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A working group within
Organic and Printed Electronics
Applications, Technologies and Suppliers
6th International Exhibition and Conference
for the Printed Electronics Industry
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Messe Mnchen, Germany
Conference: May 2628, 2014
Exhibition: May 2728, 2014
2nd picture from above: Audi AG Organic solar cell: Fraunhofer ISE
May
Organic and Printed Electronics
Applications, Technologies and Suppliers
2 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
03 Editorial
Printed Electronics in Your Hands!
04 Welcome to the OE-A
10 OE-A Roadmap for Organic and Printed Electronics
30 The Future of Printed Products Interactive Cover Page
32 Organic and Printed Electronics:
OE-A Demonstrators Illustrate the Potential
34 Market for Organic and Printed Electronics
36 List of OE-A Members Represented
102 Competence Matrix
114 OE-A Members
120 Imprint
Contents
Contents
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 3
Printed Electronics in Your Hands!
A special edition of this issue includes an interac-
tive cover page, which can light up! In keeping
with our tradition of providing functional give-
away demonstrators in our brochure, we are
pleased to present to you a multifunctional
printed electronics device that is directly inte-
grated in the cover page for the first time. This
impressively shows how thin, lightweight and
flexible printed electronics can add functionality
to traditional print products such as journals or
packages, thus enabling a completely new class
of products and possibilities applications in
advertising and marketing are just a few exam-
ples. The interactive cover page was produced
by OE-A members in an automated process; it
shows that this new technology has reached the
manufacturing state in which is can be inte-
grated into real products.
This industry is moving at an impressive speed,
is acting globally and is now witnessing new
products entering the market. The combination
of printed and classical electronics and the inte-
gration of printed electronics into systems are
general trends that are taking place in major
fields like automotive, consumer electronics,
printing and packaging, architectural, pharma-
ceutical and medical applications as well as in
textiles and fashion.
More and more products are entering our daily
life. OLED displays and lighting, packages that
light up, touch screens and switches for a variety
of surfaces, flexible solar cells and batteries, self-
dimming rear-view mirrors in cars, or printed
sensors in diabetes test strips and smart packag-
ing for the pharmaceutical industry are just a few
examples in which organic and printed electron-
ics reaches everybody.
At this point in the cycle, it is even more impor-
tant for our community to have an international
platform for the exchange of information, for
collaboration and cooperation. Our supply chains
are international and globally linked, and the
OE-A facilitates the establishment of these sup-
ply chains through a variety of activities which
ultimately help the industry to grow. The start of
international standardization activities under the
leadership of IEC and supported by the OE-A
is another important signal that this emerging
industry is entering a next level of maturity.
The OE-A is the key international industry associa-
tion for organic and printed electronics, and it is
growing constantly. With more than 215 members
from 31 countries in Europe, North America, Asia,
and Australia, we cover the entire value chain and
are a unique network of world-leading companies
and research institutes, with growth in member-
ship increasingly from end-user industries.
This brochure will be published at LOPE-C. At this
event, we provide the premier international
marketplace for the community covering the full
spectrum: commercialization, applications,
technology and science of organic and printed
electronics.
The OE-A roadmap summary is a compilation of
the views of its members on the future develop-
ment of this industry. The fifth edition of this
roadmap, which has been expanded and updated
in this issue, is included here. In this brochure you
will also find information about the OE-A, our
members and their respective products and com-
petencies, as well as a market forecast for these
emerging electronics.
We hope this industry directory for Organic and
Printed Electronics will serve as a launch pad to
help you find the right partners for your business.
June 2013
Dr. Stephan Kirchmeyer
Chairman OE-A Board,
Heraeus Precious Metals
GmbH & Co. KG
Dr. Stephan Kirchmeyer Dr. Klaus Hecker
Welcome to the fifth edition of the OE-A brochure.
Dr. Klaus Hecker
Managing Director, OE-A
4 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
The vision of the OE-A (Organic and Printed Elec-
tronics Association) is to build a bridge between
science, technology and applications to grow
an industry of emerging electronics. The OE-A
enables and fosters collaboration by members of
the value chain starting from research to inte-
gration into final end-products by coordinating,
harmonizing and facilitating their activities.
The global interest in organic and printed elec-
tronics is booming. Almost every sector of our
economy will be affected, if not revolutionized, by
organic and printed electronics. Initial products
have entered the market. The technology has
huge potential, but materials, equipment, pro-
cesses and applications still have to be developed
and improved.
OE-A The Organization
The membership of OE-A is growing fast.
Founded in December 2004, more than 215
members in 31 countries from Europe, Asia,
North America and Australia have joined OE-A.
Welcome to the OE-A
Emerging electronics means electronics beyond the
classical silicon approach, including: flexible, printed electronics
from organic, polymeric or inorganic materials.
Figure 2: OE-A involves the whole value chain of organic and
printed electronics.
Figure 1: Membership development of the OE-A. The network of the OE-A has
been growing rapidly worldwide since its formation in December 2004.
Membership Development of the OE-A
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Competencies of the OE-A Members
Material
Suppliers: 20 %
Equipment
Manufacturers: 21 %
Device
Manufacturers:
13 %
Services: <1 %
End-Users:
7 %
Research
Institutes: 19 %
Universities: 19 %
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ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 5
Our members are:
component and material suppliers
equipment and tool suppliers
producers / integrators
system integrators and distributors
end-users
research institutes and universities
OE-A is a working group within VDMA, the
German Engineering Federation. The OE-A head-
quarters is located in Frankfurt, Germany, and our
North American office is in Pittsburgh, PA., USA.

