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A Project report On A STUDY ON WELFARE AND HEALTH MEASURES IN KMN TEXTILES PRIVATE LIMITED, PALLADAM
Project Submitted In Partial Fulfillment of the Award of the Degree Of

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SUBMITTED BY K.SUDHAKAR Reg No: 35080604 MBA (HR & Marketing) UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF MRS. CHITRA MBA, M.Phil,(Ph.D) Asst.Professor S.R.M. UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES SRM UNIVERSITY (University Established Under Section 3 of the UGC Act, 1956) KATTANKULATHUR, CHENNAI 631 561 2008-2010

BONAFIDE CERTIFICATE

Certified that this project report titled A STUDY OF WELFARE AND HEALTH MEASURES is the bonafide work of K.SUDHAKAR, Reg.No. 35080604, who carried out the research under my supervision. Certified further, that to the best of my knowledge the work reported herein does not form part of any other project report or dissertation on the basis of which a degree or award was conferred on an earlier occasion on this or any other candidate.

PROJECT GUIDE

DEAN

(Dr.JAYASREE SURESH)

DECLARATION
I hereby declared that the project work entitled A STUDY ON WELFARE AND HEALTH MEASURES submitted to the SRM University, Chennai in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of Master of Business Administration is a record of original project done by me during the period of time in the SRM University, Chennai under the guidance of, Senior Lecturer in School of Management, SRM University.

Place: Chennai Date: Signature of Candidate

________________________

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I sincerely thank to Dr. JAYSHREE SURESH MBA., Ph.D. (DEAN), School of Management Studies, SRM UNIVERSITY,

Kattankulathur, who provided me this wonderful opportunity. I extend my sincere and heartfelt thanks to my faculty guide Mrs.Chitra MBA,M.Phil,(P.hd) who helped me a lot with their fruitful ideas and suggestion to complete this project in a successful manner. I am very grateful to KMN TEXTILES Company for giving me a chance to work for their company. My sincere regards to my company guide Mr. S.Hemant Kumar, Sr. Manager TQM and Mrs. K. Manonmani, Sr. Executive Training. I am also immensely indebted to Mr. G.Satya Narayan, Manager QAD. I am very grateful to my uncle Mr. M.SOMA SUNDARAM, Dealer,EMKAY TVS, for referring me to KMN TEXTILES. My heartfelt thanks to my aunt Mrs.saraswwathi, who supported me in my hardships. The gratitude towards my parents will be there always as their kind blessings will be showered on me during every effort of mine. Last but not the least I thank each and every person who is responsible directly or indirectly in the completion of my project successfully. .

Date: Place: (K.SUDHAKAR)

ABSTRACT
KMN TEXTILES PRIVATE LIMITED is a one of the leading yarn manufacturing company in the National market. The project titled A STUDY ON WELFARE AND HEALTH MEASURES IN KMN TEXTILES PRIVATE LIMITED,

PALLADAM gives us information regarding health and welfare measures followed by the company. Apart from the Factories Act 1948 the study was performed on health & welfare facilities provided by the company. A through research revealed the level of satisfaction of the employees regarding health and welfare Factors. A well-structured close-ended questionnaire was performed by the researcher. From a total of 200 employees, 100 Samples were taken into

consideration.Probablistic Random Sampling Technique was applied to use for selecting the Sample size of the respondents.

Chi-square test and simple percentage test were used to render the data collected. The results show that most of the employees were satisfied with the provision of health and welfare facilities. Only some of the employees were dissatisfied with a few facilities like Temperature, Storing & drying facilities, Canteen facilities and Health education. Suitable ideas were recommended by the researcher to improve these facilities, which also proved satisfactory for the employees as well as the company.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER NO. I
INTRODUCTION

PARTICULARS

PAGE NO 1 1 3 9 17 18 19 19 20 20 20 21 22 23 28

1.1 INDUSTRY PROFILE 1.2 ABOUT THE COMPANY 1.3 PROJECT PROFILE 1.4 LITERATURE REVIEW

II

2.1NEED FOR THE STUDY 2.2OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY 2.3LIMITATION OF THE STUDY

III

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 3.1 INTRODUCTION 3.2 RESEARCH DESIGN 3.3 DATA COLLECTION METHODS

IV

ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION 4.1 CHI-SQUARE ANALYSIS 4.2 SIMPLE PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS

CHAPTER NO. V
5.1 FINDINGS

PARTICULARS

PAGE NO. 48 53 54 55 80 82

5.2 SUGGESTIONS 5.3CONCLUSION APPENDIX I APPENDIX II BIBILIOGRAPHY

LIST OF TABLES
TABLE NO. TITLE
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WORK LEVEL AND LEVEL OF 4.1.1 SATISFACTION IN RECREATION FACILITIES RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COMING FROM AND LEVEL OF 4.1.2 SATISFACTION IN TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXPERENCE AND LEVEL OF 4.1.3 SATISFACTION IN VOCATIONAL TRAINING RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COMING FROM AND LEVEL OF 4.1.4 SATISFACTION IN PARKING FACILITIES RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WORK LEVEL AND LEVEL OF 4.1.5 SATISFACTION IN SAFETY HEALTH-CLEANLINESS HEALTH-DISPOSAL OF WASTES HEALTH-VENTILATION HEALTH-TEMPERATURE HEALTH - ARTIFICIAL HUMIDIFICATION HEALTH - REMOVAL OF DUST HEALTH - WORK SPACE AREA HEALTH-LIGHTING FACILITIES HEALTH-DRINKING WATER FACILITIES HEALTH-TOILET FACILITIES HEALTH - SPITTOON FACILITIES WELFARE-FIRST AID FACILITIES 27 26 25 24 23

PAGE NO.

4.2.1 4.2.2 4.2.3 4.2.4 4.2.5 4.2.6 4.2.7 4.2.8 4.2.9 4.2.10 4.2.11 4.2.12 4.2.13

28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

WELFARE-WASHING FACILITIES

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TABLE NO.
4.2.14 4.2.15 4.2.16 4.2.17 4.2.18 4.2.19 4.2.20

TITLE
WELFARE- STORING AND DRYING FACILITIES WELFARE- LUNCH ROOM FACILITY WELFARE- REST ROOM FACILITY WELFARE- SITTING ARRANGEMENTS WELFARE- CANTEEN FACILITIES WELFARE- WELFARE OFFICER PERFORMANCE WELFARE-HEALTH EDUCATION

PAGE NO.
41 42 43 44 45 46 47

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LIST OF CHARTS
CHART NO.
4.2.1 4.2.2 4.2.3 4.2.4 4.2.5 4.2.6 4.2.7 4.2.8 4.2.9 4.2.10 4.2.11 4.2.12 4.2.13 4.2.14 4.2.15 4.2.16 4.2.17 4.2.18 4.2.19 4.2.20 HEALTH-CLEANLINESS HEALTH-DISPOSAL OF WASTES HEALTH-VENTILATION HEALTH-TEMPERATURE HEALTH - ARTIFICIAL HUMIDIFICATION HEALTH - REMOVAL OF DUST HEALTH - WORK SPACE AREA HEALTH-LIGHTING FACILITIES HEALTH-DRINKING WATER FACILITIES HEALTH-TOILET FACILITIES HEALTH - SPITTOON FACILITIES WELFARE-FIRST AID FACILITIES WELFARE-WASHING FACILITIES WELFARE- STORING AND DRYING FACILITIES WELFARE- LUNCH ROOM FACILITY WELFARE- REST ROOM FACILITY WELFARE- SITTING ARRANGEMENTS WELFARE- CANTEEN FACILITIES WELFARE-WELFARE OFFICER PERFORMANCE WELFARE-HEALTH EDUCATION

TITLE

PAGE NO.
28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47

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CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION

1.1 INDUSTRY PROFILE The Indian textile Industry is one of the largest and most important sectors in the economy in terms of output, foreign exchange earnings and employment in India. It includes several sub-sectors: spinning, weaving, knitting and garments. It also uses different materials like cotton, jute, wool, silk, man-made and synthetic fibers. The textile industry has three main sectors: the organized mill sector (traditional weaving and spinning), the power loom sector (mechanized looms) and the handloom sector.

The total production of fabrics in all the three sectors combined was around 42 billion square meters, with 59 percent of the total fabric production produced by the power loom sector, 19 percent by the handloom sector, 17 percent by the knit (hosiery) yarn sector, and the rest by the organized mill sector. The large share of power looms (an intermediate category of looms, operated by power) has resulted from a government policy that supports the unorganized sector in the form of reservation of product categories, mandatory export entitlement quotas, and input pricing interventions.

