development opportunities accessed through work describe the knowledge, understanding and skills used to achieve the identified learning outcomes evaluate the evidence requirements used to assess whether the learning outcomes have been achieved identify and describe the assessment criteria used present the evidence from training and development to demonstrate achievement of the assessment criteria justify the techniques, methods and procedures used to produce the required evidence differentiate between personal and organisational benefits explain the personal benefits derived from their training and development produce work-based material that demonstrates how their training and development has benefited the organisation identify and describe specific areas of personal, managerial and technical expertise under development generate evidence of improved performance use techniques of self-appraisal and reflection to inform further action

Review the associated learning outcomes and describe the knowledge, understanding and skills required to achieve them

Examine the assessment criteria and justify how this is met by their training and development

4 Evaluate the benefits of the training and development undertaken

5 Demonstrate continuous improvement in their workbased learning and performance

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Guidance

Delivery It is expected that learners will undertake at least 60 hours of relevant training and development in order to meet the outcomes of this unit. It is recommended that this unit be delivered throughout a two year programme. The selection of the training and development to be used in the portfolio of evidence required by this unit should be agreed with the learners tutor and with their line manager/supervisor at work. The former can help with the interpretation of the learning outcomes and the assessment criteria implied by the training and development events. The latter can act as a mentor and advisor and should also be very well-placed to provide witness testimony regarding the actual work-based benefits to the learner and the organisation. Assessment The evidence required to achieve this unit will mainly be achieved by the learners attendance at training and development events and by their completion of the associated work required for assessment. These events will tend to be non-accredited and may be non-assessed. There may be no clear or explicit learning outcomes or assessment criteria. However, each unit of a BTEC Higher National qualification requires that evidence be provided for assessment against the outcomes and assessment criteria. Therefore, the important issues for the learner are: the training and development opportunities selected for inclusion in the portfolio of evidence must address learning outcomes and assessment criteria at a level equivalent to the Level 4 BTEC Higher National there must be authentic, valid and reliable evidence to support attendance at, and successful completion of the selected training and development opportunities the learning outcomes of such events must be clearly stated where explicit, or must be extracted from the delivery and assessment of the content where they are either absent, or merely implied the assessment grading criteria associated with such events must be clearly stated where explicit, or must be extracted from the delivery and assessment of the content where they are either absent, or merely implied work-based learners must have access to regular feedback on their progress and achievements to inform self-appraisal and reflection.

Assessors will need to be satisfied that they can assess the evidence provided by the learner against the outcomes and assessment criteria and be able to apply the generic merit and distinction grade descriptors where applicable. In agreeing the evidence for the assessment of this unit, opportunities should be taken to also identify evidence to meet the CIC Common Learning Outcomes and the higher level skills in Annex D and Annex F.

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Links By definition, there are clear links with every other unit in these qualifications. Learners should be made aware of the importance of using each and every accessible and relevant training and development event, and the knowledge, skills and understanding gained therein, to produce the required evidence. CIC Common Learning Outcomes and Higher Level Skills will feature strongly in this unit. Links to CISC Occupational Standards and NVQs at level 4 will be determined by the workbased learning activities selected. Where assessment evidence is also linked to an NVQ, the centre should map the learning outcomes and assessment criteria of the learners programme against the assessment requirements of the NVQ and identify those areas that require common evidence. Resources Given the work-based nature of this unit, the majority of resources will be those available to the learner in the workplace. Tutor support and guidance are essential and must be supported by a range of other services and facilities necessary for the learner to achieve the outcomes of this unit. Support materials Textbooks Boud/Keogh and Walker Reflection: Turning Experience into Learning (Kogan Page, 1985) Doherty, M Writing for Excellence (McGraw-Hill, 1992) Howard, K and Sharp, J et al The Management of a Learner Research Project 3rd Edition (Gower Aldershot, 2002) Moon, J Reflection in Learning and Professional Environment: Theory and Practice (Kogan Page, 1999) Schon, D The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think in Action (Aldershot, 1991) www.experienceworks.ncl.ac.uk www.prosper-group.ac.uk www.graduatecareersonline.com/workexperience www.feda.ac.uk/Pubssupport/LearningStyles.asp#Learningstyles

Websites

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Annex A
Qualification codes
Each qualification title, or suite of qualification titles with endorsements, is allocated two codes, as are the individual units within a qualification.

QCA codes
The QCA National Qualifications Framework (NQF) code is known as a Qualification Accreditation Number (QAN). Each unit within a qualification will also have a QCA NQF unit code. The QCA qualification and unit codes will appear on the learners final certification documentation. The QANs for qualifications in this publication are: 100/3048/7 100/3049/9 Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher National Certificate in Construction Edexcel Level 4 BTEC Higher National Diploma in Construction.

Edexcel codes
The Edexcel codes enable approval, registration, assessment and certification, they will appear on documentation such as the Student Report Form (SRF) and the programme definition. The Edexcel codes are not provided in this publication. The Edexcel codes will link automatically to the QCA codes for certification purposes.

QCA and Edexcel codes


All QCA and Edexcel qualification and unit codes will be published in a booklet, which will be sent to centres and made available on the Edexcel website at a later date. It will provide a comprehensive catalogue of all the qualifications and units available to centres. It will be useful for centres when making future decisions about centre choice units.

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Annex B
Representation by Professional Bodies
BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction and The Built Environment Sector Edexcel planning/steering group representation The following bodies had appointed representation on the Edexcel Planning/Steering Group. This enabled a continuous process of consultation by members of the Group as the structure and content of the new BTEC Higher Nationals was designed, developed and agreed by the employers, NTOs and professional bodies. British Association of Construction Heads (BACH) British Institute of Architectural Technologists (BIAT) British Plumbing Employers Council (Training) Ltd (BPEC) The Building Services Engineering Training Alliance (SUMMIT) The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) The Chartered Institute of Building Services Engineering (CIBSE) Construction Confederation (CC) The Construction Industry Council Standards Committee (CICSC) Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) Council of Professors of Building Engineering and Management (CPBEandM) Engineering Services Training Trust Ltd (ESTTL) Heating and Ventilation Contractors Association (HVCA) The Institute of Highway Incorporated Engineers (IHIE) The Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) The Institution of Structural Engineers (ISE) Joint Accreditation Panel (JAP) [now Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) Higher Qualifications Panel] National Electrotechnical Training (NET) Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) Training of Professionals in Construction (TOPIC) In addition to the above, these BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction have been validated and approved by the Construction Industry Council Standards Panel (CICSP) on behalf of the Construction Industrys NTOs, SSCs and professional bodies.