What OE-A Can Do for You
Networking Our International Approach
Creating the right partnerships is essential to
companies and research institutes and OE-As
strength is its global reach.
With frequent Working Group Meetings in
Europe, North America and Asia, OE-A supports
its members with an effective networking and
communication platform, fostering collaboration
and promoting information exchange among all
players along the value chain worldwide.
Market and Technology Information /
Roadmap
Being well-informed enables you to make the
right decisions. Its all about keeping track of
todays ever-increasing information flow.
OE-A provides its members with up-to-date
market and technology information. Dedicated
The OE-A is assigned to the VDMA division Innovative Business,
which includes such related associations as Productronics (Produc-
tion Equipment for Microelectronics), Photovoltaic Equipment,
German Flat Panel Display Forum (DFF), Battery Production and
Micro Technology. These partner associations provide sector-
specific expertise to their member companies, many of which are
business partners to the organic and printed electronics industry.
Our internal network also provides us with excellent contacts to
the printing and packaging as well as plastics and paper equip-
ment industries.
The German Engineering Federation (VDMA) is one of the key
industry associations in Europe and offers the largest engineering
industry network in Europe. With more than 3,100 member
companies, predominantly small and medium-sized enterprises,
VDMA represents 38 fields throughout the entire investment
goods industry from the classical machinery sector to high-tech
fields like robotics and automation. VDMA is located in Frankfurt,
Germany, with branch offices in Berlin, Brussels, Tokyo, Beijing,
Shanghai, Moscow, Kolkata, New Dehli and Mumbai.
Strengthening Synergies the VDMA Innovative Business Division
working groups focused on applications and
technologies help to create a roadmap for organic
and printed electronics. These experts provide a
forecast for the main application areas and tech-
nologies for organic and printed electronics and
identify the major hurdles yet to be overcome.
A summary of the 5th edition of the OE-A Road-
map for organic and printed electronics is
Figure 3: Meet new business partners and increase your
organizations industry exposure at OE-A Working Group
Meetings in Europe, North America and Asia.
6 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
included in this brochure. The OE-A has addressed
the increasing requirement for information on
the growing market of next generation technolo-
gies for pharmaceutical packaging, medical tech-
nology and well-being by recently adding the
new healthcare roadmap.
Our expertise arises not only from our member-
ship, but also from close cooperation with lead-
ing market intelligence companies and related
international associations.

