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GEORGIA DlVlSlON

MARCH-APRIL, 1959

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FOR PLANNIN .JLICATIOh 4GES O N A I R C R A F T O R EOUIPME

N D I N F O R M A T I O N A L P U R P O S E S O N L Y A N D I S N O T T O B E C O N S T R U E D AS A U T H O R I T Y F O R M A K I N G O R AS S U P E R S E D I N G A N Y E S T A B L I S H E D O P E R A T I O N A L O R M A I N T E N A N C E PROCEDURES O R P O L I C I E S .

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LOCK-CLAD CABLES

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-. STATIC LINE ANCHOR CABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RAMP BUMPER BOARD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


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Lock-clad cable has come into its share of convep sation recently. Mainly, this conversation has been concerned with its wear limitations. Seems like there isn't much information available in the field on how much Lock-clad cable can wear before it has to be replaced. We plan to rectify this oversight right now.

Where It's Used


Lock-clad cable is found in all the straight rum of the flight control systems on the C-130 airplanes. Wherever there is a change & e o n of more than two degrees, standard steel cable is used.

What I t Is
Lock-clad consists of a core of standard steel cable with a length of aluminum tubing swaged over it. In the swaging process the aluminum is press$ between the outer strands of the cable ;the hbi* and cable become permanently "locked" togethex. In its finished form Lock-clad resembIm a thin solid rod.

STRETCH CHARACTERISTICS OF LOCK-CLAD AND STANDARD CABLE


Why are the stretch characteristics of a control cable so important? I t goes back to the basic requirement of a flight control system. The pilot requires an instantaneous response to his control movements. "Slop" in the system - the amount of pilot control movement i t takes before the control surfaces move - should be a t a minimum. There are two reasons why Lock-clad has less stretch. In a standard cable the individual wire strands tighten around each other whenever a load is applied. The outside diameter of the cable becomes smaller and the cable length increases. Lock-clad has aluminum forced between the cable's outer strands and tightening action of the individual strands is reduced. There is less stretch.

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Why It's Used


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Lock-clad offers several advantages over standard cable :

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LOCK-CLAD IS STRETCH RESISTANT. %ke a loak a t the following graph. When a 16%p@und load is applied to a 10-foot length of Ld-clad, the cable will stretch approximately 1/32 of an inch (.04 inches). A standard cable under the same conditions will stretch approximately 6/52 of an inch (.I57 inches).

Cable stretch is also due to the strain in the metal. Metal is elastic, up t o a point, and i t stretches whenever a load is placed upon it. The greater the load (or stress), t h e more i t will stretch. But, the greater the cross sectional area under an applied load, the less the stretch will be. Lock-clad, with its aluminum covering, has a much greater cross sectional area than standard cable. Therefore, stretch is reduced. Of course, a control system could be designed, using heavier standard cables, that would give similar stretch characteristics as Lock-clad. However, there would be a weight penalty. Standard steel cable similar in stretch to Lock-clad weighs much more. In addition, it would require heavier support brackets, which in turn, would add to the weight. LOCK-CLAD REDUCES THE AFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE CHANGES. Most metals expand when heated, but not all metals expand a t the same rate. Aluminum expands more than steel. Cable tension in a n airplane on a hot day will be high (unless there is something done about it) because the airplane's aluminum structure has expanded more than the steel cables. Just to give you a n idea, a C-130 will "grow" about y 4 of an inch in length with an increase of 50 degrees in outside temperatures. Conversely, on a cold day t h e control cables will be loose. Lock-clad reduces the affects of this thermal expansion and contraction. The aluminum, swaged to the cable, lends its expansion characteristics to the steel. Mention should be made of tension regulators before we give too much credit to Lock-clad. Lockclad is not the complete answer to preventing "slop!' in a system due to temperature changes. Tension regulators are used in each control system to completely compensate for these thermal differences. Basically, the regulators are springs which keep the control cables under a given tension a t all times. (Of further interest is the fact that these tension regulators also compensate for pressurization changes. The C-130 "grows" almost a n inch when it is pressurized. The regulators prevent the cables from tightening excessively under this condition). LOCK-CLAD PROVIDES RIGIDITY. Its stiffness elihinates the need for some of the supporting brackets used with standard cable. I n addition, the whipping action experienced with standard

cables when a load is applied to them, is reduced and there is less chance for rags - and other loose objects to hang up on the cables and jam t h e controls. Lock-clad is easy to install. Remember, however, that Lock-clad should not be bent. It should not be coiled in less than a 10-foot diameter circle.

