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a question of color

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1999 Closed threads from 1999 (read only)

Learn how to remove ads Page 2 of 3 < 1 2 3 > LinkBack 10 September 1999, 05:15 AM Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

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rammjaeger Forum Ace of Aces

Not all German aircraft had such colourful markings as especially the Jastas. I was reading some weeks ago a captured and translated French report which was also dealing with the deep-flying German "Fantomas" in 1917. These aircraft were called "really invisible" - I guess the Franch report was meaning "Lozenge camouflage". Even colourful markings on the sides of the airframe would not breake the lozenge-effect (if not applied on the wings) against a higher-flying aircraft. __________________ Max Immelmann: "Fr mich als Sachsen ist das Kommandeurkreuz ein hherer Orden als der "Pour le Mrite "." My homepage: http://www.flugplatzgeschichte-grossenhain.de.tl/

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10 September 1999, 05:57 AM G. Jacobs Guest Posts: n/a

Add Post To Favorites #12 (permalink) Hello All, This reminds me of an old story from WW2...just before the Normandy Invasion, a young corporal assigned to anti-aircraft duty asked his commanding officer how to determine the difference between the aircraft. The officer replied..."its really very simple.If it is blue-it is English.If it is silver-it is American.If it is invisible-it is the Luftwaffe!" Gary Jacobs

10 September 1999, 08:34 AM Michael Skeet Forum Ace Join Date: Sep 1998 Location: Ontario, Soviet Canuckistan Posts: 705

Add Post To Favorites #13 (permalink) My two-cents' worth: while it's true that RFC/RAF aircraft were His Majesty's property, that can't have been the only reason for strict adherence to the PC10 colour scheme. I suspect there was also some sort of Army regulation concerning personalization of property in a war zone. (Instructors at training squadrons were allowed to personalize their own a/c, with results that most German pilots would probably have found shocking.) My understanding of German colouration is that it was initially purely personal and a form of heraldry or advertisment. Only later were there attempts to systematize it on a jasta level. As for identification: if you waited until you could discern colours in an approaching a/c, you were going to be dead very quickly. __________________ Michael Skeet

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10 September 1999, 10:08 AM cam Forum Ace

Add Post To Favorites #14 (permalink) It was also in the RFC/RNAS/AFC's interest not to have colourful aircraft as the average allied pilot fired at anything with a touch of colour to it. Woollett painted white blobs on his camel for camouflage in balloon attacks, his own squadron started firing at him. He removed it quick smart.

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cam __________________ Australian Flying Corps Website - http://www.australianflyingcorps.org/

10 September 1999, 10:30 AM Bruce Guest Posts: n/a

Add Post To Favorites #15 (permalink) Greetings all, From all I've read, Trenchard was an army man and he didn't really regard 'aces' or individuality as 'desirable'. The army had very strict rules governing the painting of infantry helmets in personalised colours and so this was applied to British aircraft. He didn't like the lionisation of individual pilots, pointing out they didn't do as much damage to the enemy as say a artillery battery could or the crew of a night bomber squadron. The whole British army policy was that every pilot regardless of who and how many enemy pilots he had shot down was still essentially a soldier like the poor buggers on the ground and as such, in doing their duty for King and Country should remain as anonymous as the infantry footslogger. Personally I think like all commanders in all wars Trenchard and Haig didn't like the obvious competition for media attention. Ball and McCudden however were allowed the flamboyant addition of red spinners on the nose of their crafts, McCudden arguing it gave him an extra 3 mph. Cheers Bruce

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10 September 1999, 11:59 AM mike_baram Forum Ace

Add Post To Favorites #16 (permalink) Interestingly, in WWII, the shoe was on the other foot. The German pilots were really surprised when they encountered American planes bearing likenesses of Mickey Mouse and Vargas Girls. __________________ "Both the secular Big Government progressives and the political Islam recoil from the concept of the citizen, of the free individual entrusted to operate within his own societal space, assume his responsibilities, and exploit his potential." - Mark Steyn

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10 September 1999, 02:29 PM BillyH Forum Ace Join Date: Jul 1999 Location: New York Posts: 533

Add Post To Favorites #17 (permalink) Herren und Damen: Would we have admired Richthofen if he was known as the Olive Drab Baron? The Jerries were just following the old Knighthood custom of personal colors and icons (as on their shields). Heraldry.And didn't the old regiments have uniforms with blazing colors so bright that shooters knew who they were bringing down: The Red Coats, The Blue and the Grey...But it was the King's Regulations that kept the planes as drab as the regulations.

10 September 1999, 02:46 PM

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BillyH Forum Ace Join Date: Jul 1999 Location: New York Posts: 533

Friends: If they did not want to single out these aerial primadonnas, why did they give them heavy medals for knocking five planes down? Granted these planes were flying coffins but did they haove to look like coffins? Billy H.

10 September 1999, 02:46 PM BillyH Forum Ace Join Date: Jul 1999 Location: New York Posts: 533

Add Post To Favorites #19 (permalink) Friends: If they did not want to single out these aerial primadonnas, why did they give them heavy medals for knocking five planes down? Granted these planes were flying coffins but did they haove to look like coffins? Billy H.

10 September 1999, 02:57 PM Jim 'ACE' Guest Posts: n/a

Add Post To Favorites #20 (permalink) Bill H., A predominate color for Confederate Uniforms was Butternut Brown owing to the fact that not a lot of the Southerners could afford their own uniforms, plus the fact that a lot of the gray wool came from overseas (London to be exact). So when you look at it, the brown color would've blended with the surroundings pretty well in the Fall season. GEE ... fashionable garb for the battlefield! But I do believe the drab patterns on the American and British planes were for camoflauge effect thus making them harder to detect from above. I do believe that you're correct about the reasoning behind the German's use of color as Richthofen's heraldic shield was red. Still though, it made him easier to see from a greater distance. It's like the scientific fact about cops and colors, they will usually see a brighter color speed past faster than they would a more muted color. So your Fire Engine Red or Canary Yellow sports car will catch the Cop's eye before a green or brown colored car will. That's why they call the brightly colored sports cars "Pig bait". VBR, Jim

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