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Recognition by Professional Bodies


BTEC Higher National in Construction for Design Disciplines Recognition by the British Institute of Architectural Technologists (BIAT)

Core units Design Principles and Application Science and Materials Analytical Methods Management Principles and Application Group Project Health, Safety and Welfare BIAT has selected the following specialist units to be included in a learners Higher National programme in order to progress to ABIAT status. Specialist units Building Services Engineering Technology Contractual Procedures Design Procedures Design Technology Materials Properties and Performance Refurbishment and Adaptation Spec and Contract Documentation Technology A Technology B Technology C The specialist units (10) combined with the core units (6) are the equivalent of 16 units required for a Higher National Diploma For further details of recognition and membership, contact: BIAT 397 City Road London EC1V 1NH Telephone: 020 7278 2206 Email: info@biat.org.uk

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BTEC Higher National Certificate and Diploma in Construction


Recognition by The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) Both the BTEC Higher National Certificate and Diploma in Construction are recognised by CIOB. The following recommended qualification structures have been agreed with CIOB. Higher National Certificate in Construction Construction Management and Contracting Functions
Although the award of an HNC only requires 10 units, CIOB require 12 units for entry to Associate Member level.
No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Other specialist units (alternative to Workbased Learning A or B) Additional specialist units Status Core units Unit Design Principles and Application Science and Materials Analytical Methods Management Principles and Applications Group Project Health, Safety and Welfare Technology A Technology B Law and Contract Production Management Site Surveying Procedures Work-based Learning A or B (Or one other specialist unit from those listed below could be selected as an alternative) Contractual Procedures Tendering and Estimating

Specialist units (required by CIOB)

Any other specialist units in the qualification may be added

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Higher National Diploma in Construction Construction Management and Contracting Functions


Although only 16 units are required for an HND, CIOB require 18 units for entry to Incorporated Member level.
No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Other specialist units (alternative to Workbased Learning A or B) Status Core units Unit Design Principles and Application Science and Materials Analytical Methods Management Principles and Applications Group Project Health, Safety and Welfare Technology A Technology B Law and Contract Production Management Site Surveying Procedures Contractual Procedures Tendering and Estimating Building Services Engineering Technology Supply Chain Management Structural Behaviour and Detailing Individual Student Project Work-based Learning A or B (Or one other specialist unit from those listed below could be selected as an alternative)* Technology C Construction Economics Measurement A Environment Specification and Contract Documentation Project Management Materials Properties and Performance Building Control and Inspection IT Applications General (0.5) IT Applications Project Management (0.5) IT Applications Surveying and Measuring (0.5) IT Applications Computer Aided Design (0.5)

Specialist units (required by CIOB)

Additional specialist units

* Learners progressing from a Higher National Certificate to a Higher National Diploma may only use Work-based Learning unit A or B in the Higher National Diploma qualification and the choice of 18 units.

Centres and learners should refer to the Chartered Institute of Building Recognised Exempting Awards which give details of their entry requirements using these qualifications, or contact the Institute: The Chartered Institute of Building Englemere Kings Ride Ascot Berkshire SL5 7TB Telephone: 01344 630700 Website: www.ciob.org.uk

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BTEC Higher National in Construction for Building Surveying and Quantity Surveying Disciplines
Recognition by: The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) recommended choice of units for advanced entry to an accredited degree Learners wishing to progress to membership of the RICS, through advanced entry to an accredited degree course, should be recommended to study, at least the following units: Core units Design Principles and Application Science and Materials Analytical Methods Management Principles and Application Group Project Health, Safety and Welfare Specialist units Quantity Surveying Technology A Law and Contract Building Services Engineering Technology Construction Economics Measurement A Site Survey Procedures *IT Appl Surveying and Measuring *IT Appl Computer Aided Design
* Half unit

Building Surveying Technology A Law and Contract Building Services Engineering Technology Construction Economics Measurement A Structural Behaviour and Detailing *IT Appl General *IT Appl Computer Aided Design

The choice of specialist units may vary slightly depending on the choice of university and should be confirmed by centres or learners with the establishment of their choice. Centres may also design a programme of units that facilitates progression to a particular university. Where learners are studying for a BTEC Higher National Certificate (of only 10 units). He or she will need to undertake three extra units to achieve either of the programmes recommended above. Learners undertaking a BTEC Higher National Diploma (of 16 units) will have more flexibility to study three other specialist units of their choice. For further information about the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), contact: RICS Surveyor Court Westwood Way Coventry CV4 8JE Telephone: 01344 630700 Website: www.rics.org.uk

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IT Applications Project Management IT Applications Computer Aided Design It Applications Surveying and Measurement

Mapping of BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction to CISC Occupational Standards (based on 1998 CISC CD-Rom)

IT Applications General Site Surveying Procedures Materials Property and Performance Design Technology Design Procedures Measurement B Structural Behaviour and Detailing

Specialist units

Specification and Contract Documentation Technology C Supply Chain Management Building Control and Inspection Measurement A Project Management Tendering and Estimating Production Management Individual Learner Project Construction Economics Environment Refurbishment and Adaptation Contractual Procedures Building Services Engineering Technology Law and Contract Technology B Technology A Health, Safety and Welfare Group Project

Annex C

Core units

Management Principles and Application Analytical Methods Science and Materials Design Principles and Application 3 2 1 4 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 5 3 2 3 3 2 1 3 6 3

Links

*See Index for key to Occupational Standards links on following pages


B11 B12 B13 B14 B21 B22 B23 B24 B25 B26 B31 A11 A12 A21 A22 A23 A31 A32 B1 B3 B4 B5

B32

B33

B42

B43

B51

B52

B53

B54

B61

B62

B63

B64

*CISC ref (now CIC)

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IT Applications Project Management IT Applications Computer Aided Design It Applications Surveying and Measurement

Mapping of BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction to CISC Occupational Standards (based on 1998 CISC CD-Rom)

IT Applications General Site Surveying Procedures Materials Property and Performance Design Technology Design Procedures Measurement B Structural Behaviour and Detailing

Specialist units

Specification and Contract Documentation Technology C Supply Chain Management Building Control and Inspection Measurement A Project Management Tendering and Estimating Production Management Individual Learner Project Construction Economics Environment Refurbishment and Adaptation Contractual Procedures Building Services Engineering Technology Law and Contract Technology B Technology A Health, Safety and Welfare Group Project

Core units

Management Principles and Application Analytical Methods Science and Materials Design Principles and Application 1 1 1 2 1 3 2 2 4 4 5 6 2 2 1 7 1 5 3 6 2 3

Links

*CISC ref (now CIC)

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D11 D12 D13 D14 D15 D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D31 D32 D41 D42 D43 D44 2 E11 E12 E31 E33 D3 D4

*See Index for key to Occupational Standards links on following pages

E41

E42

F11

F15

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

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IT Applications Project Management IT Applications Computer Aided Design It Applications Surveying and Measurement

Mapping of BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction to CISC Occupational Standards (based on 1998 CISC CD-Rom)