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Its Wear Limitations


The criterion for replacing worn o r damaged Lockclad cable is simple. Just remember one fact. I n selecting Lock-clad in the C-130 control systems, the design engineers have assumed that the aluminum tubing carries no load, and that the cable core takes the full load. In other words, the cable core in Lock-clad is identical with a standard cable for any particular control system requirement. Therefore, Lock-clad cable need not be replaced unless one of t h e following conditions is found:

The aluminum tubing is Gorn through to the core and the wire strands show signs of wear.

the core.

Worn spots on the tubing cause the cable to bump over fairlead rollers.

T.O.'s lC;-lSOA-2-9 and 1C-130B-2-9 will include this wear information in their next revision.
LOCKHEED SERVICE NEWS

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a word to the wise.


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(For wise electrical spe

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Some new (new to the C-130, t connectors are used in the C-130 dicating system. They are installed in the wing rear spar and in other bulkheads which t h e harness goes through from the wing tanks t o t h e flight deck fuel instrument panel, and to the single point refueling panel. They are also used for the harness connections t o each of t h e fuel quantity indicators. These connectors work fine, providing you understand how they work. If not, you may be in for a difficult time. It is easy for a person who is unfamiliar with this connector to damage the pins and ground terminal when disconnecting and reconnecting the unit. For this reason, whenever you connect the plug to t h e receptacle: Make sure the key and loeking studs on the plug are aligned properly to fit the keyway and slotted cams on the reeeptacle. Let us show you what we mean: The receptacle. Note the position of the keyway and the cam slots.

Now the plug. The plug's socket and key may not be in proper alignment with the cam studs to mate with the receptacle's pins, keyway, and cam slots. The plug's socket and key are free to rotate inside the shell; the only thing which limits this movement is the harness attached to the aft side of the socket.

LOCKING STUDS

KEY

SOCKET I )

CEPTACLF CHFI I

This is the crux of the problem. Electrical specialists, unfamiliar with this type connector, have worked for a half an hour or so, attempting to fasten the plug to the receptacle. The fact that the plug's shell is spring-loaded and that it takes some effort to slide the studs up the cam slots, complicates the procedure. It's like trying to get a jammed zipper zipped. The harder you work a t it, the worse the condi-

MARCH-APRIL, 1959

tion becomes. If it is a zipper t h a t you really want closed, your frantic efforts only make matters worse. Only in this case, the ground circular terminal and the pins a r e bent. Small metal particles are worn off the cam studs and subsequently, liberally spread over t h e connecting parts. The solution t o this problem? Just like your zipper, treat the connector gently. If you can see the keyway in the receptacle, note its position in relation to the cam slots. Then align the key in the plug, accordingly. If you can't visually determine this position, slowly rotate the plug in the receptacle. When the key has turned to t h e correct position, the studs will slide home easily. Don't force it. Mentally put yourself in the role of a successful safe cracker. You will have it made. GELAC Engineering has taken steps to solve this problem on later C-130B's. (We can't give you the exact aircraft effectivity because it's not yet known.) Red alignment marks will be painted on the plug's key and shell. With these two marks aligned, t h e plug will mate easily with the receptacle. We'd like to call your attention t o one more point, in case you are ever called upon to remove and replace a harness receptacle. The receptacle's pin body is keyed to its outer shell and is held in place by a fiber retaining nut (see the illustration). During reassembly of the receptacle, the pin body must be fully seated in the shell and the fiber retainer screwed tightly down. Otherwise, the pins will be recessed too deeply in the receptacle. The plug can be connected to the receptacle without making contact with the pins.
PINS EXTEND BEYQND INNER SHOULDER WHEN

New Part Numbers


The manufacturer of these connectors, Amphenol Electronics Corporation, is making some internal improvements to the plug. A Teflon washer will be used in the shell to cut down friction and make i t easier to shove the plug into the receptacle. The terminal cups will be changed to make i t easier to solder the harness terminals t o the connector. These improved parts will have newly assigned part numbers. They are being procured a s spares items. (Stock Numbers have not yet been assigned). Here is a listing of old and new part numbers :

