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2012-2014 GRADU A TE BULLE T I N

2012-2014

GRADU A TE

BULLE T I N

2012-2014 GRADU A TE BULLE T I N

Academic Calendar

These dates are subject to change.

SUMMER TERM 2012

First day of classes: May 21 Memorial Day: May 28 End of 1st 5-weeks: June 22 Start of 2nd 5-weeks: June 25 Independence Day Holiday: July 4 Summer session ends: July 27

FALL TERM 2012

First day of classes: August 20 Labor Day: September 3 Thanksgiving Break: November 19-23 Last day of classes: December 3 Reading Days: December 4-5 Finals: December 6-7, 10-13 Commencement: December 15

SPRING TERM 2013

First day of classes: January 14 Martin Luther King Day: January 21 Spring Break: March 18-22 Last day of classes: April 29 Reading Days: April 30 - May 1 Finals: May 2-3, 6-9 Commencement: May 11

SUMMER TERM 2013

Memorial Day: May 27 First day of classes: May 28 End of 1st 5-weeks: June 28 Start of 2nd 5-weeks: July 1 Independence Day Holiday: July 4 Summer session ends: August 2

FALL TERM 2013

First day of classes: August 26 Labor Day: September 2 Thanksgiving Break: November 25-29 Last day of classes: December 9 Reading Days: December 10-11 Finals: December 12-13, 16-19 Commencement: December 21

SPRING TERM 2014

First day of classes: January 13 Martin Luther King Day: January 20 Spring Break: March 17-21 Last day of classes: April 28 Reading Days: April 29-30 Finals: May 1-2, 5-8 Commencement: May 10

Graduate Bulletin 2012-2014 Published by The University of Tulsa 800 South Tucker Drive Tulsa, Oklahoma

Graduate Bulletin

2012-2014

Published by The University of Tulsa 800 South Tucker Drive Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104-9700

918-631-2000

www.utulsa.edu

ii

Equal Opportunity Policy

The University of Tulsa is an equal opportunity employer and institution of higher education. The University endeavors to create and nurture an informed and inclusive environment in its workplace and educational programs. Affirmative action and equal employment opportunity are integral parts of The University of Tulsa, not just because they are legally mandated but because we recognize that the present and future strength of the University is based primarily on people and their skills, experience, and potential. The University of Tulsa does not discriminate on the basis of personal status or group characteristics, including, but not limited to, the classes protected under federal and state law. The University of Tulsa seeks to recruit, select, and promote students, faculty, and all other employees on the basis of individual merit. The University of Tulsa, an Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity institution, recognizes the need to increase representation by underrepresented groups. The Associate Vice President of Human Resources and Risk Management at The University of Tulsa has responsibility for implementing and monitoring the Affirmative Action Plan of the University and assisting with the application and interpretation of pertinent laws. The University has made no statements contrary to this policy. If any such statements have been made, the University expressly disavows them.

Notice

The University of Tulsa Graduate Bulletin is published every two years as a guide to curricula, course descriptions, costs, University policies, and other information. In keeping with established procedures, the University may change programs of study, academic requirements, faculty, curricula, course descriptions, costs, policies, the academic calendar, or other information without prior notice. The University reserves the right to correct factual errors whenever they are discovered. It is the student’s responsibility to stay abreast of current regulations, curricula, and the status of the specific program being pursued. Students are responsible for adherence to all University policies, regulations, and program requirements, including student conduct codes that apply to academic and extra-curricular activities. All University Bulletins are available on the University’s website www.utulsa.edu. Undergraduate programs are offered by all colleges and are described in the current Undergraduate Bulletin. Information concerning The University of Tulsa College of Law may be found on the College of Law website at www.utulsa.edu/law.

The Mission of The University of Tulsa

The Mission of The University of Tulsa The University of Tulsa is a private, independent, doctoral-degree-granting

The University of Tulsa is a private, independent, doctoral-degree-granting institution whose mission reflects these core values:

excellence in scholarship, dedication to free inquiry, integrity of character, and commitment to humanity.

The University achieves its mission by educating men and women of diverse backgrounds and cultures to

become literate in the sciences, humanities, and arts;

think critically, and write and speak clearly;

succeed in their professions and careers;

behave ethically in all aspects of their lives;

welcome the responsibility of citizenship and service in a changing world; and

acquire the skills and appetite for lifelong learning.

iv

Accreditation

The University of Tulsa is a fully accredited national doctoral institution and is on the approved lists of the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association and the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. The various colleges and professional schools are accredited by their own professional agencies as well. All programs for the preparation of teachers and school service personnel are accredited by the Oklahoma Council for Teacher Preparation and by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council. The School of Music is a member of the National Association of Schools of Music. The curriculum in deaf education is endorsed by the Council on Education of the Deaf, and the graduate program in speech-language pathology is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology. The Ph.D. program in clinical psychology is accredited by the American Psychological Association. The graduate and undergraduate business programs of The Collins College of Business are accredited by AACSB International (The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business). The School of Nursing is approved by the Oklahoma Board of Nursing and is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. The Athletic Training program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education and the Exercise and Sports Science program is recognized by the National Strength and Conditioning Association. The College of Engineering and Natural Sciences is an institutional member of the American Society for Engineering Education. The B.S. degrees in chemical engineering, electrical engineering, engineering physics, mechanical engineering, and petroleum engineering are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. The B.S. degree program in computer science is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET. The B.S. degree program in chemistry is approved by the American Chemical Society. The College of Law is approved by the American Bar Association and is a member of the Association of American Law Schools.

v

University Assessment

The University has comprehensive programs for assessment of student learning at the institutional, program and course levels. At the institutional level, assessment is conducted through several programs:

Mission Statement Assessment Project (MSAP), a direct measure that relies on externally developed instruments;

Tulsa University Learning Assessment Project (TULAP), a direct measure that reviews course-embedded artifacts under internally developed processes;

National Survey on Student Engagement (NSSE) and Faculty Survey on Student Engagement (FSSE), indirect measures that focus on processes;

Online student evaluations of courses, an indirect measure that focuses on processes; and

Ongoing review of graduation rates, placement rates, graduate school acceptance, and passage on licensing exams. This combination of measures ensures that all Mission Statement learning goals will be evaluated within a three year cycle. Both TULAP and MSAP gather assessment data on several student learning outcomes under the University’s Mission Statement goals. The MSAP focuses on undergraduates while TULAP assesses student learning at all academic levels in all colleges; consequently, every course has the possibility of being included in the TULAP reviews. Student confidentiality is ensured by removing all identifiers from course- embedded artifacts prior to review. Assessment is also done at the college and academic department levels measuring the increasingly focused missions of these smaller units. The goal is to ensure that at every level the mission of the University is achieved, and to find ways to continually improve the curriculum, teaching and student achievement.

vi

Contents

Academic Calendar

Inside front cover

University Administration

1

About The University of Tulsa

6

History of The University of Tulsa

7

The Graduate School

10

Information Services

39

Other Academic Resources

41

Tuition and Fees

46

Campus Housing and Dining

50

Student Financial Services

54

Academic and Student Support Services

63

Special Opportunities, Facilities, and Services

66

Student Rights, Freedoms, and Responsibilities

76

The Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences

78

Anthropology

79

School of Art

87

School of Urban Education

94

English Language and Literature

106

History

114

Psychology

121

Speech-Language

Pathology

130

The Collins College of Business

136

Master of Accountancy

138

Full Time Master of Business Administration

140

Part Time Master of Business Administration

143

Master of Energy Business

146

Master of Science in Finance

149

Master of Taxation

154

Course Listings Accounting

156

Business

160

Energy Business

161

Finance

164

International Business

167

Management

168

Management Information Systems

170

Marketing

172

Master of Business Administration

174

Operations Management

177

School of Nursing

179

The College of Engineering and Natural Sciences

182

Biological

Science

183

Chemical Engineering

195

Chemistry and Biochemistry

202

vii

Tandy School of Computer Science

211

Electrical Engineering

223

Geosciences

230

Mathematics

241

Mechanical

Engineering

246

McDougall School of Petroleum Engineering

254

Physics and Engineering Physics

264

Interdisciplinary Programs

270

Museum Science and Management

270

Master of Science in Mathematics and Science Education

274

Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs

276

Joint-Degree Programs

278

Certificate Programs

284

Tulsa University Faculty of Community Medicine

292

Resident Faculty

293

Index

308

Campus Map

Inside back cover

viii

University Administration

1

University Administration

Board of Trustees

The University of Tulsa’s Board of Trustees consists of active members and emeritus members. Members hold office for a term of two or three years and election of approximately one-third of the total membership is held each year. With certain exceptions, no trustee except the President can serve more than two consecutive terms, but a trustee who has served two consecutive terms (a total of 6 consecutive years) is eligible for reelection after one year off. The President of the Tulsa Alumni Board and President of the National Alumni Board serve during the term of that office. Both active and emeritus trustees are elected by a majority vote of the Board of Trustees, which determines the terms, conditions, and qualifications of membership.

Ellen Adelson, ACSW Barbara Allen, Community Volunteer

R. Michelle Beale, President, R. Michelle Beale, LLC

Sharon Bell, Managing Attorney, Rogers and Bell, Attorneys Chet Cadieux, Chairman and CEO, QuikTrip Corporation

Michael D. Case, Owner, Case & Associates Properties, Inc. Roger B. Collins, CIO, LinkAmerica Corporation Susie M. Collins, President, Collins Investment Company

R. Casey Cooper, Attorney at Law, Hall, Estill

Katherine G. Coyle, Esq., Conner & Winters, LLP J. Scott Dickman, CEO, Oracle Packaging Co. Frederic Dorwart, Owner, Frederic Dorwart, Lawyers Randy A. Foutch, Chairman, President and CEO, Laredo Petroleum, Inc. Stephen E. Jackson, CEO, eLynx Technologies LLC Howard E. Janzen, President and CEO, Janzen Ventures, Inc.

David R. Lawson, Retired President and CEO, Capital One Auto Finance, Inc. Roxana R. Lorton, Community Volunteer Jeffrey J. McDougall, President, JMA Energy Company, LLC

A. H. McElroy, II, P.E., President and CEO, McElroy Manufacturing, Inc.

Nancy E. Meinig, Community Volunteer Sanjay Meshri, Managing Director, Advance Research Chemicals, Inc.

Charles S. Monroe, President, Charles S. Monroe, CPA PC Frank W. Murphy III, President and CEO, FW Murphy Geoffrey C. Orsak, President, The University of Tulsa Jo Buford Siegfried, Private Asset Management Ross Swimmer, President, Swimmer Group, LLC

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The University of Tulsa

Steve Turnbo, Chairman Emeritus, Schnake Turnbo Frank/PR Randi S. Wightman, Community Volunteer James E. Wilburn, Chairman, Winnercomm, Inc.

L. Duane Wilson, President, LDW Services, LLC

Ex Officio, Alumni Association President, 2012-2014

John L. Williams, Attorney, Conner & Winters, LLP

Ex Officio, Alumni National Association President, 2010-2013

Laurie Brumbaugh, Financial Manager, Junior League of Tulsa

Emeritus Trustees

C. Arnold Brown, President, KWB, Inc.

Burt B. Holmes, CEO, Leaders Life Insurance J. A. LaFortune, Jr., Community Volunteer Robert E. Norman, CEO, Norman Family Enterprises Donne Pitman, Chapman Foundations Management Donald Pray, Founding Member, Pray Walker Attorneys and Counselors at Law Robert E. Thomas, Retired CEO, MAPCO, Inc. Robert West, CEO Anchor Drilling Fluids USA, Inc. John H. Williams, Retired CEO, The Williams Companies Henry H. Zarrow, Zarrow Family Office, LLC

University Administration

3

Administrative Officers

L. Duane Wilson, Chairman of the Board

Geoffrey C. Orsak, President Roger N. Blais, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Kevan C. Buck, Executive Vice President and Treasurer Duane H. King, Vice President for Museum Affairs and Executive Director and Thomas Gilcrease Chair Dale Schoenefeld, Vice President for Information Services and Chief Information Officer Roger W. Sorochty, Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services Janis I. Zink, Senior Vice President for Planning and Outreach Michael D. Thesenvitz, Associate Vice President and Controller Peter J. Sandman, Director of Financial Services and Assistant Secretary

Academic Deans

D. Thomas Benediktson, Dean of the Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences

A. Gale Sullenberger, Dean of the Collins College of Business

James R. Sorem, Jr., Interim Dean of the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Janet K. Levit, Dean of the College of Law and Dean John Rogers Endowed Chair in Law

Janet A. Haggerty, Dean of the Graduate School and Vice Provost for Research J. Phillip Applegate, Dean of Lifelong Learning

Administrators

Kayla K. Acebo, Associate Vice President for Institutional Advancement Adrian W. Alexander, R. M. and Ida McFarlin Dean of the Library Laura M. Allen, Director of Multicultural Affiars Gary Allison, Vice Dean for the College of Law Christopher Anderson, Faculty Athletics Representative Heather V. Apodaca, Director of Annual Giving Richard V. Arrington, Jr., Assistant Dean for the Collins College of Business Michael W. Barnes, Director of Institutional Research and Records Thomas J. Brian, Director of Counseling and Psychological Services June E. Brown, Secretary to the Board of Trustees Thomas E. Burchfield, Director of Petroleum Abstracts John M. Bury, Assistant Dean and Director of Graduate Student Enrollment Management Jacqueline H. Caldwell, Chief of Staff Nona L. Charleston, Director of Nationally Competitive Scholarships and Associate Director of the Tulsa Undergraduate Research Challenge Frank L. Christel, Director of Broadcast Services, KWGS/KWTU Martha Cordell, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs, College of Law

4

The University of Tulsa

Jane R. Corso, Assistant Provost and Director, Center for Student Academic Support Carolyn W. Dalton, Director of Development for Gilcrease Museum Steven E. Denton, Director of New Student Programs and Services Richard E. Ducey, Director of Mabee Legal Information Center Karen M. Dutoi, Editor, Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature Denise E. Dutton, Assistant Provost for Honors Program and Henneke Center for Academic Fulfillment Stephanie Fell, Director of Alexander Health Center Francine J. Fisk, Associate Dean of McFarlin Library Melissa France, Associate Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services and Director of Housing and Residence Life Jeffrey C. Francis, Sharp Chaplain Amy M. Freiberger, Director of Alumni Relations Sheila A. Givens, Director of University Assessment Susan A. Gruen, Assistant Dean for Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences Vicki A. Hendrickson, Director of Student Financial Services James B. Hollanger, Director of Stewardship Activities Patricia L. Hollingsworth, Director of University School Terrance P. Hossack, Associate Vice President for Facilities and Campus Services and Director of the Lorton Performance Center Milt L. Jarrett, Assistant Provost for Academic Outreach and Coordinator for Summer Term Earl Johnson, Associate Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services and Dean of Admission Carol Y. Kealiher, Managing Editor, James Joyce Quarterly Richard P. Kearns, Associate Vice President for Information Services Brian D. Kegler, Director of Development for Athletics LeeAnna J. Lamb, Director of Auxiliary Services, Allen Chapman Activity Center, Summer Conference Programs, Parking and Card Services, and Canteen Ruth V. (Ginna) Langston, Registrar Sean Latham, Editor, James Joyce Quarterly Cheryl A. Matherly, Vice Provost for International Studies Laura E. McNeese, Assistant Dean of Students Megan Meussner, Director of Development, McFarlin Library Michael L. Mills, Associate Dean for Community Relations Kalpana Misra, Associate Dean, Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences Calvin Moniz, Director of Development for the Collins College of Business Tricia D. Moreland, Director of Networking and Communication Services Susan Neal, Associate Vice President for Public Affairs and Economic Development Deborah K. Newton, Director of Research and Sponsored Programs Linda Nichols, Associate Dean of the Collins College of Business and Director of Graduate

University Administration

5

Business Programs Eilis O’Neal, Editor, NIMROD G. Martin Page, Director of Administrative Computing Ross Parmley, Director of Athletics Wayne A. Paulison, Associate Vice President for Human Resources and Risk Management Tamara R. Piety, Associate Dean for Faculty Development, College of Law Richard A. Redner, Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Studies Richard L. Reeder, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Francine L. Ringold, Editor in Chief of NIMROD Brian S. Scislo, Director of the Golden Hurricane Club Robert W. Shipley, Associate Vice President for Operations and Physical Plant Lisa Smith, Director of Development for the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Pamela A. Smith, Dean of International Services and Programs Winona M. Tanaka, Senior Vice Provost and Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs Yolanda D. Taylor, Associate Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services and Dean of Students Suzanne Thompson, Director of Development, Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences Joe Timmons, Director of Safety and Security Michael Volk, Associate Vice President of Research and Technology Development Mary K. Wafer-Johnston, Director of Recreational Sports Patti M. Whitaker, Director of Donor Services

6

The University of Tulsa

About The University of Tulsa

As a comprehensive, doctoral-degree-granting institution with a covenant relationship to the Presbyterian Church (USA), The University of Tulsa provides undergraduate, graduate, and professional education of the highest quality in the arts, humanities, sciences, business, education, engineering, law, nursing, and applied health sciences, and participates in NCAA Division IA. Its current undergraduate enrollment is about 3,100, with about 1,100 students in its graduate programs and law. The University operates on a semester basis. The University campus lies two miles east of downtown Tulsa: a handsome, vigorous, southwestern city in a metropolitan area of over half a million people, set among the hills and lakes of northeastern Oklahoma’s “Green Country.” From the beginning, Tulsa’s founders — who developed a thriving economy based on petroleum, aerospace technology, telecommunications, and health care — invested in nationally noted museums, outstanding performing arts groups, and a system of parks and recreational facilities for citizens of all ages. The city’s remarkable cultural, technological, and economic resources nourish the University’s mission and enrich its life, just as the University, in turn, enriches the city. The University’s mission is further nurtured and supported by:

Exceptional faculty, who draw students into the pursuit of knowledge, introducing them to the pleasures and responsibilities of the life of the mind in a challenging world, and who include in their numbers the 1998-99 Carnegie Foundation Professor of the Year for all U.S. doctoral and research universities, a national Carnegie Foundation Pew Scholar, a Carnegie Foundation Professor of the Year for Oklahoma, and four Fellows of the Institute for Advanced Study;

Graduate, professional, and research programs that foster advanced theoretical development, promote professional preparation, enhance the quality of the faculty, and extend the University’s international reach;

Substantial library resources and information technology that support research and classroom learning;

A world-class museum with over 400,000 cataloged items in its collections on American western art, Native American art, ethnographic holdings on indigenous peoples of the Americas, and documents on the settlement of the New World;

A residential campus that fosters a sense of community and integrates curricular and extracurricular life;

An urban arts center in downtown Tulsa’s historic Brady District; and

Abundant opportunities for students to undertake community service, internships, and study abroad; to participate in substantive research; and to study and reflect in ways that foster intellectual, spiritual, and moral growth.

In its rich urban environment, The University of Tulsa offers a diversity of learning experiences, a balance between career preparation and liberal education, teaching, and research, and endeavors to instill in its students an understanding that stature as an individual and value as a member of society depend upon continual learning

History of the University of Tulsa

7

History of The University of Tulsa

The University of Tulsa — a private, non-sectarian institution that is formally related to the Presbyterian Church (USA) by a mutually articulated covenant with the Synod of the Sun — has its roots in the Presbyterian School for Indian Girls, a small boarding school founded in 1882 in Muskogee, Indian Territory. In 1894, at the request of the Synod of Indian Territory, the Board of Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church elevated the academy’s status and chartered it as Henry Kendall College, a coeducational institution whose name honored the first General Secretary of the Home Missions Board. The first classes in the new college were held on September 12, 1894. In the years following, financial difficulties prompted school officials to ask the Synod of Indian Territory to assume control, sell the school’s land, and seek a new location. Successfully courted by the business and professional community of Tulsa, which was booming after the discovery of oil at Glenpool, Henry Kendall College moved to Tulsa in 1907, the year of Oklahoma’s statehood. Several years later, a new college, to be named after oilman Robert M. McFarlin, was proposed for the city. Aware that Tulsa was not large enough to support two competing colleges, the Henry Kendall College trustees proposed that the contemplated McFarlin College and Kendall College affiliate under the common name “The University of Tulsa.” A charter for the University was approved on November 9, 1920. In 1926, the articles of incorporation were amended to create its modern structure as an independent school corporation governed by a self-perpetuating Board of Trustees. In 1928, the School of Petroleum Engineering opened and soon earned international recognition for its curriculum and faculty. The College of Business Administration was established in 1935. In 1943, the downtown law school, previously affiliated only loosely, became part of the University. In 1966, James A. Chapman died and bequeathed the University $34 million in endowment. In the 1970s, the Dimensions for a New Decade campaign raised an additional $43 million. By the beginning of 2006, total endowment funds and funds held in trust exceeded $800 million. The University is currently comprised of the Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences, the Collins College of Business (renamed in 2008), the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences, the College of Law, the Graduate School, and the Division of Lifelong Learning. After the 1970s, the character of the University changed. Although the programs in engineering and geosciences continued to bring the institution international renown, carefully selected graduate programs were added in other fields; the College of Law, the Collins College of Business, and the Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences were strengthened; the number of students living on campus significantly increased; and the student body — which currently hails from 45 states, two U.S. territories, and 68 different countries — became increasingly diverse. During the 1980s, the University established an innovative humanities-based general course of study called the Tulsa Curriculum that emphasizes the development of core skills in writing, mathematics, and foreign languages; increased faculty diversity; enhanced its support for excellent teaching and research; defined its academic programs with greater rigor and clarity; and began recruiting highly qualified students nationwide. In addition, ten endowed chairs for faculty were established. (To date, 53 chairs,