IT Applications General Site Surveying Procedures Materials Property and Performance Design Technology Design Procedures Measurement B Structural Behaviour and Detailing

Specialist units

Specification and Contract Documentation Technology C Supply Chain Management Building Control and Inspection Measurement A Project Management Tendering and Estimating Production Management Individual Learner Project Construction Economics Environment Refurbishment and Adaptation Contractual Procedures Building Services Engineering Technology Law and Contract Technology B Technology A Health, Safety and Welfare Group Project

Core units

Management Principles and Application Analytical Methods Science and Materials Design Principles and Application 2 3 3 2 1 3 2 1 2 2 3 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1

Links

*See Index for key to Occupational Standards links on following pages

Total links 17

F16

F17

F18

F21

F23

F26

F27

F28

F41

F42

F43

F44

F46

F47

F61

F62

F63

F64

F65

F66

F71

F72

12

11

*CISC ref (now CIC)

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12 10 6 15 13 5 9 3 14 3 12 4 7 13 8 6 7 1 7 8 4 4 1

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CISC Occupational Standards Index for Construction Mapping (where links exist)
See mapping on previous pages Unit A11 Unit A12 Unit A22 Unit A23 Unit A31 Unit A32 Unit B1 Unit B3 Unit B5 Unit B11 Unit B12 Unit B13 Unit B14 Unit B21 Unit B22 Unit B23 Unit B24 Unit B25 Unit B26 Unit B31 Unit B32 Unit B33 Unit B42 Unit B43 Unit B51 Unit B52 Unit B53 Unit B54 Unit B61 Unit B62 Unit B63 Unit B64 Unit D11 Unit D13 Unit D14 Unit D21 Unit D22 Unit D23 Unit D24 Unit D25 Unit D26 Establish mechanisms for monitoring and reviewing changes and needs in the environment Monitor and review changes and needs in the environment Implement and monitor policies and proposals Monitor the implementation and impact of policies and proposals Develop procedures to support policy implementation Maintain compliance with statutory and policy requirements Identify and agree project requirements and coordinate design development Investigate factors affecting potential developments Develop, present and agree project designs Identify and agree client, user and community requirements Establish client requirements for project procurement Negotiate and agree a brief and design programme Coordinate the design development process Select, plan and commission surveying methods Collect, analyse and present survey data Select, plan and commission mapping methods Assess and present mapping data Select, plan and commission test methods Test and report on physical characteristics Investigate development factors Investigate and assess regulatory factors affecting potential developments Investigate and assess legal factors affecting potential developments Assess, plan and control proposed capital costs Assess and recommend options for capital funding Develop and test project design solutions Recommend and advise on the selection of a project design Recommend and advise on the selection of a detailed project design Comply with statutory controls Specify, integrate and control procurement, contract and production documents Prepare drawings and schedules Prepare specifications Prepare bills of quantities Prepare procurement programmes and schedules of work Prepare and process estimate, bid and tender enquiries Prepare and submit estimates, bids and tenders Plan work methods, resources and systems to meet construction and installation project requirements Establish current and future requirements for materials supply Select and procure plant and equipment for construction and installation operations Deploy plant and equipment for construction and installation operations Implement works to meet construction and installation project requirements Establish and maintain the dimensional control of construction and installation contracts
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CISC Occupational Standards Index for Construction Mapping (where links exist) contd.
See mapping on previous pages Unit D31 Unit D32 Unit D41 Unit D42 Unit D43 Unit E11 Unit E12 Unit E21 Unit E22 Unit E31 Unit E32 Unit E33 Unit E41 Unit E42 Unit F15 Unit F16 Unit F17 Unit F18 Unit F21 Unit F26 Unit F27 Unit F32 Unit F33 Unit F43 Control contract quality, progress and costs Prepare and agree contract accounts and claims Contribute to the resolution of disputes Prepare and present evidence on disputes Adjudicate disputes Appraise and value property Assess the condition of property Progress property disposals Process property acquisitions Develop and implement property management plans Establish client requirements for project procurement Control property use Commission engineering products after installation Assess and minimise risks from engineering products and processes Establish, maintain and improve health, safety and welfare policies and systems Develop, maintain and enhance working relationships Implement and monitor research projects Interpret, evaluate and present research findings Provide solutions to and advice on, complex, indeterminate problems within an ethical framework Establish and operate technical information systems Use information to make critical decisions Implement and monitor research projects Interpret, evaluate and present research findings Enhance your own practice and performance

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Annex D
Summary of links between BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction units and the Evidence Requirements of Level 4 NVQs
Key to NVQ titles AT BC BMES CSM CservC CC CPEM PM QS SDM TP V Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estates Service Construction Site Management Conservation Control Construction Contracting Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Quantity Surveying Spatial Data Management Town Planning Valuation

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Summary of links of BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction units to the evidence requirements of Level 4 NVQs
Unit 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 Unit title Design Principles and Applications Science and Materials Analytical Methods Management Principles and Application Group Project Health, Safety and Welfare Technology A Technology B Law and Contract Building Services Engineering Technology Contractual Procedures Refurbishment and Adaptation Environment Construction Economics Individual Learner Project Production Management Tendering and Estimating Project Management Measurement A Building Control and Inspection Supply Chain Management Technology C Specification and Contract Documentation Structural Behaviour and Detailing Measurement B Design Procedures Design Technology Materials Properties and Performance Site Surveying Procedures IT Applications General IT Applications Surveying and Measuring IT Applications Computer Aided Design IT Applications Project Management Work-based Learning A Work-based Learning B AT BC BMES CSM Cserv C CC CPEM PM QS SDM TP V

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Construction Industry Council Learning Outcomes


Mapping links with Higher Nationals in Construction units Intent To provide a common set of outcomes in all programmes of study at degree and sub-degree level which meet the educational standards for access to professional body status among the professions which form the CIC. These outcomes will provide the basis upon which the recommendations of Constructing the Team can be delivered during the careers of construction professionals. Delivery These outcomes are independent of mode or method of delivery. The providers of education and training will only need to provide evidence and testimony that these outcomes have been achieved at least once during the programme of study. It is recognised that each programme of study will place variable emphases on these outcomes, and therefore they represent a minimum menu independent of time allocation, academic importance and worth, and frequency of achievement.
Extracted from: CIB paper Educating the Professional Team.