Promoting Research Activities
Research and development plays a strategic role
in leveraging this emerging technology. The OE-A
fosters and promotes the expansion of R&D
activities on several different levels. We are in
close contact with national and European fund-
ing authorities, and we work with them to define
future R&D funding programs. Another one of
the OE-As important tasks is to support and to
help coordinate industrial R&D for the entire
organic and printed electronics sector.
In addition, the OE-A organizes projects that
develop giveaway and multifunctional demon-
strators. This time, a special edition of this
brochure with an interactive cover page was
developed and produced by OE-A members.
More than 20 companies and institutes continue
to provide a unique set of devices and materials
for the OE-A Toolbox which represents the state-
of-the-art of organic and printed electronic
components.
The OE-A sponsors an annual demonstrator com-
petition which awards the best demonstrators in
categories ranging from research to prototypes
and design concepts.
The OE-A is the perfect platform to find the right
partner for your business or for bi- or multilateral
R&D projects.
Figure 4: Summary of the 5th edition of the OE-A Roadmap for organic and printed electronics.
Portable chargers
Flexible segmented
displays integrated into
smart cards, price labels,
bendable colour displays
Design projects
Primary single-cell
batteries, memory
for interactive games,
ITO-free transparent
conductive films
Garments with integrated
sensors, anti theft, brand
protection, printed test
strips, physical sensors
Existing
until 2013
Consumer electronics,
customized mobile power
Bendable OLEDs, plastic
LCD, in-moulded displays,
large-area signage,
rollable color displays
Transparent and decorative
lighting modules
Rechargeable single-cell
batteries, transparent
conductors for touch
sensors, printed reflective
display elements
Integrated systems on
garment), large-area
physical sensor arrays and
mass market intelligent
packaging
Short term
20142016
Specialized building
integration, off grid
Rollable OLEDs with OTFT,
(semi-) transparent rollable
displays, flexible consumer
electronics
Flexible lighting
Printed multi-cell batteries,
integrated flexible
multi-touch sensors,
printed logic chips
Textile sensors on fibre,
dynamic price displays,
NFC / RFID smart labels,
disposable monitoring
devices
Medium term
20172020
Building integration,
grid connected PV
Rollable OLED TVs,
telemedicine
General lighting technology
Directly printed batteries,
active and passive devices
to Smart Object
OLEDs on textile,
fibre-electronics,
health monitoring systems
and smart buildings
Longer term
2021+
OE-A Roadmap for Organic and Printed Electronics Applications
Organic
Photovoltaics
Flexible
Displays
OLED
Lighting
Electronics &
Components
Integrated
Smart
Systems
OE-A 2013
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 7
Figure 6: Printed electronic devices
(Source: Kurz)
Education and Training
Highly qualified employees are the key to success.
To help the community find employees with
expertise in this emerging technology, the OE-A
initiated the Education and Training project. In
it, experts work together to develop education
and training programs that meet the industrys
needs.
Quality Control and Standardization
With the installation of mass-production capacity
for organic and printed electronics, standardiza-
tion and consistent characterization of devices
and high-throughput in-line quality control are
increasingly becoming a focus for companies.
The OE-A supports moving organic and printed
electronics into the market by organizing a work-
ing group that deals with quality control and
measurement; the group also develops dedicated
guidelines for device characterization as well as
testing methods for encapsulation systems.
The OE-A has been a major supporter of the
international standardization process under the
leadership of IEC (International Electrotechnical
Commission) and promotes the activities of
the Technical Committee IEC-TC 119 Printed
Electronics.
Upscaling Production
The transfer of lab-type processes to mass pro-
duction of organic and printed electronics lab-
to-fab is supported by the OE-A Working Group
Upscaling Production. Experts with a strong
background in production and development
collaborate in this group to develop concepts for
moving from the laboratory through pilot lines to
full-scale manufacturing, thereby supporting
OE-A members in upscaling production. To pro-
vide a unique insight into the industrial processes
of organic and printed electronics, the OE-A
Working Group Upscaling Production initiated
the LOPE-C Demo Line. Material suppliers, equip-
ment manufacturers and process developers
have consolidated their efforts to manufacture a
functional take-home demonstrator as part of
the LOPE-C exhibition.
Green Electronics
Green and sustainability aspects are key factors
