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03/07/2009

By | Venu Gopal V 08PG0146


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CONTENTS

Chapter 1 – INTRODUCTION...........................................................................................6
1.1 Company Overview.........................................................................................................6
1.2 Growth.............................................................................................................................7
1.3 Stanley Platform..............................................................................................................8
1.4 Awards & Recognition...................................................................................................11
1.5 Brands Accquired..........................................................................................................12
1.6 The India Story..............................................................................................................13
1.7 Valued Customers..........................................................................................................16

Chapter 2 – LITERATURE SUPPORT........................................................17


2.1 Introduction to Hand Tools

2.1.1 Hand tool Market.....................................................................................................17


2.1.2 Characteristics of Industry.......................................................................................18
2.1.3 Consumption pattern of hand tools.........................................................................................19
2.1.4 Driving forces for hand tool development.............................................................................20

2.2 Introduction to Hand Tools

2.2.1 Products.....................................................................................................................23
2.2.2 Intelligent Assist Devices (IADs)..............................................................................................23
2.2.3 Engineered System Applications...............................................................................................24
2.2.4 Threaded Fastening Applications.............................................................................................24

Chapter 3 – METHODOLOGY OF STUDY..................................................26


3.1 Reach of project.............................................................................................................26
3.2 Research plan.................................................................................................................26
3.3 Collection of data & analysiss........................................................................................................28
3.4 Findings & recommendations........................................................................................28

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Chapter 4– Statement of Objecive...............................................................29


4.1 Primary..........................................................................................................................29
4.2 Secondary......................................................................................................................29

Chapter 5–............................................................................................30
5.1 Flow chart......................................................................................................................30
5.2 Scope of Study................................................................................................................30
5.3 Limitation.......................................................................................................................31
5.4 Steps Involved................................................................................................................32

Chapter 6–Data Analysis..........................................................................35

Chapter 7–Results & Interpretation............................................................36


7.1 Assembly Technology.....................................................................................................36
7.2 Hand Tools.....................................................................................................................43

Chapter 8–Recommendaion......................................................................48

Chapter 9–Bibilography...........................................................................50

Chapter 10–Annexure.............................................................................51
10.1 Questionnaire..............................................................................................................51
10.2 Hand Tool Standard....................................................................................................56

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

My summer project at Stanley Works India (P) Ltd., proved out to be a good learning

experience for me. In these two months of my project with Stanley Works India (P) Ltd., I was

able to gather a lot of information about the hand tool market and in particular how about entering

new markets and finding the suitable path to tap these new markets.

I would like to thank Mr. Kuldeep S. Bhardawaj as he found me credible enough to work for

Stanley Works India (P) Ltd. and selected me for a challenging project and guided me throughout

the project at each and every step, thus was able to complete my project successfully.

A special thanks to Mr.Naren Kumar, for his valuable guidance that was of great help during the

project and helped me in completing this project successfully.

My sincere thanks to Madam. Sreeja Bhatacharya faculty, CUIM, Bangalore for constantly

supporting and guiding me in achieving the prescribed objectives of my project.

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This study covers the business potential of Stanley Hand Tools mainly in the Bangalore region.

The study started with gaining knowledge about the industries in and around Bangalore and their

needs and requirements vis-à-vis hand tools. This was done by making daily visits to different

manufacturing units across Bangalore city. It was also observed that the driving forces behind

procurement of tools across the industry were more or less the same.

Further a study on the comparison of different brands of hand tools available in the market was

undertaken. The comparison was done on the basis of quality, ease of use, brand awareness,

durability, and price-worthiness amongst other criteria.

On the basis of the observations, certain recommendations are sighted at the end of this report.

Some important one’s are- use of e-marketing, having a marketing calendar and sticking to it,

starting of newsletters and having a regional office amongst others.

If implied, a few of these suggestions may offer a low-cost solution to the brand awareness

problems we face and harness more sales in the coming years to give us an opportunity to expand

our business in this region.

Chapter I: INTRODUCTION

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1.1: Company Overview.


The Stanley Works, The 166 year old company is a worldwide manufacturer and marketer of
tools, hardware and specialty hardware products for home improvement, consumer, industrial and
professional use. The company stills bears not only Frederick Stanley's name but also the spirit and
passion that drove him to succeed where others failed
The Stanley Works is positioned to meet tomorrow's competitive challenges and continue as a
leading worldwide manufacturer and marketer. Our businesses are
diversified in terms of products, geographic spread and channels
of distribution. We have moved effectively to expand our products
into new market areas such as the Far East and Eastern Europe.
Today, the Stanley name is known around the world as a reliable
guarantee of quality and value.
"The secret of this company's success is an open one -- all who
will may avail themselves of it, and all who do so will succeed -- one word tells it all and that one
word is – Excellence
The Stanley Fulfillment System (SFS), created to encompass and improve upon Stanley’s long
tradition of operations excellence, is the heart of our business operations. It’s a continuous
improvement program focused 100% on the needs of our customers and a comprehensive business
system that guides the way we work every day. SFS is at once our blueprint for success and our
roadmap for continued growth.

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At the heart of SFS are three simple, customer-facing goals:


• Improve Service
• Increase Quality
• Reduce Costs
Service, quality and costs have always been strengths at The Stanley Works. SFS is our
commitment to making them even stronger
1.2: Growth.
In 1843, an enterprise businessman named Frederick Trent Stanley established a little shop in New
Britain, Connecticut to manufacture door bolts and other hardware from wrought iron. Mr. Stanley
was the first Mayor in town; he brought New Britain rail service, gas lighting and a reservoir-fed
water supply.

In 1930, Stanley invented the tape rules. Stanley tools have built nearly every home, school,
church and hospital in America. Stanley Air tools build nearly every car and truck made in North
America. Millions pass through Stanley Automatic Doors each day.