Required outcomes Communication Requiring the candidates to: prepare and present a written report prepare and make an oral presentation participate in a forum where their own views are subjected to peer group criticism engage in an activity requiring manipulation of numbers prepare and make a presentation involving graphical description engage in an activity requiring use of information technology

Main mapping links (other links exist)

Group Project Group Project Design Principles and Application Group Project Analytical Methods Science and Materials Group Project

Group Project

Group dynamics Requiring the candidates to: negotiate and progress the resolution of a dispute

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Required outcomes attain set goals while working within a group perform a set role within a group setting

Main mapping links (other links exist) Design Principles and Application Group Project Design Principles and Application Group Project

achieve set goals while chairing Design Principles and Application Group Project a group identify and codify the roles of individuals in a group at work Design Principles and Application Management Principles and Application

Professional awareness Requiring the candidates to: engage in an activity where the ethical standards are central to the problem engage in an activity where issues of protection and/or care of the natural and the built environment are central to the problem engage in an activity where issues of energy management and energy conservation are central to the problem perform a task which illustrates the differences in interpretation of the idea of quality in construction Management Principles and Application Environment Technology B Design Principles and Application Management Principles and Application Environment Technology B Design Principles and Application Management Principles and Application Environment Technology B Materials Properties and Performance Management Principles and Application Technology B Specification and Contract Documentation Project Management Building Control and Inspection Site Surveying Procedures Design Principles and Application Health, Safety and Welfare Building Control and Inspection Structural Behaviour and Detailing Law and Contract All Specialist Technology units Design Principles and Application Group Project Individual Student Project Design Principles and Application Group Project Individual Student Project Health, Safety and Welfare Group Project Individual Student Project

perform a task which illustrates the essential components of the legislative framework within which construction activity takes place perform a task where the concept of value for money is illustrated perform a task where design imperatives are in conflict with the cost of solution and resolve the conflict perform a task where health and safety are major issues in the brief and the solution.

Note: Unit 34: Work-based Learning A and Unit 35: Work-based Learning B may generate evidence towards many of the Common Learning Outcomes.
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Annex E
BTEC Environmental Initiative Guidance for the incorporation of environmental components into BTEC programmes
Environmental responsibility Science and technology Resource management Policy and control Business practice Environmental investigation Explain the principles of sustainability Justify her/his own environmental values and attributes Appreciate in general terms, global and local environmental interconnections Recognise the environmental implication of her/his personal behaviour Make personal decisions which take account of the environment Explain the scientific principles and processes which influence the accumulation and dispersal of pollutants and wastes and the implications for control measures Explain the complexity of the energy environment debate Articulate her/his own views on the role of science and technology towards environmental solutions Make future work decisions, in the science and technology field, which take account of the environment Explore the characteristics of the resource/s to be managed and its/their value to people Explain the environmental implications of the uncontrolled use of the resources to be managed Identify when the use of a resource needs to be stopped, limited or when it requires protection Propose alternative ways of meeting the human wants and needs met by resources which are being over-exploited or degraded Plan and recommend resource management decisions which take account of the environment Identify the process of environmental policy making Explore her/his own view on the contribution of voluntary control towards environmental solutions and explain how to encourage this type of active citizenship Explain the need for the integration of an environmental ethic into a wide range of policy making processes Assess and evaluate the extent to which environmental policy and voluntary control is adequate in her/his area of interest Plan and contribute to the development of policy and control mechanisms for sustainability Explain her/his own view on the role of business towards environmental solutions Explain the environmental impacts and responsibilities of a selected business in her/his area of interest Identify the need for systematic environmental management Plan and recommend business decisions which take account of the environment Appropriate topic for investigation is identified Ways in which data can be collected and processed into information and the factors influencing the choice of methods are considered Appropriate investigation method(s) are identified Appropriate data analysis and interpretation methods are identified 271

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Annex F
Higher level skills and abilities
Learners will be expected to develop the following higher level skills during the programme of study, the ability to: locate, extract, read and use appropriate literature drawn from multiple sources with a full and critical understanding design, plan, conduct and report investigations and research to solve problems and communicate the results of their study accurately and reliably seek solutions to routine and unfamiliar problems through the analysis and synthesis of a range of concepts, knowledge and skills to formulate evidence-based arguments and evaluate and summarise information critically analyse and interpret data and present quantitative and qualitative information, together with analysis, argument and commentary, in a form appropriate to the intended audience; using appropriate quantitative techniques, relevant IT software and media relate academic knowledge, skills and understanding to skills in the workplace and where appropriate, demonstrate their integration through workplace experience and activities think independently and apply complex theories to practical realistic work situations, some requiring innovation and creativity apply their subject-related and transferable skills in contexts where the scope of the task and the criteria for decisions are generally well defined but where some personal responsibility and initiative are required recognise the moral and ethical issues of construction, sustainability, the environment, scientific enquiry and experimentation appreciate the need for ethical standards and professional codes of conduct and apply insight and judgement in relation to the margins and consequences of error develop an understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of construction, and of the skills required to work in non-adversarial integrated teams with other professions in construction take responsibility to manage and direct their own and where appropriate, the activities of others identify and address their own learning needs within defined contexts, recognise their own learning style and undertake further guided learning in new areas.

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Annex G
Wider curriculum mapping
Spiritual, moral, ethical, social and cultural issues Some of these issues are covered in the following units: Design Principles and Application Management Principles and Application Health, Safety and Welfare Refurbishment and Adaptation Environment Building Control and Inspection Environmental issues Learners are led to appreciate the importance of environmental issues in the following units: Design Principles and Application Science and Materials Management Principles and Application Health, Safety and Welfare Technology B and C Building Services Engineering Technology Environment Production Management Building Control and Inspection Design Technology Materials Properties and Performance European developments Much of the content of these BTEC Higher Nationals relate to legislation founded upon European Directives. The following units cover both international and European aspects: Health, Safety and Welfare Law and Contract Construction Economics Project Management Design Technology Health and safety issues These BTEC Higher Nationals are practically based and so health and safety issues are encountered throughout a programme. Learners will develop awareness of the safety of others as well as themselves in all practical activities. Learners will also study health and safety issues in the context of science and materials, the environment and technology in the following units: Health, Safety and Welfare Technology B Building Services Engineering Technology Refurbishment and Adaptation Production Management Building Control and Inspection Design Technology Equal opportunities issues Equal opportunities issues are implicit throughout these BTEC Higher Nationals and are covered specifically in: Management Principles and Application

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Annex H
Qualification Requirement
BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction This Qualification Requirement will be read in conjunction with overarching guidance from Edexcel in line with any overarching annex agreed with QCA. Rationale The NQF BTEC Higher National Certificate and Diploma in Construction have been developed to focus on: national qualifications, with detailed common standards, learning outcomes and unit grading recognisable to centres, learners, employers and professional bodies recognition by appropriate professional bodies a common core of study applicable to the whole industry a choice of optional specialist curriculum studies appropriate to the main career disciplines within construction a flexible approach to curriculum content within a nationally recognised framework changing training and educational needs relevant to construction disciplines progression to degree programmes and progression to professional institution membership a contribution to the skills, knowledge and understanding required to underpin relevant occupational standards and NVQs at level 4 providing opportunities for learners to focus on the development of higher level skills in a technological and management context a focus on the development of learners practical knowledge, skills and understanding that underpins performance in the workplace preparation for employment and further training and professional development.