for the acceptance and success of an emerging
technology. Factors relating to sustainability for
organic and printed electronic materials, processes,
products and applications include the efficient
use of materials, environmentally friendly
production, power efficiency of the products as
well as recyclability and disposal of products. The
OE-A Working Group Green provides guidelines
and methodologies for sustainability analysis.
Figure 5: Smart blister packaging (Source: Holst Centre)
8 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
Increasing Your Visibility
The OE-A promotes its members innovations
through a multitude of media outlets. This bro-
chure Organic and Printed Electronics, now
published in its fifth edition is just the tip of the
iceberg. Other examples are the OE-A Video,
Printed Electronics Ready to Go, that intro-
duces our industry to a broad audience, the
OE-A Newsletter, and the globally distributed
OPE Journal.
The OE-A arranges contacts with the interna-
tional press and with trade show and conference
organizers around the world for members. More-
over, we represent our members at international
trade fairs and conferences.
LOPE-C Large-area,
Organic & Printed Electronics Convention
One of the key tasks of the OE-A is to provide the
premier international marketplace for organic
and printed electronics. Along with our partner
Messe Munich, we have developed the leading
international trade show and conference for the
organic and printed electronics community.
LOPE-C is the premier event for end-users, manu-
facturers, investors, engineers and scientists in
organic and printed electronics and covers the
latest commercial and technological achieve-
ments.
Electronics Everywhere Big Opportunities
The combination of specialty materials with low-
cost, large-area fabrication processes (such as
printing) enables thin, lightweight, flexible and
low-cost electronics. This means that integrated
circuits, sensors, displays, memory, photovoltaic
cells or batteries can be made out of plastic.
Applications like flexible solar cells, flexible dis-
plays, lighting, RFID tags (radio frequency identi-
fication), single-use diagnostic devices or simple
consumer products and games are only a few
examples that represent a future multi-billion
Euro market. Smart objects (e. g., smart packag-
ing that integrates multiple organic and printed
devices) or smart textiles are additional examples
of applications in organic and printed electronics.
OLED displays, e-readers, printed electrodes for
several medical applications as well as printed
light sources, electrochromic rear-view mirrors,
and printed antennae for automotive applica-
tions have been on the market on a large scale for
several years.
Organic photovoltaics and OLED lighting-based
products, smart packaging, flexible batteries,
printed memory, transparent conductive films as
an ITO substitute for touch displays, smart phar-
maceutical blister packages for field trials and
smart cards with built-in displays for password
applications have become available. Within 3 to 4
years, additional products are expected to be
available to a mass market, and all of the above
mentioned applications, as well as several more,
will be available in large volumes.
Tremendous opportunities are opening up for
companies that invest in this field, regardless of
whether they are material suppliers, equipment
manufacturers, producers or system integrators.
Large-scale production capacity is presently
installed in Europe, the U.S., and Asia. On the
other hand, large-scale efforts and close collabo-
ration of all partners along the value chain
remain necessary to make organic and printed
electronics a true success story.
Cooperation and information exchange will lead
to mutual advantages. The OE-A provides the
international platform for the organic and
printed electronics community and helps the
industry to grow.
Curious? Dont hesitate to ask us for details!
Figure 7: LOPE-C is the premier marketplace for the organic and printed electronics industry.
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Messe Mnchen, Germany
Conference: May 2628, 2014
Exhibition: May 2728, 2014
LOPE-C is the leading international trade fair and
conference for printed electronics in the high-tech
business location of Munich. The exclusive business
platform addresses manufacturers and users of a
technology of the future across a wide range of
Organic solar cell: Fraunhofer ISE
industry sectors. It is innovative, exible, cost-effective
and thus suitable for mass-market production.
As the representative trade fair of this sector, LOPE-C
highlights current trends, presents innovative products,
points to market opportunities for industry and promotes
Manufacturing
processes
Printing
Photolithograph]
laser
8olution coating
Encapsulation
Assembly and packaging
technology, system
integration
Electrical contacting
lamination
laser
8]stem integration
H]orid s]stems