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With products sold in more than 130 countries, the Stanley® brand is recognized worldwide. From
crisis comes OPPORTUNITY. The chance to emerge BETTER than ever before. By remaining
committed to our guiding PRINCIPLES. And TRANSFORMING a LEGACY established over a
century ago. Today’s Stanley is lean, flexible, diverse, and focused on long term GROWTH.
Today’s Stanley is READY for tomorrow.
1.3: Stanley Platforms.
A) Consumer Tools.
A world leader in the design, development and delivery of tools, Stanley brings to market the
strongest and most innovative tools available. With thousands of products on the market and
hundreds introduced each year, Stanley develops the tools consumers need to get the job done.
Key Brands
Stanley®, Proto®, Husky®, Vidmar®, ZAG®, MAC®, Jensen®, Contact East®, Bostitch®,
Atro®, Cobotics®, LaBounty®, Innerspace®
Product categories
Industrial hand tools and tool boxes, professional and industrial mechanics tools, electronic
diagnostic tools, pneumatic fastening tools and fasteners, hydraulic tools, shearers, breakers and
crushers.
B) Security Solutions.

An industry powerhouse with a global footprint, Stanley Security Solutions builds on Stanley’s
development of the first automatic door with integrated solutions
that provide wall-to-wall security, including doors, hardware,
software and service. Stanley’s Security Solutions protect
buildings, airports and institutions all over the world.

Key Brands
Best® Access, Blick®, cj rush™, Frisco Bay™, HSM Electronic Protection Services,
Integrator.com™, ISR™ Solutions, Sargent & Greenleaf™, Safemasters®, Senior Technologies™,
Stanley® Access Technologies, Stanley® Hardware
The Stanley Security Solutions Product Group offers a wide array of electronic security products,
mechanical security products, integration software, and installation and support services for a
diverse set of industrial, institutional, and commercial facility applications.

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Electronic security, access and safety products manufactured and tested to the industry’s highest
standards for functionality and long life. Applications include schools, banks, retail stores,
hospitals, government agencies, manufacturing facilities, colleges and universities, and utilities, to
name a few.
Mechanical security products include patented keying, customized masterkey systems and
quality door and lock hardware. These combine to supply customers with mechanical access
control that is cost-effective and efficient.

C) Industrial Tools

With our powerful professional tools, Stanley’s Industrial Tools Group delivers big tools for big
jobs. Recognized as leaders in Industrial Tools, our family of brands builds everything from cars
and trucks to roofs and floors.

Key Brands
Stanley®, Proto®, Husky®, Vidmar®, ZAG®, MAC®, Jensen®, Contact East®, Bostitch®,
Atro®, Cobotics®, LaBounty®, Innerspace®

Product categories
Industrial hand tools and tool boxes, professional and industrial mechanics tools, electronic
diagnostic tools, pneumatic fastening tools and fasteners, hydraulic tools, shearers, breakers and
crushers.

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1.4: Awards & Recognition.


A steady stream of new and innovative products is the lifeblood of this company. In 2007, Stanley
introduced more than 100 new products, many of which have won awards for great distinctions.
The company itself has been triumphant in winning numerous awards throughout the years for
packaging, design innovation, communication and advertising. Most recently, Stanley won 4
Golden Hammer Awards in 2007 and also won two IDEA awards in the 2007 International Design
Excellence Competition.

2007 Golden Hammer Awards


Presented by Home Channel News, Stanley was the recipient of the following four awards at the
2007 Golden Hammer Awards Ceremony:
 The Vendor of the Year Award.
 The Innovator of the Year Award for overall new product development in all categories.
 The Gold Golden Hammer Award for the Hand Tools category.
 The Business to Consumer Communications Award for the Alien commercial featuring the
Stanley® MaxLife™ 369™ Tripod Flashlight.
2006 Golden Hammer Awards
Stanley was the only multiple award winner at the 22nd Annual Golden Hammer Awards
Ceremony, presented by Home Channel News. The awards, based on votes from retailers and
buyers, were handed out at a ceremony in Las Vegas at the 2006 National Hardware Show. Stanley
won:
 The Gold Golden Hammer Award for the Hand Tools category.
 The Business to Consumer Communications Award for the Stanley® Sharpshooter® Staple
Gun World's Weakest Man campaign.
The Innovator of the Year Award for overall new product development in all categories.

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Both the Gold Golden Hammer for the Hand Tools category and the Business to Consumer
Communications awards are the highest awards in their category. For the Innovator of the Year
award, Stanley was voted number one in new product innovation across all 36 product categories.
1.5: Brands Acquired.
Our innovative Consumer and Industrial products help people utilize their skills, express their
creativity and realize their visions on work sites around the globe. Brand names include Stanley®,
FatMax®, Husky®, Goldblatt®, Bostitch®, Jensen®, Mac®, Proto®, La Bounty®, Vidmar®,
CST®, David White® and ZAG®. Our Security Solutions brands include Stanley®, Best®,
Blick® and Frisco Bay®.

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1.6: The India Story.


Stanley India, a fully owned subsidiary of Stanley Works, U.S. having its head quarters in Delhi,
started its operations in the year 2007. They import their own products manufactured in
different countries and sell those in Indian Market with the help of its extensive chain of
distributors & dealers. In the past one year, Stanley has been able to appoint more than 170 +
distributors all over India.
All the products of Stanley are categorized into 3 segments: Hand Tools, Hardware , Assembly
technology and Hydraulics. In India, Stanley has launched nearly 2400 products, and is in the
process of launching more. Presently, Stanley India is focusing on Industrial Tools and
Hardware business in India.
Some of the valued customers of Stanley India are Tata Motors, Airtel, Nokia, Mahindra,
DMRC, etc.

The Indian operations of Stanley is involved the


• Laser Products
• Hardware
• Hand Tools
• Proto

Geographical Reach in India

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-Stanley Head Office


-Stanley India Warehouse
-Proto Distributor
-Hardware Distributor
-Stanley Hand Tools Distributor

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Stanley India Organization Structure

Stanley India Sales & Marketing Org. Chart

1.7: Stanley’s Valued Customers

Chapter II: LITERATURE SUPPORT

A) Introduction to Hand Tools

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The most popular product category is hand tools. The tools, which are operated by hands, are
known as hand tools. Hand tool products include a broad category of hand tools. Hand tool
products are broadly used in all type of industries. Today technology has become highly advanced
but still the importance of hand tools products cannot be ignored. In fact hand tool products are the
backbone of all the industries; no matter how advanced are the machines and technology used
there. No industrial process can be executed without using hand tools.
As machine can never replace importance of mankind the same way automatic tools can never take
place of hand tools. The use of hand tools is must in every kind of industrial job but sometimes it is
not promptly noticeable. Even if the entire process is executed by automatic tolls and machine,
then too hand tools are required for additional jobs like packing, finishing etc. Furthermore the
efficient working of machine is also dependant on hand tools. Hand tools are essentially required
for repair and lubrications of machines.
Apart from this they are widely used for home repairs, garages, electrical appliances etc. A kit full
of primary hand tools products may be easily found at any home. Hand tools are used to execute
very complex as well as simple tasks. Screwdriver is such a common hand tool product, which is
the part of every engineer’s tool kit as well as in every household. Spanners, screwdrivers, pliers,
clamps, riveters, wrenches etc., are used for tightening and riveting the various screws etc.
Hand tool products are designed to carry easily. That’s why every vehicle has its own set of hand
tool products. It can be used in time of any breaking of machine where one does not find any help.
Hand tool is a savior in time of need. A kit of hand tools products is like a first-aid box for
machinery.