The textile industry in India makes an enormous and multi-directional contribution to the domestic economy of the country. The sector accounts for a significant portion of the total industrial output of the country and plays a vital role in the countrys economy with regard to employment and foreign exchange.

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The industry has witnessed a phenomenal growth during the last four decades. It accounts for 9% of GDP, for nearly 20% of the total national industrial production and 35% of the export earnings, making it Indias largest net foreign exchange industry. It directly employs 35 million workers and has widespread forward and backward linkages with the rest of the economy, thus providing indirect employment to many more millions. In addition, Indias economic situation has improved dramatically since the Indian government introduced new economic reforms in 1991, leading to liberalization in government policies and a significant increase in its foreign exchange reserve position.

Textile Exports The textile products continue to play an important role in the total export basket of the country. The data about export targets for 2004-05. For 2004-05 the target for the export of textiles has been fixed at US$ 15,160 million, against US$13,500 million set during 2003-04.

Textile exports recorded a growth of 15.3% in 2002-2003 and 6.0% in 2003-2004.During the period April-November2004, textile exports were US$ 8348.5million, recording a growth of 4.6% as compared 6% to the corresponding period of previous year. The export of cotton textiles comprising yarn, fabrics and made-ups (Mill made / Power loom/Handloom) constitute more than 2/3rd of exports of all fibers/yarns/made-ups. Cotton textiles exports recorded a growth of 9.1% in2002-03 and 4.2% in 2003-04. During the period April-November 2004, cotton textile exports including handlooms were US$2144.1 million, recording a growth of 5.4%as compared to the corresponding period of previous year.

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1.2 ABOUT THE COMPANY The company was established in 1980 as a private limited company under the companies Act 1956. The commencement of business certificate was obtained in the same year. The company first started with 50,000 equity shares of Rs. 100 each. This capital structure was not changed up to the year 1998. The company is managed by the Board of Directors under the chairmanship of Mr. MANIKANDAN. The company has 200 employees. The labour force of the company works in shift basis. The company is located in palladam.

PROFILE OF THE COMPANY The company commenced its production with 12000 spindles. There were expansion programmers. The Indian Overseas Bank, Palladam, sanctioned an amount Rs.14, 50,000 to the company, as term loan in the year 1981. This loan has been utilized by the company to carry out a part of its development scheme. With this the total spindles have been raised to 15000.

Consortium loan arrangements have been made with Indian Overseas Bank as leader and with other participants. In the year 1986, the company has drawn Rs. 60, 00,000 as term loan under SIPCOT and its participants, with these another 6000 spindles were installed. The scheme of modernization is in progress as scheduled in the case of machinery. These term loans were under repayment up to year 1991-1992.

These loans were all used for the purchase of plant and machineries in view of the modernization scheme and with the help of Indian Overseas Bank. The present spindle capacity of the company is around 21,000 spindles and the present average counts is 40s.

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The present production capacity of the company is 5,000 Kgs (5 metric tones), per day and the maximum production capacity of the units ranges from 2 lakhs to 2.25 lakhs per month (200 to 225 metric tones).

LICENCED CAPACITY OF THE COMPANY The licensed capacity of KMN TEXTILES (P) LTD is 39,904 spindles.

DEPARTMENTS PURCHASE DEPARTMENT Mainly raw materials like cotton, viscose, staple virgin cotton, staple fibre, polyester staple and cotton waste are purchased. In our country the cotton growing states are Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Hariyana, Maharashatra, Rajasthan and Gujarat.

The main raw materials are cotton and viscose. The raw materials are purchased after getting various samples from different cotton merchants, they supply it along with full specification such as varieties, rates, staple length etc., regarding raw materials, the purchase manager will call for allocation from various suppliers. Before purchasing the cotton, the purchase manager will check the stock level requirements. Then he will take the decision how much to order. After receiving the information finally the company selects the suppliers by seeing the rate, delivery period, discounts and quality of material. After selecting the suppliers, the company places orders with them.

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PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT Production Process 1) Removal/contamination The examined cotton is thoroughly sent for removing impurities and contamination. The contaminations are removed by hand picking which is better the machine picking.

2) Mixing Cotton yarns from various processes are mixed for desired quality based on testing of these characteristics.

3) Blow Room Sequence of machinery line is used for gradual opening and cleaning of cotton. The voluminous cotton is converted into lap form.

4) Carding Opening and further individualization of fiber and removal of trash and foreign materials lap is converted in to sliver form. Carded sliver is converted into lap form and combers.

5) Drawing Short fibbers are removed from sliver. By combing, better ruster and strength could be given to the yarn.

6) Simplex Carded sliver are processed in comber frames. It is spun in uniform thickness. 7) Spinning Roving is converted into yarn of the required count by drafting, twisting and winding on the ring frames.

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8) Cone Winding In this stage yarn is wound on paper cones known as cops. Cones are weighed depending upon the requirement. It is very useful in processing the next stages like knitting and wrapping. After finishing the process, the material is packed into bags.

SALES DEPARTMENT The sales manager heads the sales department. He does the processing from international and local market. The Sales manager will study the market trend and finally submit the market report to the managing director according to the market demand and customer taste.

Direct sales By preparing direct invoice the products are sold to the customers directly.

Depot sales In depot sales, agents are appointed at different places like Tirupur, Erode, Salem, chennimalai, karur and madurai.As per the requirements of the agents, the product is sent to the depot sales. Agents sell the products in their own name.

Consignment Sales In consignment sales agents are appointed under separate contract and the same will be executed to each and every agent.

Export Sales In export sales, agents or merchants are appointed. The buyer and seller enter into contract through agents and merchants. The company exports the goods to the buyer mainly to earn foreign exchange, Export sales may be direct Report and merchant report.

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ACCOUNTS DEPARTMENT The main work of this department is to record the financial transactions. The day-to-day transactions are recorded in the proper book and are kept for reference. The transactions are first recorded in the journal as and when they take place. Subsequently these transactions are recorded in the bank book, purchase journal, Sales journal, Debtors ledger, Creditors ledger, etc.

PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT Recruitment For Production department the age limit for recruitment is 18 to 24. In case of others, age limit may vary according to the designation, educational qualification of the workers. In this institution the educational qualification of the workers should be above 8th standard.

Selection Selection tests may provide information about their aptitude, interest, speed, eye test, etc., selection tests are normally followed in the personal interview of the candidates. The personal manager conducts it.

Training The company for improving performance of the individual workers in particular job conducts various training programmes.

Placement After completing all the formalities the candidates are appointed for a probationary period. The probationary period may range from 3 months to 1 year. During this period the candidates are keenly observed. If they complete the training period successfully, they become permanent employees.

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WELFARE MEASURES Welfare facilities to the employees are provided by the organization. It has facilitated the employees with a colony of its own, with laid out roads, parks, avenues and blocks of residential areas. Quarters for the staff, managers and officers are situated near the factory site.

The company is running a reputed school for the children of the employees, up to plus two level. Health care of the employees, high safety practices, recreation and cultural activities, training for workers and union leaders, family planning etc., are some of the welfare measures taken by the company.

PROFITABILITY The primary objective of a business under taking is to earn profit. Profit earning is considered essential for the survival of the business. A business needs profit not only for its existence, but also for expansion and diversification. Profitability ratios measures the results of business operations or overall performance and effectiveness of the firm. They are designed to highlight the end result of the business activities which in the imperfect world of ours, is the sole criterion for the overall efficiency of a business unit.

COMPUTER DEPARTMENT Computer Systems were introduced in KMN Textiles Pvt Ltd., in the year1997-1998. Most of the important activities of the concern are computerized up to date. There are three systems available in the organization. Purchase department will enter and record transactions to the department terminals. Daily, weekly and monthly statements for all units are prepared by the use of computers. Consumption of time is recorded and work done will be very accurate with the help of computers. By using the computers we can take any type of reports at any time in any format.