8

The University of Tulsa

professorships and deanships have been created.) The library was strengthened by accelerated development of the rare book and manuscript collections, which regularly draw international scholars and archival materials to the University, expanding the University’s reputation as the home of one of the leading special collections libraries in the country and bringing international acclaim. In 1988, the University was awarded the Beta of Oklahoma chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, recognizing the University’s excellence in and commitment to liberal arts education for all students. These trends have continued into the present, advancing the University’s reputation for excellence. As the University continued into its second century, it completed its most ambitious capital campaign in its history, the New Century Campaign. Construction of the Donald W. Reynolds Center, a $28 million, 138,000 square foot multi-use facility with an 8,000- seat arena, was completed in 1999 with major funding in the form of a $14.75 million grant from the Reynolds Foundation. Several new buildings located west of Delaware Avenue constitute the Donna J. Hardesty Sports Complex. Completed in 2001, the Michael D. Case Tennis Center includes a 64,000 square foot indoor facility with six courts. In addition, there are twelve outdoor courts with stadium seating around the four center courts. For student recreation, the Fulton and Susie Collins Fitness Center, a 67,000 square foot multipurpose recreation center, opened in the fall of 2002. The Hardesty complex also includes the Hurricane Soccer/Track Facility and a new softball park. Construction of the $10.5 million Legal Information Center for the College of Law was completed in January 2000. Another addition to the College of Law is the Boesche Legal Clinic, a 4,000 square foot building located on 4th Street. These facilities are heavily used by both the University and larger communities. During the past decade, the University has made a commitment to developing a vibrant residential campus environment, which includes the addition of more than 800 market-quality apartments since 2001. The University constructed the University Square and Norman Village apartments in the northwest section of campus in 2001, and added three more apartment communities — Brown Village, Lorton Village, and Mayo Village — along the southern and eastern sections of campus in 2007. The campus has continued its dramatic physical transformation during the past few years as TU completed a number of major construction projects including Bayless Plaza, home of TU’s tradition-rich Kendall Bell; Collins Hall, home to the admission, financial aid, alumni relations, and central administration offices; the Case Athletic Complex, which houses the Golden Hurricane football offices and provides academic study resources for all TU student athletes; a complete renovation of H.A. Chapman Stadium to enhance the football game day experience; and a new south entrance along Eleventh Street that provides a grand front door to the University including Tucker Drive, Chapman Commons, and the Genave King Rogers Fountain. A 12,000-square foot, two-story addition to McFarlin Library was completed in 2009 and houses its computer labs and student technology resources, allowing for the restoration of the library’s historic reading rooms and the addition of new amenities including the Cort and Martha Dietler Café The Pat Case Dining Center and refurbished student residences in Fisher Hall, both completed during the summer of 2010, have dramatically improved the appearance and functionality of these spaces in Twin Towers. The Roxana Rozsa and Robert Eugene Lorton Performance Center, a 77,000-square- foot facility showcasing TU’s fine and performing arts, was completed in 2011. The centerpiece of the Lorton Performance Center is the Gussman Concert Hall which includes a full performance stage. The facility is the new home of the School of Music and the Film Studies Department. In October, 2010, ground was broken on a new

History of the University of Tulsa

9

engineering complex surrounding a new academic quadrangle called Samson Plaza. The J. Newton Rayzor Hall, home to electrical engineering and computer science, opened in November 2011. Stephenson Hall, which will house mechanical engineering and the MacDougal School of Petroleum Engineering, will open in the fall of 2012. On May 10, 2008, The University of Tulsa renamed the College of Business Administration as the Collins College of Business to honor the vision and leadership of Tulsa businessman Fulton Collins, who chaired the TU Board of Trustees from 1997 to 2008. The business building was renamed Helmerich Hall in 2008 in honor of Walt Helmerich, Chairman of the Board and Director of Helmerich & Payne, Inc. In October, 2007, the City of Tulsa and TU agreed to an historic public-private partnership under which TU manages operations at Tulsa’s Gilcrease Museum, home to the world’s largest, most comprehensive collection of art and artifacts of the American West. The partnership, which formally began on July 1, 2008, has resulted in numerous strategic opportunities for the museum, including streamlining its management structure, advancing and preserving the collection, and providing unparalleled opportunities for academic research of the museum’s extensive holdings. The Gilcrease partnership allows TU to leverage its nationally recognized academic resources in western American history, art history, anthropology, and archaeology to create a better understanding of the museum collection. The University of Tulsa is engaged in a partnership with the University of Oklahoma to form the Tulsa School of Community Medicine. The entry of the first class is planned for the fall of 2014. The School will address the needs of the Tulsa urban and Oklahoma rural communities that are underserved in medical and health care facilities by training M.D.’s with a desire to deal with the public health issues of these populations. The program will feature an innovative clinical presentation curriculum that has proved to produce excellent diagnosticians through integrating clinical and medical science instruction throughout the entire four-year curriculum. In addition to supporting the traditional liberal arts, the University continues to maintain and strengthen its academic standards by internationalizing its programs, developing substantive research opportunities, and seeking distinction in critical fields, including environmental studies and research, computer security, nanotechnology, bioinformatics, Native American and indigenous peoples law, risk management, and taxation, the better to equip its students for life in a rapidly changing world. A primary focus of the present administration is to elevate the University’s regional accolades for excellence to national prominence. As a mark of this success, since 1995, TU students have been successful with the following national competitions: fifty-four Goldwater Scholarships, forty-one National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowships, eleven Truman Scholarships, nine Phi Kappa Phi Graduate Fellowships, seven Department of Defense Fellowships, eleven Fulbright Grants, nine Morris K. Udall Scholarships, five British Marshall Scholarships, four Benjamin A. Gilman Scholarships, one Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellow, and one Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship. In September 2005, The University of Tulsa was gratified to be designated a Truman Honor Institution by the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation for producing graduates dedicated to public service.

10

The University of Tulsa

The Graduate School

Graduate education at The University of Tulsa is based upon the principles that no objective lies deeper in a university’s tradition than the nurture of scholarship, and that graduate education represents the highest reaches of university endeavor. The Board of Trustees authorized graduate study leading to the master’s degree in 1933. The first master’s degree was granted in 1935. The Board of Trustees approved a curriculum leading to the Doctor of Education degree in 1951. A Doctor of Philosophy program was authorized by the Board of Trustees in 1963; Ph.D. curricula in petroleum engineering, chemical engineering, English, and earth sciences (geosciences) were inaugurated and given preliminary accreditation by North Central Association in 1966, with full accreditation in 1972. The industrial/ organizational psychology doctoral program was inaugurated in 1983, followed in 1985 by the Ph.D. program in mechanical engineering. In 1987 the doctoral programs in biological sciences and computer science were approved by the Graduate Council; and, in 1988, the Ph.D. in counseling psychology program (initiated in 1985) underwent a name change to clinical psychology. Since 2008, Ph.D. programs have been added in chemistry, physics, and anthropology. The Graduate School supervises all graduate work offered by the University except that of the College of Law (College of Law information is published in a separate bulletin). The Graduate School sets standards for admission to graduate standing and recommends to the Board of Trustees for degrees those students who have completed work required for graduation. The general policies and regulations of the Graduate School are set and enforced by the Graduate Council and the Dean of the Graduate School, subject to approval by the University administration. The Dean is chair of the Council, which consists of graduate faculty members elected from each college, the deans of the colleges offering graduate work, and the president of the Graduate Student Association. Council faculty members must hold at least the academic rank of associate professor. Functions of the Graduate Council include:

Development of policies and procedures for the Graduate School and the recommendation of these policies and procedures to the administration.

Establishment of regulations for the administration of policies and procedures.

Examination and approval, or rejection, of new programs and curricula proposed for the Graduate School.

Development of criteria for membership in the graduate faculty.

General concern for the Graduate School’s welfare and the quality of work offered.

Recommendation to the Dean of the Graduate School concerning the disposition of cases filed by a student or faculty involving charges of academic misconduct involving graduate students, or perceived academic impropriety arising from an action taken by faculty. (See Petition Committee of the Graduate Council for details, page 31.)

Hearing of graduate student petitions that request departure from established Graduate School policies and a resultant recommendation to the Dean of the Graduate School. (See Petition Committee of the Graduate Council for details, page 31.)

The Graduate School

11

Degrees

Master of Arts. Specializing in anthropology, art, clinical psychology, education, English language and literature, history, museum science and management, and industrial/organizational psychology. Master of Science. Specializing in biochemistry, biological science, chemistry, computer science, engineering physics, geophysics, geosciences, math/science education, applied mathematics, physics, and speech/language pathology. Master of Science in Engineering. Specializing in chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, and petroleum engineering. Master of Engineering. Specializing in chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, and petroleum engineering. Master of Accountancy. Master of Business Administration. Master of Energy Business, online. Master of Taxation, online. Master of Science in Finance. Master of Business Administration/Master of Science in Computer Science. A joint degree program. Master of Business Administration/Master of Science in Finance. A joint degree program. Master of Science in Finance/Master of Science in Applied Mathematics. A joint degree program. Master of Teaching Arts. Offered through the School of Education in cooperation with individual disciplines and secondary education specialties. Master of Fine Arts. A 60 credit-hour program specializing in art. Doctor of Philosophy. Specializing in anthropology, biological science, chemical engineering, chemistry, clinical psychology, computer science, English language and literature, geosciences, industrial/organizational psychology, mechanical engineering, petroleum engineering, and physics. The University offers its undergraduates the option to participate in combined Bachelor’s/Master’s degree programs, which give students the opportunity to complete both degrees in a reduced amount of time. These combined degree programs are currently available in accountancy, applied mathematics, biochemistry, biology, chemical engineering, chemistry, engineering physics, geosciences, history, and physics. The University also offers joint programs between the Graduate School and the College of Law leading to a Juris Doctor/Master of Arts (specializing in anthropology, clinical psychology, English language and literature, history, or industrial/organizational psychology), Juris Doctor/Master of Business Administration, Juris Doctor/Master of Taxation, and Juris Doctor/Master of Science (specializing in biological science, finance, computer science, and geosciences).

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The University of Tulsa

Admission

The majority of graduate programs at the University are, by purpose and design, not large. The number of students admitted each year is restricted to those with high qualifications.

An applicant must hold a baccalaureate or higher degree from a college or university approved by a recognized regional accrediting agency. Applicants, having selected a major field of study, must meet requirements set by the major program and the Graduate School. Such applicants whose academic work has been superior are admitted upon approval by the major program administration and the Dean of the Graduate School.

A grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in the undergraduate major is

generally required, but requirements may vary between programs and may be higher than 3.0. Fitness of character may also be considered. Each student must satisfy course prerequisites for the graduate program before being

officially admitted to the degree program. The major program advisor and the Dean of the Graduate School may approve conditional admission, but a student is usually required to remove all such conditions before beginning the course of study leading to a graduate degree, except in some cases when a limited number of undergraduate courses are required to satisfy deficiencies. Applicants for admission to most graduate programs must take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Tests. Applicants for admission to graduate programs in the College of Business Administration must take the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). Information regarding times and places where the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Tests are given is available from the Educational Testing Service, 609- 771-7670, or www.ets.org. Information regarding times and places where the GMAT is given is available by calling 1-800-717-4628 or www.mba.com.

A University of Tulsa undergraduate student with a distinguished academic record

may enroll in graduate work in the final year before graduation or through admission to

a combined bachelor’s/master’s degree program. The student must apply for admission

to the Graduate School and be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School to enroll in graduate courses. Enrollment must be approved by the major program advisor as well as each individual course instructor and is governed by individual qualifications and course loads. Enrollment is limited to one 5000- or 7000- level course per semester; however, undergraduate students admitted to a combined bachelor’s/master’s degree program are permitted to enroll in up to six credit hours of 5000- or 7000-level courses per semester. Any exception to this requires the approval of the Graduate Dean. The student must use the graduate course number when enrolling in a course for graduate credit.

International Applicants

International applicants must hold a degree comparable to a regionally accredited U.S. bachelor’s degree and must have a strong academic performance comparable to a “B” or above average grades. We use your institution’s grading scale and do not necessarily convert your grades to a four point scale. Transcripts sent to the Graduate School must be accompanied by a certified English translation, and a clear explanation of the grading

system used at the institution. If an applicant is admitted, an I-20 will not be issued until

a letter of financial support is provided by the applicant and/or the sponsor.

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Applicants for whom English is not their first language must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) by arrangement with the Educational Testing Service, 609-921-9000 or www.toefl.org. The University of Tulsa will not accept Institutional TOEFL scores to satisfy English proficiency requirements, with the exception of its own Institutional TOEFL. If, however, the student has received his or her degree from a university in a country where English is the primary language, the TOEFL may be waived, upon petition, at the discretion of the Graduate School. The minimum TOEFL score accepted by The University of Tulsa for international applicants is 80 on the internet-based exam or 550 on the paper exam for programs offered in engineering and natural sciences and 90 on the internet-based exam or 575 on the paper exam for all other programs. Individual graduate programs may require minimum TOEFL scores higher than those stated above. Carefully review information about individual program admission requirements. Applicants may also submit a test score from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) 323-255-2771or www.ielts.org in order to fulfill the English proficiency requirement. The minimum IELTS score accepted by The University of Tulsa for international applicants is 6.0 for programs offered in engineering and natural sciences and 6.5 for all other programs, although some individual graduate programs may require minimum IELTS scores higher than those stated above. All international graduate students must check-in with the International Student Services Office upon first arriving on campus, prior to enrolling for each semester, and prior to departing the country for vacation, professional conferences, or upon degree completion. The Graduate School will not enroll an international graduate student on a student visa unless the student is approved for enrollment by the International Student Services Office. Failure to meet routinely with the International Student Services Office may adversely affect an international student’s visa status.

English Institute Admission

Admission to the English Institute for International Students (EIIS) is open to all students who wish to improve their English proficiency. Those interested in attending the Institute should contact the English Institute for International Students directly by phone at 918-631-2535 or visit their website, then submit an application and the $35 application fee. Eight-week sessions are available year-round. EIIS students are eligible for University housing. Admission to the English Institute for International Students does not guarantee a student admission to academic programs at the University.

Special Student Status

It is possible to apply to the Graduate School as a special student. Admission to the Graduate School as a special student is outside of any graduate program; it is understood that enrollment as a special student does not lead to a graduate degree. Students are admitted to this category for certificate programs, general course work or transfer purposes. Special students are required to meet the regular admission standards of the Graduate School. If the special student applies and is officially admitted to a degree program, six hours of course work taken as a special student may be applied toward a master’s degree and up to 12 hours of course work taken as a special student may be applied toward a doctoral degree.

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General Admission Procedures

All students seeking admission to the Graduate School must follow these steps:

Make application on a form provided by the Graduate School or electronically on the application at the Graduate School website: www.utulsa.edu/graduate.

Submit a nonrefundable processing fee of $40 with each application. (This fee is waived for graduates of The University of Tulsa, or those who are participants in the Ronald E. McNair Scholars program).

Submit official transcripts of all college- or university-level work. (Transcripts submitted with an application become the property of the University and will not be returned to the applicant.)

Submit all required standardized test scores at time of application.

Submit three letters of recommendation.

International students must submit a letter of financial support at the time of application.

Applicant’s character, integrity, and general fitness to practice a particular profession may also be considered in the admissions process. Normally, two weeks are required to process an application after all materials have been received in the Graduate School Office. However, in the case of international students requiring visas, at least three months should be allowed. The Graduate School maintains ownership of all application and application-related documents and these materials cannot be returned to the applicant. Applications and transcripts will be held on file, and admission will be valid for one calendar year. Unless the Graduate School Office is instructed otherwise, application credentials will be destroyed if enrollment is not completed within one calendar year. Students admitted provisionally are expected to fulfill all of their provisional conditions within the first semester of graduate study.

Immunization Regulations

Due to Oklahoma state legislation, all students who attend Oklahoma colleges and universities must provide proof of immunization against hepatitis B, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR). Students living in on-campus housing must also provide proof of immunization again meningococcal disease. Medical, religious, and personal exemptions are allowed by law and such requests must be made in writing using The University of Tulsa Certificate of Exemption form. More information about this requirement is available on page 48 of this Bulletin. Failure to comply with these requirements will result in a hold being placed on future enrollments by the student.

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Matriculation

Exceptions to the following policies are rare and are granted only on a case-by-case basis and upon recommendation of the program administration and with the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School.

Full-Time and Part-Time Status

To be considered academically full time, a graduate student must be enrolled in at least nine credit hours on the Friday that concludes the second week of classes during a regular semester (fall and spring semesters). Enrollment in PSY 8800 “Psychology Internship” is also considered full-time enrollment. Enrollment in zero (as is the case when enrolled in 7990 – “Final Enrollment”) to eight credit hours is acceptable for full-

time status for two sequential regular semesters in a master’s program or four sequential semesters in a doctoral program when the student has completed at least nine credit hours per semester for the prior two sequential regular semesters. If a student does not complete his/her degree within these two reduced-credit-hour semesters for a master’s student or four reduced-credit-hour semesters for a doctoral student, then the student will be disqualified from further reduced-credit-hour full-time status until the student has enrolled in at least nine credits per semester for two sequential regular semesters.

A student may enroll in up to 12 credit hours during a regular semester and eight

credit hours during a summer term. However, students with full-time jobs are normally limited to a maximum of six credit hours during fall and spring semesters. For financial aid purposes, half-time enrollment is enrollment in a minimum of five credit hours during the fall and spring semesters. Enrollment in zero to eight credit hours other than as described above constitutes part-time enrollment. Graduate students who are not United States residents and are attending the University on a student visa must be enrolled prior to the first day of classes and must be full-time students as required by federal regulations.

Enrollment

Graduate enrollment for the summer and fall terms usually begins in April. Spring term enrollment begins in early November. Enrollment cards for all degree-seeking students should be obtained from, and completed with the assistance of, the appropriate graduate program advisor. The card should then be presented to the Graduate School Office for final approval. Special (non-degree-seeking) students should obtain their enrollment cards in the Graduate School Office. Special students must secure the signature of the appropriate instructor for each graduate course in which they wish to

enroll. Online enrollment is currently available to approved students in graduate degree programs in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

A student must be enrolled to make use of University resources (e.g., library or faculty

time) during the fall or spring semester. No student may attend classes after the first class session, take qualifying exams, comprehensive exams, or graduate during a semester unless properly enrolled. Any graduate student who has enrolled in the required number of hours for a degree but has not finished all requirements must enroll in Graduate Residency (see p.16). Failure to enroll for one or more semesters without an official Leave of Absence (see p. 22 for details) may require an application for readmission to the degree program if the six-year Statute of Limitations (see p. 22) has expired for the student’s course work.

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The University of Tulsa

The last day of the semester is the day prior to graduation for the fall and spring semesters and the last day of classes during the summer semester, unless indicated otherwise by the instructor.

Graduate Residency (7961)

When a student has enrolled in the required number of hours for the degree but has not finished all requirements for the degree, he or she enrolls in Graduate Residency (7961). This requirement is particularly applicable, but not restricted, to the semester in which the student completes work for the degree. If a student is not enrolled in course work but wishes to make use of University resources (e.g., library or faculty time), to complete other academic milestones required by the program or Graduate School (e.g., take a qualifying or comprehensive examination, have an oral defense of a thesis or dissertation), or to be considered for graduation during a given semester, the student must be enrolled in Graduate Residency

(7961).

Final Enrollment (7990)

Students who enrolled in a semester and complete their degree requirements after the end of that semester, but before the start of the next semester are required to enroll in Final Enrollment (7990). There is no charge for enrollment in 7990. Students may only enroll in 7990 after all of the requirements for the degree have been met. Circumstances where enrollment in Final Enrollment 7990 is applicable:

Student who submit their thesis or dissertation after commencement but before the beginning of classes for the next semester.

Non-thesis students who have taken all required courses for the degree but received an “Incomplete” in one or more courses.

Students who are transferred by their employer prior to their last semester at The University of Tulsa, and successfully petition the Graduate School to attend another accredited institution to complete their degree program. The credits are then transferred to appear on the student's University of Tulsa transcript as prescribed in the transfer credit policy (see Transfer Credit on page 19). If the student does not satisfy any of the above three conditions for enrolling in Final Enrollment, they will need to enroll in at least one hour of Graduate Residency or Thesis/Dissertation.

Undergraduate Courses for Graduate Credit (4000/6000)

In some programs, upper-level undergraduate courses, designated in this Bulletin by 6000-level course numbers, may be taken for graduate credit with the approval of the graduate program advisor. Students enrolled in these courses for graduate credit will be given assignments beyond those required for undergraduate students in the same course. Students who have previously enrolled in a course at the 4000-level may not enroll in the same course at the 6000-level. The faculty responsible for the program must submit a written justification for any master’s degree program containing more than 40 percent of its total credit hours (excluding the removal of deficiencies) in 6000-level courses. Such justification must be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School.

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Undergraduate courses taken for graduate credit must be 6000-level courses approved for registration. Graduate tuition must be paid for such courses.

Graduate Courses for Undergraduate Credit (7000/5000)

The University has select graduate courses taught at the 7000-level that are cross-listed

at the 5000-level and may be taken by undergraduates for undergraduate credit with the

approval of the undergraduate program advisor, the instructor of the course, and the graduate program advisor for the discipline in which the course is offered. This option

is intended for exceptional undergraduates with at least junior standing, and may be

offered in conjunction with a combined bachelor’s/master’s degree program for TU undergraduates. Enrollment is limited to one 5000- or 7000- level course per semester; however, students admitted to a combined bachelor’s/master’s degree program are permitted to enroll in up to six credit hours of 5000- or 7000-level courses per semester while completing their undergraduate degree. Any exception to this requires the approval of the Graduate Dean. Undergraduate students in a 5000-level course must meet all the requirements and

complete all of the same assignments as required for the graduate students in the 7000- level of the course. Undergraduate students are evaluated in exactly the same way as the graduate students in that course. Students may not receive credit for a course at the 5000-level and then later retake the same course at the 7000-level.

Auditing

A student may elect to audit a course and will have all the privileges of students taking

the course for credit, except taking the final examination or receiving credit for the course. Students must pay the same tuition rate for an audited course as they would if the course was taken for credit. The credit hours from audited courses are not counted when determining a student’s full-time status. An auditor may elect to take a course for credit at any time within the first three weeks of a regular semester if the course instructor and the Dean of the Graduate School give their permission. The schedule for auditing courses during a summer term should be obtained from the Office of Registration and Records.