2.1: Hand tools Market


2.1.1: Indian hand tools market

India has a competitive advantage in the hand tool industry compared to other countries because
of easy availability of raw materials, entrepreneurship skills and skilled labor at competitive
wages. The hand tool industry as a whole is witnessing a shift of manufacturing base from
traditional manufacturing countries in Europe and Taiwan to the developing world and this is a
good sign for India to benefit. There has been an average growth of 17% per annum of the hand
tool market in India for the last 7 years.

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Estimated No. of Units in India 2500


SSI Units 95%
Large Units 7
Estimated number of workers 25000
Jallandhar/
Major Manufacturing regions
Nagpur

2.1.2: US hand tool market


The U.S. hand tool industry is estimated to be a $6.2 billion. Hand tool demand, including
power tool in the United States is expected to rise 3.1% annually through 2011, reaching $14.3
billion, according to a recently released report. There are more than 1,000 firms active in the
U.S. hand and power tools industry, ranging from small, privately owned firms to major
corporations like Stanley Works, Black & Decker, Bosch, Danaher and Snap-on etc. In fact
these major companies accounted for nearly 55% of the total sales in 2006.

2.2: Characteristics of the industry


• A labor Intensive Industry: A source of employment to many, hand tools industry is
basically labor intensive in nature, whose development is of great importance for a competitive
as well as a self-reliant industrial structure. The manufacturers of hand tools produce a
comprehensive range of of hand tools, right from carpentry and plumbing tools to striking and
cutting tools.

• Energy intensive industry: Apart from being a labor intensive industry, this industry is
also an energy intensive one. It is estimated in a recent study that in most economies adoption of
energy efficient processes and technologies can yield in energy savings of up to 30 to 50%.

• Effective contributor to the economy: Adding positively to the income of a country,


hand tools industry has contributed to economy in terms of development and technology up-
gradation.

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2.3: Consumption patterns of hand tools


This depends on the following factors:
• Price
• Supply chain dynamics
• Product quality, design and safety
• Service
• Environmental factors

2.4: Driving forces for hand tool development


Hand tools were in use since a long time and there has been a great change in the designs of
hand tools from time to time. There were many factors that led to hand tool development.

2.4.1: Workers safety & health:


This is a very important consideration in today's designing of hand tools. Hand tools should be
designed in such a way so that they reduce wear and tear on the operator. Ergonomics hand
tools have become very popular, driven by an increased emphasis on worker safety and health.
Workers nowadays prefer tools, which reduce stress on the body and at the same time reduce
employee time loss due to job-related disabilities. Today, designers are coming up with more
comfortable grips, reducing the weight of the object, and making hand tools adjustable to
different body types.
2.4.2: Chemicals
When tools are designed, manufacturers consider ergonomics, performance and the
environment. Besides considering health and cleaning factors, hand tools are also produced
nowadays using less chemicals, using less environmentally damaging products which are not
harmful to the the human body and which becomes an environment friendly product.

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2.4.3: Cleaning
One of the driving force for change in hand tool has always been to make cleaning easier. For
proper functioning and durability of hand tools, it is necessary keep them clean after usage. In
most cases, the latest designs go for flexible handles which can be removed and cleaned
separately as both the handle and the tool blade are of different materials.
2.4.4: Hand Tools Standards
With the rapid advancement and expansion in the global trade, standardization of various
products is very necessary. The standards given to various products help in expanding
international trade which in turn bridges the quality gap between the manufacturers, suppliers
and buyers of different nations. In hand tools as well, standards play a vital role.

Standards are required in hand tools for the following reasons:


• They provide performance requirements.
• They provide safety requirements.
• Standards are available for all types of hand tools like pliers, screwdrivers, wrenches,
striking tools, torque instruments etc.
• These standards also include the various tests that are required to determine
conformance with the safety and performance requirements.
B) Introduction to Stanley Assembly Technology:
Stanley Assembly Technologies, an operating group of The Stanley Works was founded in 1963.
Originally called Stanley Air Tools, the group was renamed in 2002 to reflect the emphasis on
technology to deliver solutions of high value to customers. Assembly Technologies headquarters
are located in Highland Heights, Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland. The Stanley Works is global
corporation, headquartered in New Britain, Connecticut and has manufacturing and distribution
in all world areas. An application center is located in Troy, Michigan. Locations in Europe
include the U.K., France, Germany and Italy.

Assembly Technologies Product Group provides solutions to the global assembly market,
including the motor vehicle industry. Core solutions include high-performance DC electric and
pneumatic tightening tools and controllers, conventional pneumatic articulating arms, torque
tubes and Intelligent Assist Devices for ergonomic material handling.

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Tightening torque capacity ranges from 0.5 to 2000 Nm and above. Tool geometries include
straight, pistol, angle, hold & drive, crowfoot and tubenut outputs. Different levels of torque
control, fit assembly requirements ranging from the most critical, such as safety related vehicle
components to non-critical. Network systems enable plant-wide real-time assembly monitoring
including statistical charting, trace analysis, remote tool configuration and hardware diagnostics.
With Cobotics products, Stanley Assembly Technologies leads the growing global market for
Intelligent Assist Devices (IADs). Engineered to dramatically improve the productivity, quality
and ergonomic safety of assembly operations, IADs are computer controlled, servo powered lift
assist devices that assist workers in lifting and manipulating heavy and awkward parts.