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1.3 PROJECT PROFILE


Introduction Labour welfare is an important facet of industrial relations, the extra dimension, giving satisfaction to the worker in a way which even a good wage cannot. With the growth of industrialization and mechanization, it has acquired added importance. The worker cannot cope with the pace of modern life with minimum sustenance amenities. He needs an added stimulus to keep body and soul together. Employers have also realized the importance of their role in providing these extra amenities. And yet, they are not always able to fulfill workers demands however reasonable they might be. They are primarily concerned with the viability of the enterprise. Labour welfare, though it has been proved to contribute to the efficiency in production, is expensive. Each employer depending on his priorities gives varying degrees of importance to labour welfare. It is because the government is not sure that all employers are progressive minded and will provide basic welfare measures that it introduces statutory legislation from time to time to bring about some measure of uniformity in the basic amenities available to industrial workers. Today, Labour welfare has been generally accepted by employers. The State only intervenes to widen the area of applicability. It is now accepted that it is a social right. The Committee on Labour Welfare (CLW), formed in 1969 to review the labour welfare scheme, described it as social security measures that contribute to improve the conditions under which workers are employed in India. The author Vaid considers it as an expression of the assumption by industry of its responsibility for its employees. Though industrial workers are generally better paid, their conditions of work, and often poorer living conditions necessitate more than minimum amenities, and hence most statutory legislation applies to them. In a resolution in 1947, the ILO defined labour welfare as such services, facilities and amenities as adequate canteens, rest and recreation facilities arrangements for travel to and from work, and for the accommodation of workers

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employed at a distance from their houses, and such other services, amenities and facilities as contribute to improve the conditions under which workers are employed. Industrial progress largely depends on committee labour force. The importance of labour welfare measures was accepted as early as 1931, when the Royal commission on Labour stated: The benefits, which go under this nomenclature, are of great importance to the worker and which he is unable to secure by himself. The schemes of labour welfare may be regarded as a wise investment which should and usually does bring a profitable return in the form of greater efficiency

Concept of Labour Welfare Welfare connotes a condition of well being, happiness, satisfaction conservation and development of human resources. The concept of welfare is necessarily elastic in character which vary in interpretations from country to country and time to time, depending on different social systems, degree of industrialization and general level of social and economic developments. The need and importance of labour welfare is being increasingly appreciated throughout the civilized world. In its inert sense it is more or less synonymous with labour condition as a whole, including labour legislations and social insurance. Another focus of interpretation centers round the voluntary or statutory nature of welfare for the working class. According to the committee on Labour Welfare, welfare services should mean: Such services, facilities, and amenities as adequate canteens, rest and recreation facilities, sanitary and medical facilities, arrangements for travel to and from place of work, and for the accommodation of workers employed at a distance from their homes; and such other services, amenities and facilities, including social security measures, as contribute to the conditions under which workers are employed.

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WELFARE OF THE WORKERS


Washing facilities In every factory, adequate and suitable facilities for washing shall be provided and maintained. They shall be conveniently accessible and shall be kept clean. There must be separate provisions for male and female workers.

Storing and Drying facilities The State Government may make rules requiring the provision of suitable facilities for storing and drying clothing.

Sitting facilities Sitting facilities must be provided for workers who have to work in a standing position, so that they may take rest when possible. When work can be done in a sitting position efficiently, the Chief Inspector may direct the provision of sitting arrangements.

First Aid facilities Every factory must provide first aid boxes or cupboards. They must contain the prescribed materials and they must be in charge of persons trained in first aid treatment.

Canteens facilities Where more than 250 workers are employed, the State Government may require the opening of canteen or canteens for workers. Rules may be framed regarding the food served and its management etc.

Shelter facilities In every factory where more than 150 workers are employed there must be provided adequate and suitable shelters or rest rooms and a lunch room (with drinking water supply) where workers may eat meals brought by them. Such

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rooms must be sufficiently lighted and ventilated and must be maintained in a cool and clean condition. The standards may be fixed by the State Government.

Welfare officers Welfare officers must be appointed in every factory where 500 or more workers are employed. The State Government may prescribe the duties, qualifications etc. of such officers.

Leave facilities Every worker who has worked for a period of 240 days or more in a factory during a calendar year shall be allowed during the subsequent calendar year, leave with wages for a number of days calculated at the rate of one day for every twenty days of work performed by him during the previous calendar year.

Recreational facilities To provide the worker an opportunity to develop a sense of physical and mental discipline, in the form of music, dance, drama, games and sports, Library, paintings, hobbies and other cultural activities.

Medical facilities The efficient working process needs sound health of the persons engaged therein. Unless the workers are physically and mentally healthy they cannot perform their duties effectively and smoothly. Therefore, medical care and health facilities for industrial workers form and integral part of labour welfare programme in all the countries of the world. Medical facilities for workers and their families in the form of suitably equipped first aid centers, ambulance rooms, dispensaries, for the treatment of diseases like TB, cancer, leprosy, mental disease, etc.

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Housing facilities Housing facilities are made available in the form of self-contained tenements with all basic facilities like electricity, sanitation and running water supply.

Social Insurance measures The Employees State Insurance Act, 1948 protects the working class against the hazards of sickness, maternity disablement and death due to employment injury or occupational disease. This benefit was available to casual workers also who were covered under E.S.I. Act 1948. At present five kinds of benefits were extended to workers viz; maternity benefits, disablements benefits, dependents benefits, sickness benefits, and medical benefits.

Educational facilities Educational facilities for the workers and their children in the form of provision of schools, reading rooms, libraries and financial assistance. Education plays a very important part in motivating and enabling the working population for changes necessary for accelerated progress.

Transport facilities The provision of adequate and cheap transport facilities to workers residing at a long distance is essential, as such a facility not only relieve the workers from strain and anxiety but also provides opportunities for greater relaxation and recreation. Provision of transport facilities also helps them in reducing the rate of absenteeism particularly when it is an employee who resides in their own housing units.

Employees counseling The counseling programmes are organized on a continuous basis in enlightened organizations for the management of workers personal and emotional problems.

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Vocational training Vocational training for the employees are conducted periodically for the benefit of the workers.

Parking facilities Every Organization must provide parking facility and security

arrangements at the place of parking.

Trade union involvement A trade union is an essential basis of labour movement for without it, the labour movement cannot exist, because trade unions are the principal schools in which the workers learn the lesson of self-reliance and solidarity

Grievance handling A formal grievance procedure has the advantage that facts rather than perceptions speak for themselves. This ensures parity of individuals and objectivity as far as treatment from management is concerned. If both parties used the grievance procedure meticulously, then firmness would not be resented because the worker wants, above all fairness in treatment.

Safety measures Safety is a basic and primary requirement in a factory. Unless body, mind and life of workers are secured, smooth and proper working cant be ensured in any factory. Sections 21 to 41 of Factories Act, 1948 deals with the security and safety measures.

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HEALTH OF THE WORKERS


Cleanliness Every factory shall be kept clean by daily sweeping or washing the floors and workrooms and by using disinfectants where every necessary. Walls, doors and windows shall be repainted or revarnished at least once In every 5 years. Disposal of wastes The waste materials produced from the manufacturing process must be effectively disposed of wastes.

Ventilation and temperature There must be provision for adequate ventilation for the circulation of fresh air. The temperature must be kept at a comfortable level. Hot parts of machines must be separated and insulated. The State Government may make rules for the keeping of thermometers in specified places and the adoption of methods which will keep the temperature low.

Removal of Dust If the manufacturing process used gives off injurious or offensive dust and steps must be taken so that they are not inhaled or accumulated. The exhaust fumes of internal combustion engines must be conducted outside the factory.

Artificial humidification The water used for this purpose must be pure. The State Government can frame rules regarding the process of humidification etc. The water used for humidification shall be taken from a public supply or other source of drinking water and must be effectively purified before use. The inspector of factories may, if necessary, specify the measures necessary for purifying the water.

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Work space area There must be no overcrowding in a factory. In factories existing before the commencement of the Act there must be at least 350 c.ft.(or 55cubilc meters) of space per worker. For factories built afterwards, there must be at least 500 c.ft.(or 75 cubic meters) of space. In calculating the space, an account is to be taken of space above 14 ft. (or 5 meters) from the floor.

Lighting Factories must be well lighted. Effective measures must be adopted to prevent glare or formation of shadows which might cause eye strain.

Drinking water Arrangements must be made to provide a sufficient supply of wholesome drinking water. All supply points of such water must be marked drinking water. No such points shall be within 20 ft. (or 7.5 meters) of any latrine, washing place etc. Factories employing more than 250 workers must cool the water during the hot weather.

Toilet facilities Every factory must provide sufficient number of latrines and urinals. There must be separate provisions for male and female workers. Latrines and urinals must be kept in a clean and sanitary condition. In factories employing more than 250 workers, they shall be of prescribed sanitary types.