Withdrawal

Voluntary Withdrawal from the University. Official withdrawal from the University requires a standard procedure originating through the Graduate School. It is financially and academically advantageous to students to follow the official withdrawal procedure. Students withdrawing prior to the start of the seventh week of a regular semester are entitled to a partial refund of tuition calculated from the date of their official withdrawal. Nonattendance of classes does not constitute official withdrawal. Medical/Psychological Withdrawals. Students withdrawing from the University based on a medical or psychological reason should submit a Request for Leave of Absence form to the Center for Student Academic Support. A request for medical/psychological withdrawal must be supported by documentation from the student’s physician, psychologist, or psychiatrist. Additionally, the student’s physician, psychologist, or psychiatrist must complete the Medical Verification Form, which can be obtained from the Center for Student Academic Support. A medical/psychological withdrawal is allowed on a one-time basis. The request and documentation must be submitted before the last day of classes. A late withdrawal request (after the 12th week

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of classes) must be accompanied by supporting documentation that explains the unforeseeable conditions that prevented earlier submission of the information. Not completing the signed medical/psychological withdrawal forms and not providing documentation in a timely manner (within 10 business days of the request) will result in tuition being charged for the semester. After completing the process for a medical/psychological withdrawal, “W” grades will be assigned to all classes for the current semester before the last day of classes. Students who have not completed the process will be assigned permanent grades by the instructor. Retroactive grade changes are not permitted. The Center for Student Academic Support will maintain all documentation in confidential student files and will provide verification of appropriate documentation as needed. A medical/psychological withdrawal does not negate the student’s financial responsibility to the University. Students should contact the Business Office, Housing and Dining, and/or Student Financial Services regarding outstanding fees, bills, refunds and other charges related to their enrollment or withdrawal. Withdrawal from the University for Military Service. Students who are called to active military duty at any time during their enrollment will be eligible for a full refund or credit of their tuition for the semester of their withdrawal. Students are strongly encouraged to discuss their situation with their graduate program advisor to consider alternate arrangements. For example, students who are called to report for active duty near the end of a semester may choose to take “incompletes” in their courses, rather than repeating the entire semester when they return to the University. The University will work closely with students to minimize the impact a withdrawal will have on their academic progress. All students called to active military duty are required to meet with the Veteran’s Coordinator in the Office of Registration and Records. Non-voluntary Withdrawal from the University. Students may be required to withdraw from the University for habitual absence from class, habitual idleness, or any other behavior that prevents them from fulfilling the purposes implied by their registration in the University. A grade of “W” will be entered for each of the courses in which a student is registered. Students who have been required to withdraw must apply for readmission to the Graduate School in the same manner as that required of a suspended student. Voluntary Withdrawal from a Course. Withdrawal from a course prior to the start of the fourth week of a regular semester is considered a cancellation of enrollment, and the course is not shown on students’ academic records. Withdrawal from a course after the start of the fourth week and up to and including the twelfth week of a regular semester will be considered a partial enrollment for which a grade of W (withdrew) will be recorded. Withdrawals are not permitted after the end of the twelfth week of a regular semester. The schedule for withdrawal from courses and refund of tuition is printed in the schedule of courses for each semester. Any formal withdrawal shall constitute a forfeiture of any and all right to the subsequent make-up of incomplete grades. Non-voluntary Withdrawal from a Course. Students may be withdrawn from a class for habitual behavior which prevents the student or other students from fulfilling the purposes implied by registration in the University. A grade of “W” will be entered for the course in which the student was registered.

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Transfer Credit

Transfer credit is limited to six hours at the master’s level and 12 hours at the doctoral level. Only credit hours are transferable; any grades associated with transferred credit hours will not transfer and will not be included when computing the student’s GPA at The University of Tulsa. The major program advisor is responsible for determining the applicability of transfer work to the student’s program. Any such graduate credit must have been earned at an accredited graduate school and completed within the six-year statute of limitations. Transfer credit will not be granted for any course work with a grade below B. Credit for transfer work will be recommended by the major program advisor to the Graduate School only after the student has completed the same number of credit hours at The University of Tulsa with at least a 3.0 grade-point average. Transfer Credit forms are available in the Graduate School. Course work used to satisfy requirements for one graduate degree may not be used to meet the requirements for a second graduate degree. Credits earned under the Study Abroad program will appear on The University of Tulsa transcript with grades of either “P” or “F”. All transfer credit is subject to final approval by the Dean of the Graduate School.

Transfer of Records

The Office of Registration and Records will forward official transcripts to other institutions or prospective employers upon the request of students. No transcript is issued for students who have not met their financial obligations to the University. The University does not issue unofficial transcripts or copies of transcripts from other institutions.

Academic Honesty

In keeping with the intellectual ideals, standards for community, and educational mission of the University, students are expected to adhere to all academic policies. Cheating on examinations, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty violate both individual honor and the life of the community, and may subject students to penalties ranging from failing grades to dismissal. Academic misconduct also includes unauthorized or inappropriate use of University computers, vandalism of data files or equipment, use of computer resources for personal reasons unrelated to the academic and research activities of the University, plagiarism, violation of proprietary agreements, theft, or tampering with the programs and data of other users. Specific policies exist in the various colleges in addition to the overall University policies published in this Bulletin and other campus policy guides.

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Scholarship

Grades

An overall scholastic average of 3.0 is required in all graduate work taken at The University of Tulsa. All course work taken for graduate credit is computed in the average, including the initial grade in a course that is repeated. Grades earned in the College of Law are not computed in the graduate grade-point average. No graduate credit is earned for a course in which the student received a grade below a C. Thesis and dissertation enrollments are evaluated on a pass-fail basis. An I (Incomplete) is assigned at the end of each semester when the thesis or dissertation is in

progress, but, after consultation with the Graduate School, a grade of F (Fail) may be assigned in place of an I (Incomplete) by the thesis or dissertation advisor if the advisor does not believe that sufficient progress towards completion of the thesis or dissertation

is being achieved. The thesis or dissertation supervisor will submit a grade change form

when the student has either ceased work on the research or completed all requirements for graduation.

No graduate credit will be given for work receiving a pass/fail grade, with the exception of thesis, dissertation, certain master’s reports, certain College of Law

courses, certain internship work, and credit earned through study abroad. A grade of P signifies that graduate work has been completed that would otherwise receive a grade of

C or higher. No graduate credit can be awarded for experiential learning that occurs

prior to admission into a TU graduate program and which has not been under the supervision of a University of Tulsa faculty member.

Incompletes

An I (Incomplete) grade indicates that some portion of the student’s work is lacking, for an acceptable reason, at the time grades are reported. It is the responsibility of the student to fulfill the requirements for the course within a maximum of one calendar year from the date on which the course was originally to have been completed, or within a more restricted period of time as designated by the instructor on the Contract for Grade of Incomplete. If the student is unable to do so because of circumstances beyond his or her control, the student may petition the instructor of the course and the Dean of the Graduate School for an extension of time. When the instructor grants an incomplete, a Contract for Grade of Incomplete form must be completed and filed in the Graduate School Office. This form, to be signed by the instructor and by the student, should specify what must be done to remove the incomplete and give a deadline for completion of the unfinished work. The faculty may give a maximum of one calendar year for completion of the work or specify less than one calendar year on the contract. Following the expiration of the contract deadline or

one calendar year, if an earlier deadline is not specified, a symbol (IZ) will be added to the transcript indicating that the course is no longer valid and the incomplete may not be removed. These regulations do not apply to theses, dissertation, or non-coursework enrollments (which includes enrollment in Practicum, Advanced Practicum, Internship, Externship, Project, Report, Research and Paper, Pre-Dissertation Research, Research Experience, Independent Study, Directed Reading, or Qualifying Exam Prep) in which completion

of the work necessary to satisfy that enrollment is not required at the end of the

semester. An I (Incomplete) is assigned at the end of each semester when thesis, dissertation, or non-coursework enrollments are in progress and adequate progress has

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been made for that semester. The thesis, dissertation, or non-coursework supervisor will submit a grade change form when the student has successfully completed the work necessary to satisfy that enrollment.

Certification or Licensure

The process of certification or licensure in some disciplines may require that the graduate student submit to and pass a background check. It is the graduate student’s responsibility to consult with her/his faculty advisor regarding such requirements and to meet such requirements in order to be properly certified or licensed.

Intellectual Property

A student’s research project for the master’s or doctoral degree may result in a patentable discovery, whereby the inventor may be a student or a student and advisor. Timely disclosure of the findings to The University of Tulsa Intellectual Property Committee will not delay a student’s graduation. The University of Tulsa recognizes the potential benefits of the intellectual capital of its faculty, staff and students: to society, to the University, and to themselves. The University has placed a high priority on realizing those benefits. Technical information, discoveries, inventions, computer algorithms and patents resulting from investigation or research conducted by employees or students of The University of Tulsa which is financed in whole or in part from funds administered by the University, or as a direct result of an employee's duties or a student's academic pursuits with the University, or made in whole or in part by the utilization of University resources or facilities, are the property of The University of Tulsa. The intellectual property shall, on request, be assigned to the University or its designee, unless the University relinquishes its rights therein to the inventor. Creators of intellectual property at The University of Tulsa share in the recognition and rewards derived from these works.

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Academic Standing

Statute of Limitations

The work for a degree must be completed within six years. This policy remains in effect even if a student is absent or not enrolled during several semesters. A student who allows the time limit to expire and is subsequently readmitted must also meet the new requirements for the degree as stipulated by the program at the time of readmission. Graduate work more than six years old must be validated by the department for currentness in the discipline. In addition, the student’s knowledge resulting from this graduate work must be determined to be current and the student deemed competent by examinations, or by other means of evaluation at the discretion of the major program. When all work toward the degree is out-of-date, it is possible to validate six of the out-of-date hours to be applied toward future work on the degree. All petitions for extension must be recommended by the student’s advisor and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. A more stringent statute of limitations may be imposed under the particular requirements of individual programs.

Leave of Absence

A leave of absence will be considered for up to one academic year for medical/

psychological or other extenuating circumstances upon submission of a request for a leave of absence to the Dean of the Graduate School. The Graduate School will work with the Center for Student Academic Support to review the request and notify the student if the Dean approves the requested leave. Any medical documentation submitted in support of the request for a leave of absence will be forwarded to the Center for Student Academic Support, which will maintain all documentation in confidential student files. Students should seek clarification from the Dean of the Graduate School as to how this affects their academic status as a full-time or part-time student. However, the six- year statute of limitations regarding course credit is still in effect. The student should also check with the Office of Student Financial Services or their loan provider regarding the effect of a leave on loan obligations or any other financial aid issues. Any financial support currently being provided to the student may or may not be available upon the student’s return. The student will be responsible for working directly with the Business Office, Housing Office and any other campus offices regarding how a leave of absence may affect any obligations to those offices.

Probation and Dismissal

Prospective students having a cumulative grade point average below a 3.0 or marginal test scores may be admitted on probation and must establish a 3.0 average in the first nine hours of graduate work and within a specified time period. Additional

requirements (e.g. successful completion of deficiency courses, completion of specified graduate courses with specified minimum grades, etc.) may be placed on a student who

is

admitted probationally. Failure to meet any of the conditions of probation may lead

to

dismissal from the Graduate School. Students who have not maintained a 3.0 cumulative grade point average in graduate

courses at the end of any semester or summer session will be placed on probation.

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Upon approval of the Dean of the Graduate School, a student on probation may be allowed to enroll in up to nine additional credit hours to achieve the required 3.0

graduate grade point average. Only courses taken at The University of Tulsa will be used to determine the grade point average for the purpose of removing probation. If the average is not improved to 3.0 after the additional nine hours, and within one semester of enrollment for full-time students or three semesters for part-time students, the student may be dismissed from the graduate program. Exceptions for additional hours beyond the nine hours to achieve the required 3.0 average are granted on a case-by-case basis upon recommendation of the major program and with the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School.

If a student in a joint-degree program is placed on probation or dismissed by either

the College of Law or by the Graduate School in a particular graduate degree program, that action shall pertain only to the student’s status within the particular degree program from which they are on probation or dismissed. The student may opt to continue

pursuing studies within the other college or degree program. In such cases, the student will be obliged to satisfy the normal requirements of the college selected or degree program selected, which may include credit for some work done in the discontinued degree program, as determined by the Dean of the College of Law or the Dean of the Graduate School.

If a student has not made satisfactory progress toward the completion of a degree

program because of incompletes in course work, the student may be placed on probation and further enrollment may be affected until the work is submitted for the incomplete courses, grades are submitted, and the student’s academic progress is evaluated.

A student may be placed on probation or dismissed from the Graduate School for

reasons other than poor grades, even if he or she is in good academic standing. This includes, but is not limited to, the falsification of application materials, failure to satisfy stipulations imposed upon admission to the program, failure to maintain the standards of academic, ethical, or professional integrity expected in a particular discipline or program, and failure to satisfy other program or Graduate School requirements in a timely fashion as defined by established policies.

Degree Card and Graduation

Students who fulfill all requirements for their degree will be graduated at the end of the semester in which the requirements were met. A degree card should be filed in the Graduate School when a student enrolls for the final semester of the degree program. To graduate and receive a diploma, the student must be enrolled the semester of graduation, all academic degree requirements must be completed, all incompletes for courses being applied to the degree must be removed from the student’s record, and all indebtedness to the University must be satisfied. If a requirement for the degree is completion of a thesis or dissertation, the thesis or dissertation should be deposited with the library by April 15 to graduate at the conclusion of the spring semester, by December 1 to graduate at the conclusion of the fall semester, or by the last day of classes for summer graduation. The Master’s and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are conferred at the first commencement exercises after the completion of all graduation requirements. Each candidate is expected to attend the ceremonies. Enrolled students who complete all degree requirements and deposit the final drafts of their thesis or dissertation in the library after April 15 or December 1 but before the respective May or December commencement may graduate that semester upon review

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and approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. Students who wish to participate in commencement exercises but have not submitted their thesis or dissertation by the deadline must petition their advisor and the Dean of the Graduate School in writing by April 15 (for spring) or December 1 (for fall). The petition represents an exception to policy.

May Commencement Policy

Deserving non-thesis graduate students who have no more than six credit hours remaining to complete all the requirements for their degree by the end of the summer session will be permitted to take part in May graduation ceremonies; this includes having their names printed in the commencement program. However, the student must petition both the advisor and the Graduate School in writing. Please call the Graduate School for information about what the petition must include and when it is due.

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Master’s Degree Requirements

The following are minimum requirements only, and programs may have additional requirements. Students are responsible for compliance with all Graduate School requirements as set forth in this Bulletin.

Residence

Candidates for most master’s degrees at The University of Tulsa must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of graduate study. Not more than six credit hours of approved graduate work completed in residence elsewhere may be accepted for credit toward the degree. All graduate students must be enrolled during the final semester of completion of degree requirements. (See Graduate Residency and Final Enrollment, page 16.)

Public Access to Theses

All theses are expected to be public documents. These are bound and available in the library upon submission and acceptance by the Graduate School. Any exceptions must be agreed to in writing by the Dean of the Graduate School, an appropriate University officer, and the external funding source, if any, at the time the thesis proposal is presented and prior to the commencement of the research. The University of Tulsa policy on intellectual property rights applies to research conducted by University of Tulsa students. A request to sequester a thesis is an exception to policy and may only be granted for a limited period of time.

Thesis

Many programs require a candidate for the master’s degree to submit a thesis presenting the results of scholarly investigation of a topic connected with the major field of study. In the case of creative work such as art and writing, the requirement may be satisfied by a creative production of acceptable quality. No fewer than two and in most cases no more than six credit hours may be earned by the thesis or creative production. An individual advisor or thesis director should be chosen as soon as practical in accordance with department policies. The establishment of the thesis committee, composed of at least three members of the graduate faculty for the purpose of providing advice and guidance, should also occur early in the student’s research endeavor in order to maximize the committee’s benefit to the student. The thesis committee must be recommended by the program administration to the Dean of the Graduate School for approval. At least one member of the committee shall be from outside the major program or discipline or, with the Dean’s approval, from outside the University. Any travel-related or other associated costs for a student, faculty member, or committee member to participate in a thesis defense are the responsibility of the student and will not be reimbursed by the Graduate School. It is strongly recommended that a student and his/her thesis advisor make prior arrangements to cover such costs. Candidates must follow the guidelines for preparing a thesis set forth in “The Preparation of the Master’s Thesis and Doctoral Dissertation,” available in the Graduate School Office and on the Graduate School website. The thesis shall be presented before final submission to the Graduate School to the thesis committee in preparation for the thesis defense or oral examination.

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The Graduate School Office should receive a request to approve the date, time, and place of the oral examination at least two weeks prior to the oral examination. The committee will examine the thesis and report to the chair supervising the research or creative work. Theses are graded on a pass-fail basis. A copy of the thesis must be presented to the Graduate School, with a Signature Page signed by the student’s committee members, for review. The student will be notified when the manuscript has been reviewed and is responsible for making any necessary corrections. The student should submit three copies of the corrected thesis on 25 percent rag or cotton content bond paper to the Graduate School. The Graduate School will initiate the completion of an “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form and the student will complete a Thesis/Dissertation form. The student will then submit the “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form to the Business Office and it must be signed and dated by the Business Office after payment of all fees. The thesis copies and the “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form are then delivered to the Periodical Desk in McFarlin Library and the “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form must be signed and dated by the library to verify delivery of the copies for binding. The student should then return the completed “Approval and Binding of Thesis and Dissertation” form showing the signatures to the Graduate School. If the thesis is not deposited in the Library within six months after the successful completion of the thesis defense, the student may be required to re-defend and update the thesis. Students graduating at the end of the spring semester must complete their oral examinations and deposit the final drafts of their theses in the library by April 15. The deadline for students graduating at the end of the fall semester is December 1, and the summer deadline is the last day of summer classes. Students who deposit the final draft of their thesis in the library after April 15 or December 1 but before the respective May or December commencement may graduate that semester upon review and approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. An abstract of not more than 150 words shall be prepared by the candidate, one copy of which is to be bound with the thesis, and additional copies are to be filed with the librarian and the Graduate School Office. Some programs offer curricula not requiring a thesis. These are discussed in the appropriate sections on specific program requirements.

Comprehensive Examination or Qualifying Examination

Candidates may be required by the major program to pass an oral or written comprehensive examination in the major and minor fields in addition to the regular course examinations.

Master of Fine Arts Degree

The Master of Fine Arts degree is a 60-hour program offered only through the School of Art. See requirements in the Art portion of the Graduate Bulletin for specific information.

Combined Bachelor’s / Master’s Degree Programs

Outstanding students in accountancy, applied mathematics, biochemistry, biological sciences, chemistry, chemical engineering, engineering physics, geosciences, history, and physics may be considered for admission to combined Bachelor’s/Master’s degree programs. These combined degree programs encourage students to complete graduate

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level work as undergraduates and typically permit a restricted number of 5000-level courses to be applied to both the undergraduate and graduate degree programs. These programs have been developed to allow exceptional students the opportunity to complete a Bachelor’s degree and a Master’s degree in a reduced amount of time. For more information please see page 276 of this Bulletin.

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Doctoral Degree Requirements

The following are minimum requirements only; programs may have additional requirements. Students are responsible for compliance with all Graduate School requirements as set forth in this Bulletin. Information regarding comprehensive exams, dissertation committee structure, and other specific requirements may be found under Anthropology, Biological Science, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Clinical Psychology, Computer Science, English Language and Literature, Geosciences, Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Mechanical Engineering, Petroleum Engineering, and Physics. Any exception to the doctoral degree requirements must be approved by the major program administration and the Dean of the Graduate School.

Residence

Candidates for doctoral degrees must complete a minimum of 72 credit hours of

graduate study. Some doctoral programs require a minimum of 90 hours (60 hours beyond the master’s degree). At least two consecutive semesters in residence at The University of Tulsa as a full-time student are required. Not more than 12 hours of approved graduate work that was not applied to another completed degree program and

in residence elsewhere may be accepted for credit toward the degree.

Comprehensive Examination or Qualifying Examination

Candidates may be required by the major program to pass an oral or written examination or both as comprehensive examinations in the major and minor fields in addition to the regular course examinations.

Candidacy

A student who is admitted to a doctoral degree program is not a candidate for a

doctoral degree until he or she has passed a qualifying examination or comprehensive examination, and has an approved proposal or prospectus for a dissertation topic. After approval of the dissertation topic by the appropriate committee within the program, the student’s department will recommend the student for candidacy. Usually a student has completed all coursework before being recommended for candidacy. After the recommendation is approved by the Dean of the Graduate School, the student is then a candidate for the doctoral degree.

Public Access to Dissertations

All dissertations are expected to be public documents. These are bound and available in the library upon submission and acceptance by the Graduate School. Any exceptions must be agreed to in writing by the Dean of the Graduate School, an appropriate

University officer, and the external funding source, if any, at the time the dissertation proposal is presented and prior to the commencement of the research. The University

of Tulsa policy on intellectual property rights applies to research conducted by

University of Tulsa students. A request to sequester a dissertation is an exception to policy and may only be granted for a limited period of time.

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Dissertation

An individual advisor or dissertation director should be chosen as soon as practical in accordance with department policies. The establishment of the dissertation committee, composed of graduate faculty for the purpose of providing advice and guidance concerning the student’s research, should also occur early enough in the student’s research endeavor to give the student the full benefit of the committee’s counsel and to act as a resource for the student. The dissertation committee must be recommended by the program administration to the Dean of the Graduate School for approval. A doctoral student must enroll in at least one credit hour of Research and Dissertation. Candidates must follow the guidelines for preparing a dissertation set forth in “The Preparation of the Master’s Thesis and Doctoral Dissertation,” available in the Graduate School Office and on the Graduate School website. The dissertation shall be presented to the dissertation committee for their review. The Graduate School Office should receive a request to set the date, time, and place of the oral examination at least two weeks prior to the oral examination. Any travel- related or other associated costs for a student or faculty member to participate in a dissertation defense are the responsibility of the student and will not be reimbursed by the Graduate School. It is strongly recommended that a student and his/her dissertation advisor make prior arrangements to cover such costs. The committee will examine the dissertation and report to the chair supervising the research. Dissertations are graded on a pass-fail basis. A copy of the dissertation must be presented to the Graduate School, with a Signature Page signed by the student’s committee members, for review. The student will be notified when the manuscript has been reviewed and is responsible for making any necessary corrections. The student should submit at least three copies of the corrected dissertation on 25 percent rag or cotton content bond paper to the Graduate School. The Graduate School will initiate the completion of an “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form and the student will complete a Thesis/Dissertation form. The Graduate School will also provide doctoral students with an UMI Agreement form that must be completed and submitted to the Library. The student will then submit the “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form to the Business Office and it must be signed and dated by the Business Office after payment of all fees. The dissertation copies, “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form, and UMI Agreement form are then delivered to the Periodical Desk in McFarlin Library and the “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form must be signed and dated by the library to verify delivery of the copies for binding. The student should then return the completed “Approval and Binding of Thesis and Dissertation” form showing the signatures to the Graduate School. If the dissertation is not deposited in the Library within six months after the successful completion of the dissertation defense, the student may be required to re-defend and update the dissertation. Students graduating at the end of the spring semester must complete their oral examinations and deposit the final drafts of their dissertation in the library by April 15. The deadline for students graduating at the end of the fall semester is December 1, and the deadline for summer graduation is the last day of summer classes. Students who deposit the final draft of their dissertation in the library after April 15 or December 1 but before the respective May or December commencement may graduate that semester upon review and approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. In such cases, the student might have missed the deadline for having their name printed in the respective commencement program.