A highly skilled direct sales force works directly with major customers and supports distributors
in all world areas. Assembly Technologies sales engineers and distributors are qualified to
analyze customer applications and propose the ideal selection of assembly and material
handling components. Technical Service employees support customers from Assembly
Technologies offices and regional locations. Other services offered by Stanley Assembly
Technologies are:
• Field service
• Training for customers’ support personnel
• Design consultation for special systems
• Maintenance programs
• Telephone support,
• Spare parts and repair,

Equipment calibration and tool system certification include:


• Auto and Light Truck Assembly
• Auto Parts and Components
• Large Truck Assembly
• Construction and Farm Machinery
• Recreational Vehicles

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2.5: Products:
1) Thread Fastening.
i. Torque Equipment
ii. Standard Nut Runners
iii. Small QPM Tools

2) Engineered Systems
i. Articulating Arm
ii. Fixtured Tools

3) Material Handling
i. Trolley
ii. Lift

2.6: Intelligent Assist Devices (IADs) are a new generation of computer controlled, servo
powered assist devices that allow seamless collaboration of a human operator with computer-
controlled machinery, delivering superior speed and precision in material handling. IADs are
analogous to power steering for material handling. Providing an improved method for moving
heavy or difficult to handle loads, these systems are poised to revolutionize the ergonomic
handling industry, bringing unprecedented levels of productivity, quality and ergonomic
safety to manual processes.

2.7: Engineered System Applications:

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A two spindle DC electric has adjustable bolt centers that can automatically change the
tightening torque level for each centers' dimension.
Tool Positioning System for Cylinder Head Bolts
A Stanley Tool Positioning System uses a single QPM DC electric tool to sequentially tighten
26 cylinder head bolts. This is a lower cost alternative to an additional multiple spindle system.
The tool is mounted on an articulating arm with a PLC that monitors the tool position and tool
parameter settings.
Wheel Bearing End Play Tool
A special wheel bearing end play tool automates the tapered bearing assembly operation.
Four Spindle Blocker Beam
A four spindle fixtured multiple enables fastening of the 8 bolts for the blocker beam in two
operations.
Shear Bolt Tool
Assembly of tension control fasteners that have an integral controlled shear section for
installation without the use of torque-controlled nut runners.
2.8:Threaded Fastening Applications

QPM Door Strap Secure


A QPM E12PB-17 pistol DC electric tool secures the door check strap that prevents motor
vehicle door from opening past 60 degrees.
QPM Instrument Panel to Firewall Secure
QPM pistol DC electric tool for securing the automobile instrument panel to the firewall.

Adaptive Tightening Control (ATC) is a patented algorithm developed exclusively by Stanley


Assembly Technologies and is a standard feature of all QPM Assembly Systems. ATC
automatically manages speed and power to the motor of DC electric nutrunners based on dynamic
feedback during the course of each and every rundown. If a single application consists of a mix of
hard and soft joints with the same fastener drive type and target torque, other tools must be set for
the middle of the road (i.e. tolerate some overshoot on the hard joint and increased cycle time on
the soft joint). With ATC, each joint type is sensed during that particular.
BENEFITS OF ATC
• Dynamic loads Improve Quality: accurately tightens a wide variety of joints.
• Improve Productivity: optimize speed of tools on a wide variety of joints.

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• Improve Ergonomics: no sudden speed changes from downshifting.


• Reduce Acquisition Cost: tools can be used on any assembly within their torque range.
• Reduce Installation Cost: tools don't need to "learn" the job before use in production.
• Reduce Maintenance Cost: smooth torque and speed transition minimizes on gearing.

Chapter III: METHODOLOGY OF STUDY

The projected was executed in such a way that it is complete to the maximum extent covering all the
aspects and thus arriving at a suitable conclusion to meet the objective of the project. Few
recommendations were also suggested to the company, which can help the organization to grow
further and penetrate faster into the new markets.

3.1: Reach of the Project


The study was conducted covering the two major industrial regions in Bangalore & Hosur. The reach
of the project consisted of various industries and dealers located in these above mentioned areas.

3.2: Research Plan


The research was started with a well laid research plan and weekly schedule. The research plan
included the following important stages.
1) Data Sources
2) Research Approaches
3) Research Instruments

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4) Sampling Plan
3.2.1:Data Sources
Primary Research: most of the data in this project was through primary research conducted in
industries. It was done completely through personal interviews, though a prepared questionnaire was
used as guide line and which was later filled summarized.
Secondary Research: Latest information available on internet about various industries and dealers
was also used apart from the data got through primary research, so as to have a good study of the
hand tools market in Visakhapatnam and Kakinada.

3.2.2: Research Approaches

Approaching Customers/Industries:
– Getting permission into an industry would complete almost 50% of your job as it would give is
the platform to know about their operations.
– Get the details of the persons as many as possible in the industry
– Spend your maximum time in the industry, so that you would know what is their work
environment i.e., whether they are using quality products, how much of their operations are being
done by contractors, what is their hand tools purchase quantity and frequency of purchase, etc.
– Also try to find out how the process of purchase takes place, which might be different for
different departments.

Closing the sale:


– This is very important for both the parties to build the relation and also for oneself as this give
the motivation and adds more value to your work.
– To reach to this stage, one must be clear how much work need to be put in, which operates as a
funnel like, if u want to reach or make x sales at least you need to meet 10x customers.
– The time in which you would achieve this should also be planned in the similar way.

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3.2.3: Research Instruments


The research instrument was both qualitative and quantitative and hence consisted of personal
interviews, which were guided by self prepared Questionnaires. Each of the questionnaire consisted
of 17 questions on an average. The questions were both open ended and closed ended. The closed
ended questions were a diverse type consisting of single choices, multiple choices, likert scales and
rating scales.
3.3.4: Sampling Plan
The industries to be visited were based on their type of industry like ship building industry, steel
plants and any other major industries. The sample for studying the dealers was chosen to be
minimum 10, which should have the mixture of both types of dealers like the once who do counter
sales and the ones who don’t deal in counter sales.

3.3: Collection of Data and Analysis


Various Pie-charts and bar-graphs are made to have an easy and quick understanding of the study
conducted. Initially all the questionnaires were analyzed individually, and then finally an overall
comparison of the various responses from all the dealers was done and analyzed.