Spittoons A sufficient number of spittoons must be provided at convenient places, in a clean and hygienic condition. The State Government may take rules regarding their number, location and maintenance.

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1.4 LITERATURE REVIEW


NATIONAL COMMISSION (1969) - The report of this commission was appointed in 1966 had reviewed many aspects of labour welfare in India such as existing conditions of labour. Legislative measures available to protect their interest level of workers earnings, standard of living and various welfare facilities viz. health and medical facilities, canteens, crches, housing, transportation, recreational facilities, provisions of Family planning and adult education etc. were studied in detail.

For this purpose it had studied manufacturing industries, mining, plantations and agriculture sector. It had reviewed the existing welfare facilities in rural areas also. Existing administrative structures at central level and in states were also evaluated by the commission to find out the extent of efficacy and efficiency of these institutions. Finally it had come out with various recommendations in regard to efficient and effective implementation of labour welfare schemes and statutory provisions. In its report it had highlighted the nonexistence of basic welfare provisions in various industrial units studied by it throughout the country.

NATIONAL COMMISSION(1972) - In conjunction with the passage in 1970 of the occupational Safety and Health Act Congress established a National Commission undertake a compensation laws in order to determine if such provide an adequate, prompt, equitable system of compensation.

The framework of objectives utilized to the commission includes: 1. Broad coverage of employees and work related injuries and disease. 2. Substantial protection against interruption of income. 3. provision of accident medical care and rehabilitation services, 4. Encourage of safety.

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CHAPTER II

2.1 NEED FOR THE STUDY


The need for the study arises from the very nature of the industrial system, which is characterized by two basic factors; one, the conditions under which work is carried on are not congenial for health; and second, when a labor joins an industry, he has to work in an entirely strange atmosphere, which create problems of adjustment.

The working environment in a factory adversely affects the workers health because of the excessive heat or cold, noise, odors, fumes, dust and lack of sanitation and pure air etc., lead to occupational hazards. These must be held in check by providing ameliorative services, protective devices and compensatory benefits following accident or injury or disablement.

When a worker, who is in fact a ruralite, comes to work in a factory, he has to work and live in unhealthy, congested factories and slum areas, with no outdoor recreation facilities. To escape from the trying conditions of his tedious and tiresome job, he absents himself, becomes irregular and often undisciplined. Hence the need for providing welfare service arises.

In the conditions of work and life of the employees, whatever leads to increasing adaptation of the worker to this job, and whatever makes him fully contented, lessens his desire or need to leave the factory for a time and lighten for him the burden of this social invasion of the factory.

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2.2 OBJECTIVES
The Objectives of the study are To study the exisisting welfare and health measures provided by the KMN TEXTILES PVT LIMITED. To analyze the workers satisfaction towards health and welfare measures provided by the KMN TEXTILES PVT LIMITED.

2.3 LIMITATIONS
The study is applicable to KMN TEXTILES PVT LIMITED only. Therefore cannot be generalized for the whole Textile industry. The sample size was limited to 100. There may be personal bias of the respondents, which affect the results of the study.

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CHAPTER III
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3.1 INTRODUCTION Business research is of recent origin and is largely supported by business organizations that hope to achieve competitive advantages. Research

methodology lays down the various steps that are generally adopted by a researcher in studying the problem.

Research methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problems. It may be understood as a science of studying how research is done scientifically. It includes the overall research design, the sampling procedure, data collection method and analysis procedure.

3.2 RESEARCH DESIGN A research design is the arrangement of conditions for collection and analysis of data in a manner that aims to combine relevance to the research purpose with economy in procedure. The research design is the conceptual structure within which research is conducted. It constitutes the blueprint for the collection, measurement and analysis of data.

Descriptive research Descriptive research studies are those studies which are concerned with describing the characteristics of a particular individual, or of a group.

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Sampling Design/Techniques Sampling is the process of selecting a sufficient number of elements from the population, so that a study of the sample and an understanding of its properties or characteristics would make it possible for us to generalize such properties or characteristics to the population elements. Sampling design is to clearly define set of objects, technically called the universe to be studied. The sampling design used in this study is probability sampling. Sampling technique used is Stratified Random sampling. Sample size The concern, which is considered for this study, is KMN TEXTILES PRIVATE LIMITED, around 200 workers are working in this concern. This sample taken for the study is 100. 3.3 DATA COLLECTION METHODS While deciding about the method of data collection for the study the researcher should keep in mind the two types of data collection. Primary Data The primary datas are those, which are collected afresh and for the first time and thus happen to be original in character. With help of the structured questionnaire, personally administered interview technique has been used for the collection of Primary data from the respondents. Secondary Data The secondary datas are those which have already been collected by some one else and which already have been passed through the statistical process. The secondary data has been collected from the company records, journals and various websites.

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CHAPTER IV
ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

ANALYSIS Analysis is the process of placing the data in the ordered form, combining them with the existing information and extracting the meaning from them. The raw data becomes information only when they are analyzed and when put in a meaningful form.

INTERPRETATION Interpretation is the process of relating various bits of information to other existing information. Interpretation attempts to answer, What relationship exists between the findings to the research objectives and hypothesis framed for the study in the beginning .

ANALYSIS METHODS SIMPLE PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS The collected data is analyzed by using simple percentage method. Under this method, percentage is used to compare the data collected (or) to interpret them.

CHI-SQUARE ANALYSIS Chi-square analysis is a statistical measure used in the context on sampling analysis for comparing a variance to a theoretical variance.

34

4.1 CHI-SQUARE ANALYSIS


RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WORK LEVEL AND LEVEL OF SATISFACTION IN RECREATION FACILITIES TABLE- 4.1.1 Level of Satisfaction Work level Unskilled workers Skilled workers Total 13 63 9 17 7 20 29 100 50 8 13 71 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Dissatisfied Total

Null Hypothesis (Ho)

- There is no significant relationship between

Work level and level of satisfaction in recreation facilities.

Alternative Hypothesis (H1) -

There is close relationship between work level

and level of satisfaction in recreation facilities.

Chi-square Result:

Calculated chi-square value = 7.2231 Degree of freedom Table value Level of significant =2 = 5.9915 = Sig. At 5% level

CONCLUSION From the above analysis we conclude that there is close relationship between work level and level of satisfaction in recreation facilities.

35

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COMING FROM AND LEVEL OF SATISFACTION IN TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES TABLE- 4.1.2 Level of Satisfaction Coming from 0-5km 5-10km >10km Total Highly Satisfied 22 9 6 37 Satisfied 10 16 14 40 Dissatisfied 11 5 7 23 Total 43 30 27 100

Null Hypothesis (Ho)

There is no significant relationship between

coming from and level of satisfaction in transportation facilities.

Alternative Hypothesis (H1) -

There is close relationship between coming

from and level of satisfaction in transportation facilities.

Chi-square Result:

Calculated chi-square value = 10.3657 Degree of freedom Table value Level of significant =4 = 9.4877 = Sig. At 5% level

CONCLUSION From the above analysis we conclude that there is close relationship between Coming from and level of satisfaction in transportation facilities.

36

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXPERENCE AND LEVEL OF SATISFACTION IN VOCATIONAL TRAINING TABLE- 4.1.3 Level of Satisfaction Highly Experience 0-10yrs 11-15yrs >15yrs Total Satisfied 21 20 13 54 Satisfied 10 6 12 28 Dissatisfied 6 5 7 18 Total 37 31 32 100

Null Hypothesis (Ho)

-There is no significant relationship between

Experiences and level of satisfaction in Vocational training

Alternative Hypothesis (H1)

- There is close relationship between

Experience and level of satisfaction in Vocational training.

Chi-square Result:

Calculated chi-square value = 4.0111 Degree of freedom Table value Level of significant =4 = 9.4877 = Sig. At 5% level

CONCLUSION From the above analysis we conclude that there is no relationship between Experience and level of satisfaction in vocational training.

37

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COMING FROM AND LEVEL OF SATISFACTION IN PARKING FACILITIES TABLE- 4.1.4 Level of Satisfaction Coming from 0-5km 5-10km >10km Total Highly Satisfied 13 17 10 40 Satisfied 16 5 7 28 Dissatisfied 14 8 10 32 Total 43 30 27 100

Null Hypothesis (Ho)

There is no significant relationship between

coming from and level of satisfaction in parking facilities.

Alternative Hypothesis (H1) -

There is close relationship between coming

from and level of satisfaction in parking facilities.