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All dissertations are published on the UMI website and an abstract published in Dissertation Abstracts. Publication costs must be paid by the candidate unless a signed contract for commercial publication of the entire dissertation can be produced. An abstract of not more than 350 words shall be prepared by the candidate, one copy of which is to be bound with the dissertation, and additional copies are to be filed with the librarian and the Graduate School Office.

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The Committee for Petitions of the Graduate Council

The Committee for Petitions of the Graduate Council considers petitions submitted in writing by any person who believes that he or she was treated improperly on a graduate academic matter, but only after attempts have been made to resolve the problems by discussions with relevant faculty members, the Graduate Program Advisor, the Chair of the Department, and the Dean of the Graduate School. Only academic issues involving procedures and affecting status in the graduate program are considered. The Committee makes recommendations to the Dean regarding the disposition of:

student petitions requesting departure from established Graduate School policies,

petitions involving charges of academic misconduct involving graduate students (these cases may be brought by the student or by the faculty member involved),

petitions involving a perceived academic impropriety arising from an action taken by an instructor, a department, or a committee charged to administer academic policies of a particular department or college.

Committee membership includes at least one graduate faculty member from each college offering graduate study. The Dean of the Graduate School designates the chair; the Committee elects the vice-chair, who presides in the absence of the chair and also in cases in which the petition being considered originates in the chair’s college. When a committee member is from the department where the petition originates, that member participates in the deliberations regarding the petition, but neither chairs the Committee nor votes on the disposition of the petition. Three or more committee members constitute a quorum; and a majority of three committee members is needed to sustain a charge. A tie vote indicates that the charge was not proven and is therefore rejected. The Committee elects a secretary who keeps the minutes of all meetings. Written records of the proceedings are preserved for three years, along with any written statements of evidence presented. A copy of the written record is available to the petitioner upon request. Costs incurred in producing the copy are the responsibility of the petitioner. The petitioner has the right to see contrary evidence submitted to the committee and to write a rebuttal. The person bringing the complaint must file the petition with the Graduate School during the semester in which the incident occurred, or during the subsequent two semesters. The petitioners may appear before the Committee, but only at the Committee’s invitation, and the Committee may also invite other concerned parties to attend. The petition is available to anyone against whom allegations are made so that those individuals may have the opportunity to respond. The Committee conveys its findings and recommendations in writing to the Dean of the Graduate School. The petitioner and any accused person may see the final report and may write a response to be kept with the final report. Any appeals concerning the outcome of the petition may be addressed to the Provost of The University of Tulsa and must be submitted within one month after the petitioner or accused person has been notified of the outcome. For further details concerning jurisdiction, procedures, and confidentiality issues concerning The Committee for Petitions of the Graduate Council, call the Graduate School Office.

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Services and Programs Available to Graduate Students

Competitive Research Grants and Awards

The Graduate School and the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs offer several programs in which students may compete for awards. The purpose of the programs is to encourage students in their research endeavors and in the presentation of their scholarly works in a professional forum. These programs aid students with their research expenses (Student Research Grant Program) and assist with expenses associated with attendance at professional meetings to present their scholarly research (Student Travel Grants and Chapman Graduate Scholar Presentation Awards). For details, inquire at the Graduate School Office or the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

Annual Student Research Colloquium

Students, in conjunction with the Graduate School, organize an Annual Student Research Colloquium. This is held during the spring semester to give students additional public speaking experience and to encourage their research endeavors. The students’ presentations are judged according to criteria that are commonly used at scholarly professional meetings. The winners are announced and cash awards are presented at a Student Research Colloquium Awards Banquet.

Graduate Student Association

The Graduate Student Association helps organize the Annual Student Research Colloquium as well as other campus functions. The student members elect the association’s president, who conducts the organization’s meetings and also serves as a student member on the Graduate Council.

Honor Societies

Phi Kappa Phi was founded in 1897 as the Lambda Sigma Eta Society at the University of Maine. In 1900, the society added chapters at the Pennsylvania State College (now Pennsylvania State University) and the University of Tennessee and was renamed Phi Kappa Phi. The University of Tulsa chapter, chartered in 1990, is one of over 250 chapters in the United States. Phi Kappa Phi elects members from all recognized branches of academic endeavor. Members are selected on the basis of high academic achievement and good character. Inductees may include a maximum of 10 percent of the graduate students in the university.

Study Abroad

The University of Tulsa is committed to offering its graduate students opportunities to acquire international and cross-cultural experience and learn a foreign language. Students can choose from several study abroad options, including summer, semester and year-long programs. TU offers a wide selection of international study options where students can choose courses in all disciplines and apply them towards their majors, as well as satisfy other graduation requirements. TU has international exchange partnerships with universities throughout the world, and plans are underway to take

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advantage of additional exchange opportunities. The Center for Global Education office can also arrange overseas internships for credit. In addition to consulting and securing approval from their graduate program advisor and the Graduate School, interested students must visit the Center for Global Education office six months prior to the semester in which they wish to study abroad and must submit a special application form.

Certificate Programs

Graduate students may complete certificate programs, which allow them to acquire proficiencies in a specialized area of study without having to fulfill all of the requirements of a degree program. Many of the hours that count toward a certificate may also count toward a degree should the student decide to enroll in a degree program. Certificates can be earned by individuals who already possess one or more college degrees or who have otherwise been admitted as special students. Most certificate programs require completion of 15 to 27 credit hours of advanced coursework. Certificates are currently offered in Finance, Information Security, as well as Respecialization in I/O Psychology.

Life Skills Workshop Series

This workshop series provides TU graduate students with skills outside their disciplines that will build their professional competencies and maximize their options to succeed in their careers and lives. In addition to career development skills, the series also deals with issues such as stress, ethical decisions, and other topics. The Graduate School recognizes the unique pressures that graduate students encounter during their academic studies. Each workshop, seminar, or panel discussion focuses on an issue that relates to the student’s academic career and beyond. For details about workshop dates, topics, and locations, call the Graduate School Office 918-631-2336 or visit the Life Skills workshop webpage on the Graduate School website.

The Center for Student Academic Support

All students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with, and take advantage of, services provided by the center, such as tutoring, academic counseling, and developing study skills. The center also provides confidential consultations for any student with academic concerns as well as for students with disabilities. Students with disabilities should advise the Center for Student Academic Support of their needs in order to facilitate their rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act. The center is located in Lorton Hall, Room 210. Call 918-631-2315 for more information, or visit the Center’s website.

Career Services

The Office of Career Services provides a comprehensive set of services to assist students and alumni in the development of career plans and specific strategies leading to a desired employment goal. This office specializes in career planning, career counseling and assessment, internships, job fairs and career days, employment and recruitment, and offers a Graduate School admission workshop. For further information contact the office at careerhelp@utulsa.edu or call 918-631-2549.

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Graduate School Memberships

The Graduate School is a member of the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS), the Conference of Southern Graduate Schools (CSGS), and the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) and enrolled students are eligible for awards offered by these groups. Awards include the CGS/UMI Distinguished Dissertation Award, the CSGS Master’s Thesis Award, and the MAGS Distinguished Master’s Thesis Award. In addition, since 1993 students and faculty of The University of Tulsa have benefited from its membership in Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU). ORAU is a consortium of 105 colleges and universities and a contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORAU works with its member institutions to help their students and faculty gain access to federal research facilities throughout the country; to keep its members informed about opportunities for fellowship, scholarship, and research appointments; and to organize research alliances among its members. Through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), the DOE facility that ORAU operates, undergraduates, graduates, postgraduates, as well as faculty enjoy access to a multitude of opportunities for study and research. Students can participate in programs covering a wide variety of disciplines including business, earth sciences, epidemiology, engineering, physics, geological sciences, pharmacology, ocean sciences, biomedical sciences, nuclear chemistry, and mathematics. Appointment and program length range from one month to four years. Many of these programs are especially designed to increase the numbers of underrepresented minority students pursuing degrees in science- and engineering-related disciplines. A comprehensive listing of these programs and other opportunities, their disciplines, and details on locations and benefits can be found in the ORISE Catalog of Education and Training Programs, which is available at www.orau.gov/orise/educ.htm, or by calling either of the contacts below. ORAU’s Office of Partnership Development seeks opportunities for partnerships and alliances among ORAU’s members, private industry, and major federal facilities. Activities include faculty development programs, such as the Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Awards, the Visiting Industrial Scholars Program, consortium research funding initiatives, faculty research, and support programs as well as services to chief research officers. For more information about ORAU and its programs contact: Janet A. Haggerty, Dean of the Graduate School at 918-631-2336, Monnie E. Champion, ORAU Corporate Secretary at 865-576-3306, or visit the ORAU homepage www.orau.org.

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Financial Assistance

Fellowships and Teaching and Research Assistantships

The University offers a number of different fellowships and assistantship programs to full-time graduate students. Students must apply for the teaching and research assistantships; awards are made upon the recommendation of the applicant’s discipline. Awards that are competitive outside a specific degree program are initiated by student self-nomination and are determined by the administration. Stipends vary according to the amount of work required and the experience of the student. No assistantship or combination of assistantships for a given student may exceed 20 hours of duties per week. Tuition scholarship awards of up to nine credit hours remission of tuition per semester will be based on academic achievement. Students awarded financial assistance must be enrolled in at least nine but not more than 12 credit hours of graduate work during a regular semester (fall and spring). Special permission is required to deviate from these hours except for two sequential regular semesters in a master’s program or four sequential regular semesters in a doctoral program when the student was enrolled in at least nine hours per semester for the prior two sequential regular semesters. Students must also maintain a 3.0 grade point average, be in good academic standing, and be on-track to complete their degree program. Students on probation are not eligible for consideration. The University of Tulsa maintains that a full-time graduate student receiving a graduate assistantship has a full-time commitment. Any employment in addition to the assistantship is specifically prohibited. Any violation of this policy may result in the immediate termination of the assistantship. Any request for an exception to this policy must be submitted in writing to the Graduate Program Advisor and the assistantship supervisor and must receive their approval as well as that of the Dean of the Graduate School. Employment beyond the 20 hours associated with assistantships may place either the student’s academic performance or that individual’s performance on the assistantship at risk, and may therefore jeopardize the continuation of the student’s good academic standing. The Dean will consider only requests for exceptions when employment will benefit the student’s career development or in instances of severe financial need. Applications are available from the Graduate School in Lorton Hall 201. The application deadline for most types of assistance is February 1, and recipients will be announced in early April. The Ben Henneke Research Fellowships, Foster Brooks Parriott Graduate Scholarships, Wilfred Woobank Graduate Assistantships, John S. Zink Fellowships, and Bellwether Fellowships have an application deadline of January 15. Reapplication is not automatic. Recipients of an assistantship must reapply in order to be considered in subsequent years and must satisfy all reporting requirements. Forms for graduate assistantships, fellowships, and scholarships may be downloaded from the Graduate School website.

Assistantships and Fellowships

The awards in this section have a tuition scholarship component as well as a stipend component awarded to graduate students at The University of Tulsa. These awards come with the fringe benefit of student health insurance.

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Teaching/Research/Administrative Office Assistantships. Open to students pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees. The assistantship includes a stipend and remission of tuition for nine credit hours per semester. Workload: Teaching two courses or the equivalent in research activities or administrative office activities for approximately 20 hours per week. Wilfred Woobank Graduate Assistantships. The applicant must be a citizen of the United States and either be seeking full-time enrollment or be enrolled full-time in an engineering or natural sciences graduate degree program. The awards may be designated for one year or may be awarded for up to three years of study for the master’s or four years for the doctoral degree. The award includes a stipend and 18 or 19 credit hours of tuition scholarship. There is a 10 hour per week service component to the Wilfred Woobank Assistantship, intended to foster interaction between the scholar and the department. Some recipients have condensed their service duties to 20 hours per week for one semester and used the following semester for a research abroad experience. Application deadline is January 15; applications are available from the Graduate School. Ben Henneke Research Fellowships. This award honors the University’s first Trustees Professor of Humanities and President Emeritus, Ben Graf Henneke. The applicant must be a citizen of the United States and either be seeking full-time enrollment or be enrolled full-time in a master’s degree program within the arts, humanities, or social sciences (anthropology, art, education, English language and literature, history, speech- language pathology, or psychology). The award carries a 9- or 12- month stipend and nine credit hours of tuition for each of the fall and spring semesters, as well as six credit hours of summer tuition when appropriate. Some recipients have used the summer funding for research abroad. Application deadline is January 15; applications are available from the Graduate School. Bellwether Fellowships. Bellwether fellowship recipients are expected to be leaders in their respective disciplines and trendsetters for The University of Tulsa doctoral degree. The recipients will receive an award up to 21 credit hours in tuition and a stipend for 12 months, and University housing for up to 12 months. To be eligible for an award, a doctoral student must be admitted to candidacy (passed all qualifying or comprehensive exams and successfully defended the prospectus or dissertation proposal) and be able to emonstrate a good track record with respect to timely completion of Ph.D. milestones. Candidates for the award are expected to be in the writing stage of their dissertation work with the majority of the research (and data collection where applicable) completed. Application deadline is January 15; applications are available from the Graduate School Office.

Student Health Insurance

Students who have a 20 hour per week teaching/research/administrative office assistantship, Woobank Assistantship, or full University fellowship (such as Bellwether Fellowships or Henneke Research Fellowships) and who are uninsured are eligible to receive the University Student Health Insurance that is provided by The University of Tulsa to the individual student (see page 47 for more information). This is a community benefit; therefore, students who already have health insurance that pays benefits in Oklahoma will not be reimbursed, nor may the student receive the equivalent cost of the insurance to apply to another policy with another company. To acquire the insurance, a student must complete the Graduate Assistant or Fellow Request for University Student Health Insurance form available at the Graduate School.

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Other Types of Financial Assistance

John S. Zink Fellowship for Students with Physical Disabilities. This endowed fellowship is available to aid TU students with physical disabilities, and is given to students in any graduate program. Fellowship amounts are variable and awarded on the basis of need. The intention of the award is to assist with covering additional expenses incurred by the student because of a physical disability while in a graduate degree program. These awards do not cover full tuition or provide stipend in an amount sufficient to cover all living expenses. To qualify, you must be admitted to The University of Tulsa, be in good academic standing, qualify for services provided by The Center for Student Academic Support, and be registered to receive those services. Application deadline is January 15; application forms are available from the Graduate School. Foster Brooks Parriott Graduate Scholarships. A number of these scholarships, established in memory of Foster Brooks Parriott by the Parriott family, are awarded annually on the basis of scholastic achievement and need. The scholarship includes up to 24 credit hours of tuition for the year. Application deadline is January 15; applications are available from the Graduate School Office. Educator Tuition Scholarship. All full-time, Oklahoma elementary or secondary school teachers and administrators who qualify for admission to the Graduate School and wish to enroll on a part-time basis may apply for a two-thirds tuition scholarship by completing the scholarship form and returning it to The University of Tulsa Graduate School on or before the time of enrollment. Other Scholarships. Certain corporations, businesses, and individuals offer a variety of graduate scholarships. These may include full or partial payment of tuition, fees, or books. Recipients are often chosen only from among applicants interested in fields prescribed by the donors. Information on these awards may be obtained from the Graduate School Office or from the discipline in which the student plans to study. Loan Funds. Inquiries regarding loans should be made to the Office of Student Financial Services (see p. 54.)

Financial Assistance for Research/Scholarship Purposes

Student Research and Travel Grant Program. Financial assistance is available through the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs for students to engage in worthwhile research projects, presentations at professional meetings, and juried exhibitions. A student’s application should be prepared with faculty guidance. Doctoral students enrolled in Research and Dissertation are eligible for awards up to $1,000, with a cap of $2,000 in total funding as a doctoral student. All other degree seeking students are eligible for individual research awards of up to $500, with a cap of $1,000 in total funding while enrolled in a specific degree program. The maximum amount for a group research project is $1,000. Research project grants may be up to $500, with a cap of $1,000 during your degree program. Graduate students may be awarded up to $600 for a single presentation at a professional meeting. This is also the maximum amount that can be received while a graduate student is in a single degree program. If a degree is awarded and a graduate student begins a new degree program, they are eligible for an additional $600. For more information on this program, contact the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs Chapman Graduate Scholar Presentation Awards. The Chapman Graduate Scholar Presentation Awards Program through the Graduate School provides assistance for

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graduate students to present their scholarship in a national or international forum to enhance the student’s career opportunities. Any enrolled graduate student who is a senior author on an abstract and orally presenting research conducted at The University of Tulsa may apply. The maximum amount of an individual award is $1,000 at the master’s degree level and $1500 at the doctoral degree level. Applications for support during an academic year must be submitted by the end of the second week of classes during the fall or spring semesters; for a summer presentation, the request must be submitted by the end of the second week of the spring semester. !

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Information Services

McFarlin Library

McFarlin Library, named in honor of the original donors Mr. and Mrs. Robert McFarlin, serves as the academic heart of the University. The homepage can be located at www.lib.utulsa.edu. Undergraduates at The University of Tulsa have direct access to the library’s holdings of more than three million items that include more than 47,000 electronic journals, 500 print journals, and over 120,000 electronic books. The library collection also includes digitized University of Tulsa dissertations and archival materials, and extensive collections of electronic reference sources and databases, as well as print resources such as books, serials, government documents, microforms, maps, literary manuscripts, historical archives, and other materials. McFarlin Library staff provides a wide variety of services including a library instruction program, which strengthens the information literacy skills of members of the University; a flexible circulation system, which allows patrons to conduct much of their library business online; and a wide-reaching Interlibrary Loan system, which provides patrons with materials from libraries around the world. McFarlin Library is open more than 95 hours each week. Open stacks provide easy access to materials. The Federal Document Depository collection, which consists of over 500,000 items issued by the Congressional, Judicial and Executive departments, includes a complete file of U.S. census reports. The document unit also supports the growing body of information issued in electronic format by the government. More than 128,000 rare books and 3,500 linear feet of literary and historical manuscripts are shelved in Special Collections. These growing collections, focused on American, British, and Irish literature of the late 19th and 20th centuries and on Native American history and law, have achieved an international reputation in the scholarly community. This collection supports teaching and research across many academic departments and is routinely used in undergraduate instruction. McFarlin Library houses and provides access to an outstanding energy collection, notably in petroleum. It serves the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences with more than 300,000 print items and numerous electronic collections pertaining to engineering and physical sciences. In addition, the Petroleum Abstracts Document Delivery Service, housed in the library, maintains an extensive collection of articles, papers, patents, and reports.

Information Technology

All students, faculty, and staff members automatically receive an access account at The University of Tulsa. This account is used for e-mail and access to University enterprise computing servers for other resources across campus. All students living in residence halls or in University apartments and all faculty and staff are able to connect to a University fiber optic Intranet, to the commodity Internet and to Internet2. The University maintains centralized Unix and MS Windows-based academic and administrative servers that host the employee e-mail services, a variety of development environments, database management systems, a variety of web services, tools to support instructional technology and distance education, and other academic software. E-mail accounts hosted off campus are accessible by students using University credentials and a University email address. Administrative information services at the University,

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including web-based information access, are maintained on site and licensed from Datatel, which is exclusively focused on higher education information technology. Many IT services are integrated and accessible on the University’s intranet web site Campus Connection at http://cc.utulsa.edu. The homepage for Information Technology is www.utulsa.edu/IT. The newly remodeled Tyrrell Hall opened in May of 2012. One of the historic buildings on campus, Tyrrell features instructional technology in every classroom. The latest in teaching and learning technology has been designed to enhance the learning experience of students, including SMARTboards, digital capture technology, and video conferencing. The building has a ubiquitous 802.11n wireless network in addition to high speed wired access to University resources and the outside world. The central student computer laboratory and modern technology classrooms, used to access numerous digital instructional and research materials, are a part of the Pauline M. Walter Academic Technology Center in McFarlin Library. Public labs are available 24-7 when University classes are in session. All colleges have numerous computer laboratories and high technology classrooms to support contemporary teaching and learning strategies. Staff offices are located in Zink Hall and McFarlin Library. The Client Services Desk in the Pauline M. Walter Academic Technology Center in McFarlin Library provides assistance by answering numerous routine user questions and routing other calls to appropriate individuals. Personnel with IT Client Services have significant expertise locating hardware and software from University vendors. The University licenses certain Microsoft desktop products through Microsoft’s Campus Agreement program.

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Other Academic Resources

Office of Research and Sponsored Programs

The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP) is responsible for the administration of all research and sponsored program activity. Faculty, students, and staff at The University of Tulsa engage in a wide variety of research activities, participating in both externally-funded and University-funded scholarship. ORSP helps identify sources of support, provides information on program guidelines and procedures, assists in proposal development, administers grants and contracts, and

funds student research grants.

of-Research-and-Sponsored-Programs.aspx for more information. TU receives funding from various sources including private foundations, industry, and federal and state agencies. As a federally funded research institution, TU must comply with federal regulations regarding the conduct of research. For example, any research project involving human subjects must be submitted to ORSP for approval by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). When animals are to be used in research, prior approval must be obtained from the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). A listing of many of these compliance issues may be found at the ORSP website. The purpose of ORSP is to facilitate student interactions with our office and other administrative offices and to encourage students to further their scholarly pursuits at the University.

Institute for Information Security

The Institute for Information Security (iSec) is a multi-disciplinary program of study and research tackling cyber security issues on a global scale. In May 2000, the National Security Agency (NSA) designated The University of Tulsa as a Center of Academic Excellence for Information Assurance Education. In May 2009, the National Security Agency (NSA) designated The University of Tulsa and iSec as one of the new Centers for Academic Excellence for Information Assurance Research. iSec faculty regularly integrate students into sponsored research programs as a catalytic component of professional development. Through the cyber security curriculum developed by iSec faculty, The University of Tulsa offers federal certifications available at the undergraduate and graduate levels in all six standards for information assurance training established by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS). These and other research and educational opportunities available to graduate students through iSec prepare them for a career in cyber security.