FIBER RETAINING NUT

We give you these procurement details for a very good reason. You probably won't be able to find a substitute connector which will do t h e job. A peculiar feature of the Amphenol connector is its internal ground. The circular terminal in the cent e r of the socket is the ground. This terminal grounds each section of the harness sheath - an important feature in the C-130B fuel indicating circuit. Otherwise, "loop currents" in t h e sheath will affect the indicating circuits and cause erroneous readings on the indicators. Grounding each section of harness to t h e airplane's structure will not prevent these "loop currents". Of course another separate grounding wire could be used, but it would have to be a continuous run from wing tanks to instruments, and each section of harness grounded to it. The Amphenol connector, with i t s internal ground, simplifies this wiring installation.
LOCKHEED SERVICE NEWS

INNER SHOULDER

MECHANIC'S
N E X T BEST FRIEND
It has often been said that a maintenance mechanic's best friend is his mother - and his -2 airplane handbook. We will take this a step further and say that his next best friend is his girl - and . . . . . his . -4 Illustrated Parts Breakdown. Whethe r you ever stopped to realize i t o r not, girls and -4 .Parts Breakdown have a lot in common. Just about everyone will admit that they are complicated. Sometimes they are perplexing; other times, down right exasperating. They have been known to let you down, miserably a t times, and on other occasions, come through when you least expect it. Experts on the subject claim t h a t the more knowledge and experience you have them, the more you stand to profit.
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Unlike your girl, however, the C-130A-4 Illustrated Parts Breakdown doesn't have everything. More specifically : The -4 does not list engine and nacelle build-up parts. This information is obtained from your 1C-130A-10, Aircraft Power Package Build-Up Instructions. The -4 does not list electrical wiring material. T.O. 1C-130A-2-13, Airplane Wiring Diagrams Handbook has this information. The -4 does not list permanently attached structure of the airframe. The T.O. lC-l3OA-3 Structural Repair Handbook has this information. The -4 does not give a break-down listing of many equipment components used on the airplane. Separate Technical Orders for this equipment carry this information. There is another big difference between girls and the -4 Parts Breakdown, o r to be more correct, a difference in your attitude concerning t h e two subjects. When "girls" are mentioned, eyes light up, things take on a warmer glow, and a general feeling of enthusiasm develops.
MARCH-APRIL, 1959

The -4 has just the opposite affect. Many of us look on the -4 with a feeling of distaste. We use i t only as a last resort, and then, with a feeling of reluctance. We justify our actions because we can't see any semblance of order in its make-up, and even if we are lucky enough to find the illustration which contains our part, only a Philadelphia lawyer could interpret the various code numbers used in describing. the part. Of course, the front of the -4 explains how to use the book, but who has got time t o read i t ? Now, if someone were to give it to us straight, in an easily digested form . . .

To Find the Part Number of a n Unknown Part


Let's use, a s a n example, the aileron trim tab actuator. Suppose we had just removed one from the airplane and wanted t o get another one. The first

thing to do is to see if we can get the number off the actuator, itself - but maybe the number is illegible. The first step is to turn to the Table of Contents in the front part of 1C-130A-4. The major breakdowns are:

Tip: Don't depend t m heavily on nomenclature in finding parts in the -4. For example, what you call an "0" ring, may be listed as a "seal" or "gasket". Use the illustrations to find your part. Note the index number and then look it up in the parts listing.

WING EMPENNAGE FUSELAGE LANDING GEAR POWER PLANT (INSTALLATION INFORMATION ONLY) SYSTEMS FIRE EXTINGUISHING OXYGEN AERLAL DELIVERY PITOT STATIC AUTO PILOT FUEL HYDRAULIC HEATING, VENTILATION, AND PR SURIZATION

can't tell how many of these actuators a r e used since "ref." (or reference) is the only thing called out in the "Units per Assembly" column. The listing refers you to Figure 12 for this information.
Tip: The Parts Listing gives the number of units per assembly in only one place - where the part is used.

2 are called out below the main title. You

Two aileron trim tab *actuatorassemblies

Now don't jump to any hasty conclusions about this breakdown. It can throw you if you do. For instance: "Wing" means the wing panels. The wing center section is part of the fuselage. The aileron trim tab actuator is part of the wing installation, and that's obviously the outer wing and not the wing center section. So we look under "WING" in t h e Table of Contents, and find: WING CONTROLS Aileron Trim Tab Actuator- -pg. 126 Page 126 gives a n exploded view of the actuator assembly and its location on the airplane. The Parts List is shown on this page. The first line, "Aileron Trim Tab Actuators" is the title of the illustration. In this particular P a r t s List we think "Rudder" should have been included in the title, since t h e rudder trim tab is part of the breakdown. However, the parts listing information is taken from engineering drawings, and in this instance the engineering drawing title was not all-inclusive.