3.4: Findings & Recommendations


Finally, the various findings from the study were listed out along with certain invaluable
recommendations for STANLEY, to help them generate and tap the new markets.

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Chapter IV: STATEMENT OF OBJECTIVE

4.1 PRIMARY OBJECTIVES


• To assess the scope for the business development of Stanley Hand Tools &Stanley Assembly
Technology.
• To position Stanley as a brand by focusing on its quality characteristics.

4.2 SCONDARY OBJECTIVE


• To find the potential for Stanley Hand Tools in the existing market.

• To find the hand tools purchaser’s needs and the expectation on hand tools.

• To find the feedback about Stanley Assembly Technologies and take corrective action thereby
ensuring better business development.
• To identify potential customers and new plants where business development can truly happen

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Chapter V: RESEARCH

5.1 RESEARCH DESIGN FLOW CHART

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Two types of information are required for doing Multi Dimensional Scaling. The first type of
informational requirement pertains to those that are requires to measure the dependent variable
which in this case is customers intention to buy.
The second type of information required pertains to the independent variable. The independent
variables being considered in this case are price, brand, quality, durability, reliability, discount,
warranty, availability, breakage and comfort.
This research was Multiple Cross- Sectional in nature as: Data collection was done only once from
only one sample of the population (Purchasers and end users). The research involved very less of
secondary data then the primary data. This was due to the fact that the accuracy of the research was
to be kept high. Moreover, the research was done on the currency basis i.e. it was done for the
current situation.

5.2 SCOPEOF SYUDY


The study provided an insight into the SAT and its applications, hand tools usage, expectations and
attitude towards hand tools like spanners, pliers and screw drivers. And to find out what factors the
customers seek in general, with regards hand tools and SAT. This study will help to find out the
feedback of SAT and Stanley hand tools with regards to price, brand, quality, durability, reliability,
availability, and comfort.

5.3 LIMITATIONS IN THE STUDY


No research would be a fool proof, 100% error free with the time/ money constraints and within the
limited resources. My research study was no exception.
I too had my own set of problems in terms of price, availability and with the fact that I was a first
timer in this field.

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• The first limitation could be the fact that Expert opinion. Depth interview and all the
Descriptive study were conducted on a sample size of 40+. Though these techniques were conducted
to unearth it still could be limited.
• Next limitation would be the fact that the sample size of 40+. More the sample size more
detailed study would be.
• The sample taken for creating the model included people from various industries in Bangalore.
• The conclusions made are based on the data collected from the sample size. So the conclusion
are based how truthfully the people entered the data.
These were some of the limitations identified during the course of my research

5.4 STEPS INVOLVED


The following steps were followed to attain the objective.
5.4.1Literature study
There is no specific study, which was done on identifying hand tools purchasers purchase behaviour.
5.4.2Expert opinion
Expert opinion is the process where an expert in the related field is interviewed to get information
that can be used in the study. In this case distributors, dealers, sales officers, marketing manager of
Stanley for south and purchase managers of industries which use hand tools are considered as an
expert.
5.4.3Descriptive study
The descriptive research design used in this case is survey method and personal interview. Personal
interview with various industry purchase managers made the researcher to find some of the factors
and ideas by observation, hearing their grief and interacting with them

.5.4.5 Scaling technique


The scaling technique used in the questionnaire was likert scale, open, closed ended and ranking
scale. All the questions in the main questionnaire were extracting answers by this scale. This was
maintained throughout the questionnaire to keep the reliability and validity in control. The likert
scale technique is widely used to determine the level of agreement or disagreement of an issue in the

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questionnaire. And another set of likert scaling were used to determine the most important and least
important of an issue in a questionnaire. The scale was designed with five response categories as
shown below.
1---Strongly disagree
2---Disagree
3---Neutral (Neither disagrees nor agrees)
4---Agree
5---Strongly agree

1---Most important
2---Important
3---Neutral (Neither important nor unimportant)
4---Less important
5---Least important
The questionnaire when framed was carefully done to avoid complex words. In circumstances where
such words could not be avoided, explanations were given for the respondents to understand easy.
The ambiguous words or sentences were also avoided. Each section of the questionnaire had an
initial explanation of how to answer the questions. An example was also given for easy
understanding of filling the questionnaire. Important instructions were highlighted in bold letters to
improve the vision and for a quicker understanding of the instructions by the respondent.
The questionnaire was altered twice based on the opinion of the internal guide. The corrections were
made and then it was tested amongst the respondents. The respondent didn’t have any problem in
understanding the questionnaire and answering it.
5.4.6 Designing questionnaire
Based on the results obtained from the descriptive study and using scaling method the final
questionnaire was prepared and administered to the respondents.
5.4.7 Deciding the sample size
The sampling technique used for the research was more of a stratified random sampling. This is
because of the customers who were all possible to meet were selected. The sampling was done as
mentioned above due the lack of time to get data.

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As the market research was done to B2B market the sample size was taken as 40. The data was
collected from purchase managers and end users. Certain care was taken to avoid errors of history as
the consumers were all contacted at the place of location. The other errors were either avoided or
even though present it was cancelled out due to the presence of the same with other brands.
5.4.8 Data collection
Data was collected from both purchase managers and end users using stratified random sampling.
The researcher went to each of them and conducted a depth interview, which takes almost 10
minutes. The sample was about 40 potential customers for SAT
The data for the questionnaire was collected directly and through e-mail from purchaser mangers and
end users. The data was collected from most of all industries in Bangalore. Using the data collected
by the researcher was able to come with factor analysis to see whether the factors are really related
to the buying decision.
5.4.9 Analysis of the data collected
All the data collected was fed into a database created in Microsoft Excel especially for this purpose.
The various tools and functions available on excel were used for necessary calculation. Bar graphs
and pie charts were generated to make the interpretation of the results easier. SPSS software was
used for the purpose factor analysis.

Chapter VI: DATA ANALYSIS

Data analysis model is econometric model and was planned to be done with the statistical tool SPSS.
The data was got mainly in the likert scale for this purpose. The various tools and functions available
on Excel were used for necessary calculations. Bar graphs and pie charts were generated to make the
interpretation of the results. SPSS software was used for the purpose of factor analysis.

6.1 Plan of data analysis


The data analysis done as in the plan given below
1.Filtering of the questionnaire were done
2.The questionnaires were sorted into the respective groups.