Visit the ORSP website at www.utulsa.edu/research/Office-

The College of Law

For the first time in its history, The University of Tulsa College of Law has been named in the top 100 law schools in the nation by U.S. News and World Report 2013 Best Graduate Schools rankings. As one of the smallest law schools in the country, TU Law has advanced 48 places in the last three years in the rankings, which are based on several factors including an overall quality assessment, reputation, selectivity of student applications, job placement success and faculty resources. The College of Law offers four degree programs: the Juris Doctorate Degree; an LL.M. in American Indian & Indigenous Law; an LL.M. in American Law for Foreign

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The University of Tulsa

Graduates (including an Energy Concentration program); and an online Masters of Jurisprudence in Indian Law. In partnership with the Graduate School, the College of Law offers 11 joint J.D./masters degrees, including J.D./M.A. degrees in Anthropology, Clinical Psychology, Computer Science, English, History and Industrial Psychology; J.D./M.B.A; J.D./M.S. degrees in Biological Sciences, Finance and Geosciences; and J.D./M.Taxation. Graduate and undergraduate students not enrolled in joint degree programs may be permitted to take law courses, and law students may take courses through the Graduate School. The College of Law’s J.D. program offers four legal specialty certificates, including Sustainable Energy and Resource Law; Native American Law; Health Law; and Comparative & International Law. Students also have expanding opportunities to develop the skills and professionalism needed for transitioning into the practice of law through the Boesche Legal Clinic’s Immigrant Rights Project, the Legal Externship Program, the Judicial Externship Program, and the many career-building programs offered by the Professional Development Office. The Tulsa Law Review and the Energy Law Journal provide students with opportunities to publish articles demonstrating their legal reasoning and writing skills. With an enrollment of about 320 students, the College of Law offers students opportunities for small class sizes, one-on-one interactions with their professors, and individualized career counseling. Professors and students enjoy newly-renovated classrooms that feature state-of-the-art electronic classroom technology, and outstanding legal research and information services provided by the Mabee Legal Information Center’s facilities, librarians and staff. Academic life is enriched by the College of Law’s many lectures and conferences, programs that are open to the entire Tulsa community. College of Law Programs and Admission Requirements. Contact the Admissions Office at 918-631-2406, or visit the College of Law website at www.utulsa.edu/law. Mabee Legal Information Center (MLIC). The Mabee Legal Information Center (MLIC), a library for the 21st century, has recently been recognized as the 34th best law school library in the country. It offers many information resources and services provided by seven librarians and a strong support staff. The MLIC holds more than 430,000 volumes, featuring a solid general legal collection and specialized collections in energy and environmental law and Native American law. All MLIC users have access to a vast number of law-related electronic resources, including LEXIS and WESTLAW. A recent study showed that the MLIC ranked 13th in the country among American Bar

Association law school libraries in the percentage of its acquisitions budget that goes to

electronic products.

any of the numerous seating options (tables, carrels, or comfortable lounges). Enhanced wireless connectivity extends to outside areas as well. Students especially enjoy logging in while relaxing in serenity of the newly-furnished outdoor Martin H. Frey Plaza. In addition, the MLIC houses two student journal offices, the Board of Advocates, and other student organizations. The Utsey Family Native American Law Center is a beautiful and inviting reading room featuring Native American rare and primary resources and artwork representing all the Oklahoma tribes. Outside the Native American Law Center is the Indigenous People’s Collection that houses over 2,700 titles covering a broad range of topics that relate to native culture in general and native law in particular. Other popular areas include the International and Comparative Law Center, two classrooms, and numerous student collaboration rooms.

Patrons may use the wireless network throughout the MLIC at

Other Academic Resources

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Boesche Legal Clinic. Located in a 3,800 square foot state-of-the-art clinic building, the Boesche Legal Clinic functions much as a real law firm does, representing real clients with real problems through its Immigrant Rights Project. Depending on assignments, students gain experience interviewing and counseling clients, negotiating with other attorneys, planning cases, conducting factual investigations, drafting documents, examining and preparing witnesses, working with federal, state, and local government agencies, and providing written and oral advocacy and community education workshops. The Immigrant Rights Project’s faculty and students represent non-citizens in immigration matters. Clients primarily include persons seeking asylum in the United States as a result of persecution or a fear of persecution in their home countries. The clinic may also represent non-citizen victims of domestic violence, unaccompanied non- citizen minors, or other non-citizens subject to removal and immigration detention. Students in the clinic perform a valuable public service, learn a new and developing area of law, obtain experience working with someone from another culture, conduct intensive factual investigation into human rights conditions, grapple with challenging ethical dilemmas, and experience the satisfaction that comes with knowing that their hard work and effective advocacy have given their client a fair opportunity to win relief and, in many cases, may have helped to save their client's life. Price and Turpen Courtroom. The Law School’s Price and Turpen Courtroom was dedicated in April 2003. This courtroom is designed for the future of legal instruction. It includes a state-of-the art sound system, broadcast and recording capabilities, videoconferencing technology, and wireless network access. The room is no longer called a “moot courtroom” because it is a working courtroom and is the venue for several Oklahoma civil and criminal appeals cases each year. Sustainable Energy and Resources Law (SERL) Program. The SERL Program has three principal objectives: (1) offer comprehensive training in the fields of energy, environmental, and natural resources law; (2) produce nationally and internationally recognized scholarship and research that contributes to the public policy debate; and (3) facilitate communication among the many individuals, companies, organizations, and public bodies interested in energy, environmental and natural resources, with the expectation that such communication will lead to more enlightened national and international laws and policies. Energy, natural resources, and environmental law and policy are areas of independent significance and importance; SERL's primary focus is the nexus between energy and natural resources on one hand and the environment on the other. Accordingly, SERL is especially concerned with promoting laws and policies that facilitate energy reliability, sustainable supplies of natural resources, and a healthy environment. SERL accomplishes its mission through an advanced sustainable energy and resources law curriculum; the scholarship and public presentations of the SERL faculty and members of the Society of SERL Professorial Professors; publication of The Energy Law Journal in conjunction with the Energy Bar Association; publication of the Environment, Energy, and Resources Law: The Year in Review in conjunction with the ABA Section of Environment, Energy and Resources; and student-centered co-curricular activities in conjunction with the student-led Resources, Energy, & Environmental Law Society (REELS). SERL’s curricular offerings include a Sustainable Energy & Resources Law Certificate and an LL.M. for Foreign Graduates: Energy Law Concentration. SERL’s co-curricular activities include opportunities to work and network with members of its partner organizations, including the National Energy Policy Institute (NEPI); The

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The University of Tulsa

Energy Bar Association; the ABA Section of Environment, Energy and Resources; REELS; and the SERL Board of Visitors, which is comprised of energy, environmental and natural resources professionals in the midst of prestigious careers. For more information, visit the SERL website at www.utulsa.edu/serl. Native American Law Center (NALC). The Native American Law Center (NALC)

is the umbrella organization overseeing various aspects of TU’s Indian law programs.

The University of Tulsa College of Law boasts several full-time faculty and additional adjunct faculty specializing in Indian law, as well as several academic programs for interested students. An active Native American Law Students’ Association provides opportunities for student activities and interaction with the Indian community .

Opportunities are available for students to work with NALC professors, lawyers, judges, and tribes on cutting-edge issues of Indian law. TU College of Law is located in Indian Country, within the original borders of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation. It offers a significant number of specialized Indian law courses, many of which are taught each year. It was the first law school to offer a certificate program (a specialization as part of the J.D. degree) in Indian law. In addition, it has an LL.M. (Masters in Law) in American Indian and Indigenous Law and

a new Master of Jurisprudence in Indian Law for non-lawyers offered completely

online. The Mabee Legal Information Center employs a law librarian whose primary job

is to manage the world class collection of Indian and Indigenous materials, as well as

work with students using those materials. The library includes a study room especially dedicated to the Native American Collection. For more information, visit the NALC website at www.utulsa.edu/nalc.

Lifelong Learning

The Division of Lifelong Learning at The University of Tulsa serves as the academic outreach for the University. Its programs represent each of the University’s academic colleges. Lifelong learning professionals at the University recognize that the information individuals need to prosper increases every day and that continuing education at any age is an investment in the future. A wide range of non-credit courses is offered in the arts, humanities, sciences, and professional development. Operating as three separate units within the Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences, the Collins College of Business, and the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences, and as a stand-alone unit of the University, Lifelong Learning serves a world- wide market through the provision of non-credit public and customized in-company seminars, workshops, short courses, conferences, and professional certificate programs. Many courses meet the mandatory continuing education requirements of professional licensing and certification boards. Through the division’s unabridged education program, individuals in the Tulsa community may attend selected courses for personal enrichment at a greatly reduced cost. The Division of Lifelong Learning hosts several professional post-baccalaureate certificate programs, including the only post-baccalaureate American Bar Association- approved paralegal program in northeast Oklahoma. For additional information regarding any of our programs, call 918-631-2070. For business programs, call the Center for Executive and Professional Development (CEPD) at 918-631-2215. For science and engineering programs, call Continuing Science and Engineering (CESE) at 918-631-3088. For the Unabridged Education, Life Enrichment, and Certificate Programs, contact the Office of Lifelong Learning at 918-361-2598.

Other Academic Resources

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University School

The University School at The University of Tulsa was established to offer the city of Tulsa and the state of Oklahoma leadership and service in the field of gifted education. The mission of University School is to serve as a national model of excellence in pre- college education for students with high academic potential. A by-product of this service and leadership has been local, national, and international recognition for The University of Tulsa. Paralleling the goals of The University of Tulsa of providing excellence in education for academically able adults, the University School serves as a model of excellence in education for academically able children. The University of Tulsa provides University School as a service to the community to demonstrate the high value it places on academic excellence and to provide an alternative educational option for gifted children.

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The University of Tulsa

Tuition and Fees

Unless indicated otherwise, figures in this section are for the fall semester of 2012 and are subject to change without notice at the beginning of any semester or summer term.

Tuition

Tuition per semester hour

$1,035.00

Fees

Fees are in addition to the tuition shown above.

Graduate School application fee, Thesis and Dissertation Fees:

$40.00

Binding (3 required copies)

Fall semester, nonrefundable

$39.00

UMI Publication (required for doctoral students)

$65.00

Copyright (optional)

$55.00

Art supply fee, nonrefundable, varies by course Chemistry laboratory fee,

$15.00 - 200.00 $10.00 - 100.00

Community fee

$75.00

ID card replacement fee

$15.00

International Student Services fees:

$150.00

Spring semester,

$150.00

Summer term, nonrefundable

$100.00

Parking permit fees Parking permits are required of all students, faculty, and staff (part-time, full-time,

day, and evening) who park motor vehicles on University property.

Automobiles, per year

Contact ID/Parking Center for current fees

Motorcycles and mopeds, per year

$25.00

Bicycles

Free

Placement fee

$5.00

Professional liability insurance, per year

$17.50

Professional liability insurance is required for students in communication disorders courses.

Student Association fee, 9 or more credit hours

$55.00

Student Association fee, 1-8 credit hours Student Health Insurance

$5.00

Student health insurance is required of all part-time and full-time students. An opt- out provision is available. See page 47 of this Bulletin or visit

https://www.aetnastudenthealth.com/stu_conn/student_connection.aspx?GroupID=846521.

Single student, annual rate

$886.00

Student and spouse, annual

$3,796.00

Student and children, annual rate

$2,826.00

Student, spouse, and children, annual

$5,736.00

Payment of Accounts

It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that all educational expenses are paid during the semester in which they are incurred. If financial aid does not cover all of the

Tuition and Fees

47

student’s expenses, the student may pay the balance in full or participate in The University of Tulsa’s monthly payment plan. Contact the University Business Office, 918-631-2600, or visit www.utulsa.edu/controller/busoffice/ to obtain information regarding the monthly payment plan. A nominal fee will be assessed to establish a monthly payment plan. Payment of current semester charges or payment arrangements must be made by 5:00 p.m. on the first day of classes. Payment arrangements may include the monthly payment plan, pending financial aid, or a combination. Payments not made when due will be subject to a finance charge of 1.5% per month. Currently enrolled students with an unpaid balance may be eligible to enroll in a subsequent semester provided that:

The student balance is not in excess of $5,000.00;

The student balance includes current semester charges only; and

The student has established a University-approved payment plan, at least one payment of that plan has been processed, and the terms of the payment plan allow for payment in full of the current unpaid balance by the start of the semester in which the student wishes to be enrolled.

A failed payment plan will result in cancellation of enrollment. If the account remains

unpaid, the University reserves the right to suspend or withdraw the student from classes; to withhold grades, transcripts, and diplomas; deny future enrollments; and to require the student to move from student housing. The University accepts charges on valid Visa, MasterCard, American Express, or Discover credit cards.

Refunds

If a student withdraws from his/her courses at the University, he/she may receive

reduction of tuition based upon the following schedule. The reduction shall be calculated from the date on which application for withdrawal is processed. Housing and dining cancellations are processed separately based on written notice to the Housing Office. The University shall follow federally mandated refund schedules as they apply. Failure to attend classes does not constitute an official withdrawal or drop.

Refund Schedule First day of classes

100%

Day 2 through end of first week

90%

Second and third

50%

Fourth through seventh

25%

Remainder of semester

0%

Financial aid recipients receiving refunds will have their refunds returned to the proper aid accounts as determined by the Student Financial Services Office pursuant to Federal guidelines. The prescribed order of refund distribution is to FFEL programs, Federal Perkins Loan program, Federal Pell Grant Program, and to other Student Financial Aid Programs.

Insurance and Immunization Requirements

Student Health Insurance. All students enrolled at The University of Tulsa are required to have health insurance coverage which provides for benefits in the State of Oklahoma. A student may obtain required coverage by purchasing health insurance

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The University of Tulsa

coverage offered through the University, or obtain coverage provided through another carrier, such as coverage under a dependent student’s parent’s policy, as long as that coverage provides benefits for claims made in Oklahoma. If a student has a spouse and/or dependents, the student may add coverage for them under the policy offered through the University. This approach to health insurance coverage helps to ensure that all enrolled students have access to health care, especially as increasing numbers of TU students come from outside of Oklahoma. To help ensure coverage, all students will have the cost of the coverage available through the University added to their University bill each semester. This charge is specified on page 46 of this Bulletin. However, the charge will be removed from the student’s account upon verification of other appropriate coverage. Verification must be received annually by September 15th for students enrolling in the fall semester and January 31st for students enrolling for the first time in the spring semester. Student Renter’s Insurance. Renter’s insurance is recommended for all students living in on campus or other away-from-home accommodations. In many cases, parents’ homeowner policies will cover expenses related to dependents’ expenses in external locations. However, it is wise to conduct an insurance review to assure that a student has the appropriate amount of coverage. Immunization Policy. State law requires that all students who attend Oklahoma colleges and universities provide written documentation of immunization against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) and hepatitis B. Students who are first-time enrollees and who reside in on-campus housing are also required to be immunized against meningococcal disease (meningitis). Medical, religious and personal exemptions are allowed by law. For more information on health services and immunization requirements, visit www.utulsa.edu/student-life/Health-and-Wellness.aspx or call the Alexander Health Center at 918-631-2241.

Parking and Bicycle Permits

All University students, faculty, and staff must register motor vehicles and bicycles that are to be parked or utilized on University parking lots, streets or bicycle racks. Parking permits and copies of parking regulations may be obtained from the Parking and Card Services office located in Fisher Hall. Parking fees are specified on page 46 of this Bulletin and at www.utulsa.edu/parking.

TU One Card

The Parking and Card Services office in Fisher Hall issues identification cards to all students and University employees. The cards are required for admission to the campus libraries, dining hall, residence halls, labs, selected classrooms and other facilities. Whenever students are on University property or at University events, they are required to carry their TU One Card and to present it to University officials to verify their identity. ID cards may not be loaned to anyone at any time. Disciplinary action will be taken against a student who fraudulently uses another’s card, and against a cardholder who permits fraudulent use of his or her card. The TU One Card is used for admission to Student Association-sponsored programs and University athletic events. All students at The University of Tulsa are allowed one free student ticket to each athletic event. Students must present their valid University of Tulsa ID and ticket for admittance to athletic events. For more information regarding the athletic event ticket policy, visit www.tulsahurricane.com/tickets/tickets-students.html.

Tuition and Fees

49

Hurricane Gold Dollars

Hurricane Gold Dollars is a safe and convenient option for on- and off-campus dining and shopping. Hurricane Gold Dollars reduces the need to carry or keep cash on hand. It is a non-interest-bearing declining balance convenience account, not a credit card or a checking account, and is tied to a student’s TU One Card. Hurricane Gold Dollars may be used at all campus dining locations, at the bookstore, in vending machines and at many off-campus merchants and restaurants. Purchases are deducted from the student’s account when the ID card is swiped at the register. When the deposited limit is reached, a student may add funds to the card by simply prepaying an amount ($25.00 or more) into the student’s Hurricane Gold Dollars account at the Parking and Card Services office in Fisher Hall or in the Business Office in McClure Hall. Students can also log on to www.MyGoldDollars.com. Banking regulations and University policy prohibit cash withdrawals during the academic year, but remaining balances are fully refundable at the end of the spring semester or upon withdrawal from the University. Requests for withdrawal of funds must be presented in writing. If a student loses a TU One Card, especially when there is money in his or her Hurricane Gold or Dining Dollars account, he or she should notify the Parking and Card Services office immediately. The student will be responsible for all transactions made by the student or by anyone else who uses the card, even if lost. However, to minimize loss, a $20.00 per day spending limit has been established for all vending locations. The Parking and Card Services office will instantly change the account number to protect the account from unauthorized use and will issue a replacement TU One Card. The fee for a replacement card is specified on page 46 of this Bulletin. Loss of an ID after normal business hours can be reported to any Hurricane Gold location with a cash register - e.g., the Hut or Pat Case Dining Center - which can “lock out” use of the missing card. Then, when the Parking and Card Services office reopens, the account number can be changed and the account reactivated. If this is not convenient, the student should leave a message on the voice mail at the Parking and Card Services office. Invalidation of the card will occur on the morning of the next business day. The University of Tulsa is not responsible for cash balances of lost cards.

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The University of Tulsa

Campus Housing and Dining

The University maintains the following residential facilities that are open to both graduate and undergraduate students: Lottie Jane Mabee Hall for approximately 231 women, John Mabee Hall for about 244 men, 5 th Place house for 26 men and women, Fisher West Suites for 199 women and men in double and single-room suites, the International Living Community comprising of LaFortune House for 118 men and women in double and triple room suites and 7 th Street House for 40 men, and approximately 754 campus apartments for upper class undergraduate students and graduate, law, married, and nontraditional students. Each residence hall room has wired and wireless internet access and expanded basic cable connection (these services are also available in the University apartments). The halls feature designated study lounges and recreational/social areas and television. Each residence hall provides vending areas and free laundry. A reception desk is staffed in each hall to provide information and check out recreational equipment to residents.

Live-in professional residence directors and student assistants work with student hall governments and staff to schedule programs and activities each semester and are available for general information, counseling, and referral assistance. The Residence Hall Association (RHA) is hall government’s umbrella legislative body and represents student views to the administration, develops policy recommendations, and plans educational and social programs for all residence hall students and the apartment advisory council provides similar communication for apartment residents. In the Fall 2012, a new living program will be launched in LaFortune House and 7 th Street House. The International Living Community (ILC) offers an excellent opportunity for American students and international students to live together in an environment that fosters interaction and understanding. The ILC is open to all members of the TU community with the goal of a balanced population of domestic and international students. The ILC concept is based on the belief that students from many different backgrounds and cultures working, studying and living together greatly enhance their education experience. Dining facilities for residential students are provided in the Pat Case Dining Center and meals to go in Food Court of Allen Chapman Activity Center. Meal plans are required for all residence hall students and second year students residing in apartments. Dining plans are available to all students, even those not residing in University housing.

A la carte facilities are available in ACAC, McFarlin Library and Collins Fitness Center.

Housing and Dining Application/Policy Information

Students living in the residence halls or apartments are subject to the terms and conditions

of the Guide to Campus Living, The Student Handbook, the University Bulletin(s),

and the Housing and Dining Services application/license. The housing and dining application/license extends for the entire academic year. Students may also license for the summer period. If a student signs an application/license, the student agrees to use said services for the duration of the license period unless he or she either graduates in December

or participates in a study abroad program. If a resident desires to arrive prior to or remain past the selected license period, this must be requested in writing and approved by the Office of Housing and Dining and additional charges will be assessed to the student’s account. The same rules apply to the dining portion of the agreement. Any reason/request for release

Campus Housing and Dining

51

from the Housing and Dining License must be submitted in writing to the Housing and Dining Services office and must include appropriate documentation. The decision as to the release will be at the University’s sole discretion. Review the Housing & Dining License Terms and Conditions for more detailed information. The University may suspend participation in dining programs or remove students from housing for failure to pay charges when due or if student conduct problems arise. A $250.00 one-time deposit must accompany each application as a reservation fee/deposit. In accordance with student recommendations, this total fee ($250.00) is held on account until graduation or final departure from the University. Dining service agreements provide a variety of options and tremendous flexibility in support of student schedules. The dining service agreement provides food from the published beginning date of the dining program (usually in conjunction with the beginning of undergraduate classes) to the last day of undergraduate exams for the semester. The agreement does not include meals during the summer term, holidays, or vacation periods. Applications and additional information on housing and dining services may be obtained from the Office of Housing and Dining Services in Fisher Hall, 918-631-2516. Following is the current cost schedule for the residence halls and dining for the 2012-13 academic year.

2012-13 Campus Housing Costs

(Prices are subject to change without notice. The first column in each case refers to the semester cost, and the second to the cost for the academic year.)

Fisher South, John Mabee and Lottie Jane Mabee Hall rates per person. Each student will be assessed a non-refundable $25 Residence Hall Association fee per semester.

 

Semester

Academic Year

Double Room

$2,762.00

$5,524.00

West Suites rates per person. Each student will be assessed a non-refundable $25 Residence Hall Association fee per semester.

 

Semester

Academic Year

Double Room

$2,925.00

$5,850.00

Standard Single

$3,283.00

$6,566.00

5th Place House rates per person. No meal plan required for 3 rd year and above students. No RHA fee assessed.

 

Semester

Academic Year

Double Room

$2,762.00

$5,524.00

LaFortune House (International Living Community) rates per person. No meal plan required for 3 rd year and above students. No RHA fee assessed.