LOCKHEED SERVICE NEWS

Figure 12 it is cu o pin poin 3 From the Index No. for the tab actuator. Index Nos. 47 and 57 both point to the actuator
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assembly. The Parts Listing for Figure 12 should help us here. What gives? Index No. 47 calls out 3460423 "Actuator Assembly". Index No. 57 calls out 363049-1 "Actuator Assembly". Can i t be a mistake? No, the number of spaces each item is indented tells the story.

Index No. 47 "Actuator Assembly" and some attaching parts are indented four spaces. They make up the necessary parts for installation of the trim tab controls. ( T h i s is the item preceding Index No. 47 and it is indented three spaces.) Index Nos. 50 thru 58 are indented five spaces. This signifies that these parts make up the Index No. 47 "Actuator Assembly". Index No. 57 "Actuator Assembly" is therefore a part of Index No. 47 "Actuator Assembly".
Tip: The next higher assembly for an item in the Parts

L i s t will precede the item in the listing and be indented


one space to the left. Sub-assemblies (the ilidividml parts which combine to make up an item) win follow the item in the parts listing and be indented one space to the right. Attaching parts always immediately follow the item which they attach.

Now back to Figure 22 Parts List. The "Usable On Code" and explanation at t h e end of this listing gives the same airplane efieeetivity we found on Figure 12.

Notice one more thing about Index No. 57. It is shown on the same line with the 363049-1 Actuator Assembly. However, Index No. 57 applies equally as well to Actuator Assembly 357823-1. The Index No. is not necessarily placed in front of the first item to which it applies. Rather, the Index No. is placed before the item which is used on the majority of the aircraft.

Tip: You may find your part listed above or below the Index No. in the Parts List. Compare titles, descriptionsz and airplane eflectivities of any like items in the listing to select the correct part for your requirement. he C-130B Parts Breakdown and future revised pages in the C-130A Breakdown will duplicate the Index No. of any like items, which should help you to spot your part.

It takes a motor and a mechanical rsssembly to make an actuator. The description rurd :'Usable Oa Code" tell which parts are used f o r each actuator assembly. W o other pieces of information may be l e m e d from U l e motor description : " (70210)" h d i m t e s the manufacturer of the motor. In the front of t b I&sak is a listing of manufacturers' codes rand acldrfmes. This list shows that 70210 is Q4iRB search Manufacturing Company, Los Angeles; @aL ifornii- "(Lockheed Spec. Dwg. 695205-4) " refers ~ C Jthe specifications drawing Lockheed prepared i n dk.et.(y to procure t h e part from an o &&uw. In some cases, parts for a D n drawing are procured from one*squrcg. In these instances, the P a r k Breakd o g ! will list each supplier.

7'tuator assembly are indented two apoces.

The sub-assemblies which make up an ac-

The "Usable On Code" gives you the airplane effectivity for these two actuator assemblies. Actuator Assembly 357823-1 is used on airplanes A F 53-3129 thru A F 56-525. Actuator Assembly 363049-1 is used on airplanes A F 56-526 and up.
MARCH-APRIL, 19'59

T o Find the Illustration for a Part Whose Number is Known This one's easy. Just use the Numerical Index in the back of the book. The sequencing arrangement may confuse you, however, unless you understand it. They are in alphabetical-numerical order beginnning with the first left hand character. For example : AN3-24 AN3021-10 AN4-5 R50 10014 1005200 12-215 1250 338928-189 338928-19 338928-190 We used the aileron trim tab actuator in the preceding example. Below is a portion of the Numerical Index which lists this actuator.

Along with the part number and the reference to the figure number and index number where i t can be found in the Parts Breakdown, is information for ordering the part.

An explanation of the "Source (=ode7' is given in the front of the book. This refers to whether a part can be procured or manufactured locally, the maintenance level which can use the part, etc. The Stock Number is also found in the index. You will need this number when ordering a replacement part. In our aileron trim tab example, "1ALG is listed as the Class Code. The complete Stock Number is lALG-357823-1. The "1ALG" is the Air Force Stock number. These Air Force numbers are in the process of being converted to Federal Stock numbers. 1560 572-2014 is an example of a Federal Stock Number. Not all items in the Numerical Index have been assigned a Source Code or a Stock Number. These numbers are obtained from the Air Force and are listed in the index as soon as they are known.

