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Easy Editing: Basic Digital Photography Manipulations Instructional Designer: Jessica Pettyjohn
Easy Editing: Basic Digital Photography Manipulations
Instructional Designer: Jessica Pettyjohn

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After completing this tutorial, the learner will be able to use Windows Live Photo Gallery® for basic digital photography manipulations, including: adjusting exposure, adjusting color, straightening photos, cropping photos, adjusting detail, fixing red eye, and adding black and white effects.

Learners will demonstrate newly acquired digital photography manipulation skills by completing several exercises and projects that will incorporate their own personal digital images. Learners can repeat any of the IU exercises or tutorials until they feel as if they have mastered all skills being taught.

Easy Editing: Basic Digital Photography Manipulations Instructional Designer: Jessica Pettyjohn I I N N S S

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The following steps outline the steps learners will take while completing the basic digital photography manipulations tutorials:

  • 1. Set up and familiarization of program workspace

  • 2. Introduction of photography manipulations

  • 3. Completion of photography manipulations tutorials and exercises

  • 4. Completion of photography manipulations project

  • 5. Check for understanding and mastery of skills

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The flowchart on the last page of document depicts the main tasks, subordinate skills, and entry behaviors involved with the completion of this photography manipulations tutorial and Instructional Unit (IU).

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In order to complete the IU learning goal, learners will be required to use a variety of intellectual and

cognitive skills. The goal is considered an intellectual skill goal because “learners will be required to learn concepts, follow rules, and solve problems in performing the goal (Dick, Carey & Carey, 2005).”

Another way to describe the learning domain of the goal would be to use Benjamin Bloom’s Domains of Learning (McNair, 2004). Bloom divided learning behaviors into the three domains of cognitive, affective, and psychomotor. The learning goal of this IU falls under the cognitive domain of learning. Bloom’s Taxonomy divides the cognitive learning domain into the following six main categories of

I I N N - - D D E E P P T T H H

behavior: knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. These six categories of behaviors are used to describe the increasing complexity of cognitive skills as students move from beginner to more advanced in their knowledge of content (Vinson, 2011).

This domain focuses on intellectual skills and is most familiar to educators since the cognitive domain is the core learning domain (Science Education Resource Center at Carleton College, 2011). This IU requires learners to use both intellectual and cognitive skills as they complete the multiple tutorials and exercises of the unit.

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One of the members of the intended audience (a high school student) and a fellow high school graphic design instructor were asked to review the task analysis and flow chart of this IU. The photography manipulations tutorials were met with some boredom from the student whom said he already knew how to complete the steps listed. When I asked him to review them as if he was

teaching someone else how to complete the photography manipulations, he became more interested and offered sound advice. Firstly, he expressed apprehension with the number of steps in the task analysis and suggested combining a few of the steps so that there were a less number of tasks. Secondly, when I explained that the IU had to be completed within half an hour, he suggested that I focus on less photography manipulations and manipulation exercises. I took both of his suggestions into consideration while revising my task analysis.

The high school graphic design instructor reviewed the IU and the task analysis flowchart. Like the students, he also advised a decrease in the number of photography manipulations. With the given time limit for the IU, tutorials, exercises and final project, he said that I might have given too many steps and photography manipulations techniques for the learner to master. Additionally, he offered suggestions for the entry level behaviors that were required for learners to possess in order to complete the tutorials. However, he suggested utilizing Adobe Photoshop® instead of Windows Live Photo Gallery®. After discussing and explaining the basic photography manipulations skills that would be taught, he then agreed that Windows Live Photo Gallery® would be best to use in this IU.

Based on the peer reviews, I decreased the number of first level tasks from 6 steps to five. I combined the tasks of (3) completion of photography manipulations tutorials and (4) completion of photography manipulations exercises. These were combined into the new step three (3): Completion of photography manipulations tutorials and exercises. The exercise for each manipulation will be found at the end of each manipulation tutorial.