Aims of the qualification These qualifications meet the needs of the above rationale by: preparing learners for a range of technical, professional and management careers in construction by providing specialised studies which are directly relevant to individual occupations and professions in which learners are currently working or in which they intend to seek employment enabling learners to make an immediate contribution in employment in the construction sector providing learners with flexibility, knowledge, skills, understanding and motivation as a basis for progression to graduate and postgraduate studies

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developing a range of skills and techniques, personal qualities and attitudes essential for successful performance in working life providing further study, career development and progression from a Technician Technical Certificate at level 3 within or following an Advanced Modern Apprenticeship (AMA).

BTEC Higher National course structures and curriculum content The content of the programmes and courses should be constructed around the core curriculum that supports the appropriate specialist content for a discipline or disciplines within construction. Programmes and courses should develop the learners knowledge, understanding, skills and awareness necessary to provide them with the potential to progress to technical, supervisory and managerial positions in construction. Programmes should make provision for: both breadth and depth of coverage to meet the needs of industry in technical and personal skills the development of higher level skills the foundation for subsequent study and developing a commitment to lifelong learning.

All courses should include the development of learners skills in managing and developing themselves, working with others and being part of a team, communicating, managing tasks, solving problems, applying numeracy, IT, design and creativity. An understanding of health, safety, environment and sustainability issues and the need to design, install and maintain through safe systems of work is essential and courses should expose learners to these issues, hazard and risk assessment, CDM, environmental and the legal requirements. Mandatory curriculum content Design Principles and Application: planning, design and production phases of the construction process and the co-ordination and management of each phase; factors that affect the selection of materials, systems and equipment, environmental impact of energy and other constraints on the planning, design and construction processes; roles, responsibilities and obligations (including liability for health, safety and welfare) of all parties to a project; cost implications and how technology affects the design of a construction project and the design processes and procedures used for the production phase. Science and Materials: scientific principles and a knowledge of the properties of and use of materials needed to successfully complete the other core and specialist content; analyse, apply, investigate and evaluate scientific principles, properties and behaviour of materials and components and their effects on structural design, construction operations; determine comfort levels in the design and use of buildings; experimentation and modelling of scientific principles. Analytical Methods: mathematical knowledge and application of analytical techniques needed to successfully complete the core and specialist content to include algebra, graphical representation, space, time and motion, matrices, trigonometry, calculus, statistics and probability, to the management and production; surveying; testing and control; structural, construction and building services systems.

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Management Principles and Application: principles of management, the work of pioneers and founders of management, their evolution and application to modern day practice. Construction Industrys markets and activities, the roles of the professions/disciplines in project teams and the management principles appropriate to organisations within the industry; application of management techniques to organisation, work planning, co-ordination, control of resources, cost control, quality, communications and client/customer liaison involved in the design and construction processes; methods of procurement and contracting; partnering and supply-chain management. Note: The content of management principles and application should be founded on the principles of the Latham and Egan reports, which advocate non-adversarial multi-discipline team working and partnering. The agenda advocated in Accelerating Change in 2002, is particularly relevant. Project Team Working Skills: evaluate and resolve realistic practical problems by working as part of a team within a major piece of work or project that reflects the type of performance expected of a technologists in a construction discipline; this work should involve, interpreting an agreed brief that contains an agreed timescale for the staged development of an overall plan of work and be within given defined constraints with the team working towards an acceptable and viable solution; enabling learners to demonstrate the application of individual high level skills and CIC common learning outcomes in managing self, working as a member of a team and presenting technical solutions. Health, Safety and Welfare: main health, safety and welfare legislation and codes of practice applicable to construction, including CDM; the main requirements of an effective health and safety policy, procedures and the organisational arrangements necessary for its implementation; hazard and risk identification; risk assessment and review; control measures to prevent ill health and injury, monitoring effectiveness of policies and procedures. Optional specialist curriculum content Optional specialist curriculum can be developed to address four main progression routes: Production and management Quantity Surveying Building Surveying Architectural Design

Construction Technology: site evaluation techniques, site investigation techniques and the methods used to classify soils; analyse how site evaluation and site investigation techniques influence the various forms of sub-structure used in low-rise and medium-rise buildings and the methods used to construct such sub-structures; analyse and evaluate the various forms of superstructure design and construction used in low-rise and medium-rise buildings and details of the methods used to construct such superstructures; causes of decay and deterioration of buildings; range of materials and constructional forms available for the erection of multi-storey buildings; range of systems currently used to provide sufficient flexibility of internal layouts to meet both present and future design requirements; principles of buildability in terms of safety, efficiency, economy and quality standards; development of sustainable construction strategies; contractual and legal responsibilities involved in the alteration, remediation and safe demolition of complex structures; current construction issues and practices; forms and methods of special construction; research and analytical techniques to support the design process and selection of the solutions; presentation of the chosen design solution, oral, graphical and written communication.

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Law and Contract: introduction to the national legal system and the law of contract; contractual administration relating to the common types of contract used for building or civil engineering works of various sizes; nature and significance of the principles and procedures of law and legislation as applied to the construction; liabilities and responsibilities of parties to a contract; application of the principles and procedures of law to the effective organisation and practice of a company or partnership; relevant legal principles and requirements when undertaking a construction contract in Europe. Building Services Technology: principles and techniques used to co-ordinate the planning, design and installation of the plant and equipment used for space heating, ventilation and airconditioning; systems to distribute services to a variety of buildings; disposal systems for a variety of buildings; design and installation requirements for lifts and escalators in a range of buildings; problems associated with the integration, accommodation and access for maintenance of mechanical and electrical services into a variety of buildings. Contract Procedures: purpose of legal requirements and contracts; types of procurement arrangements used for the construction and civil engineering works; factors affecting the choice of different procurement and contractual arrangements; application of current issues and best practice associated with the procurement of projects through reference to government and industry sponsored reports and recommendations; roles and activities of the parties and organisations involved in contracts; analysis of the forms of contract with particular reference to time, cost, quality and performance; evaluation of the forms of contract in respect of supplychain management. Refurbishment and Adaption: feasibility of modifying existing buildings for new situations and use; requirements of a design brief for the modification of an existing building; drawings and specification for the modification of an existing building; alteration design and construction plan for the execution of the work. Environment: impact of the construction process upon the built environment; global environmental issues of concern to the construction industry and how these might be addressed; local environmental issues of concern to the construction industry and how these might be addressed; indoor environmental effects such as sick building syndrome and present recommendations on how these effects may be minimised; environmental assessment systems in common use. Construction Economics: methods of allocation of scarce resources and the determination of price; factors affecting the economics of an organisation; size and economic significance of the work carried out by different sectors of the construction industry; government economic activity and how it affects the construction industry. Individual Project Related Skills: applying individual skills, knowledge and understanding, including higher level skills, within a major piece of work that reflects the type of performance and level of ability expected of professional project personnel in a construction discipline; recording activities, collecting, analysing and applying data, finding and using sources of information and developing solutions; communicating and presenting a project. Production Management: principles and application of effective site management; effective communication, the use of ICT and the essentials of planning and resource management; cost forecasting, control and reporting techniques; planning and programming of construction projects and in the design of systems for production control, co-ordination and monitoring; implications of quality, environmental considerations, health, safety and welfare arrangements and image within the production process.