PART NUMBER

1560 571-9372 4730 601-0067

1560 593-7281 1560 593-7282

1560 609-9967

1560 609-9969

1563 571-2013 1560 545-6563 1560 560-4182 560 571-2014

560 571-1686

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LOCKHEED SERVICE NEWS

STATIC
LINE

ANCHOR
CABLES
If you have ever readied a C-130A for an airdrop mission, you may have been faced with the same problem as shown in the cartoon. Each C-130 comes equipped with four static line anchor cableg, stowed on reels in the a f t end of the cargo compartment. The problem is that there are various length anchor cables used in service, and the cables are not identified as to their installed positions. For example: (a) You may find one C-130 which has four anchor cables all of equal length, or: (b) You may find another C-130 which has four anchor cables all of equal length, but not the same length as the cables on your first airplane, or: (c) You may find a third C-130 which has four anchor cables of varying lengths. Two of the cables will be the same length, but the remaining two cables will be of different lengths. And none of these cables will agree in length with those mentioned in conditions (a) and (b) . , above. (d) These cables vary in length to such an extent that the cable turnbuckle adjustments will
MARCH-APRIL, 1959

not completely compensate for this variance. Therefore, the anchor cables cannot be interchanged. (If you have been able to digest the meaning of (a), (b), (c), and (d) above, you are now fully qualified to tackle the instruction booklet which comes with your 1958 income tax forms.) Two conclusions can be drawn from the above statements. For one, anchor cables taken from one C-130 airplane won't necessarily fit another C-130. And two, you may have to use the trial and error method for installing the anchor cables on the group (c) airplanes named above, unless each of these cables carries some sort of identification. Unfortunately, these cables probably are not identified. They were a t one time, but identification tags and markings have a way of getting lost. Hence, the suggestion has been made to use different colored paints and color code the shackle sleeve on each cable with its matching "U" bolt support attachment. We think it's a good idea, and you just might agree. But before cable shackle sleeves start looking like Joseph's coat, we had better review each specific C-130 configuration.

Major changes to the static line anchor cable installation were made on the late C-130A production airplanes, starting with Serial No. AF57-458 and up. The cables were re-routed and the anchor AIRPLANES AF56-469 T

supports changed to facilitate paratroop jumping . . . to get more paratroops out in less time. The cable installation on these airplanes looks like this :

ERNATE OUTBOARD

-A".-.-..-

...-

Retrofit of this production change was also approved. T.O. 1C-130A-606 (with Supplements -606A and -606B issued as of this writing) has been released making this change effective on all of the earlier C-130A airplanes. However, structural differences in these airplanes made i t necessary to have two different installation configurations. Airplane Serial Nos. GF56-469 thru AF57457, after they have been modified, will require the same cables a s the above production airplanes.

Airplanes AF53-3129 thru AF56-468 a r e the only ones which may give you difficulty in cable identification. Three different cable lengths are required after T.O. 1C-130A-606 has been incorporated on these aircraft. A simple method of identifying these cables is to stretch them out and compare lengths. Then install them in their correct positions and color code each cable shackle sleeve with its matching "U" bolt. This cable installation is shown below.

LOCKHEED SERVICE NEWS

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F e '
t this time, T.O. 1C-130A-606 has been incorpor-

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a quick check is to count the number of "U" bolts ated on many of the airplanes, but not on all. Idenon the forward anchor support a t fuselage bulktification of the cables on aircraft lacking this head 245. The unmodified airplanes will have four retrofit change is not necessary, since all fou "U" bolts; the modified airplanes, six. cables on any one airplane are the same 1 e n g t h . b ~ ''&' T.O.'s 1C-130A-9 and 1C-130A-4 will be revised I n case you are interested in knowing whether to show the modifi d airplane conyour airplanes have received the retrofit change, figurations.
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"WE POSITIVELY GUARANTEE THAT THIS

turns to normal.
Correction After landing, check the oil ~ . . ~ ec , r on the engine which is giving the trouble. It may be unlocked. Explanation The oil tanks on the C-130 engines are pressur' ized a t altitude. Each oil tank contains a pressuriL ? a t i o n valve which starts to close a t 10,000 feet
MARCH-APRIL, 1959

the tank, keeps the tank pressuralve maintains a 3.5 psi differential pressure and outside pressure. In nk pressure is 3.5 psi greater than outside pressure a t 22,000 feet and above. Now what happens when the filler cap is not securely locked? The tank won't be pressurized. The gravity feed from the tank to the engine oil umps has only about 6 psi air pressure acting pon it as compared to 14.7 psi pressure a t sea vel. The gear box pumps are not able to put out normal oil pressure with this reduced inlet pressure. System pressure will drop off.
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It's not too difficult to back a the C-130 ramp and c a w i $ @ . the photograph. In f w t , it i s

which fasten to $%e down rings an each side of the ramp floor, The board k'&q&$Q e;omMeW; the mderials