Inspection and
test systems
Electrical, ph]sical,
optical, chemical
characterization
8imulation
lifetime testing
0ualit]/Process control
Devices
Transistors and
diodes
Passives
Displa]s
Photovoltaic cells
8ensors
Antennas
Batteries
Applications
8olar cells
Displa]s
8mart textiles
8peakers
lighting
lntegrated smart
systems
RFlD
Services
Consulting
R&D
Professional and
trade associations
Venture and equit]
capitalization
Materials
8uostrates
Conductors
8emiconductors
Dielectrics
Encapsulation
materials and resins
LOPE-C Exhibition: The entire value chain for printed electronics.
LOPE-C Conference: One Congress Many Components.
Plenary session: delivered by international experts
Business conference and Investor forum: with focus on commercialization
Technical conference: with focus on new technologies and applications
Scientic conference and Poster session: delivered by established and young scientists
Short courses: featuring established industry and academic experts
Visitor target groups:
Automotive
Building and architecture

Chemical

Consumer electronics

Energy

Lighting

Logistics

Mechanical engingeering

Medical and pharmaceutical

Packaging

Printing and graphic arts

Textiles and fashion
the development of new materials, manufacturing
processes and applications.
This makes the event the most important gathering in
the eld of printed electronics.
10 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
Organic and printed electronics is based on the
combination of new materials and cost-effective,
large-area production processes that open up
new fields of application. Thin, lightweight,
flexible and environmentally friendly electronics
thats what organic electronics aims to deliver.
It also enables a wide range of electrical
components that can be produced and directly
integrated in low-cost reel-to-reel processes.
Intelligent packaging, OLED lighting, printed
multi functional systems, rollable displays, flex-
ible solar cells, disposable diagnostic devices or
games, flexible touchscreens, and printed
batteries are just a few examples of promising
fields of application for organic electronics based
on new large-scale processable electrically con-
ductive and semi-conducting materials. Organic
electronics can be used by itself, but also as part
of a heterogeneous system combining printed
and organic components and silicon, each where
they make the most sense. These heterogeneous
systems will be especially important in the first
generations of products.
In the following pages, you will find an updated
overview of the organic and printed electronics
applications, technologies and devices, as well as
a discussion of the different technology levels
that can be used in producing organic electronic
products. We have taken account of the exciting
technical progress made since the last edition
and the appearance of first products, and have
made some changes to the grouping of applica-
tions within clusters. In particular, we have
included EL lighting now into Electronics and
Components, fitting with its areas of commercial
applications, and moved RFID into Integrated
Smart Systems, as organic RFID is expected to
find its primary application in smart systems
rather than as a competitor to Si-based EPC
applications in the near future.
At the time of the last roadmap, products were
starting to enter the market, and this trend has
continued, so that commercial products are
available in all of the key technology areas. First
organic electronic products reached the market a
number of years ago, e.g., passive ID cards that
are mass-printed on paper and are used for tick-
eting or toys. Flexible lithium polymer batteries
produced in a reel-to-reel process have been
available for several years and can be used for
smart cards and other mobile consumer prod-
ucts. Printed electrodes for glucose test strips or
for electrocardiograms are common. Organic
photovoltaics (OPV) modules integrated into bags
to charge mobile electrical devices are commer-
OE-A Roadmap for Organic and Printed Electronics
The roadmap for organic and printed electronics is a key activity of
the OE-A. Organic electronics is a platform technology that enables
multiple applications that are based on organic electronics but
vary widely in their specifications. This technology is still in its early
stage; while increasing numbers of products are available and
some are in full production, many applications are still in lab-scale
development, prototype activities or early production. Nonetheless,
it is important to develop a common opinion about what kind of
products, processes and materials will be available and when.
For this fifth version of the OE-A Roadmap, key teams of experts in
five application clusters and three technology areas developed
roadmaps for their fields, which were presented to and discussed
with the OE-A members during association meetings. The resulting
roadmap is a synthesis of these results representing common
perspectives of the groups.