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Tendering and Estimating: application of tendering procedures; principles and methods of estimating as an integral part of the tendering process; commercial awareness of tendering and estimating; commercial aspects of construction and civil engineering work; information required to produce a tender; use of SMM and CESMM; application of the principles and techniques of estimating; methods of pricing to determine and formulate an estimate; evaluation of different tendering procedures and contractual arrangements in common use. Project Management: concepts and practice of project management; identify and evaluate the requirements of a project manager in the construction and civil engineering; analyse their duties and responsibilities; achieving the Clients objectives of time, cost, quality and performance; contribution of project management process in adding value to the management and performance of a project; relationship with best practice and key performance indicators. Measurement: measurement techniques and their application during the design and construction phases of a project; taking off and production of quantities for a range of elements and components to large scale (non-domestic) structures; mathematical calculations to the measurement process; standard methods of measurement, manual and computer preparation of different types of bills of quantities, schedules and contract documentation; preamble and preliminary items for given situations; interim certificates and final accounts. Building Control and Inspection: principles of the building control system and the primary legislation; origins of statutory regulations and controls in England and Wales; legal issues related to enforcement of the statutory regulations and controls; interpretation of the various statutory controls and regulations to a range of construction situations. Supply Chain Management: types of supply chain management organisations, their range of activities and functions and their effects on the construction process; size and scope of subcontractors, material suppliers and component manufacturers and trends in the development of technologies and the management and organisation of construction works; different kinds of supply chain management arrangements and the procurement and contractual implications for the main contractor using the different forms of subcontract; work of the main contractor in respect of supply chain management, methods of planning, purchasing, programming, progressing and payment. Specification and Contract Documentation: types of contract documents that are required for a construction project; how construction works are specified in respect of standards and quality; contractual provisions of contract documents and their relationship to each other and their application to the contract. Structural Behaviour and Detailing: strength and elastic properties of typical structural materials; loading conditions for simple structures and performance and behaviour of the structure down to foundation level; statically determinate structures, including simple frames, stress in individual elements of that structure; design elements of a structure using manual methods and computer software; detailing elements of a structure both by manual methods and by using computer assisted drawing (CAD) in a variety of structural materials. Design Procedures: nature of design and its attendant methods, technologies, processes and procedures in terms of design practice; the roles and responsibilities of the design technologist in terms of design practice and during the contract phase of the construction process; roles and responsibilities of the design technologist during the project management phase of the construction process.

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Design Technology: specification of materials, systems and methods used to realise a design solution and appropriate procedures to guarantee quality control; graphical communication techniques; the mechanisms by which construction materials fail in use and preventative and remedial measures; implications of buildability and sustainability for design and construction. Materials Properties and Performance: failure mechanisms of common structural materials in terms of their physical and chemical structure and methods to prevent or minimise such failure; properties of modern composite materials and why such materials can be much more than the sum of their parts; embodied energy costs associated with the common construction materials and cost comparisons with potential energy savings in use. Site Surveying Procedures: range of instruments used for surveying and setting-out processes; principles of surveying and setting-out; calculate from raw data the information required for cartographic detailing and setting-out of construction and civil engineering work; surveying controls; use of electronic and laser instruments; GPS systems; total station instruments and the application of computer software to calculate and produce surveying solutions. General IT Applications: manipulation software to edit, save, retrieve and printout files; changes and format text and images in standard word processing applications; simple spreadsheet formulae to aid repetitive calculation and display the results in graphical format; extract information from a database application using the softwares built in query and report system. Surveying and Measuring IT Applications: application of spreadsheets and database packages; measurement software; estimating software. CAD IT Applications: dimensioned plans; elevations, 3D-views and perspective views. Project Management IT Applications: spreadsheet based resource management tools; planning and project information software; project information systems; IT systems for construction and civil engineering sites. Professional body recognition The NQF BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction have been developed with career progression and recognition by professional bodies in mind. It is essential that learners gain the maximum benefit from their programme of study. The following is an indication of relevant professional bodies who recognise or are likely to recognise these BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction and their recommended unit structure, as a qualifications contributing towards their requirements: CIOB RICS BIAT

The recommended programme structures that have been recognised by professional bodies, NTOs/SSCs and industry may be found in the full specification (refer publication code: B013362). In addition to individual recognition by the main professional bodies, the NQF BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction have also been validated and approved by the Construction Industry Council Standards Panel (CICSP) which represents all the main professional bodies, NTOs (SSCs), employer bodies and key employers for higher level qualifications in the Construction and Built Environment Sector.

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Links to National Standards As part of the development process the curriculum content in this qualification requirement has been mapped to the 1998 Construction Industry Standing Conference (CISC) Occupational Standards (OS) and also the relevant NVQ at level 4. Through the study of the core and relevant option curriculum content, learners will cover much of the underpinning knowledge, skills and understanding for the relevant NVQ level 4 units in: Architectural Technology Building Control Building Maintenance and Estate Service Construction Site Management Conservation Control Construction Contracting Construction Plant and Equipment Management Property Management Quantity Surveying Spatial Data Management Town Planning Valuation.

There are good links between the curriculum content of the BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction and the QAA Building and Surveying threshold benchmark standards, albeit that the BTEC Higher Nationals are normally only two year programmes and the QAA benchmark standards, which are set at honours degree level, are normally three years of study. Entry prerequisites Edexcels policy regarding access to its qualifications is that: the qualifications should be available to everyone who is capable of reaching the required standards the qualifications should be free from any barriers that restrict access and progression there should be equal opportunities for all wishing to access the qualifications.

Centres are required to recruit learners to BTEC qualifications with integrity. This will include ensuring that applicants have appropriate information and advice about the qualifications and that the qualification will meet their needs. Centres should take appropriate steps to assess each applicants potential and make a professional judgement about their ability to successfully complete the programme of study and achieve the qualification. This assessment will need to take account of the support available to the learner within the centre during their programme of study and any specific support that might be necessary to allow the learner to access the assessment for the qualification. Centres should also show regard for Edexcels policy on learners with particular requirements.