TIL YOU HA ' B m O V m THE BUMPER BOARD. We m >%rpiainting the bumper board and straps red, & a warning.

b.er this mution: THE RAMP UN-

Evreux-Fauville Air Base perso@ ireoJvwl this problem by desi Evreux has used it fpr sp truck d r i v b s t i * especiaily apprecht The board is easily on the ramp ledge lip, and is secured in'pmition by t;wg web straps

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RAMP BUMPER BOARD


APPROXIMATE WEIGHT--40 LBS.

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LOCKHEED SERVICE NEWS

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LOCKHEED, GEORGIA DIVISION, FIELD SERVICE DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION

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TOM J. CLELAND: . . . Acting Manager TOM H . NEIGHBORS J R Techmcal Group Supervisor Service School Supervisor DON L. BRAUND. . Field a e r a t i o n s Supervisor TOM J. CLELAND. JOHN M. CLARKE. Foreign Regional Representative JACK C. GARWOOD. Domestic Regional Representative
1 J Ckbd 1 H Neiphks, Jr D L Onumd
J C Canood

. . .. . .... .. . . ... . .. .. .

J M Clarke

RepresentativesOn Field Assignment

ASHIYA AIR BASE, JAPAN


HERB D. SPRING * Jim M. Certich E. Roy Clark M. L. "Macv McDaniel PH. 2562 P& 2906 R C. "Bob" Lewis Ed O'Rourke Tom A. Nicholas

NAHA, OKINAWA
P. E. "GENE" GUTHRIE F. J. "Ox" Ochsenfeld C. H. "Charlie" Jackson PH. W A 7168 Ph. WA 0110

CAMBRIDGE RESEARCH CENTER, MASSACHUSETTS


HUNTER M. SOHN PH CR 4-6100 Ext. 464 Ph. BR 2-1760

RAAF RICHMOND, AUSTRALIA

R D. "BOWMCKNEELY *

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CHATEAUROUX, FRANCE
E. TAIT HUNTER PH. 1980, Ext. 3447

PH. 60,71, Ext. 539 Ph. JW 4381 J i m F. Rowan Bovd J. Saver Mac K. Cannon A. C. "Chic" Postier

SEWART AIR FORCE BASE, TENNESSEE


H. E. "RED" PACKARD* PH. GL 9-2561, Ext. 3132 Ph. Murfreesboro, TW 32621 Jack H. Burdick W. L. "Redtt Staples Jim E. Allgood Joe D. Douglas Joe J. Schaffer U. S. "GO" Golightly R C. "Bob" Reeves

EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA


J. C. "PUG" SMITH *

TURNER AIR FORCE BASE, GEORGIA


NED C. RIDINGS * Cliff E. Rooker Arch H. McCleskey PH. HE 5-3411 Ext. 7129 Charlie E. Landrum

Fred A. Hehmeyer Bo) 'E, Helmuth

PH. 1101, Ext. 2-6071 Ph. WH 8-3763 Jack W. Martin John R. Dantzler

&. - #,-.
EVREUX-FAUVILLE AIR BASE, FRANCE
LEE E. WILKINSON * PH. 1194 o r 1195, E x t . 6466 Ph. 1675 R. B. "Dennyf7Dennis H. M. "Steve" Stevens

WARNER ROBINS AIR MATERIEL AREA, GEORGIA


FRANK W. GRIFFITH PH WA 2-5341 Ext. 6183 Ph. WA 3-4464

NABS, EL CENTRO, CALIFORNIA


R- "BOB" KELLING pH. EL 2-3310, Ext. 291 Ph. EL 2-7615

WIESBADEN AIR BASE, GERMANY RCIEIN-MAIN AIR BASE, GERMANY


L. C. "TUSKY" MORGAN Tom G. McLain pH. 6096 Ph. Bad Homburg 5511

* Resident Representative