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3.Coding of the questions were done


4.All the data was entered into different excel sheets
5.This data was copied to the SPSS tool all the variable were explained
6.The other questions related awareness, departments, ranking and current brand were
analyzed using Micro soft Excel.
7.Results were tabulated and conclusion and recommendations were drawn.

Chapter VII: RESULTS AND INTERPRETATION

7.1 STANLEY HAND TOOLS


7.1.1 Hand Tool Market Share
The below table & graph gives the market share different companies hold.

CURRENT BRAND
East Everes Ambik
Company ==> Taparia
man t a
No. Of
Respondents 20 8 7 5
==>

Our study reveals from the above table and pie chart that about 50% of the respondent
industries are using Taparia tools and about 20% by Eastman. As a competitor we can tap the

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segmented audience using these taparia tools in case of sockets as our prices are much cheaper
than the other tools which we can use this as a penetration strategy.

7.1.2 Frequency & Channel of Buying Hand Tools

From the above frequency table it is revealed that about 37.5% of the industries purchase
hand tools half yearly, 47.5% of the industries purchase annually and 15% once in two years. This
concludes company should constantly focus on the market to grab the opportunity.

The above chart clearly indicates that around 44% of the dealers procured hand tools
directly from the company, 37% of them import those directly from the company and the
remaining 19% get it from regional distributor. This also indicates that they have a very good reach
in the market as they are able to get the items imported directly or from the regional distributors
though not very frequently but at least once in 6 months as required by their foreign clients.

7.1.3 Factor Analysis

KMO and Bartlett's Test

Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy. .766

Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx. Chi-Square 114.141

df 66.000

Sig. .000

Kaiser-Mayer-Olkin
A measure of whether your distribution of values is adequate for conducting factor
analysis. A measure >.9 is marvellous, >.8 is meritorious, >.7 is middling, >.6 is mediocre, >.5 is
Miserable and unacceptable. In this case it is middling.
Bartlett’s test of Sphericity

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This is a measure of the cumulative normality of researcher’s set of distribution. It also


tests whether the correlation matrix is an identity matrix. A significance value <.05 indicates that
these data do not produce an identity matrix and are thus approximately multivariate normal and
acceptable for the factor analysis. In this case it is <.05, so this data is acceptable for the factor
analysis.

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Correlation Matrix
Correlation
E Pric Perf Cust C
Qu ase e Avail Main orm Functi omiz omp
alit Dura of wort abili tena Relia anc Desi onalit abili actn
y bility Use hy ty nce bility e gn y ty ess
Quality 1.000 .291 -.117 -.224 -.086 -.090 .204 -.236 .398 -.205 -.019 .250

Durabili
.291 1.000 -.365 -.129 -.217 .226 .342 .249 .600 -.453 .098 .112
ty
Ease of
-.117 -.365 1.000 .336 .107 .011 -.152 .125 -.468 .481 .135 -.152
Use
Price
-.224 -.129 .336 1.000 -.195 -.045 .137 .231 -.114 .241 .362 .127
worthy
Availabi
-.086 -.217 .107 -.195 1.000 .159 -.133 -.104 -.221 .240 -.176 -.126
lity
Mainten
-.090 .226 .011 -.045 .159 1.000 -.043 .012 .138 -.120 -.039 .245
ance
Reliabili
.204 .342 -.152 .137 -.133 -.043 1.000 .101 .300 -.203 .244 .069
ty
Perform
-.236 .249 .125 .231 -.104 .012 .101 1.000 .018 -.177 .288 .053
ance
Design .398 .600 -.468 -.114 -.221 .138 .300 .018 1.000 -.536 .025 .012

Functio
-.205 -.453 .481 .241 .240 -.120 -.203 -.177 -.536 1.000 .285 -.102
nality
Customi
-.019 .098 .135 .362 -.176 -.039 .244 .288 .025 .285 1.000 .061
zability
Compac
.250 .112 -.152 .127 -.126 .245 .069 .053 .012 -.102 .061 1.000
tness

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This Scree plot’s the Eigenvalues on a bicoordiante plan. It is used to select how many
factors to rotate to a final solution. The traditional construct for interpretation is that the Scree
should be ignored and that only factors on the steep portion of the graph should be selected and
rotated.

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Component Matrixa

Component

1 2 3 4 5

Quality .496 -.130 -.403 .551 .131

Durability .776 .210 .165 -.082 .213

Ease of Use -.660 .272 .036 .128 .158

Price
-.285 .718 .007 .104 -.156
worthy
Availability -.324 -.418 .308 .083 .598

Maintenanc
.166 -.043 .813 .279 .182
e
Reliability .435 .417 -.242 .069 .381

Performanc
.075 .593 .370 -.435 -.040
e
Design .819 .041 -.067 -.060 .167

Functionalit
-.760 .128 -.153 .289 .246
y
Customizab
-.065 .745 -.121 .126 .276
ility
Compactne
.237 .184 .303 .694 -.432
ss

The rotated factor structure is displayed next. Note that due to the selection of the sort by
size option, the factor loading are sorted in two ways. Firstly the highest factor loading for each
factor are selected and listed in separate blocks and secondly within each block the factor loading
are sorted from largest to smallest. The numbers in each column are the factor loading for each
factor, roughly the equivalent of the correlation between a particular item and the factor.

7.1.4 Source of Information

SOURCE OF INFORMATION

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General Special
Specialis In Friends
newspap Sales exhibiti
Parameter t local or
ers or Repsentat on or Others
s magazin outle colleagu
magazine ive Semina
es t es
s rs
No. Of
Responden 3 3 18 3 5 8 0
ts ==>

Much of the information about the hand tools was obtained from the local outlets. Hence,
better visibility must be done through magazines, newsletters and through special exhibitions and
seminars, as they carry a meager 20%. Better promotional campaigns and brand awareness
programs must be carried out.

7.2 STANLEY ASSEMBLY TECHNOLOGY


7.2.1 Market Share
The following table indicates the existing brands in the assembly technology categories and there
relative market share.