Chi-square Result:

Calculated chi-square value = 6.3732 Degree of freedom Table value Level of significant =4 = 9.4877 = Sig. At 5% level

CONCLUSION From the above analysis we conclude that there is no relationship between coming from level and level of satisfaction in parking facilities.

38

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN WORK LEVEL AND LEVEL OF SATISFACTION IN SAFETY TABLE- 4.1.5 Level of Satisfaction Work level Unskilled Workers Skilled Workers Total 12 60 10 21 7 19 29 100 48 11 12 71 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Dissatisfied Total

Null Hypothesis (Ho)

There is no significant relationship between

work level and level of satisfaction in safety.

Alternative Hypothesis (H1) -

There is close relationship between work

level and level of satisfaction in safety.

Chi-square Result:

Calculated chi-square value = 6.4636 Degree of freedom Table value Level of significant =2 = 5.9915 = Sig. At 5% level

CONCLUSION From the above analysis we conclude that there is close relationship between work level and level of satisfaction in safety.

39

4.2 SIMPLE PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS


HEALTH-CLEANLINESS TABLE- 4.2.1 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Satisfied Cleanliness Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 64 29 2 5 0 100 % 64.00 29.00 2.00 5.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 64 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 29 percent of the employees are satisfied, 2 percent of the employees are Neutral and 5 percent of the employees are dissatisfied in the cleanliness.

CHART- 4.2.1
HEALTH-CLANLINESS
120 100 100 80

No. of 60 Respondents
40 20

64

29 5 Dissatisfied

2 0 Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral

0 Highly Dissatisfied Total

Cleanliness

40

HEALTH-DISPOSAL OF WASTES TABLE- 4.2.2 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Disposal of Wastes Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 51 34 2 11 2 100 % 51.00 34.00 2.00 11.00 2.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 51 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 34 percent of the employees are satisfied, 2 percent of the employees are Neutral, 11 percent of the employees are dissatisfied and 2 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Disposal of wastes.

CHART- 4.2.2
HEALTH - DISPOSAL OF WASTES
100 100 90 80 70 60 51 34

No. of Respondents

50 40 30 20 10 0

11 2 Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied 2 Highly Dissatisfied Total

Disposal of wastes

41

HEALTH-VENTILATION TABLE- 4.2.3 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Satisfied Ventilation Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 56 22 2 18 2 100 % 56.00 22.00 2.00 18.00 2.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 56 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 22 percent of the employees are Satisfied,2 percent of the employees are Neutral,18 percent of the employees are Dissatisfied and 2 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Ventilation.

CHART- 4.2.3
WELFARE - VENTILATION
100

100 90 80 56 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 2 2 22 18

No. of Respondents

Ventilation

42

HEALTH-TEMPERATURE TABLE- 4.2.4 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Satisfied Temperature Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 12 36 8 38 6 100 % 12.00 36.00 8.00 38.00 6.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 12 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 36 percent of the employees are satisfied, 8 percent of the employees are Neutral, 38 percent of the employees are dissatisfied and 6 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Temperature.

CHART- 4.2.4
HEALTH - TEMPERATURE
100 100 90 80 70 60

No. of Respondents

50 40 30 20 10 0 12

36

38

Highly satisfied Satisfied

Neutral

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

Total

Temperature

43

HEALTH - ARTIFICIAL HUMIDIFICATION TABLE- 4.2.5 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Artificial humidification Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 15 38 11 34 2 100 % 15.00 38.00 11.00 34.00 2.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 15 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied,38 percent of the employees are Satisfied,11percent of the employees are Neutral,34 percent of the employees are Dissatisfied and 2 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Artificial humidification.

CHART- 4.2.5
HEALTH - ARTIFICIAL HUMIDIFICATION

Highly Dissatisfied 2%

Highly Satisfied 15%

Dissatisfied 34%

Satisfied 38% Neutral 11%

44

HEALTH - REMOVAL OF DUST TABLE- 4.2.6 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Removal of Dust Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 56 31 3 10 0 100 % 56.00 31.00 3.00 10.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 56 percent of the employees Highly Satisfied, 31 percent of the employees Satisfied, 3 percent of the employees Neutral, 10 percent of the employees Dissatisfied in the Removal of Dust.

CHART- 4.2.6
HEALTH - REMOVAL OF DUST
100 100 90 80 70 60 56

No. of 50 Respondents 40
30 20 10 0

31

10 3 0 Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total

Highly Satisfied Satisfied

Neutral

Removal of Dust

45

HEALTH - WORK SPACE AREA TABLE- 4.2.7 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Work space area Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 73 21 2 4 0 100 % 73.00 21.00 2.00 4.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 73 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 21 percent of the employees are satisfied, 2 percent of the employees are Neutral, 4 percent of the employees are in the work space area.

CHART- 4.2.7
WELFARE - WORK SPACE AREA
120 100 100 80 73

No. of 60 Respondents
40 21 20 2 0 Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 4 0

Work space area

46

HEALTH-LIGHTING FACILITIES TABLE- 4.2.8 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Lighting Facilities Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 63 28 1 6 2 100 % 63.00 28.00 1.00 6.00 2.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 63 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 28 percent of the employees are satisfied, 1 percent of the employees are Neutral, 6 percent of the employees are dissatisfied and 2 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Lighting facilities.

CHART- 4.2.8
HEALTH - LIGHTING FACILITIES

Dissatisfied 6 Neutral 1

Highly 2

Satisfied 28 Highly satisfied 63

47

HEALTH-DRINKING WATER FACILITIES TABLE- 4.2.9 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Drinking Water Facilities Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 25 57 3 13 2 100 % 25.00 57.00 3.00 13.00 2.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 25 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 57 percent of the employees are satisfied, 3 percent of the employees are Neutral, 13 percent of the employees are dissatisfied and 2 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Drinking Water facilities.

CHART- 4.2.9
HEALTH - DRINKING WATER FACILITIES

Dissatisfied 13% Neutral 3%

Highly Dissatisfied 2%

Highly satisfied 25%

Satisfied 57%

48

HEALTH-TOILET FACILITIES TABLE- 4.2.10 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Toilet Facilities Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 19 61 7 13 0 100 % 19.00 61.00 7.00 13.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 19 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 61 percent of the employees are satisfied, 7 percent of the employees are Neutral and 13 percent of the employees are dissatisfied in the Toilet facilities.

CHART4.2.10
HEALTH - TOILET FACILITIES
100

100 90 80 70 61

No. of Respondents

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 19 7 0 13

Toilet facilities

49

HEALTH - SPITTOON FACILITIES TABLE- 4.2.11 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Spittoon Facilities Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 27 31 2 35 5 100 % 27.00 31.00 2.00 35.00 5.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 27 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 31 percent of the employees are satisfied, 2 percent of the employees are Neutral, 35 percent of the employees are dissatisfied and 5 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the spittoon facilities.

CHART- 4.2.11
HEALTH-SPITTOON FACILITIES
120 100 100 80 60 40 20 2 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 5 31 35

No. of Respondents

27

Spittoon facilities

50

WELFARE-FIRST AID FACILITIES TABLE- 4.2.12 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied First Aid Facilities Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 77 14 2 7 0 100 % 77.00 14.00 2.00 7.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 77 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 14 percent of the employees are satisfied, 2 percent of the employees are Neutral and 7 percent of the employees are dissatisfied in the First Aid facilities.

CHART- 4.2.12
WELFARE - FIRST AID FACILITIES
100 77

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Highly satisfied

No. of Respondents

14 2 7 0

Satisfied

Neutral

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

Total

First Aid facilities

51

WELFARE-WASHING FACILITIES TABLE- 4.2.13 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Washing Facilities Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 24 56 6 14 0 100 % 24.00 56.00 6.00 14.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 24 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 56 percent of the employees are satisfied, 6 percent of the employees are Neutral and 14 percent of the employees are dissatisfied in the Washing facilities.

CHART- 4.2.13
WELFARE - WASHING FACILITIES
100 100 90 80

No. of Respondents

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

56

24 14 6 0 Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total

Washing facilities

52

WELFARE-STORING AND DRYING FACILITIES TABLE- 4.2.14 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Storing & Drying Facilities Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 26 22 11 32 9 100 % 26.00 22.00 11.00 32.00 9 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 26 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 22 percent of the employees are satisfied, 11 percent of the employees are Neutral, 32 percent of the employees are dissatisfied and 9 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Storing & Drying facilities.