 

Semester

Academic Year

Double Room

$2,925.00

$5,850.00

Triple Room

$2,263.00

$4,526.00

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The University of Tulsa

7 th Street House (International Living Community) rates per person. No meal plan required for 3 rd year and above students. No RHA fee assessed.

 

Semester

Academic Year

Double Room

$2,762.00

$5,524.00

University Apartments are available for upper class undergraduate students and graduate, law, married, and nontraditional students. Undergraduate apartment offerings include one and two bedroom, market-quality apartments in three different villages (Mayo, Lorton, and Brown Villages), and one, two, and three bedroom units (University Square South and West). Law/Graduate offerings include one and two bedroom units (Norman Village). Arrangements for electric utility service for all apartments must be completed prior to receipt of key and check-in. Rates vary by complex, and are available online at www.utulsa.edu/housing. (Rent payments are due the first of each semester and are payable at the Business Office in McClure Hall.) The approximate academic lease period is August 17, 2012 - May 12, 2013, depending on date of availability. Summer and/or academic year arrangements are available. Charges are for the entire application/license period selected and are assessed by semester. Prices are based on the published academic calendar of classes and are subject to change without notice. Graduate and law calendars that exceed the parameters of the undergraduate calendar result in additional charges based on the actual length of stay. Students who plan to arrive earlier than/stay later than the designated opening/closing dates should submit their request online at the housing website www.utulsa.edu/housing, preferably thirty days in advance. (If accepted later, please send such requests as soon as possible.) Daily pricing in apartments varies depending on apartment type. Call for specific costs for a unit: 918-631-2516.

2012-13 Norman Village and University Square South/West Village Costs. (Includes the law/graduate and “intensive study” area only.) Rental prices range from one-bedrooms at $3,979.00 to three-bedrooms at $7,491.00 per semester, with amounts divided approximately evenly among residents up to one person per bedroom. For non- family members, rent charges increase if the number of occupants exceeds the number of bedrooms. Students are responsible for electric utility costs through AEP/ PSO. Full size washer/dryer units are included in each apartment. Expanded basic cable television and wired and wireless access to the campus computer network included in the semester rental rate. Telephone and premium cable television services are available through Cox Communications at 918-806-6000.

2012-13 Mayo, Lorton, and Brown Village apartment costs. Rental prices range from one-bedrooms at $4,167.00 to two-bedrooms at $5,811.00 a semester, with amounts divided approximately evenly among residents up to one person per bedroom. For non- family members, rent charges increase if the number of occupants exceeds the number of bedrooms. Students are responsible for electric utility costs through AEP/PSO. Full size washer/dryer units are included in each apartment. Expanded basic cable television and wired and wireless access to the campus computer network included in the semester rental rate. Telephone and premium cable television services are available through Cox Communications at 918-806-6000.

2012-13 Lorton Village townhouse costs. Rental prices range from one-bedrooms at $4,274.00 to two-bedrooms at $5,956.00 a semester, with amounts divided

Campus Housing and Dining

53

approximately evenly among residents up to one person per bedroom. For non-family members, rent charges increase if the number of occupants exceeds the number of bedrooms. Students are responsible for electric utility costs through AEP/PSO. Washer/Dryer units, expanded basic cable television and wired and wireless access to the campus computer network included in the semester rental rate. Telephone and premium cable television services are available through Cox Communications at 918-

806-6000.

2012-13 Dining Options*

 

Semester

Academic Year

Unlimited Access Meal Plan

 

As many times as you wish/50 Dining Dollars

$2,552.00

$5,104.00

19

Meals per week/50 Dining Dollars

$2,205.00

$4,410.00

15

Meals per week/100 Dining Dollars

$2,084.00

$4,168.00

10

Meals per week/150 Dining Dollars

$1,890.00

$3,780.00

230

Meals per semester with $300 Dining Dollars

$2,556.00

$5,112.00

190

Meals per semester with $400 Dining Dollars

$2,556.00

$5,112.00

165

Meals per semester with $500 Dining Dollars

$2,556.00

$5,112.00

110

Meals per semester with $250 Dining Dollars

$1,662.00

$3,324.00

80 Meals per semester with $300 Dining Dollars

$1,415.00

$2,830.00

*Meal plans are required for all 1st and 2nd year residents and all students residing in the residence halls. Meals are served in the main dining hall. Dining Dollars may be used in multiple locations on campus including ACAC eateries for flexibility, Collins Fitness Center and snack and beverage vending machines. Dining Dollars are nonrefundable per academic year. Please use all Dining Dollars each academic year; they do not transfer to the following academic year. Hurricane Gold Dollars is a declining balance account tied to a student’s TU One Card, and can be used for purchases both on and off campus. Hurricane Gold Dollars is the safest and most convenient option for on and off campus dining and purchasing. Students can swipe the TU One Card at any participating merchant location. The amount is deducted at the register and a student’s account balance adjusted. Any remaining balance is refundable at year-end or withdrawal from the University. Hurricane Gold is easy to buy. Simply prepay $25 or more on a student account at the Parking and Card Services, located in East Hall, or the Business Office in McClure Hall. Students can also log on to www.MyGoldDollars.com. When students reach their Gold limit, they may always purchase more (for additional information on related policies, see TU One Card and Hurricane Gold account policies, pages 52-53.).

Summer Term Housing and Dining

Housing locations and rates for summer term sessions will be determined and published during the spring semester. Payment in full is due prior to check-in, and charges are calculated until an individual officially checks out and turns in appropriate keys. Specific meal plans are not offered during the summer due to student class and work schedule demands. Students are encouraged to deposit money on their Hurricane Gold accounts to use at their convenience in facilities operating during the summer months. !

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Student Financial Services

General Information

To make high quality private higher education accessible to all qualified students, The University of Tulsa offers financial assistance in the form of scholarships, grants, loans, and part-time employment.

Financial Need Determination

The Office of Student Financial Services uses the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine financial need. Students must submit the FAFSA directly to the processor. All information contained in these credentials is held in strict confidence. Also, financial records are protected in accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended. Financial need represents the difference between the cost of attending the University and the amount that the student is expected to contribute toward the educational costs. The factors considered in determining the types and amounts of aid received by an applicant are: (1) the availability of funds; (2) the student’s financial need; and (3) the student’s classification and record of academic performance. Applicants desiring first consideration should submit their applications as soon after January 1 as possible to assure timely consideration for the next academic year.

Financial Aid Packaging

Packages of aid may consist of a combination of scholarship, loan, and employment. This aid packaging concept enables the University to make more funds available to a larger number of applicants. The FAFSA form is required for consideration for loans, and part-time employment opportunities. Recipients of aid must reapply each year to be considered for continuation in the following year. Timely submission of the FAFSA and all information requested is required to receive the largest award possible. The University of Tulsa reserves the right to reduce or rescind award packages if federal allocations to the University are insufficient to cover expenditures.

Academic Requirements

All students who receive financial assistance must demonstrate the ability to do satisfactory college work. High academic performance is usually required for scholarship consideration. There are minimum academic course-load requirements for the various types of financial assistance available through the Office of Student Financial Services. To be considered for financial aid, a graduate student must be enrolled at least half-time, 5 credit hours, for each fall and spring semester during the degree program. The only exception is the last fall and spring semester prior to completion of a master’s degree or during the last four semesters (last two fall and last two spring semesters) before completion of a doctoral degree. Students must be enrolled in at least one credit hour to be eligible for federal financial aid. If students are enrolled in an internship to complete their degree requirements and have no tuition charges, they are only eligible to borrow a private, credit-based loan. Enrollment in audit classes does not count toward eligibility for financial assistance. Summer eligibility is based upon the number of weeks enrolled

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so please contact the Office of Student Financial Services for questions regarding summer enrollment requirements. Students receiving financial aid who reduce their course loads below the required minimums after enrollment must inform the Office of Student Financial Services, which may cancel awards at any time if students fail to maintain satisfactory academic progress or minimum course-load requirements. Transient students and those who only attend summer term are ineligible for financial aid. All aid recipients must be admitted as regular students pursuing a degree program. Eligibility for continued financial assistance depends upon maintaining satisfactory academic progress and good standing. Students who do not meet satisfactory progress and good-standing criteria are not eligible for financial assistance for the next academic period. If extenuating circumstances interfere or prevent students from meeting these requirements, they should consult the Office of Student Financial Services immediately.

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)

Policy revised as of 2011-2012 academic year

Federal regulations require that all recipients of student financial assistance make satisfactory academic progress toward a degree or eligible certificate. Students applying for assistance through the Federal Pell Grant, Federal SEOG, Federal Work Study, TEACH Grant, Oklahoma Tuition Aid Grant (OTAG), Federal Perkins Loan, Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan, Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Direct Parent PLUS Loan and Direct Graduate PLUS loan programs must meet THREE requirements to maintain their financial aid eligibility at The University of Tulsa:

1. QUALITATIVE: First, students are required to maintain a required minimum cumulative grade point average.

2. QUANTITATIVE (PACE): Second, students are required to complete (pass) a minimum 67% of hours they attempt.

3. MAXIMUM TIME FRAME: Third, students must complete their degree within a timely manner.

These three requirements are summarized in the following charts. Failure to meet ALL of these minimum academic standards will result in the loss of federal financial aid eligibility. Students are expected to know, based on this Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy, when they may be placed on Financial Aid Warning, Financial Aid Suspension or Financial Aid Probation. Satisfactory academic progress is reviewed at the end of each semester once grades have been posted to the academic transcript.

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1. Qualitative - Grade Point Average Requirement - Each student must meet a required minimum cumulative grade point average to remain eligible for federal student aid.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy Requirements

Graduate Students

Total Hours Attempted from all Institutions

All Hours

Minimum Cumulative GPA Requirements

3.00 GPA

2. Quantitative (PACE) - Satisfactory Completion of Semester Hours Requirement - Students must also successfully complete and pass 67% of all courses they attempt. Grades of A, B, C, D, F, P, I, MG and W are all considered attempted hours. All transfer and repeat hours are included in this calculation.

Total number of credit hours successfully completed PACE = Total number of credit hours attempted

Percentage of cumulative attempted hours a student must complete to remain eligible for Federal Student Aid

Percentage of cumulative attempted hours a student must complete to remain eligible for Federal Student Aid

Student must successfully complete

Graduate

Students

67% of attempted courses

3. Maximum Time Frame for Degree Completion - Students must complete their degree program within an allotted time frame to remain eligible for financial aid. The chart below indicates the time frame in which a degree must be acquired. Be aware that hour limits are cumulative; therefore, all accepted hours from all institutions attended will be included, even if a student did not receive federal student aid. The Office of Student Financial Services recommends that students contact their graduate program advisor to ensure they are taking the courses necessary to complete their degree. For financial aid purposes grades of A, B, C, D, F, P, I, MG and W are all considered attempted hours. All transfer and repeat hours are included in this calculation. Once students reach their maximum time frame (150% of the published length of the program) for their specified degree, they are no longer eligible for federal student aid. If there are extenuating circumstances that prevented acceptable progress, students may request an extension of eligibility by submitting a

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petition to the Office of Student Financial Services. All petitions for federal financial aid reinstatement should be received no later than the first day of class in the semester the suspension takes effect.

Attempted Hours Allowed for Earning a Degree – 150% of the published length of the degree program

Attempted Hours Allowed for Earning a Degree – 150% of the published length of the degree

54 credit hours – First Master’s

135 credit hours – Ph.D.

Repeated Coursework – Students may receive federal financial aid consideration to repeat a previously passed course once. Student may repeat failed courses until they have attained a passing grade. An “Incomplete” grade (I) that remains on the academic record at the time satisfactory academic progress is reviewed will be treated as not completed but the attempted hours will be counted. Upon completion of the Incomplete (I) course, the grade and course will be given due credit in future consideration.

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Evaluation

Satisfactory Academic Progress is evaluated at the conclusion of each academic semester after grades have been posted. All attempted hours and transfer hours are counted during this evaluation.

Good Standing – students that are enrolled in an eligible program, in compliance with satisfactory academic progress, and receiving federal aid.

A Financial Aid Warning – is given to students for one semester who do not meet both requirements I and II shown above. This is a warning status and financial aid eligibility and payment of funds will be continued throughout the warning period. Note: A warning is not given to students regarding maximum time frame, it is the student's responsibility to know how many hours they have attempted and where they stand. Students that have been placed on Financial Aid Warning may be removed from that status and return to Good Standing by meeting the completion rate and/or cumulative grade point average requirements as set forth in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy by the end of the Financial Aid Warning term.

Financial Aid Suspension – will be required for students who fail to meet both requirements I and II, at the conclusion of their Financial Aid Warning semester. Students cannot receive funds from the federal aid programs listed above while suspended.

Financial Aid Probation – is assigned to students who were on “Financial Aid Suspension”, appealed and have received an appeal approval. The status of Probation is given for the next period of enrollment for one final opportunity to demonstrate satisfactory academic progress. Federal financial aid is reinstated on probationary status for one payment period only, after the appeal is approved. The student will receive an approval letter along with a list of conditions that must be performed for reinstatement of federal financial aid for the upcoming semester. Students are placed on Financial Aid Probation only once during their

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academic career at The University of Tulsa. The student must comply with the completion and grade point average requirements by the end of the semester. After grades for the semester are posted to the student academic transcript, the Office of Student Financial Services will review the academic performance of the student to determine if the satisfactory academic progress requirements are met. If the student meets the SAP requirements at the completion of the semester, federal financial aid is continued for future semesters. If the student cannot mathematically achieve SAP standards in one payment period, an academic plan will be required.

Financial Aid Academic Plan – is the status assigned to students who were on “Financial Aid Suspension,” appealed and have received an appeal approval, however, the student cannot achieve SAP standards within one payment period. Students in this category must follow an individually designed Academic Plan developed to ensure achievement of satisfactory academic progress standards over an assigned period of time. Students remain eligible for federal aid as long as the conditions of the Academic Plan are met.

Rules are applied uniformly to all students whether or not aid has been received previously.

Financial Aid Appeal Process

A student with extenuating circumstances may appeal a financial aid suspension by

submitting a Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal form to the Office of Student Financial Services. The student can either print the form from:

http://www.utulsa.edu/admission-and-financial-aid/undergraduate-financial-aid/Forms.aspx or pick it up in the Student Financial Services Office. Appeals must explain in detail why the student failed to meet the minimum academic standards, what extenuating circumstances caused the failure, and how the situation has since improved. Examples

of extenuating circumstances include, but not limited to, illness, medical issues with

immediate family members, or a death in the family. Personal or financial issues with family, friends, or roommates are not considered extenuating circumstances. The Financial Aid Appeals Committee will evaluate all documentation submitted and the student's appeal will be approved or denied. The results of the appeal will be emailed to the student's TU email account within approximately ten working days. If denied, the student is responsible for paying for their own educational costs until the student improves his/her scholastic record to meet the minimum standards. Students who were denied due to maximum time frame are responsible for paying for their own educational costs for the remainder of their degree program. If approved, the student will either be:

1. Placed on Financial Aid Probation for one semester only, or 2. Placed on an Academic Plan designed for completion rate and/or cumulative grade point average improvements until the standards of the SAP policy are met.

The student's approval letter will explain all requirements that must be met during his/her probationary period to continue to receive financial aid. Removal from Financial Aid Suspension Without Appealing. To re-establish federal financial aid eligibility without completing the appeal process noted above, students must meet all the criteria listed in the Student Financial Services Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy. A student on Financial Aid Suspension can re-establish

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eligibility by meeting the standards of the SAP Policy by achieving a completion rate of 67% and a required minimum cumulative grade point average without federal and/or state financial aid assistance. Changing Majors. Students who change majors should contact the Office of Student Financial Services regarding how this will impact their satisfactory academic progress. Study Abroad or Consortium Classes. Any student who has completed a semester with Study Abroad or have a Consortium Agreement as a Visiting Student with another college or university must wait until grades have been submitted to The University of Tulsa to determine satisfactory academic progress. The student cannot receive federal financial aid for the semester until the grades are received from the institution in which the student was enrolled. Changing from Undergraduate to Master’s or from Master’s to Doctoral Programs. If the student is beginning a new degree level, satisfactory academic progress begins in a clear status for the new program. Students Who Left More Than a Year Ago. The University of Tulsa reviews satisfactory academic progress each payment period. If the student was not making satisfactory academic progress when last enrolled, provided it was more than a year ago, the student can be placed on Financial Aid Warning for the first payment period. Satisfactory Academic Progress and Part-Time Students. If the student receives part-time federal financial aid, the required hours completed for satisfactory academic progress will be reduced proportionately. Transfer Hours. Transfer hours that are accepted by The University of Tulsa and will apply toward the student’s current program and will be included as both attempted and completed hours. Audit Courses. Grades of “AU” are not counted in the total hours attempted for any semester or as successful completion of the course. Students cannot receive federal financial aid for audit courses. Independent courses may count toward successful completion of hours attempted if they are completed by the last day of the semester. For information about eligibility and payment of federal aid for this type of course, please contact the Office of Student Financial Services. Student Responsibility. Students are held responsible for reading and understanding the Satisfactory Academic Progress eligibility requirements and knowing their status at the end of each semester. If students have any questions, they should contact the Office of Student Financial Services at 918-631-2526.

*Please note: Financial aid warning, probation, and suspension are separate from academic probation and suspension.

Verification. Students are selected randomly for verification of the information they supplied on the FAFSA by the federal processor. Applicants selected for verification who retrieve and transfer their income tax return information using the IRS Data Retrieval Process will be considered to have verified the FAFSA IRS information. These applicants will still need to complete a Verification Worksheet and submit it to TU. If the student makes changes to their tax information on the FAFSA after the information has been imported from the IRS, or if the IRS Data Retrieval process was not utilized, the applicant must provide an IRS Tax Return Transcript to TU for the most recent tax year for both the student and spouse. Additional documentation may be required.

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Students eligible for campus-based programs and Federal Direct loans must complete verification prior to the last day of enrollment. In addition, a valid EFC must be received by TU before the last day of enrollment. Federal Direct loan applications must be certified by the Office of Student Financial Services before the last day of enrollment each academic period to receive loan funds. TU does not disburse awards for students who are selected for verification until the process is complete. If students have questions concerning verification and the required documents, they should contact the Office of Student Financial Services Failing to complete verification by the deadlines will result in loss of any eligibility for Federal Aid funds.

Application Procedure

Students must be admitted to the University before final consideration for financial aid is possible. However, applications for admission and financial aid may be submitted and processed simultaneously. Students applying for financial assistance through the Office of Student Financial Services are asked to submit the Free Application For Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Students may complete the FAFSA at: www.fafsa.ed.gov We encourage students to apply for a PIN at www.pin.ed.gov if they have not already done so. This will allow students to electronically sign the online FAFSA, making the application process simpler and faster.

For Best Consideration

The FAFSA should be completed as soon after January 1st as possible. The FAFSA is used as the University’s application for consideration of most sources of financial assistance. It is designed to be a student’s financial aid application for the Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study program, and the Direct Loan programs. Once a student’s FAFSA is processed, they will be sent an acknowledgement report via email from the processor.

Loans

Federal Perkins Loan

Awards. Made on a limited basis to graduate students of up to $8,000 per year. (Priority is given to undergraduate applicants.) Eligibility. Determined on the basis of need by the Office of Student Financial Services. Application procedure. File the FAFSA. Other information. The interest rate is 5 percent simple interest, beginning nine months after the student ceases to be at least a half-time student. There is no interest while the student is enrolled at least half time. Repayment begins nine months after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time and the minimum monthly payment is $40. The loan must be repaid within 10 years from the date payments begin.

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Direct Loan Programs

Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan

Awards. Loan amounts may not exceed reasonable college costs, less other scholarship, loan, and gift assistance. A processing fee may be deducted from the loan proceeds. The maximum amount that can be borrowed from the Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan is $20,500 per academic year. The loans have a fixed interest rate of 6.8% and repayment will begin 6 months after ceasing half time enrollment. Application procedure. File the FAFSA. When the loan is awarded, the student will be directed to a web site to electronically sign a Master Promissory Note (eMPN). The eMPN must be signed and entrance counseling completed before the loan funds will be disbursed to TU. The eMPN is good for ten years.

Direct Graduate PLUS Loan

Awards. Loan amounts may not exceed reasonable college costs, less other scholarship, loan, and gift assistance. A processing fee will be deducted from the loan proceeds. Application procedure. File the FAFSA. Other information:

These loans are dependent on the absence of adverse credit and have a fixed interest rate of 7.9%.

Repayment will begin 6 months after ceasing half time enrollment.

Borrowers are responsible for the interest during in-school and deferment periods on the unsubsidized Stafford loan. Students can choose to pay the interest quarterly while in school or have it capitalized to their principle balance which is done at repayment.

Students have a maximum of ten years to repay the loan. If students choose to consolidate their loans after graduation, the years of repayment are extended according to their loan debt.

Employment

Federal Work-Study Program (FWS)

Awards. Size is determined by need. Range is normally from $700 to $2,600 per year. Eligibility. Determined on the basis of need by the Office of Student Financial Services. Application procedure. File the FAFSA. Other information: Students are employed in academic or administrative offices on campus. Additional off-campus positions are available in community service agencies. Each year the off-campus agencies contract with the University to hire FWS students. The listing of agencies is available in the Office of Student Financial Services. The Office of Student Financial Services maintains the available positions on the TU website.

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Part-time Work for Students Not Receiving Aid

The Office of Housing and the Office of Dining Services often have part-time work available to students not on the Federal Work-Study Program. Apply at Housing & Dining Services. Other departments such as the libraries, KWGS radio station and Allen Chapman Activity Center may have work available to students.

Information regarding federal financial aid programs is accurate at the time of publication, but subject to congressional change without notice. All federal aid programs require U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status. Scholarship policies are reviewed annually and are subject to change from year to year.

Assistantships, Fellowships, and Scholarships

Assistantships and Fellowships

Graduate financial assistance awards are made upon the recommendation of the applicant’s discipline. Stipends vary according to the amount of work required and the experience of the student. Accompanying tuition scholarships of up to nine graduate credit hours per semester are based on academic achievement. See page 35 of this Bulletin for information on these awards. It is important to notify the Office of Student Financial Services when students receive an assistantship or fellowship. This could affect the amount of Federal aid a student is eligible to receive.

Scholarships

The Office of Student Financial Services, the individual programs offering graduate work, and the Graduate School have information on a limited number of scholarships for which graduate students may be eligible. Upon receipt of any scholarship funding, please contact the Office of Student Financial Services to inquire about the affect of the scholarship on the Federal aid package.