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Centres will need to review the profile of qualifications and/or experience held by applicants, considering whether this profile shows an ability to progress to a Level 4 qualification. For learners who have recently been in education, the entry profile is likely to include one of the following: a BTEC National Certificate or Diploma qualification in Construction or a related vocational area a BTEC National Award in Construction (used as a bridging programme for mature entrants) an AVCE/Advanced GNVQ in Construction and the Built Environment or a related vocational area a GCE Advanced level profile which demonstrates strong performance in a relevant subject or an adequate performance in more than one GCE subject. This profile is likely to be supported by GCSE grades at A * to C related work experience other related Level 3 qualifications.

Mature learners may present a more varied profile of achievement that is likely to include extensive work experience (paid and/or unpaid) and/or achievement of a range of professional qualifications in their work sector. Edexcel encourages centres to recognise learners previous achievements and experience through the Accreditation of Prior Learning. Learners may have evidence that has been generated during previous study or in their previous or current employment or whilst undertaking voluntary work that relates to one or more of the units in the qualification. Assessors should assess this evidence against the BTEC Higher National standards in the specifications in the normal way. As with all evidence, assessors should be satisfied about the authenticity and currency of the material when considering whether or not the outcomes of the unit have been met. Full guidance about Edexcels assessment policy on APL is provided on our website (www.edexcel.org.uk). Higher level skills and abilities Learners will be expected to develop the following skills during the programme of study, the ability to: locate, extract, read and use appropriate literature drawn from multiple sources with a full and critical understanding design, plan, conduct and report investigations and research to solve problems and communicate the results of their study accurately and reliably seek solutions to routine and unfamiliar problems through the analysis and synthesis of a range of concepts, knowledge and skills to formulate evidence-based arguments and evaluate and summarise information critically analyse and interpret data and present quantitative and qualitative information, together with analysis, argument and commentary, in a form appropriate to the intended audience; using appropriate quantitative techniques, relevant IT software and media relate academic knowledge, skills and understanding to skills in the workplace and where appropriate, demonstrate their integration through workplace experience and activities

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think independently and apply complex theories to practical realistic work situations, some requiring innovation and creativity apply their subject-related and transferable skills in contexts where the scope of the task and the criteria for decisions are generally well defined but where some personal responsibility and initiative are required recognise the moral and ethical issues of construction, sustainability, the environment, and scientific enquiry and experimentation appreciate the need for ethical standards and professional codes of conduct and apply insight and judgement in relation to the margins and consequences of error develop an understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of construction, and of the skills required to work in non-adversarial integrated teams with other professions in construction take responsibility to manage and direct their own and where appropriate, the activities of others identify and address their own learning needs within defined contexts, recognise their own learning style and undertake further guided learning in new areas.

The Construction Industry Council has an agreed set of Common Learning Outcomes for all sub-degree and degree level courses. These should also be incorporated into all programmes developed from this curriculum content.

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Annex I
Summary of support materials (all units)
Other publications/textbooks Adams, S Practical Buildability (Butterworths, 1989) Adler, D Metric Handbook 2nd Edition (Butterworth Architecture, 1999) Alexander, W and Street, A Metals in the Service of Man 11th Edition (Penguin, 1998) ASHRAE Guide Ashworth, A Civil Engineering Contractual Procedures (Longman, 1998) Ashworth, A Contractual Procedures in the Construction Industry 4th Edition (Longman, 2001) Ashworth, A Cost Studies of Buildings 3rd Edition (Longman, 1999) Ashworth, A Pre-Contract Studies: Development Economics, Estimating and Tendering (Longman, 1996) Ashworth, A and Hogg, K Added Value in Design and Construction (Longman, 2000) Barbour Index (CD-Rom) or equivalent (Barbour Index) Barnes, M Civil Engineering Standard Methods of Measurement Handbook 2nd Edition (Thomas Telford, 1992) Bell, J Doing your Research Project 2nd Edition (Open University, 1993) Bennett, J Construction Project Management (Butterworths, 1985) Bland, J Statistics for Construction Learners (Construction Press, 1985) Boud/Keogh and Walker Reflection: Turning Experience into Learning (Kogan Page, 1985) Boughton, B Reinforced Concrete Detailers Manual 3rd Edition (Crosby Lockwood Staples, 1979) Brand, S How Buildings Learn Revised Edition (Orion, 1997) BRE Digests and publications Brighty, S revised by Stirling, D Setting Out: A Guide for Site Engineers 2nd Edition (BSP Professional, 1989) British Refrigeration Association papers British Standards Institute BS 6399-1:1996 Loading for Buildings. Code of Practice for Dead and Imposed Loads (British Standards Institute, 1996) British Standards Brown, A The UK Environment (The Stationery Office, 1992) BSI British Standards Codes of Practice Latest Editions BSI National Building Agency Specification Latest Editions Building Project Information Committee Common Arrangement of Work Sections for Building Work (Building Project Information Committee, 1998)

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Cain, J and Hulse, R Structural Mechanics 2nd Edition (Palgrave, 2000) Cement and Concrete Association papers Chadderton, D - Building Services Engineering 3rd Edition (E and FN Spon, 2000) Chudley, R Building Construction Handbook 2nd Edition (Butterworth-Heinemann, 1995) Clarke, H Knights Building Control Law (Tolley, 1995) CIB Working Group 11 Towards a 30% Productivity Improvement in Construction (Thomas Telford, 1996) CIOB Code of Practice for Project Management for Construction and Development (Longman, 1996) CIOB Constructing Success (Thomas Telford, 1997) CIOB Code of Estimating Practice 6th Edition (Addison Wesley Longman, 1997) CIOB Partnering the Team (Thomas Telford, 1997) CIOB Project Management in Building 2nd Edition (CIOB, 1989) Code of Procedure for the Production of Drawings RICS/CCPI Code of Procedure for Specifications RICS/CCPI Common Arrangement of Work Sections (CAWS) RICS/CCPI Construction Best Practice Programme (DETR 1999/2001) Cooke, B and Williams, P Construction Planning, Programming and Control (Macmillan, 1997) Co-ordinating Committee for Project Information A Guide with Examples Copper Development Association papers Couzens, E and Yarsley, V Plastics in the Modern World (Penguin Pelican, 1968) Current Forms of Standard Contracts Current Legislation relevant to the construction industry Dalby, J EU Law for the Construction Industry (Blackwell Science, 1998) Davis, L Guide to the Building Regulations 1991 for England and Wales (Butterworth Architecture, 1992) Davis/Langdon and Everest Spons Architects and Builders Price Book 2000 125th Edition (Taylor Francis Books, 1999) Dean, Y Finishes 3rd Edition (Longman, 1996) Department of the Environment Defects in Buildings (HMSO, 1989) Doherty, M Writing for Excellence (McGraw-Hill, 1992) Downward, A Building Control: A Guide to the Law (College of Estate Management, 1992) Draycott, T Structural Elements Design Manual (Heinemann Professional, 1990) Durka, A and Morgan, W et al Structural Mechanics 6th Edition (Pearson, 1996) Edwards B Green Buildings Pay (Spon, 1998)