Instructional Goal: After completing this tutorial, the learner will be able to use Windows Live Photo Gallery® for basic digital photography manipulations, including: adjusting exposure, adjusting color, straightening photos, cropping photos, adjusting detail, fixing red eye, and adding black and white effects.

D. Download Windows Live Photo Gallery® C. Access organized digital photos on computer B. Download digital
D. Download
Windows Live Photo
Gallery®
C. Access organized
digital photos on
computer
B. Download digital
photos from camera
to computer
A. Ability to operate
personal computer
Entry Level Skills Above
1.
Set up and
familiarization of
program workspace
1.1 Open Windows
Live Photo Gallery®
Program
1.2 Open digital
photograph
learner wants to
work with
1.3 Open and view
each menu at top
of workspace
1.4 After choosing
“Fix”, explore
menu to left of
digital photo
YES
YES
2.1 Read
YES
definitions and
2.4 Comprehend
2.2 Comprehend
2.3 Comprehend
2.5 Comprehend
2.
Introduction of
explanations of
Straightening
Adjust Exposure?
Adjust Color?
Cropping Photos?
Photos?
digital photography
manipulations
each manipulation
NO
Repeat
NO
YES
all tasks
2.8 Comprehend
Adding Black &
White Effects?
2.6 Comprehend
2.7 Comprehend
Fixing Red Eye?
Adjusting Detail?
YES
YES
YES
3. Completion of
photography
manipulations
tutorials and
exercises
3.1 Complete each
manipulation
tutorial and
exercise
3.2 Demonstrate
mastery of adjust
exposure tutorial by
completing exercise?
3.3 Demonstrate
mastery of adjust color
tutorial by completing
exercise?
3.4 Demonstrate
mastery of straightening
photos tutorial by
completing exercise?
YES
YES
Repeat
YES
NO
all tasks
NO
NO
YES
3.8 Demonstrate
mastery of adding black
& white effects tutorial
by completing exercise?
3.7 Demonstrate
mastery of fixing red
eye tutorial by
completing exercise?
3.6 Demonstrate
mastery of adjusting
detail tutorial by
completing exercise?
3.5 Demonstrate
mastery of adjusting
detail tutorial by
completing exercise?
4. Completion of
photography
manipulations
project
YES
YES
YES
4.1 Examine
requirements for
and directions for
project
4.2 Evaluate
project example
given to learner
4.3 Compose
photography
manipulations
example
5.
Check for
understanding and
mastery of skills
5.1 Compare learner’s
photography
manipulation project
to project example
5.2 Does learner’s
project resemble
project example?
YES
NO

RREEFFEERREENNCCEESS

Dick, W., Carey, L., & Carey, J. (2005). The systematic design of instruction (6 th ed.). Boston:

Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.

McNair, J. (2004). Domains of Learning. Miami, FL: Miami-Dade Community College. Retrieved March 9, 2011, from

http://faculty.mdc.edu/jmcnair/Joe19pages/DOMAINS%20OF%20LEARNING.htm

Microsoft Company. (2011). Windows live photo gallery 2011. Redmond, WA: Author. Retrieved February 13, 2011, from http://explore.live.com/windows-live-photo-gallery?os=other

Konkle, B. (1999). The photo editing process. Marceline, MO: Walsworth Publishing Company. Retrieved February 13, 2011, from http://www.walsworthyearbooks.com/idea-file/8080/the- photo-editing-process/

Science Education Resource Center at Carleton College. (n.d.). Domains of Learning. Northfield, MN:

Author. Retrieved March 8, 2011, from http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/assessment/domains.html

Tracey, S. (2010). The importance of photo editing software. Xzcution.com. Retrieved February 13, 2011, from http://www.xzcution.com/the-importance-of-photo-editing-software/

Vinson, C. (n.d.). Learning domains and delivery of instruction. Los Altos Hills, CA: Foothill-De Anza Community College District. Retrieved March 8, 2011, from http://pixel.fhda.edu/id/learning_domain.html

All images and pictures from Microsoft Word® Clip Art Gallery.