Air Force ROTC

By agreement with the United States Air Force, eligible full-time students at The University of Tulsa may participate in Air Force ROTC (AFROTC), be awarded scholarships, and receive officer’s commissions in the Air Force upon graduation. They are commissioned through the AFROTC program at OSU-Tulsa but remain students at TU and graduate from TU. (Note: AFROTC scholarships are not administered by The University of Tulsa.) For further information, please call the U. S. Air Force ROTC office at OSU-Tulsa.

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Academic and Student Support Services

Academic Support Services

All students are encouraged to make full use of the academic resources of the University and to seek advice from members of the faculty on specific academic issues in areas of particular interest to them. Center for Student Academic Support. The Center serves as an initial reference point for students who need academic assistance, tutoring, and other kinds of help. Faculty members are encouraged to send students with such problems directly to the Center, where their situations are evaluated and appropriate assistance is given. Center personnel are trained to detect and deal with problems that place students at risk. They also coordinate campus tutoring efforts and act as a liaison with other student services, both academic and personal, on students’ behalf. Services for Persons with Disabilities. Information concerning special services and facilities for students with disabilities in need of accommodation may be obtained from the Center for Student Academic Support (CSAS). A copy of the 504/ADA Policy for Students with Disabilities may be obtained from the CSAS website at http://www.utulsa.edu/student-life/Center-for-Student-Academic-Support/Forms-and-Policies.aspx or by calling 918-631-2315. Writing Center. Located on the second floor of McFarlin Library and sponsored and staffed by the Department of English, the Helen N. Wallace Writing Center provides free assistance to students in the form of individual and group tutorials on writing assignments. The Writing Center is also available for drop-in tutoring assistance on a first-come, first-served basis. Although tutors will not “fix” or edit essays, they can offer valuable assistance at any point of the writing process from inventing a topic to proofreading final drafts. Students wishing these services should call 918-631-3131 for information and an appointment well before their papers are due. Students are encouraged to use these services for any class in which they have a writing assignment.

Student Support Services

Career Services. Located in the Holmes Student Center, this office provides services for all students and alumni of the University. A major goal is to help all students gain the information and skills needed to select a career and conduct a job search that will lead to desirable employment. The office also assists students with finding public service internships and part-time employment. Each student and alumnus is provided with individual support in developing a career plan and specific strategies that will lead to his or her employment goal. Providing 24/7 access to information through its active website www.hireTUgrads.com and GoldenOpporTUnities online tool, Career Services maintains information on internships and other pre-professional work experiences; hosts career fairs that provide information on potential employers; maintains job vacancy information from a variety of sources; and arranges campus interviews with more than 100 prospective employers. Students are encouraged to meet with staff members and begin the career planning process as soon as they arrive on campus. Health Services. The Alexander Health Center provides care and treatment of students, faculty and staff with minor illnesses and injuries. Other services include

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diagnostic testing and lab studies, medications, immunizations, flu shots, allergy shots, women’s clinic, pregnancy testing, STI testing and health education. The Health Center is staffed by registered nurses and a physician Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Appointments are encouraged. Summer hours vary. Office visits are free. There is a minimal charge for lab work and for medications which can be charged to the student’s TU account. The student is responsible for any fees charged for off-campus medical services, such as ambulance and emergency room visits, lab, x-ray and CT/MRI fees, office appointments with specialists, and pharmacy prescription medications. There is a $250.00 deductible for care received off-campus for students covered under the University student health insurance plan. All students are responsible for filing their own insurance claim forms. For more information on the student health insurance requirement, see page 47 in the Tuition and Fees section of this Bulletin. All contacts at the Health Center are strictly confidential as protected by law and professional ethics. No information will be released without a separate written consent form signed by the patient. Speech, Language, and Hearing Testing and Therapy. The University’s program in speech language pathology provides diagnostic testing in speech, language, and hearing along with therapy services for individuals of all ages. There is a fee for these services. A free screening clinic is available at the Mary K. Chapman Speech and Hearing Clinic on Fridays, by appointment, to determine if a significant communication problem exists. Although these screenings do not include detailed diagnostic or therapy services, they do include appropriate counseling, recommendations, and referrals. Counseling and Psychological Services. Helping students cope optimally with tensions that arise amid the changes and transitions of college life is the special concern of the Counseling and Psychological Services Center, located in the Alexander Health Center. The center also helps faculty and staff function more effectively in their roles. Services for students, faculty, and staff include psychological counseling, assessment, psychoeducational programs, and consultation. Confidentiality is protected by psychologist-client privilege. Appointments may be made in person or by telephone, 918-631-2200, Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. (8:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. on Tuesdays). Provisions are also made for anyone requesting counseling immediately. Office of Student Affairs. Throughout the year, the Office of Student Affairs provides programs that enhance academic endeavors, counsels individual students regarding their problems, offers guidance and direction to student organizations, and provides a variety of extracurricular and co-curricular activities that broaden students’ educational experiences. This office also handles student disciplinary matters, investigates complaints of sexual harassment or sexual assault, administers the alcohol policy, houses the ombudspersons, coordinates commencement activities, and educates the campus community on student policies and procedures. The Office of Student Affairs is located in the Holmes Student Center. Multicultural Student Programs. This office provides individual counseling and support for African, Asian, Hispanic, Native American, bisexual, gay, lesbian, and transgendered students; advises student organizations related to these cultural groups; encourages involvement of students in these groups in all aspects of University life; and provides cross-cultural activities to promote understanding among students of all groups. Multicultural Student Programs include academic study groups, peer mentoring,

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and a wide variety of celebrations, seminars, and activities that focus on different cultures. International Student Services. The needs of students who are citizens of other countries are the concern of International Student Services located in Westby Hall. The office coordinates undergraduate admission, issues government and immigration documents, counsels students on academic and personal matters, and offers various programming activities throughout the year. The office also assists international members of the faculty. All University of Tulsa students and faculty who are not U.S. citizens are required to register with this office. English Institute for International Students (EIIS). The English Institute offers an intensive course in writing, speaking, and understanding the English language for international students. The primary objective of the Institute is to provide international students with a sufficient command of English to function on a level comparable to that of their American classmates. For information about applying to the English Institute, see page 13 of this Bulletin.

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Special Opportunities, Facilities, and Services

The Fine and Performing Arts

Students who wish to act, to make music, to create and exhibit art work, or to write and publish fiction, poetry, and performance scripts have many opportunities to do so, regardless of whether or not they major in one of the arts. Through campus activities and programs described below, students are given the opportunity to experience the arts as creators, performers, and observers. Internships and apprentice programs are available with arts organizations in the Tulsa community and students have the opportunity to engage in interdepartmental and interdisciplinary studies. Students are encouraged to discuss these options with their graduate program advisor and to take part in the rich variety of arts activities on campus. Visual Arts. The multi-purpose Alexandre Hogue Gallery, housed in Phillips Hall and run by the School of Art, serves as the chief focal point for the University’s engagement with the visual arts. Used year-round for the exhibition of arts, crafts, performance art, and special events, the gallery also offers exhibitions of historical, global, and multicultural significance. It is also the site of the annual Gussman Student Art Exhibition and numerous shows by prominent artists, and can be comfortably used for poetry readings and chamber music performances. The gallery program is combined with the School of Art’s Visiting Artists Program, which brings to campus national and international established and emerging artists to talk about their work, give workshops, and work with students in the studios. Visiting critics and art historians add a scholarly dimension to this program. The Alexandre Hogue Gallery is open Monday through Friday without charge. The University of Tulsa Theatre. Each season, The University of Tulsa Theatre presents several plays from the classical, modern, and contemporary repertoire, including productions of the musical theatre program described below. TU Theatre is consistently chosen to represent the State of Oklahoma in regional American College Theatre Festival competitions. Recent productions have included Into the Woods, Angels in America, Hayfever, Hamlet, Reefer Madness, Rent!, West Side R & J, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Visiting artists have included such notables as Edward Albee, Hal Prince, Jose Quintero, Anthony Zerbe, and Carole Shelley, as well as numerous guest designers and acting teachers. Auditions, open to all University students, are announced in the student newspaper and on the bulletin boards in the Allen Chapman Activity Center. There are also opportunities to work in costumes, scenery, lighting, and special effects. Call 918-631- 2566 or visit the theatre office in Kendall Hall for more information. Musical Theatre. A collaborative undertaking of the School of Music and the Department of Theatre, the Musical Theatre program offers an active production season that includes staging of musicals and dance theatre such as Momentum: A Body in Motion, So You Think You Can Dance?, The Drowsy Chaperone and Songs for a New World. Productions are given both on and off campus. Roles are filled by audition, and qualified students are invited to participate as performers or stage technicians. For more information, call or visit the theatre office in Kendall Hall.

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Film Studies. The Department of Film Studies, located in the Lorton Performance Center, screens three student film festivals every year. Casting calls for student narrative films offer opportunities for interested student actors. Frequent campus visits by distinguished film directors, producers, writers, and composers, often accompanied by special film screenings, are open to all University students. Students may inquire about events, opportunities and courses at the Department of Film Studies office on the second floor of the Lorton Performance Center. Literary Arts. The University offers creative writing instruction through the Departments of Communication, English, Film Studies, Languages and Theatre, and occasional opportunities for all students to publish their work in a student-edited journal called Stylus, The Student Journal of Art and Wrting. The University also publishes the Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry, described on page 68, which publishes writers from all over the world but is also open to competitive submissions from graduate and undergraduate students. Writer-in-residence and Applied Professor Michael Wright and Russian poet Yevgeny Yevtushenko teach and encourage new students of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. They also offer expertise in the legal complexities of publishing, film rights, and media coverage. Wright has published ten plays, most recently Sky Tumbling, and two books, Playwriting in Process, 2nd ed., and Playwriting Master Class, 2nd ed., that are standard texts nationally and internationally. The J. Donald Feagin Distinguished Visiting Artist program and the Darcy O’Brien Distinguished Chair annually bring to the campus guest artists in the humanities such as Seamus Heaney, David Lehman, Colleen McElroy, Jose Rivera, Stephen Sondheim, and Tina Howe. TU Concert Chorale. The TU Concert Chorale is the largest choral ensemble in the School of Music performing standard major works as well as smaller choral pieces. Literature is chosen to increase the student’s knowledge of repertoire and to supply a well-rounded body of choral music over a four-year period. Placement auditions are required. TU Cappella Chamber Singers. This is an auditioned smaller ensemble that performs chamber literature from the Renaissance through Twentieth Century and beyond. The most select vocal ensemble, the Chamber Singers also perform at University functions and tour throughout the region. Chamber Ensembles. A variety of smaller student ensembles, made up of strings, woodwinds, brass or percussion, is formed to provide experience in this media. Opera Workshop. Opera Workshop is open through audition to all qualified students interest in exploring the opera experience. Programs of opera scenes are given, drawing from the standard and contemporary literature of opera and operetta. Character and music development are stressed as well as backstage organization and stage deportment. Orchestra. Membership in the TU Orchestra is open to all qualified students through auditions held during the first week of each semester. The TU Orchestra performs on campus and in other locations such as the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. Each concert features masterworks from the orchestral repertoire and outstanding faculty or student soloists. The orchestra also performs in selected productions of the musical theatre and opera programs. Wind Ensemble. Composed of nearly fifty wind and percussion players, this prestigious concert ensemble is assembled in the early fall and draws participants from throughout the University. The TU Wind Ensemble presents several concerts each year both on and off campus. An audition is required.

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Symphonic Band. The TU Wind Ensemble forms the nucleus of this larger ensemble. The Symphonic Winds performs in campus concerts, at commencement and other University events. Sound of the Golden Hurricane. Distinguished by its exciting corps-style half-time entertainment, the Sound of the Golden Hurricane features contemporary music and drill at every home game and selected away games. During basketball season, the Sound of the Golden Hurricane serves as a pep band in the student spirit section of the Reynolds Center and accompanies the team during post-season tournaments. Auditions are held on designated audition dates in February and March or by special appointment. Jazz Ensembles. The TU Jazz Ensembles are recognized as among the nation’s best. These include Jazz Guitar Ensemble, Jazz Combos, Vocal Jazz, and the Big Band. Auditions for the jazz ensembles take place during the first week of the fall semester. Jazz groups perform regionally as well as on campus. Each year, the jazz program brings prominent professional artists to TU to perform and tour with the student ensembles.

Religious Life

Because The University of Tulsa was founded as an institution of higher education of the Presbyterian Church (USA), the University encourages a full, rich, and diverse expression of religious life. The Office of the Sharp Chaplain provides for and supports the expression of the life of faith on campus: planning, implementing, and sponsoring religiously oriented programs; providing counseling and pastoral care; serving as a liaison with other religious groups; and assisting the campus community in nurturing a caring and respectful environment for its pervasive expressions of faith. Sharp Memorial Chapel, home to the ministries of the Sharp Chaplain, shares the plaza with McFarlin Library, Kendall Hall, and Tyrrell Hall. Its location at the center and heart of the campus is a fitting metaphor for the University’s historic and continuing covenantal ties with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). With renovations completed in April 2004, the chapel sanctuary has been refurbished and a new wing now stands in place of the original west wing of the chapel complex. On the first floor of the new wing is the Robert C. Sharp Westminster Student Center for Presbyterian campus ministry; the Josephine P. Sharp Reception Suite for formal receptions and other special events; the Buford Atrium for group meetings, presentations, lunch and dinner gatherings; and a full kitchen. On the new wing’s second floor is the Martha S. Buford Canterbury Suite — a seminar room for group meetings, seminars and workshops — and the Offices of the Sharp Chaplain. The Chapel complex also offers, beyond its other striking architectural features, a new bell tower and carillons. A number of campus ministries provide programs of outreach and nurture for their respective constituencies at the University. Each of these ministries, which are listed on pages 74- 75, adds its distinctive identity and voice to the University’s rich and vibrant religious life.

Publications, Radio, and Television

Collegian. The Collegian, the student newspaper, is published on Tuesday during the fall and spring semesters. The publication, which reports on campus issues, has received numerous national and state awards for overall newspaper excellence and individual writing. Salaried positions on the paper for editor, business manager, writers, and layout and paste-up staff are available. Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry. In the tradition of the influential “little” magazines that first published Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, and James

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Joyce, Nimrod publishes excellent writing, including competitive work by graduate and undergraduate students. Published twice yearly, the journal sponsors the national Nimrod/Hardman Awards competition in fiction and poetry. Thematic issues, one each year, have featured Arabic, Chinese, East Indian, Native American, and Russian writers, the works of writers over age 65, the Arctic Circle, and The City. U.S. Poet Laureate Philip Levine will serve as a master teacher and do a reading at the Nimrod Conference for Readers and Writers in the fall of 2012. James Joyce Quarterly. For nearly forty-five years the James Joyce Quarterly has been the flagship journal of international Joyce studies. In each issue, the JJQ brings together a wide array of critical and theoretical work focusing on the life, writing, and reception of James Joyce. Submissions of all types are encouraged, including archival, historical, biographical, and critical research. Each issue of the JJQ provides a selection of peer-reviewed essays representing the very best in contemporary Joyce scholarship. In addition, the JJQ publishes notes, reviews, letters, a comprehensive checklist of recent Joyce-related publications, and the editor's "Raising the Wind." To supplement the print journal, a wide array of electronic resources for scholars, including an archive of past issues, a calendar of Joyce events, and an on-line checklist are available at www.utulsa.edu/jjq/. The goal of the JJQ is simple: to provide an open, lively, and multidisciplinary forum for the international community of Joyce scholars, students, and enthusiasts. Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature. Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature, the first journal devoted solely to women's literature, has for twenty-eight years published groundbreaking articles, notes, research, and reviews of literary, historicist, and theoretical work by established and emerging scholars in the field of women's literature and feminist theory. From its founding in 1982 by Germaine Greer, Tulsa Studies has been devoted to the study of both literary and nonliterary texts — any and all works in every language and every historical period produced by women's pens. Public Radio Tulsa. Public Radio 89.5, KWGS-FM, and Classical 88.7, KWTU-FM, are northeastern Oklahoma’s National Public Radio affiliates. Administered by six professional staff members, these stations offer students opportunities to experience broadcasting in actual work settings. The stations are affiliates of National Public Radio, Public Radio International, American Public Media and the British Broadcasting Corporation. KWGS was the first FM station to sign on in Oklahoma and KWTU is the state’s first HD Radio station. Students throughout the University who are interested in the production, engineering, and management aspects of broadcasting are encouraged to audition and apply for employment in Kendall Hall, Room 160. For more information, e-mail public@publicradiotulsa.org or visit www.publicradiotulsa.org. RLTV. Residence Life Television (RLTV) is sponsored by The University of Tulsa’s Office of Housing and Dining Services and is an on-campus broadcast TV channel developed to bring students up-to-date campus information, free hit movies, educational videos, campus programs, and much more. Movies are shown at 12:00 a.m., 3:00 p.m., 6:00 p.m., and 9:00 p.m. each weekday, and every three hours 24 hours a day on the weekends. RLTV also provides live tutoring for Spanish I, Physics I and Calculus I two nights a week. This program allows students to watch tutors work through problems and to call in questions. TUTV. Students from any major can do extracurricular work to produce TUTV, a weekly half-hour information and entertainment program about the University. Students are the on-camera talent and operate all of the equipment. In addition, the studio and facilities are used for classes in video and film production taught each semester.

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Occasionally, other campus-related videos are produced. One television studio, three control rooms, video editing facilities, and a TV classroom are located in Kendall Hall.

Campus Recreation

Collins Fitness Center. The Fulton and Susie Collins Fitness Center, located at 5th and Delaware, is available free of charge to students, and for a fee to faculty and staff. It houses an indoor track, a cardio theater, three basketball courts, a huge fitness area, a lounge, multipurpose rooms and equipment check out. A complete schedule of hours, as well as information regarding intramural sports, fitness, and informal recreation, is available in the Campus Recreation Office. Additional information regarding Campus Recreation is available at www.utulsa.edu/recreation. The Starbucks at Collins Fitness Center offers grab-n-go sandwiches, smoothies, pastries, soups, and the ever popular world famous Starbucks coffee and espressos. The shop is located in the lobby of Collins Fitness Center. Starbucks hours are 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Friday when the Collins Fitness Center is open. Mabee Gymnasium. Located at 8th and Florence just north of H. A. Chapman Stadium, the Mabee Gym has racquetball and squash courts available for student, faculty, and staff use. Mabee Gym also has an indoor turf room. For racquetball and squash court schedules, call 918-631-3232. For turf room availability, contact Associate Director of Athletics Nick Salis.

NCAA Athletics

The University of Tulsa is an NCAA Division I-A member for all sports and a member of Conference USA. TU currently sponsors 18 intercollegiate sports: women’s basketball, cross country, golf, indoor track, rowing, soccer, softball, tennis, outdoor track, and volleyball; and men’s basketball, cross country, football, golf, indoor track, soccer, tennis, and outdoor track. The mission of the Athletic Department is to provide student athletes with the opportunity to compete at the highest level while making progress toward completion of a degree of their choice in an environment consistent with high academic standards, a commitment to equity and diversity, sportsmanship, personal growth and development, and ethical conduct. The nickname of TU athletic teams is the Golden Hurricane. TU’s colors are Old Gold, Royal Blue, and Crimson.

Student Government

Graduate Student Association. All full- and part-time graduate students are members of the Graduate Student Association (GSA). The GSA promotes and provides intellectual, social, and cultural opportunities for the entire graduate campus community. In addition, acting as a catalyst for change within the University, the GSA strives to represent the needs of the entire graduate student body. Services include, but are not limited to, programming, support for other graduate student organizations, and legal services. Residence Hall Association (RHA) and Apartment Advisory Council. See page 50 in the Campus Housing and Dining section of this Bulletin.

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True Blue Neighbors

Designed to provide a vehicle to engage the entire TU community in a structured partnership with the neighborhood community surrounding the campus, True Blue Neighbors formalizes the service and commitment provided by our students, faculty and staff through a collaboration of partners dedicated to improving the quality of life in the greater Tulsa community, with primary focus on the Kendall Whittier Neighborhood. Initiated in 2009, True Blue Neighbors embodies the University’s motto of Wisdom, Faith and Service. The mission of the True Blue Neighbors Volunteer Center is to develop a culture of service within the University, advocating community service and social responsibility for all members of the TU community; to serve as a clearinghouse of resources and referrals on community agencies, service opportunities, and other public service initiatives; to promote awareness of social issues; to connect the resources of the University with community needs and strengths; and to empower students, faculty, and staff to develop a lifelong commitment to service. The True Blue Neighbors Volunteer Center maintains a database of local non-profit organizations, community service agencies, schools, and other entities seeking volunteers. Assistance is provided to ensure that individuals find the right opportunity to provide service in a meaningful way. The Center is located in the Holmes Student Center.

Student Organizations

Campus Organizations and Activities. The following campus organizations and activities, which appeal to a broad spectrum of interests and needs, have been officially recognized by the Student Association Senate. Further information on these organizations and activities is contained in the Student Handbook found online at www.utulsa.edu/student-life/Office-of-Student-Affairs/Student-Handbook.aspx.