CHART- 4.2.14
WELFARE - STORING & DRYING FACILITIES

100 80 60

100

No. of Respondents

40 20 0

26

32 22 11 9 Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total S1

Highly satisfied

Satisfied

Neutral

Storing & Drying facilities

53

WELFARE- LUNCH ROOM FACILITY TABLE- 4.2.15 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Lunch room facility Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 26 51 6 11 6 100 % 26.00 51.00 6.00 11.00 6.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 26 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 51 percent of the employees are satisfied, 6 percent of the employees are Neutral, 11 percent of the employees are dissatisfied and 6 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Lunch room facility.

CHART- 4.2.15
WELFARE - LUNCH ROOM FACILITITY
120 100 100 80

No. of 60 Respondents
40 26 20

51

6 0 Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral

11

6 Highly Dissatisfied Total

Dissatisfied

Lunch room facility

54

WELFARE- REST ROOM FACILITIES TABLE- 4.2.16 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Rest room Facilities Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 19 63 7 11 0 100 % 19.00 63.00 7.00 11.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 19 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 63 percent of the employees are satisfied, 7 percent of the employees are Neutral and 11 percent of the employees are dissatisfied in the Rest room facilities.

CHART- 4.2.16
WELFARE RESTROOM FACILITIES

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 19 7 11 0 Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 63

100

No. of Respondents

Restroom facilities

55

WELFARE- SITTING ARRANGEMENTS TABLE- 4.2.17 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Sitting Arrangements Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 44 23 7 26 0 100 % 44.00 23.00 7.00 26.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 44 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 23 percent of the employees are satisfied, 7 percent of the employees are Neutral and 26 percent of the employees are dissatisfied in the Sitting arrangements.

CHART- 4.2.17
WELFARE - SITTING ARRANGEMENTS

100 100 80

No. of Respondents

60 40 20 0

44 23 7 26 0 S1 Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total

Sitting Arrangements

56

WELFARE- CANTEEN FACILITIES TABLE- 4.2.18 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Canteen Facilities Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 12 40 9 36 3 100 % 12.00 40.00 9.00 36.00 3 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 12 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 40 percent of the employees are satisfied, 9 percent of the employees are Neutral, 36 percent of the employees are dissatisfied and 3 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Canteen facilities.

CHART- 4.2.18
WELFARE - CANTEEN FACILITIES

Highly Dissatisfied 3%

Highly satisfied 12%

Dissatisfied 36%

Satisfied 40% Neutral 9%

57

WELFARE- WELFARE OFFICER PERFORMANCE TABLE- 4.2.19 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Welfare officer performance Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 66 32 2 0 0 100 % 66.00 32.00 2.00 0 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 66 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 32 percent of the employees are satisfied, and 2 percent of the employees are Neutral in the welfare officer performance.

CHART- 4.2.19
WELFARE - WELFARE OFFICER PERFORMANCE
100 90 80 70 60 66 100

No. of 50 Respondents 40
30 20 10 0

32

0 Dissatisfied

0 Highly Dissatisfied Total

Highly Satisfied Satisfied

Neutral

Welfare Officer Performance

58

WELFARE - HEALTH EDUCATION TABLE- 4.2.20 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Health Education Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 10 42 7 35 6 100 % 10.00 42.00 7.00 35.00 6.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 10 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 42 percent of the employees are satisfied, 7 percent of the employees are Neutral, 35 percent of the employees are dissatisfied and 6 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Health Education.

CHART- 4.2.20

WELFARE - HEALTH EDUCATION


120 100 100 80

No. of 60 Respondents
40 20 0 Highly Satisfied 10

42 35

7 Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied

6 Highly Dissatisfied Total

Health Education

59

CHAPTER V

5.1 FINDINGS
WORK LEVEL AND RECRECTION FACILITIES Among the respondents, 58% of the respondents are in the work level of unskilled workers, 22% of the respondents are in the work level of skilled workers have reported that they are satisfied with the Recreation facilities provided by the organization with regards to Health and welfare.

From the chi-Square analysis we have found out that there is close relationship between work level and level of satisfaction in recreation facilities.

COMING FROM AND TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES Among the respondents, 32% of them are coming from 0-5km, 25% of the respondents are coming from 5-10km, 20% of them are coming from >15km have reported that they are satisfied with the Transportation facilities provided by the organization with regards to health and welfare.

From the chi-Square analysis we have found out that there is close relationship between Coming from and level of satisfaction in Transportation facilities.

60

EXPERIENCE AND VOCATIONAL TRAINNING Among the respondents, 31% of the respondents are in the working Experience of 0-10 years, 26% of the respondents are in the working Experience of 10-15 years, 25% of the respondents are in the working Experience of >15 years have reported that they are satisfied with the vocational training provided by the organization with regards to health and welfare.

From the chi-Square analysis we have found out that there is no relationship between working experience and level of satisfaction in Vocational training.

COMING FROM AND PARKING FACILITIES Among the respondents, 29% of the respondents are coming from0-5km, 22% of the respondents are coming from 5-10km, 17% of the respondents are coming from >15km have reported that they are satisfied with the Parking facilities provided by the organization with regards to health and welfare.

From the chi-Square analysis we have found out that there is no relationship between coming from and level of satisfaction in the parking facilities.

WORK LEVEL AND SAFETY Among the respondents, 59% of the respondents are in the work level of unskilled workers , 22% of the respondents are in the work level of skilled workers have reported that they are satisfied with the Safety measures provided by the organization with regards to health and welfare.

From the chi-Square analysis we have found out that there is close relationship between work level and level of satisfaction in Safety measures.

61

HEALTH-CLEANLINESS - Among the respondents, almost all of the

respondents have reported that the organization made arrangement to remove the dirt and refusal from the work place.

HEALTH-DISPOSAL OF WASTE - Among the Respondents, most of them

have reported that the Disposal of wastes has been maintained by the organization.

HEALTH-VENTILATION - Among the respondents, most of them have told

that the organization maintained ventilation facility.

HEALTH -TEMPERATURE - Among the respondents, more than half of the

employees have told that the organization no maintained the normal temperature level.

HEALTH- ARTIFICIAL HUMIDIFICATION - Among the respondents, more

than half of the respondents have told that the organization no monitoring of humidity at work place.

HEALTH-REMOVAL OF DUST - Among the respondents, most of them

have reported that the organization made the arrangements for the removal of dust daily.

WELFARE - WORK SPACE AREA - Among the Respondents, almost all of

them reported that the organization provided adequate work space area.

HEALTH - LIGHTING FACILITIES - Among the Respondents, Almost all of

them have reported that the organization provided natural or artificial Lighting in every part of the departments.

62

HEALTH - DRINKING WATER FACILITIES - Among the respondents, most

of the employees have told that the organization has arranged adequate drinking water facility.

HEALTH- TOILET FACILITIES - Among the respondents, most of the

employees have reported that the organization maintained Toilet facilities and kept in a clean and sanitary condition.

WELFARE- SPITOON FACILITIES - Among the respondents, more than half

of the employees told that the organization provided spittoon facilities at convenient places, in a clean and hygienic condition

WELFARE - FIRST AID FACILITIES - Among the respondents, almost all of

them have reported that the organization provided First aid facilities and the First Aid boxes are replenished regularly.

WELFARE - WASHING FACILITIES - Among the respondents, most of the

respondents have reported that the organization has arranged adequate washing facilities and kept the area clean.

WELFARE - STORING & DRYING - Among the respondents, most of the

respondents have reported that the organization no provided storing and drying facilities for clothes.

WELFARE-REST ROOM & LUNCH ROOM FACILITIES - Among the

respondents, most of the respondents have reported that the organization provided adequate and suitable rest room & Lunch room facilities.

WELFARE - SITTING ARRANGEMENTS - Among the respondents, more

than half of the respondents have reported that the organization provided sitting arrangements.

63

WELFARE-CANTEEN FACILITIES - Among the respondents, half of the

respondents have reported that the organization no maintained canteen facilities.

WELFARE

WELFARE

OFFICER

PERFORMANCE

Among

the

Respondents, almost all of the employees have reported that the organization satisfied with the Welfare officer performance. .
WELFARE HEALTH EDUCATION - Among the Respondents, half of them

have reported that the organization Health education level is low.

The other Health and Welfare measures are appended in APPENDIX I.

64

5.2 SUGGESTIONS
HEALTH-TEMPERATURE Due to the constant running of machinery the temperature in the shop floor is very high, thus causing hardship to the workers. So, I kindly request you to install Artificial Humidifiers and fans which will make working condition for employees better.