We present here a summary of the fifth version of the roadmap,
which is a supplement to and improvement on the fourth version
presented in 2011.
The goal of this roadmap is to help the industry, government agen-
cies and scientists plan and align their R&D activities and product
plans, for example, by identifying promising applications and key
challenges requiring breakthroughs. Roadmapping, especially in
such a young industry, is an ongoing process and the OE-A will
continue this key activity.
A White Paper explaining the 2011 roadmap in more detail is
already available for download from the OE-A website
(www.oe-a.org), and a White Paper for the current version will
be released later in 2013. For further details please contact the
OE-A secretariat.
The OE-A Roadmap
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 11
cially available. Printed antennae are commonly
used in (still Si-based) RFID tags. Large-area
organic pressure sensors for applications such as
retail logistics have recently been introduced.
First organic LED (OLED) lighting based products
became available just before the last edition of
the roadmap and have grown, with the number
of both commercial OLED lighting products and
large-scale installations at lighting trade fairs
much larger than at the time of the last edition
of the roadmap. User tests of smart cards with
built-in displays for one-time password applica-
tions were already started before the last road-
map and have started to be commercialized. New
products such as flexible, roll-to-roll-produced
e-paper price labels have been commercially
installed into stores, printed RF-driven smart
objects have become commercially available, and
printed non-volatile memory is being sold to
product developers. Recently, printed systems
incorporating organic electronics have also
become commercial; for example, a rechargeable
battery-powered flashlight containing OPV to
recharge the battery, first shown as an OE-A
demonstrator in 2011, can now be purchased.
Organic electronics has appeared in everyday
products where many people are not even aware
that they contain organic electronics, e.g., self-
dimming rearview mirrors in cars or OLED dis-
plays in smart phones. While we do not explicitly
investigate these already existing products in this
forward-looking roadmap, they are evidence that
organic electronics is already becoming an
industry.
Unbreakable displays with OTFT (organic thin
film transistor) backplanes have been piloted,
but full product introduction has been delayed;
however, development of unbreakable and even
rollable displays has continued. While no organic
electronic products have truly achieved full mass
market introduction, with the possible exception
of OLED displays, it appears that this is likely for
some products within the next few years.
Organic electronics is based on the combination of a new class of
materials and large-area, high-volume deposition and patterning
techniques. Often terms like emerging, printed, plastic, polymer,
flexible, printable inorganic, large-area or thin film electronics or
abbre viations like OLAE or FOLAE (Flexible and/or Organic Large
Area Electronics) are used, which essentially all mean the same
thing: electronics beyond the classical approach. For simplicity, we
have used the term organic electronics in this roadmap, but keep
in mind that we are using the term in this broader sense.
Organic Electronics
Figure 1: Overview of the OE-A Roadmap for organic and printed electronics applications.
OE-A Roadmap for Organic and Printed Electronics Applications
today
OE-A 2013
future
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12 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
In the applications section which follows, we
have updated our forecast for the market entry
on larger scales for various applications and
reviewed the appearance of first products. We
have also re-examined the key application and
technology parameters and principle challenges
(so-called red brick walls) seen for further devel-
opment of organic electronics. In the technology
section we also take account of recent progress in
new materials and improved processes.
Applications
Organic and printed electronics is a platform
technology that is based on organic conducting
and semi-conducting as well as printable
inorganic materials. It opens up new possibilities
for applications and products. As in previous
roadmap editions, some key applications have
been chosen to demonstrate the needs from the
application side, identify major challenges, cross-
check with the possibilities of the technology and
forecast a time frame for the market entry in
large volumes.
Below, we continue to look at applications
discussed in the previous edition of the roadmap,
clustered into the five groups OLED Lighting,
Organic Photovoltaics, Flexible Displays,
Electronics and Components (printed memory,
batteries, active devices and logic, and passive
devices) and Integrated Smart Systems (smart