Honor Societies

Alpha Epsilon Delta (Pre-med) Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting) Beta Beta Beta (Biology) Beta Gamma Sigma (Business) Delta Theta Phi (Law) Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical Engineering) Honors Program Iota Sigma Pi (Women in Chemistry) Kappa Delta Pi (Education) Kappa Kappa Psi (Music) Lambda Alpha (Anthropology) Lantern (Sophomore) Mortar Board (Senior) Mu Epsilon Delta (Natural Sciences) National Residence Hall Honorary Omega Chi Epsilon (Chemical Engineering) Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics) Omicron Delta Kappa (Leadership) Order of Omega (Fraternities and Sororities)

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The University of Tulsa

Phi Alpha Delta (Law) Phi Alpha Theta (History) Phi Beta Kappa (Liberal Arts) Phi Delta Phi (Law) Phi Eta Sigma (Freshmen) Phi Kappa Phi (All disciplines) Phi Lambda Upsilon (Chemistry) Phi Sigma Iota (International Foreign Languages) Phi Sigma Tau (Philosophy) Pi Gamma Mu (History/Sociology) Pi Kappa Lambda (Music) Pi Sigma Alpha (Political Science) President’s Ambassador Council (PAC) Psi Chi (Psychology) Scroll (Junior) Sigma Delta Pi (Hispanic) Sigma Iota Epsilon (Management) Sigma Pi Sigma (Physics) Sigma Theta Tau (Nursing) Tau Beta Pi (Engineering) Theta Alpha Phi (Theatre)

Special Interest, Service and Pre-professional Organizations

Academic Bowl Team ACT-TU (Actors, Costumers and Technicians) Alpha Phi Omega, Beta Pi Chapter (Service) American Association of Drilling Engineers (AADE) American Association of Petroleum Geologists American Indian Cultural Society (AICS) American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) American Society of Mechanical Engineers Angola (Angolan Student Association ) Art Student Society Asian American Student Association Association of Black Collegians Association of International Students Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) Astronomy Club Badminton Club Ballroom Dance Club Big Brothers Big Sisters Biology Graduate Student Association Bisexual, Lesbian, Gay, Transgender, Queer, Straight Alliance (BLGTQSA) Business Law Society Chinese Association of Petroleum Engineers Chinese Student Association Coalition for Women’s Issues (CWI) Colleges Against Cancer/Relay for Life Commuter Advocacy and Resource Society

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Cultural Exchange Coalition Deaf Education Association of TU (Deaf TU) Earth Matters East Side Activities Council Engineers Without Borders English Graduate Student Association Exercise and Sports Science Club Future Alumni Council Future Athletic Trainers’ Society Geosciences Club Graduate Chemistry Association Graduate Student Association Graduate Students in Psychology Association Habitat for Humanity Indian Student Association Information Technologists United (iTU) Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Kazakh Students Association of Tulsa Knights of Columbus Korean Student Association Lanbrew Latin American and Hispanic Student Association Leaders INCorporated Malaysian Students Association Mathematical Student Association of America Marketing Club Model United Nations Muslim Student Association National Art Education Association National Association of Black Accountants National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) National Society of Black Engineers Oklahoma Intercollegiate Legislature Omani Student Association Operation Smile Orientation Leaders Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Peace and Justice Fellowship PERMIAS - Tulsa Persian Student Association Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia (Music Fraternity) Robotic Club Russian Club Saudi Arabian Student Club Sigma Alpha Iota (Women’s Music Fraternity) Slackline Club Soccer Club for Men Society of Automotive Engineers Society of Exploration Geophysicists

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Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Society of Petroleum Engineers Society of Physics Students Society of Women Engineers Spiked Punch Lines Improv St. Jude / Up Til Dawn St. Theresa Women’s Group Student Abolitionists Student Diversity Council Student Economics Association Student Finance Association Student Health Advocates Association Student Mobilization Student Nursing Association Students Acting on Poverty Sustainable Engineering for Needy and Emerging Areas Tabletop Gaming Tennis Terpsichore Tertulia Treks TU Blue Thumb TU Global Network TU Producers TU Student Speech, Language, and Hearing Association TU Tasters Tulsa Baja Racing Turkish Student Association Ultimate Frisbee University Ambassadors University Events Vegetarian Association Vietnamese Student Association Volleyball Club Young Republicans

Religious Organizations

Baptist Collegiate Ministries Canterbury Episcopal Student Fellowship Chi Alpha (Assembly of God) Christian Legal Society College Hill Presbyterian Church Campus Ministry Crossover Bible Church Campus Ministry CRU (Campus Crusade for Christ) Fellowship of Christian Athletes FIRE (Unitarian/Universalists Campus Ministry) - All Souls Church Gateway Campus Ministry - First Presbyterian Church, Tulsa International Student Ministries Hillel House

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Latter Day Saints Student Association Lutherans and Friends Muslim Student Association/Muslim Prayer House Newman Catholic Campus Ministry Park Plaza Church of Christ Campus Ministry Presbyterian Campus Ministry/Presbyterian Leaders and Scholars - Sharp Chapel Rivendell Fellowship RUF (Reformed University Fellowship) St. Antony Orthodox Church Campus Ministry St. Philip Neri Newman Center - Catholic Campus Ministry Student Mobilization United Campus Ministries University United Methodist Church - Campus Ministry Wesley Foundation Young Life

Governing Bodies

5th Place House Apartment Advisory Council Engineering and Natural Sciences Council Fisher South Government Interfraternity Council International Living Community Government (7th Street House and LaFortune House) John Mabee Hall Government Lottie Jane Mabee Hall Government Panhellenic Council Residence Hall Association Student Association West Suites Government

Intramural Sports

Badminton Singles and Doubles Basketball (One on One, Three on Three, Five on Five, Tip-Off Basketball Classic) Bowling Dodgeball Eight Ball Pool Flag Football Disk Golf Golf (Championship Doubles, Putt Putt) Sand Volleyball Doubles Soccer Softball Table Tennis Singles Tennis Singles and Doubles Ultimate Volleyball

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The University of Tulsa

Student Rights, Freedoms, and Responsibilities

The University of Tulsa maintains a statement of rights, freedoms, and responsibilities, which sets forth general guidelines suggested for members of the University community. The document outlines University policy in the following areas: freedom of academic inquiry, freedom of expression, freedom of association, right to privacy, off-campus freedom, student self-government, right of students to participate in University government and the decision-making process, and standards in disciplinary proceedings. More detailed information concerning any of these areas may be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs, Holmes Student Center, and the current Student Handbook found online at www.utulsa.edu/student-life/Office-of-Student-Affairs/Student-Handbook.aspx.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children's education records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a school beyond the high school level. Students to whom the rights have transferred are "eligible students." Parents or eligible students have the right to inspect and review the student's education records maintained by the school. Schools are not required to provide copies of records unless, for reasons such as great distance, it is impossible for parents or eligible students to review the records. Schools may charge a fee for copies. Parents or eligible students have the right to request that a school correct records which they believe to be inaccurate or misleading. If the school decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student then has the right to a formal hearing. After the hearing, if the school still decides not to amend the record, the parent or eligible student has the right to place a statement with the record setting forth his or her view about the contested information. Generally, schools must have written permission from the parent or eligible student in order to release any information from a student's education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR § 99.31):

School officials with legitimate educational interest;

Other schools to which a student is transferring;

Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes;

Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student;

Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school;

Accrediting organizations;

To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena;

Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and

State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law.

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Schools may disclose, without consent, "directory" information such as a student's name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, honors and awards, and dates of attendance. However, schools must tell parents and eligible students about directory information and allow parents and eligible students a reasonable amount of time to request that the school not disclose directory information about them. Schools must notify parents and eligible students annually of their rights under FERPA. The actual means of notification (special letter, student handbook, or newspaper article) is left to the discretion of each school. For additional information or to get a Release of Information Form, contact the Office of Student Affairs at 918-631-2327. Additional Information is also available at the Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, D.C. 20202-8520.

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA)

This act includes provisions to protect the privacy of individually identifiable health information. For more information about the University’s policy, contact the Office of Human Resources.

General Standard of Conduct

In keeping with the ideals and standards of higher education and the mission of The University of Tulsa, students are expected to treat one another and other members of the University community with mutual respect, dignity, honor, and trust. Specifically, students are expected to respect order, fairness, morality, and the rights of others; obey the laws of the land and the regulations, rules, and policies of the University; and conduct their activities with high regard for the ideals of higher education, which include personal honor, academic honesty, and intellectual freedom. Behavior that runs contrary to these expectations provides sufficient cause for the University to initiate disciplinary proceedings, as specified in the current Student Handbook. The full text of the General Standard of Conduct as well as the rules and regulations governing student life and policies governing such issues as drug and alcohol use, sexual harassment, and sexual violence can be found in the Student Handbook found online at www.utulsa.edu/student-life/Office-of-Student-Affairs/Student-Handbook.aspx. See also the summary statement on academic honesty which appears on page 19 of this Bulletin.

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The Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences

The Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences

The following departments in the Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences offer the Master of Arts degree: anthropology, art, education, English language and literature, history, clinical psychology and industrial/organizational psychology. Speech language pathology offers a Master of Science degree and the School of Art offers a Master of Fine Arts degree. In addition to the MA degree, the School of Urban Education offers the following degrees: Master of Education, Master of Science in Mathematics and Science Education, and Master of Teaching Arts. Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered in anthropology, English language and literature, clinical psychology, and industrial/organizational psychology.

Our Mission

The College nourishes free and rigorous intellectual inquiry among students and faculty in an atmosphere that respects differences in background, belief, and aspiration; it also maintains and strengthens the academic and civic values that underlie and support an open, culturally diverse, and democratic society. We seek to create, refine, conserve, and disseminate knowledge and artistic expression at the highest levels. The success of the College in offering all students of The University of Tulsa a broadly based liberal arts education depends upon the rigor with which the faculty approaches teaching and scholarship and upon the degree to which students commit to intellectual excellence, aesthetic appreciation, and critical thinking. The faculty affirms that service to the institution, the profession, and the community is a significant dimension of the professional life of faculty members.

Anthropology

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Anthropology

Chair Michael E. Whalen

Professors Garrick Bailey Donald O. Henry Lamont Lindstrom Peter G. Stromberg Steadman Upham Michael E. Whalen

Associate Professor H. Thomas Foster, II

Assistant Professor Miriam Belmaker

Affiliated Faculty Duane H. King Robert B. Pickering

Graduate Program Advisor Donald O. Henry

The program in Anthropology prepares students for further graduate or postgraduate education and work in a variety of careers, not limited to anthropology itself. Our courses provide intensive exposure to the diversity of human cultures as well as the intellectual tools required to understand world societies that are increasingly

interconnected. The faculty is strongly committed to anthropological research and publication that advance knowledge of the human species and its history, societies, and cultures. It is also committed to integrating its research and teaching responsibilities. Finally, it values mentoring of both graduate and undergraduate students in areas of research and professional skills. The M.A. program in anthropology provides students with the necessary theoretical and technical background for pursuing professional careers or continuing graduate studies at the doctoral level. Concentrated course work is offered in archaeology, cultural anthropology (including ethnohistory), and Native American studies. The program emphasizes development of analytical and writing skills in all areas of course work. The Ph.D. program, offering concentrated course work in archaeology, emphasizes a sound understanding of archaeological science, interdisciplinary training and the

development of practical skills applicable to both pure and applied research.

program prepares students for professional careers in academia, museums, and public archaeology.

Master’s Degree Program

Admission. Candidates for admission to the master’s degree program in anthropology must either hold a bachelor’s degree in anthropology or archaeology or hold a bachelor’s degree in another subject with significant course work in anthropology. Candidates without this background may apply after first strengthening areas of deficiency. The Graduate Advisor will assist in this process. Applicants for admission should have a minimum grade point average of 3.0. Applicants with GPAs of less than 3.0 may be admitted on probation with the approval of the Graduate Advisor and the Dean of the Graduate School. Applicants must submit scores from the General Tests of the Graduate Record Examination.

The

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General Requirements. For students who write theses, the program entails 30 credit hours, including 6 credit hours of thesis work. The non-thesis option entails 36 credit hours of course work. Candidates who select this option must complete the specified 24 credit hours of course work plus an additional 12 credit hours of classes selected in consultation with the graduate advisor. All graduate students are also expected to develop field research skills through participation in the department’s ongoing research programs. There is no formal language requirement for the M.A. degree. Students, however, will consult with their advisors regarding the development of pertinent linguistic and/or computer skills necessary for thesis research and analysis. Students are reminded that most Ph.D. programs and many research positions require proficiency in one or more foreign languages. Students focus on one of three tracks: archaeology, cultural anthropology, and Native American studies.

Archaeology Track

Thirty credit hours required (including 6 credit hours thesis) for thesis option; no more than 12 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level. (Students pursuing this option are required to present a thesis proposal, approved by a faculty member, to the graduate advisor). Thirty-six credit hours for non-thesis option; no more than 15 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level.

Core Courses

6

hours

ANTH 7103, Archaeological Theory ANTH 7113, Design and Administration of Archaeological Research Methods Courses

9

hours

ANTH 7203, Ceramic Analysis ANTH 7213, Analysis of Lithic Artifacts ANTH 7233, Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology Topical and Regional Courses Selected from available 6000- and 7000-level courses in anthropology. Tutorials/Independent Research (ANTH 7991-3)

9

hours

Specialized training and information not provided in regularly scheduled courses. With consent of advisor, tutorials may be taken in lieu of topical and regional courses.

Thesis (ANTH 7983-6) The thesis is expected to involve field and/or laboratory research.

Cultural Anthropology Track

Thirty credit hours required (including 6 credit hours of thesis) for thesis option; no more than 12 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level. (Students pursuing this option are required to present a thesis proposal, approved by a faculty member, to the graduate advisor). Thirty-six credit hours for non-thesis option; no more than 15 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level.

6 hours

Core

6

hours

ANTH 6263, Contemporary Anthropological Problems ANTH 7123, History of Anthropological Theory Methods Courses ANTH 7233, Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology ANTH 6403, Qualitative Research Methods

6

hours

Anthropology

81

Topical and Regional Courses (At least 6 hours must be taken at the 7000-level)

Selected from available 6000- and 7000-level courses in anthropology. Tutorials/Independent Research (ANTH 7991-3) Specialized training and information not provided in regularly scheduled courses. With consent of advisor, tutorials may be taken in lieu of topical and regional courses.

Thesis (ANTH 7983-6) The thesis is expected to involve field research.

Native American Studies Track

Thirty hours required (including 6 hours thesis) for thesis option; no more than 12 of

these hours may be taken at the 6000 level. (Students pursuing this option are required to present a thesis proposal, approved by a faculty member, to the graduate advisor). Thirty-six hours for non-thesis option; no more than 15 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level.

12 hours

6 hours

Core

6

hours

ANTH 6263, Contemporary Anthropological Problems ANTH 7123, History of Anthropology Theory Methods Courses

6

hours

ANTH 7253, Techniques of Ethnohistoric Data Collection ANTH 6403, Qualitative Research Methods Topical and Regional Courses

12

hours

(At least 6 hours must be taken at the 7000 level) Selected from available 6000- and 7000-level courses in anthropology. Tutorials/Independent Research (ANTH 7991-3) Specialized training and information not provided in regularly scheduled courses.

With consent of advisor, tutorials may be taken in lieu of topical and regional courses.

Thesis (ANTH 7983-6) The thesis is expected to involve field research.

Ph.D. Program

Admission. Candidates for admission to the doctoral program in anthropology, with a concentration in archaeology, must either hold a bachelor’s degree in anthropology or archaeology or hold a bachelor’s degree in another subject with significant course work in anthropology. Candidates without this background may apply after first strengthening areas of deficiency. The Graduate Advisor will assist in this process. Applicants for admission should have a minimum grade point average of 3.5. All applicants must submit scores from the General Tests of the Graduate Record Examination. Students with exceptional promise that do not meet one or more of the admission conditions may be admitted on probation with the approval of the Graduate Advisor and the Dean of the Graduate School. General Requirements. The total hours required for the Ph.D. will include a minimum of 72 hours beyond the bachelor’s degree and a minimum of 42 hours beyond the master’s degree. Students who enter the program with a B.A. and want to obtain the Ph.D., will complete 36 hours of M.A. course work and a written comprehensive exam. There is no formal language requirement for the Ph.D. degree. Students, however, will consult with their advisors regarding the development of pertinent linguistic and/or

6 hours

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The Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences

computer skills necessary for thesis research and analysis. Students are reminded that many research positions require proficiency in one or more foreign languages.

Curriculum Group I: Core Courses – 21 credit hours Ceramic Analysis (ANTH 7203) Analysis of Lithic Artifacts (ANTH 7213) Design and Administration of Archaeological Research (ANTH 7223) Quantitative Analysis (ANTH 7233) Seminar in Archaeological Theory (ANTH 7103) History of Anthropological Theory (ANTH 7123) Geographic Information Systems (GEOL 6083)

Group II: Elective Courses – 18 credit hours minimum at 7000 level Geoarchaeology (ANTH 7183) Environmental Archaeology (ANTH 7283) Digital Applications in Archaeology (ANTH 7193) Techniques of Ethnohistoric Data Collection (ANTH 7253) Cultural Property, Ethics, and Law (ANTH 7053) Independent Research (ANTH 7991-3) Evolution of Complex Societies (ANTH 7173)

Group III: 6000-level Elective Courses – 9 credit hours at 6000 level

Topics in Prehistory

Regional Studies in Prehistory (ANTH 6713) Archaeology of the Americas (ANTH 6033) Old World Prehistory (ANTH 6043) Introduction to Museum Work (ANTH 6413) Methods and Techniques in Museum Anthropology (ANTH 6013)

(ANTH 6503)

Group IV: Interdisciplinary Electives - minimum of 6 credit hours

Dissertation Research – minimum of 18 hours

Transfer Credits. Students with an M.A. degree in a relevant field of study may apply up to 30 credit hours to the Ph.D. program including up to 9 hours of thesis work. Up to 12 credit hours of graduate enrollment not applied to any degree may be transferred. See page 19 of the Graduate Bulletin for more information about transferring graduate credit. Advisory Committee. Students in the Ph.D. program will be advised initially by the Graduate Advisor. The student must select a research area and a research advisor or co- advisors by the end of the second semester after enrollment in the program. The student, after consultation with the advisor or co-advisors, recommends the members of the advisory committee to the Dean of the Graduate School by the end of the third semester of enrollment. The advisory committee must have at least four graduate faculty members, consisting of at least two members from the department of Anthropology and one member from outside the department. One member of the advisory committee may be a qualified expert in the research area from outside the University. At least half the total committee must be full time Anthropology graduate faculty members at The University of Tulsa. The advisory committee approves the dissertation and administers the final dissertation oral examination.

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Qualifying Examination. Prospective Ph.D. students must take the written qualifying exam no later than the end of their second year of enrollment. This exam is based on the core curriculum of archaeology. Students are strongly encouraged to have completed the core curriculum at this time. The examination will be given normally in December and May, and it can be retaken only once. Those entering the program with only a bachelor’s degree and wanting to obtain the Ph.D. must complete 36 credit hours of M.A. coursework and the written qualifying examination. Those passing the examination will continue in the Ph.D. program and are eligible to receive an M.A. degree upon the recommendation of the program to the Dean of the Graduate School. Those failing twice to pass the exam will receive a terminal M.A. degree. Students holding an M.A. from another institution must pass the comprehensive examination described above. At the discretion of the faculty, they may be required to do additional course work at the M.A. level before sitting for the comprehensive examination. Dissertation Proposal. After passing the qualifying examination, Ph.D. students submit and defend a research proposal on their intended dissertation topic before the end of the semester following the qualifying examination. The proposal is presented orally before the advisory committee in a forum open to any students or faculty. Candidacy. A student in the Ph.D. program is recommended for candidacy by the Graduate Program Advisor after the qualifying examination has been passed and the dissertation proposal has been successfully defended. Dissertation. Ph.D. candidates must write a dissertation on the results of their research. The dissertation must demonstrate the candidate's abilities in independent investigation in the area of interest and must contribute to the field of archaeology. The dissertation must follow the Graduate School's recommended procedures for submission to the student's advisory committee, and before it is finally reproduced it must be presented to the full advisory committee for examination and review and presented orally in a forum open to all students and faculty. The dissertation will be microfilmed and published in Dissertation Abstracts. The dissertation will be graded on a pass-or-fail basis. Final Oral Examination. Each candidate must pass a final oral examination before the advisory committee. The examination will consist of a defense of the dissertation, the general field of the dissertation, and other parts of the program which may be chosen by the committee. The advisory committee recommends the candidate to the Dean of the Graduate School for the Ph.D. degree upon successful completion of the final oral examination and acceptance of the dissertation.

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The Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences

Anthropology (ANTH)

The number of credits per course is indicated by the last digit of the course number.

7053

Cultural Property: Ethics, and Law Provides students pursuing careers in museum work and anthropology a broad background in legal and ethical issues involving the study, use, and management of cultural property. Addresses issues concerning both tangible property (art objects, archaeological material, human remains, sacred artifacts, and other items of cultural patrimony) and intellectual property (music, song, design, and other cultural knowledge).

7103

Seminar in Archaeological Theory:

Archaeology as Anthropology Examines the development of archaeological theory in relation to the larger body of general

anthropological theory. Emphasizes current theoretical orientations within the discipline, including: systems theory, classification schema, ethno-archaeology, processual archaeology, and cultural ecology.

7113

Seminar in the Design and Administration of Archaeological Research Introduces the procedures of conducting archaeological research. Discussions focus on

the development of research designs, methods of obtaining research funding, and the administration of a research project.

7123

History of Anthropological Theory Anthropological thought from the 19th century through the present is surveyed, concentrating on the major evolutionary, historical, psychological, functional, and structural orientations of European and American anthropologists. Prerequisite: 15 hours of

anthropology or permission of instructor.

7173

Evolution of Complex Societies Complex societies evolved in only a few areas of the world, and archaeologists long have been interested in their formation processes. The class takes a historical approach, examining literature on the rise, development, and ruin of complex societies from many different theoretical perspectives. Examples

from the Old and New Worlds are used to illustrate one of humanity’s major developments.

7183

Geoarchaeology Focuses on understanding the application of geological principles and techniques to the solution of archaeological problems. Geomorphology, pedology, sedimentology, stratigraphy, and geochronology are surveyed and discussed as approaches to understanding prehistoric human ecology.

7193

Digital Applications in Archaeology Examines the ways in which archaeologists employ digital technology in gathering and developing imagery, integrating , modifying, and analyzing digital images, and presenting digital imagery as part of reports appearing in print and electronic formats.

7203

Ceramic Analysis Presents several approaches to the study of ceramics: identification of clays and tempering materials; determination of vessel size, shape, and form from fragmentary remains; and design element analysis strategies. Provides tools for both the functional and chronological aspects of ceramic analysis.

7213

Analysis of Lithic Artifacts Examines various procedures employed in the analysis of chipped stone artifacts. Specific topics include morphological typologies, lithic technologies, functional attributes, and raw material characteristics.

7233

Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology Instruction in the use of computer and statistical analyses for the solution of anthropological problems. Emphasis on the fundamentals of computer usage and the application of relevant statistics to anthropological data.

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7253

Techniques of Ethnohistoric Data Collection and Analysis An introduction to the approaches employed in studying sociocultural systems through archaeological and documentary evidence

7283

Environmental Archaeology Techniques used in collecting, analyzing, and interpreting paleoenvironmental evidence, focusing on the integration of geomorphological, palynological, and

zooarchaeological studies as a means of reconstructing past environments.

7961

Residency (See page 16.)