WELFARE-STORING & DRYING While doing my research, there are no proper conditions for the storage of clothing for the workers. I suggest that the company supplies adequate storing facilities to the employees. The workers also find it difficult for drying out the washed work cloths. So, it would be better if the company provides a specific area for drying.

WELFARE-CANTEEN FACILITIES During the analysis, I have made to understand that the conditions regarding the canteen need to be improved. The quality of food and hot beverages is not satisfactory in view of the employees. So, the company shall kindly look into the matter and do the needful.

WELFARE-HEALTH EDUCATION We should bear in mind the most of the employees are ignorant about the hazardous health conditions involved during the work. So the company educated its employees and guides them in the proper direction.

65

5.3 CONCLUSION
Organizations can show good performance in Health and Welfare measures. It is important for them to carry out their operations effectively. From this research I conclude that most of the employees of KMN TEXTILES PRIVATE LIMITED are satisfied with the Health and Welfare facilities provided by the organization with exception of a few facilities.

66

HEALTH - PERIODICAL HEALTH CHECK UP TABLE- A 1.1 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Periodical health check up Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 57 33 4 5 1 100 % 57.00 33.00 4.00 5.00 1.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 57 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 33 percent of the employees are Satisfied,4 percent of the employees are Neutral, 5 percent of the employees are Dissatisfied and 1 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Periodical health check up. CHART-A 1.1
HEALTH-PERIODICAL HEALTH CHECKUP
100

100 90 80 70 57

No. of Respondents

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 4 5 1 33

Periodical health checkup

67

HEALTH - NOISE LEVEL TABLE-A 1.2 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Satisfied Noise level Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 19 58 6 17 0 100 % 19.00 58.00 6.00 17.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 19 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied,58 percent of the employees are Satisfied,6 percent of the employees are Neutral , 17 percent of the employees are Dissatisfied in the Noise level. CHART-A 1.2
HEALTH - NOISE LEVEL
100 100 90 80 70 60 No. of Respondents 50 40 30 20 10 0 Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 6 0 19 17 58

Noise level

68

HEALTH - PREVENTIVE MEASURES TABLE- A 1.3 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Preventive measures Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 43 48 0 9 0 100 % 43.00 48.00 0 9.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 43 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 48 percent of the employees are satisfied and 9 percent of the employees are dissatisfied in the Preventive measures. CHART-A 1.3
HEALTH-PREVENTIVE MEASURES
120 100 100 80

No. of Respondents

60 43 40 20

48

9 0 0 Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total

0 Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral

Preventive measures

69

HEALTH- CURATIVE MEASURES TABLE- A 1.4 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Curative measures Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 72 24 4 0 0 100 % 72.00 54.00 4.00 0 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 72 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 24 percent of the employees are satisfied and 4 percent of the employees are Neutral in the Curative measures. CHART-A.1.4

HEALTH-CURATIVE MEASURES
100 100 90 80 70 72

No. of Respondents

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 4 0 0 24

Curative measures

70

WELFARE- LEAVE FACILITIES TABLE- A 1.5 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Leave facilities Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 78 8 5 9 0 100 % 78.00 8.00 5.00 9.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 78 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 8 percent of the employees are satisfied, 5 percent of the employees are Neutral, and 9 percent of the employees are dissatisfied in the Leave facilities. CHART-A 1.5
WELFARE-LEAVE FACILITIES

120 100 100 80 No. of Respondents 60 40 20 0 Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 78

9 0

Leave facilities

71

WELFARE- MEDICAL FACILTY TABLE- A 1.6 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Medical facility Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 32 48 5 15 0 100 % 32.00 48.00 5.00 15.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 32 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 48 percent of the employees are satisfied, 5 percent of the employees are Neutral and 15 percent of the employees are dissatisfied in the Medical facility.

CHART-A 1.6
WELFARE-MEDICAL FACILITY
100 100 90 80 70

No. of Respondents

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Highly Satisfied 32

48

15 5 Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied 0 Highly Dissatisfied Total

Medical facility

72

WELFARE- HOUSING FACILITIES TABLE- A 1.7 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Housing facilities Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 32 37 15 16 0 100 % 32.00 37.00 15.00 16.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 32 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 37 percent of the employees are satisfied, 15 percent of the employees are Neutral and 16 percent of the employees are dissatisfied in the housing facilities. CHART-A 1.7
WELFARE-HOUSING FACILITY
120 100 100 80

No. of Respondents

60 40 20 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 32 37 15 16 0

Housing facility

73

WELFARE- LOAN FACILITIES TABLE- A 1.8 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Satisfied Loan facilities Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 39 36 6 19 0 100 % 39.00 36.00 6.00 19.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 39 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 36 percent of the employees are satisfied, 6percent of the employees are Neutral, 19percent of the employees are Dissatisfied in the Loan facilities. CHART-A 1.8
WELFARE-LOAN FACILITIES
100 100 90 80 70

No. of Respondents

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 6 0 39 36 19

Loan facilities

74

WELFARE- SOCIAL INSURANCE MEASURES TABLE- A 1.9 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Social Insurance measures Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 65 17 10 8 0 100 % 65.00 17.00 10.00 8.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 65 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 17 percent of the employees are satisfied, 10percent of the employees are Neutral, 8percent of the employees are Dissatisfied in the Social Insurance measures. CHART-A 1.9
WELFARE-SOCIAL INSURANCE MEASURES
120 100 100 80

No. of Respondents

65 60 40 20 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 17 10 8 0

Social Insurance measures

75

WELFARE- CHILDRENS EDUCATION FACILITIES TABLE- A 1.10 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Childrens education facilities Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 41 27 13 19 0 100 % 41.00 27.00 13.00 19.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 41 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 27 percent of the employees are satisfied, 13 percent of the employees are Neutral and 19 percent of the employees are dissatisfied in the Childrens education facilities. CHART-A 1.10
WELFARE-CHILDRENS' EDUCATION FACILITIES
100 100 90 80 70

No. of Respondents

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 27 19 13 0 41

Childrens' education facilities

76

WELFARE- NIGHT SHIFT ALLOWANCE TABLE- A 1.11 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Night Shift allowance Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 52 6 28 14 0 100 % 52.00 6.00 28.00 14.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 52 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 6 percent of the employees are satisfied, 28 percent of the employees are Neutral, and 14 percent of the employees are dissatisfied in the Night Shift allowance.

CHART-A 1.11
WELFARE-NIGHT SHIFT ALLOWANCE
120 100 100 80

No. of Respondents

60 40 20

52

28 14 6 0

0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total

Night shift allowance

77

WELFARE- TEA ALLOWANCE TABLE- A 1.12 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Tea allowance Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 16 40 4 32 8 100 % 16.00 40.00 4.00 32.00 8.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 16 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 40 percent of the employees are satisfied, 4 percent of the employees are Neutral, 32 percent of the employees are dissatisfied and 8 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Tea allowance. CHART-A 1.12
WELFARE-TEA ALLOWANCE
120 100 100 80

No. of Respondents

60 40 40 20 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 16 4 8 32

Tea allowance

78

WELFARE- BONUS SCHEME TABLE- A 1.13 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Bonus scheme Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 52 25 8 1 14 100 % 52.00 25.00 8.00 1.00 14.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 52 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 25 percent of the employees are Satisfied,8 percent of the employees are Neutral,1percent of the employees are Dissatisfied and14 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Bonus scheme. CHART-A 1.13
WELFARE-BONUS SCHEME
120 100 100 80

No. of 60 Respondents
40

52

25 20 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 8 1 14

Bonus scheme

79

WELFARE- INCENTIVES TABLE- A 1.14 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Incentives Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 42 34 7 12 5 100 % 42.00 34.00 7.00 12.00 5.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 42 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 34 percent of the employees are satisfied, 7 percent of the employees are Neutral, 12 percent of the employees are dissatisfied and 5 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Incentives. CHART-A 1.14
WELFARE-INCENTIVES
120 100 100 80

No. of 60 Respondents
40 20 0

42 34 12 5 Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Neutral

Incentives

80

WELFARE- EMPOYEE COUNSELING TABLE- A 1.15 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Employee counseling Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 65 27 1 7 0 100 % 65.00 27.00 1.00 7.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 65 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 27 percent of the employees are satisfied, 1 percent of the employees are Neutral, 7 percent of the employees are dissatisfied in the Employee counseling. CHART-A 1.15

WELFARE-EMPLOYEE COUNSELING
120 100 100 80 65

No. of 60 Respondents
40 20 1 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 27 7 0