MARKET SHARE
Stanley
Company Atlas Assembly
IR
==> Copco Technolog
y
No. Of
Respondents 12 24 4
==>

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IR is better penetrated in the assembly technologies market (60%) compared to other brands like
Atlas Copco (30%) and SAT (10%). Atlas Capco subsequently followed IR in tapping the assembly
technology market. SAT’s presence has slowly been improving across major industries and has a huge
potential to tap the market in the near future.

7.2.2 The Usual Applications in Assembly Line


The following table indicates the user oriented applications of SAT in manufacturing plant.

APPLICATIONS
Engineeri
Thread Material
Period ==> ng
Fastening Handling
Systems
No. Of
Respondent 13 18 9
s ==>

Engineering Systems is identified as the major application across the industry segments (45%)
followed by Thread Fastening related applications. There is a huge scope in the material handling
segment for SAT with a wide variety and highly sophisticated equipment being available. SAT can
surely emerge as the best fastening solution provider in the near future.

7.2.3 Awareness of SAT Products


The table below shows the awareness of Stanley Assembly Technology.

AWARENESS OF
STANLEY ASSEMBLY
PRODUCTS
Response
Yes No
==>

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No. Of
Respondents 24 16
==>

60% of the people across the industry segments are aware of the Stanley as a brand. It is
mainly known for the range of applications and operational efficiency which act as the major
differentiators when compared to IR and Atlas Copco.

7.2.4 Present Scenario of technology in production line


The table below indicates the satisfaction levels of the existing technologies in the production line
which mainly are non-SAT related applications.

SATISFACTION LEVEL OF EXISTING ASSEMBLY


TECHNOLOGY
(Highly (Dis-
Paramete Satisfie satisfie
2 3 4 5 6
rs d) d)
1 7
No. Of
Responden 1 6 5 13 13 2 0
ts ==>

It can be interpreted from the above table that the satisfaction levels across the various assembly
technologies are moderate and there by SAT with its wide range of applications and operational
efficiency has a edge over its competitor. SAT thus has a huge potential in addressing these needs
and thereby delivering desired satisfaction levels.

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7.2.5 Expansion Plan


Based on the expansion plan of the companies, the forecast for SAT requirements can be arrived.

EXPANSION PLAN
Period ==> Yes No
No. Of
Respondents 57.5% 42.5%
==>

57.5% of the respondents (People across the industry segments) are leaking out for expansion
plans. Example: Toyota “New Plant” and “Training Centre” “Tetra Vectra” for SAT to tap these
expansion plans thereby ensuring better “Business development and positioning of SAT”

58% of the respondents are planning for expansion roughly in 2 years down the line. Example:
Toyota. Other Plants Example: Tetra Vectra have their expansion plans 1 year down the line (42%).
Much of the “Expansion Plans” of the companies are a hold due to the Recession factor.

Chapter VIII: RECOMMENDATIONS

Based on my experience and research conducted, I have identified that the major issue
concerning us is that the brand Stanley is the least visible in the industry compared to our

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competitors. I have the following recommendations which I have divided as short term and long
term implementation to face the current situation.
Short Term:
1. Newsletters: By creating our own email newsletter, we could send out industry news and tips to
suspects in our market. Since we will be on your prospects' minds more often than our competition,
eventually, our sales leads will turn into actual sales. Articles about latest trends in tools industry,
helpful solutions and how Stanley plays a helpful role.

2. Customer feedback: It’s important to get feedbacks from our existing customers on a regular
basis. This can be done by asking them how is their product performing, and if any problems, be
ready to offer a solution. This way we build a good relationship with our existing customers. Small
questionnaires through e-mails, or visits to the plant to see if customer is satisfied.

3. Create a marketing calendar and keep it consistently: Scheduling marketing activities that
take place weekly, bi monthly, monthly and quarterly will help us to avoid sudden planning or
having ineffective seminars. And, by doing so, marketing will become easier since it becomes a
regular part of our business life. Regular seminars, for example once a month or once in two months,
every 2nd Saturday. This will help the industry relate brand Stanley with an info provider and just
another company trying to sell its expensive products. Plus it will be like a ritual followed by Stanley
and keep the employees motivated and on their feet.

4. Leaf Lets & Brochures: Equip the sales man with enough amount of product catalog, brochures
and leaflets which he can leave at customers place.

5. Freebies: Provide customers with freebies like table calendar or year book, which the customer
uses and Stanley stays at top of mind recall.

Long Term:

1. Internet Marketing: Pay per click, Social networking sites, blogs, links, search engine
optimization. These are inexpensive ways to make the Stanley brand visible, which we have not used
yet. Sites like Facebook, LinkedIn etc are being used extensively by the biggest of companies, so
what is stopping us from capitalizing the huge potential of such cost-free marketing. This will also
help spread brand awareness before Stanley plans to increase its operations in India.

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2. Increase the number of Sales Team: Presently the sales team for Karnataka operations has only
two dealers and one BDE, hence this BDE has a hurricane task to cover the entire state which is
highly impossible. Thus Stanley should increase strength of its sales team.

3. Build a referral team: Good referral team involves existing satisfied customers, vendors,
distributors, some retailers, auxiliary services like service personnel who can suggest usage of
Stanley Tools for better performance and less break down maintenance and other technical issues.

4. Local Office setup: A well organized local office setup is recommended to streamline the
operations. The local employees, distributors and dealers will have a common place to have their
periodic meetings, which will ensure identifying loopholes, potential business areas and strategizing
further steps at regular intervals.

Chapter IX: BIBILOGRAPHY

– www.stanleytools.com
– www.infoengineers.com
– www.industrialtools.in
– www.wikipedia.com
– www.agelessmarketing.com
– www.marketingprofs.com
– www.hand-tools-manufacturers.com/handtools-publications.html

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– http://www.hti.org/0410HTIStandards.htm
– http://www.hand-tool-manufacturers.com/suppliers/
– JÖNKÖPING INTERNAT IONA L B U S I N E S S SCHOOL
– http://www.learnmarketing.co.uk/consumer.htm
– Company Manual

Chapter X: ANNEXURE

10.1 QUESTIONNAIRE
We would like to know your views and opinion on the Stanley Hand Tools and
Assembly Technology, as a part of our survey.

Part A - General:
1. What is the approximate annual turnover of your company?

_____________________

2. What is the amount of purchases done annually?

________________________

3. What is the amount of Hand tools in your total purchases purchased?

_______________________

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4. What is the amount of special purpose hand tools in the total purchases?