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Egan, J Rethinking Construction-A Consultation paper by the Strategic Forum for Construction (DETR, 2002) Egan, J Rethinking Construction DETR, 1998) Engineering Council Project Guidelines Everett, A Materials 5th Edition (Longman, 1994) Extracts from British Standards for learners of structural design Ferguson, I Buildability in Practice (BT Batsford, 1989) Fink, A and Kosecoff, J How to Conduct Surveys (Sage, 1998) Forster, G Construction Site Studies 2nd Edition (Longman, 1989) Fryer, B The Practice of Construction Management (Blackwell, 1997) Gauld, B Structures for Architects 3rd Edition (Longman, 1994) Gordon, J The New Science of Strong Materials (Penguin, 1991) Greer, A and Taylor, G Mathematics for Technicians (Stanley Thomas, 1994) Guidance notes on Town and Country Planning Act, Health and Safety at Work Act, CDM Regulations, and other relevant legislation Hall, F Building Services and Equipment Volumes 1 and 2 (Pearson, 1994) Harvey, R and Ashworth, A The Construction Industry of Great Britain (Oxford, 1997) Health and Safety Commission A Guide to the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 Health and Safety Commission - Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1992 Health and Safety Commission Successful Health and Safety Management Health and Safety Executive Sick Building Syndrome (HSE Books, 1995) Hillebrandt, P Economic Theory and the Construction Industry 3rd Edition (Palgrave, 2000) Hore, A and Kehoe, J et al Construction 1 Management, Finance and Measurement (Macmillan, 1997) Howard, K and Sharp, J et al The Management of a Learner Research Project 3rd Edition (Gower Aldershot, 2002) ICE Civil Engineering Standard Method of Measurement 3rd Edition (Thomas Telford, 1991) Illston, J Construction Materials 2nd Edition (Spon, 1993) Illston, J and Dinwoodie, J et al Concrete, Timber and Metals (Chapman and Hall, 1979) Illston, J Construction Materials: Their Nature and Behaviour 2nd Edition (E and FN Spon, 1993) Irvine, W Surveying for Construction 4th Edition McGraw Hill, 1995) Joint Contracts Tribunal JCT Forms of Contract Latest Revisions/Editions Joint Contracts Tribunal Joint Contracts Tribunal Forms of Contract Latham, M Constructing the Team (The Stationary Office Books, 1994)

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Lawson, B How Designers Think 3rd Edition (Butterworth Architecture, 1997) Lead Development Association papers McGeorge, D and Palmer, A Construction Management: New Directions (Blackwell Science, 1997) McMullan, R Environmental Science in Building 5th Edition (Palgrave, 2001) Moon, J Reflection in Learning and Professional Environment: Theory and Practice (Kogan Page, 1999) Morris, P The Management of Projects New Edition (Thomas Telford, 1997) National Building Agency National Building Specification 4 Vols (RIBA, 1973) Neufert, E and Neufert, P Architects Data 3rd Edition (Blackwell Science, 2000) Newton, P Structural Detailing 2nd Edition (Macmillan, 1991) Norton, P and Allinson, L Asking Research Questions (University of Humberside, 1994) Noy Building Survey and Reports 2nd Edition (Blackwell Science, 1995) Nutt, B and Kincaid, P et al Adapting Buildings for Changing Uses (Spon, 2002) Owen, S Law for the Construction Industry 2nd Edition (Longman, 1998) Oxley, R and Poskitt, J Management Techniques Applied to the Construction Industry (Blackwell Science, 1996) Papers from ABE, ASHRAE, BRE, CIBSE, CIOB, ICE, RICS, RICS BCIS, VALUER, etc Papers from BIAT, RIBA and RTPI Papers from Cement and Concrete Association Papers from TRADA Parsloe, C and Wild, L Project Management Handbook for Building Services (BSIRA, 1998) Reid Understanding Buildings: A Multi-disciplinary Approach (The MIT Press, 1988) RIBA Architects Handbook of Practice Management 5th Edition (RIBA, 1991) RIBA Plan of Work for Design Team Operation (RIBA, 1973) Richardson, B Remedial Treatment of Buildings 2nd Edition (Butterworth-Heinemann, 1995) RICS SMM7 The Standards Method of Measurement of Building Works Revised Edition (RICS, 1998) Rossow, E Analysis and Behavior of Structures (Prentice Hall, 1996) Rougvie, A Project Evaluation and Development (Batsford, 1988) Schofield, W Engineering Surveying 5th Edition (Butterworth-Heinemann, 2001) Schon, D The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think in Action (Aldershot, 1991) Scott, A Dimensions of Sustainability (E and FN Spon, 1998) Seeley, I Advanced Building Measurement 2nd Edition (Palgrave Macmillan, 1989) Seeley, I Building Quantities Explained 5th Edition (Palgrave Macmillan, 1998) Seeley, I Civil Engineering Quantities 5th Edition (Palgrave Macmillan, 1993)

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Sharpe, G A Contractors Guide to Conservation v(CIOB, 1997) Sharpe, G Works to Historic Buildings A Contractors Manual (Pearson, 1999) Sher, W Computer-Aided Estimating: A Guide to Good Practice (Longman, 1996) Shutt, R Economics for the Construction Industry 3rd Edition (Longman Scientific and Technical, 1995) Smith, R Estimating and Tendering for Building Work (Longman, 1986) Stroud, K Engineering Mathematics 4th Edition (Macmillan, 1995) Taylor, G Materials in Construction 3rd Edition (Pearson, 2000) Technical and professional journals and trade literature Technical and professional journals on economic issues The Aqua Group Contract Administration for the Building Team (Blackwell Science, 1996) The Aqua Group Pre-Contract Practice for the Building Team 8th Edition (Blackwell Science, 1992) The Aqua Group Tenders and Contracts for Building 3rd Edition (Blackwell Science, 1999) TSO Annual Abstract of Statistics TSO BSI Codes of Practice TSO Building Regulations 1991 TSO Housing and Construction Statistics TSO The Building Regulations and The Approved Documents TSO The Building Act 1983 TSO UK National Accounts Thomas, R Environmental Design (E and FN Spon, 1995) Thompson, A Architectural Design Procedures 2nd Edition (Arnold, 1998) Turner, D and Turner, A Building Contract Claims and Disputes 2nd Edition (Longman, 1999) Walker, A Project Management in Construction 4th Edition (Blackwell Science, 2002) Westbrook, R and Walker, D Structural Engineering Design in Practice 3rd Edition (Longman, 1996) Willis, A and Trench, W Williss Elements of Quantity Surveying 9th Edition (Blackwell Science, 1998) Wills, C J and Willis, J A Specification Writing for Architects and Surveyors 11th Edition (Blackwell Science, 1997) Zunde, J Design Technology (Sheffield Hallam University Press, 1989)

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