Employee counseiling

81

WELFARE- JOB SECURITY TABLE- A 1.16 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Satisfied Job security Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 84 12 2 1 1 100 % 84.00 12.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 84 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 12 percent of the employees are satisfied, 2percent of the employees are Neutral, 1percent of the employees are Dissatisfied and 1percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Job security. CHART-A 1.16
WELFARE-JOB SECURITY
120 100 100 84 80

No. of 60 Respondents
40 20 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 12 2 1 1

Job security

82

WELFARE- PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES TABLE- A 1.17 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Promotional Activities Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 37 37 9 17 0 100 % 37.00 37.00 9.00 17.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 37 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 37 percent of the employees are satisfied in, 9percent of the employees are Neutral, 17percent of the employees are Dissatisfied in the Promotional Activities. CHART-A 1.17
WELFARE-PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES
120 100 100 80

No. of 60 Respondents
40 20 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 37 37 17 9 0

Promotional activities

83

WELFARE-SUPPORT AT CALAMITY TABLE- A 1.18 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Support at Calamity Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 39 34 5 22 0 100 % 39.00 34.00 5.00 22.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 39ercent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 34 percent of the employees are satisfied, 5percent of the employees are Neutral, 22percent of the employees are Dissatisfied and in the Support at calamity. CHART-A 1.18
WELFARE- SUPPORT AT CALAMITY
120 100 100 80

No.of 60 Respondents
39 40 20 5 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 0 34 22

Support at calamity

84

WELFARE-LEADING PROSPEROUS LIFE TABLE- A 1.19 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Leading Prosperous life Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 34 37 12 16 1 100 % 34.00 37.00 12.00 16.00 1.00 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 34 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 37 percent of the employees are satisfied in, 12percent of the employees are Neutral, 16 percent of the employees are dissatisfied and 1 percent of the employees are Highly Dissatisfied in the Leading Prosperous life. CHART- A 1.19

WELFARE-LEADING PPROSPEROUS LIFE


120 100 100 80

No. of Respondents

60 40 20 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 34 37 16 1

12

Leading prosperous life

85

WELFARE-TRADE UNION INVOLVEMENT TABLE- A 1.20 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Trade union involvement Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 82 16 2 0 0 100 % 82.00 16.00 2.00 0 0 100

INFERENCE

It is inferred from the above table that 82 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 16 percent of the employees are satisfied, and 2percent of the employees are Neutral in the Trade union involvement. CHART-A 1.20
WELFARE-TRADE UNION INVOLVEMENT
120 100 100 82 80

No. of 60 Respondents
40 20 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 16 2 0 0

Trade union involvement

86

WELFARE-GRIEVANCES HANDLING TABLE- A 1.21 Factor Level of Satisfaction Highly Satisfied Grievances Handling Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total No. of Respondents 57 20 14 9 0 100 % 57.00 20.00 14.00 9.00 0 100

INFERENCE It is inferred from the above table that 57 percent of the employees are Highly Satisfied, 20 percent of the employees are satisfied, 14percent of the employees are Neutral, 9percent of the employees are Dissatisfied in the Grievances Handling. CHART-A 1.21
WELFARE-GRIEVANCES HANDLING

120 100 100 80 No. of 60 Respondents 40 20 20 0 Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total 14 9 0 57

Greivances handling

87

APPENDIX I
A STUDY ON WELFARE AND HEALTH MEASURES IN KMN TEXTILES PRIVATE LIMITED, PALLADAM QUESTIONNAIRE

I. PERSONAL DETAILS 1. Name(Optional) : 2. Age <20 3. Designation : Skilled worker Supervisor Executive : 21-25 26-30 31-35 36-40 >40

Unskilled worker 4. Gender :

Male

Female

5. Qualification

: +2 ITI Diploma UG PG

Upto10 6. Marital status :

Single

Married

7. Income Level(Rs): 2000-5000 8. Coming From : 6-10Km 10-15Km >15Km 5001-10000 10001-15000 >15000

0-5Km 9. Experience <5yrs :

6-10yrs

11-15yrs

16-20yrs

21-25yrs

88

Please specify the appropriate answers for the Health and Welfare measures, by making a tick ( ) in the appropriate Box: HS Highly Satisfied SSatisfied NNeutral D-Dissatisfied HDHighly Dissatisfied

II. HEALTH: HS 1. Cleanliness 2. Disposal of Waste 3. Ventilation 4. Temperature 5. Artificial Humidification 6. Removal of Dust 7. Work space area 8. Lighting facilities 9. Drinking Water facilities 10. Toilet facilities 11. Spittoon facilities 12. Periodical Health checkup 13. Noise level 14. Preventive measures 15. Curative measures : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : S N D HD

89

III. WELFARE: HS 1. First Aid facilities 2. Washing facilities 3. Storing & Drying 4. Lunch room facility 5. Rest room facility 6. Sitting arrangements 7. Canteen facility 8. Snack & food items supplied 9. Recreation facilities 10. Welfare Officer performance 11. Earned Leave facilities 12. Casual Leave facilities 13. Sick Leave facilities 14. Medical facility 15. Housing facilities 16. Loan facilities 17. Social Insurance measures 18. Childrens education facilities 19. Night Shift allowance 20. Tea allowance 21. Bonus scheme : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : S N D HD

90

22. Incentives 23. Transportation 24. Employee counseling 25. Job security 26. Promotional Activities 27. Support at calamity 28. Leading a Prosperous life 29. Satisfaction by, Safety provisions 30. Vocational Training 31. Parking facilities 32. Trade union involvement 33. Grievances Handling 34. Health Education
35. Providing such other facilities,

: : : : : : :

: : : : : :

Which increase the morale of the staff:

36. If you suggest any other welfare measures, enumerate please 1) 2) 3)

THANK YOU

91

APPENDIX II DEFINITIONS
I.WELFARE

1.

The Labour Investigation Committee defined, Anything done fir the intellectual, physical, moral and economic betterment of the workers, whether by employers ,by government or by other agencies, over and above what is laid down by law or what is normally expected of the contractual benefits for which workers may have bargained.

2.

According to the Committee on Labour Welfare, Such services, facilities, and amenities as adequate canteens, rest and recreation facilities, arrangements for travel to and from place of work, and for the accommodation of workers employed at a distance from their homes; and such other services, amenities and facilities, including social security measures, as contribute to the conditions under which workers are employed.

3.

The International Labour Organization report refers to Labour Welfare as, Such services, facilities and amenities as may be established in or in the vicinity of undertakings it enable the persons employed in them to perform their work in healthy, congenial surroundings and provided with amenities conductive to good health and high morale.

4.

The Encyclopedia of Social Sciences has defined Labour Welfare work as, The voluntary efforts of the employers to establish, within the existing industrial system, working and sometimes, living and cultural conditions of the employees beyond what is required by law, the custom of the country and the conditions of the market.

92

5.

In the word of R.R.Hopkins, Welfare is fundamentally an attitude of mind on the part of management, influencing the method by which management activities are undertaken.

6.

E.S.Proud defines welfare work as, Voluntary efforts on the part of the employers to improve the existing industrial system and the conditions of employment in their own factories.

7.

Arthur James Todd defines welfare work as, anything done for the comfort and improvement, intellectual and social, of the employees over and above the wages paid, which is not necessity of the industry.

8.

The Oxford dictionary defines labour welfare as, efforts to make life work living for workmen.

9.

Chambers dictionary defines welfare as a state of faring or doing well; freedom from calamity enjoyment of health, prosperity, etc.

II.HEALTH

1.

The Definition of Health by the World Health Organization (W.H.O) as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity.

2.

The joint ILO/WHO Committee, defined Organizational health as(1) the promotion and maintenance of physical, mental and social well-being of workers in all occupation;(2)prevention among workers of ill-health caused by the working conditions;(3)protection of workers in their employment from risk resulting from factors;(4)placing and maintenance of the worker in an occupational environment adopted to his physical, psychological equipment.

93

BIBLIOGRAPHY

MAMORIA.MAMORIA.MAMORIA, RELATIONS 14th EDITION.

(2004)

DYNAMICS

OF

INDUSTRIAL

SEWA SINGH CHAUHAN, (1993) LABOUR WELFARE ADMINISTRATION IN INDIA FIRST EDITION. AJAY GARG, (1995) LABOUR LAWS 8 th REVISED EDITION. C.R.KOTHARI, (1997), RESEARCH METHODOLOGY- METHODS AND TECHNIQUES 2nd EDITION. ARUN MONAPPA, (1994), INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 8th EDITION.

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