_______________________

Part B - Hand Tools:


1. Which company hand tools do you use?
1. Taparia
2. East man
3. Everest
4. Ambika
5. __________

2. Name few hand tools which you frequently use:


1.
2.
3.
4.

3. How often do you buy hand tools:


1. 6months
2. 1year
3. 2years
4.________

4. Are you aware of STANLEY products: yes / no

5. How do you rate the existing hand tools on the following parameters
Parameters (Very Poor) (Very
1 2 3 4 Good)
5 6
7

Quality \
Durability
Ease of Use
Price worthy
Availability
Maintenance
Reliability
Performance
Ergonomically
Design

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Functionality
Customizability
Compactness

6. Rate your satisfaction level on your existing hand tools :

(Highly (Dis-satisfied)
Satisfied)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

7. How do you find out information about hand tools?

General newspapers Specialist magazines


In local outlet From friends or colleagues
From sales reps From
special exhibitions or seminars

Other (PLEASE WRITE IN)______

Part C - Assembly Technology:

1. Which company’s products do you use in assembly line?


1. Atlas Copco
2. IR
3. Stanley Assembly Technology
4. _________________

2. What are the usual applications in assembly line?


1. Thread Fastening
2. Engineering Systems

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3. Material Handling
4. _______________

3. Are you aware of STANLEY ASSEMBLY TECHNOLOGY? : yes / no

4. Rate your satisfaction level on your existing assembly line method :

(High 5 (Dis-
ly satisfied
Satisf 2 3 4 5 6 )
ied)
1 7

5. List a few issues you currently face in your assembly line:


1.__________________________________________________________.
2.__________________________________________________________.
3.__________________________________________________________.

6. Plans of expansion in near future: yes/ no.

7. By when are you planning to expand :


1. 6months
2. 1year
3. 2years
4.________

Part D - Response:

1. Are all your queries and doubts be satisfied when a Stanley works
Salesman visits you?

Yes No

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2. Do you think the content and level of details presented by them is


adequate?

Yes No

3. If No, then suggest measures for improvement.

Part E – Personal Details:


Company Name:

Address:

Phone number:

Email Id:

Name of individual participating in the survey:

Designation:

Thank you.

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10.2 Hand Tool Standards


B107 Standards
The B107 ASME series standard is given to various hand tools and accessories. The
Committee of B107 Standards operate under the American National Standards Institutes's
procedure. The B107 Committees are comprised of experts in the field of hand tools. These
standards are published by ASME after being approved by ANSI and ASME. The B107
standards on hand tools cover the complete general and dimensional data for hand tools,
including safety and other requirements.
• B107.1-1993 Socket Wrenches, Hand (Inch)
• B107.2-1995 Socket Wrenches, Extensions, Adaptors, and Universal Joints, Power Drive
(Impact) (Inch Series)
• B107.4M-1995 Driving & Spindle Ends for Portable Hand, Impact, Air, and Electric Tools
(Percussion Tools Excluded)
• B107.5M-1994 Socket Wrenches, Hand (Metric Series)
• B107.6-1994 Wrenches, Box, Angled, Open End, Combination, Flare Nut, and Tappet (Inch
Series)
• B107.8M-1996 Adjustable Wrenches
• B107.9M-1994 Wrenches, Box , Angled, Open End, Combination, Flare Nut, and Tappet
(Metric Series)
• B107.10M-1996 Handles and Attachments For Hand Socket Wrenches - Inch and Metric
Series
• B107.11M-1993 Pliers, Diagonal Cutting, and Nippers, End Cutting
• B107.12-1997 Nut Driver (Spin Type, Screwdriver Grip) (Inch Series)
• B107.13M-1996 Pliers - Long Nose, Long Reach
• B107.14M-1994 Hand Torque Tools
• B107.15-1993 Flat Tip and Phillips Screwdrivers
• B107.16-1998 Shears (Metal Cutting, Hand)
• B107.17M-1997 Gages, Wrench Openings, Reference

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• B107.18M-1996 Pliers (Wire Twister)


• B107.19-1993 (R1998) Pliers, Retaining Ring
• 107.20-1998 Pliers (Lineman's, Iron Worker's,
• B107.21-1998 Wrench, Crowfoot Attachments (Inch Series)
• B107.22M-1998 Electronic Cutters
• B107.23M-1997 Pliers, Multiple Position, Adjustable
• B107.25M-1996 Pliers - Performance Test Methods
• B107.27-1996 Pliers, Multiple Position (Electrical Connector)
• B107.28M-1997 Electronic Torque Instruments
• B107.29M-1998 Electronic Tester, Hand Torque Tools
• B107.31M-1997 Screwdriver, Cross Tip Gaging
• B107.34M-1997 Socket Wrenches for Spark Plugs
• B107.35M-1997 Nut Drivers (Spin Type, Screwdriver Grip) (Metric Series)
• B107.38M-1998 Electronic Pliers
• B107.41M-1997 Nail Hammers, Safety Requirements
• B107.42M-1997 Hatchets - Safety Requirements
• B107.43M-1998 Wood Splitting Wedges - Safety Requirements
• B107.44M-1998 Glaziers Chisels & Wood Chisels, Safety Requirements
• B107.45M-1998 Ripping Chisels and Flooring/Electricians' Chisels - Safety Requirements
• B107.46M-1998 Stud, Screw, and Pipe Extractors - Safety Requirements
• B107.47M-1998 Metal Chisels - Safety Requirements
• B107.48M-1998 Metal Punches and Drift Pins: Safety Requirements
• B107.49M-1998 Nail Sets: Safety Requirements
• B107.50M-1998 Brick Chisels & Brick Sets: Safety Requirements
• B107.52M-1998 Nail Puller Bars - Safety Requirements
• B107.53M-1998 Ball Peen Hammers - Safety Requirements
• B107.54-2001 Heavy Striking Tools - Safety Requirements
• B107.55M-1998 Axes: Safety Requirements
• B107.56-1999 Body Repair Hammers and Dolly Blocks - Safety Requirements
• B107.57-2001 Bricklayers Hammers & Prospecting Picks - Safety Requirements
• B107.58-1998 Riveting, Scaling, Tinners Setting Hammers - Safety Requirements

Stanley Works India (P) Ltd.