objects, RFID, sensors and smart textiles). Figure 1
gives an overall view of the expected develop-
ment of the five clusters.
The large number of applications reflects the
complexity of the topic and the wide possible
uses for organic electronics, and it is likely that
the list will even grow in the future. This is one
reason for grouping applications into related
clusters in order to make it possible to maintain
an overview. The application fields and specifica-
tions cover a wide range, and although several
parameters like accuracy of the patterning
process or electrical conductivity of the materials
are of central importance, the topic cannot
currently be reduced to one or two simple scaling
laws such as the increase in transistors per chip
for silicon formulated by Moore in 1965. Regard-
less, we will watch the trends and find out
whether it will be possible to find an analogue to
Moores law for organic electronic. Some poten-
tial scaling trends are starting to be visible, such
as higher resolution patterning processes and
increased charge carrier mobilities, which can
improve device packing density and performance
in a similar way that has been observed in
Si electronics.
The question whether there is one killer applica-
tion for organic electronics still cannot be
answered with certainty. There are many differ-
Figure 2: OLED lighting product. (Source: OSRAM)
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 13
ent fields in which the advantages of organic
electronics might result in the right application
to become a killer application, but at this point,
it is too early to predict where this is most likely
to happen, though OLED displays are making
strong progress. Past experience with new tech-
nologies has shown that the predicted killer
applications are frequently not the ones that
really open up the largest markets. Therefore, one
has to continue the work on the roadmap, as is
planned, follow the current trends and take
account of new developments as they occur.
In fact, with the increasing diversity of organic
electronics it is unclear whether there will be a
single killer app or if gradual market penetra-
tion in a variety of areas is more likely. At the
moment, we are starting to see market penetra-
tion in a variety of areas and it looks as if, for the
near future, organic growth in many areas is a
more likely scenario than an explosive killer app
in only one or two areas.
Applications Roadmap
OLED Lighting is an example of Solid State Light-
ing (SSL), which also includes LED-based lighting
and is seen as the most promising approach for
future lighting due to lack of hazardous materi-
als, flexible form factor, high energy efficiency
and long lifetime. The LED lighting industry is
growing rapidly, but OLED lighting continues to
make progress both technically and toward com-
mercialization. OLED lighting has grown out of
the technical progress made in developing the
OLED display industry but has increasingly
focused on the specific properties of OLEDs that
are relevant to lighting. OLED lighting products
promise novel features in the longer term: large-
area, very thin and optionally flexible or non-
planar form factor, and variable color are all
feasible with OLED lighting, and new lighting
applications can be expected to take advantage
of these properties, for example, embedded light-
ing or homogeneous area lighting.
While OLED lighting has not yet reached the
mass market, limited-release prototypes and
commercial products have become available to
demonstrate the potential and allow interested
users to try out OLED technology (Figure 2). A
number of European and Japanese companies
have shown advanced prototype products, and in
the USA the Department of Energy has supported
OLED lighting development strongly. Though
both vacuum deposited and solution processed
OLEDs are possible, vacuum deposited devices are
more efficient and dominate the market, though
much development is ongoing in improving solu-
tion processed OLEDs. The market is expected to
grow, especially if some key challenges such as
lowering the production cost and developing
reliable and cost-effective encapsulation are met.

Organic Photovoltaics (OPV) comprises both
hybrid systems (e.g., combining titania and dyes)
as well as systems using only organic semicon-
ductors. Flexible dye-sensitized titania and poly-
mer-based OPV modules have been available for
some years now, and products integrating
flexible OPV modules have been commercially
available since 2010. These applications target
low-power consumer applications, e.g., modules
for battery chargers for mobile electronics such
as cell phones, PV-powered computer keyboards,
or the mobile laser pointer shown in Figure 3.
Despite the difficult market for PV in general in
the last couple of years and the significant set-
back of the loss of a key OPV pioneer, both techni-
cal and commercial development is continuing.
Laboratory scale cells have now reached efficien-
cies that can compete with thin film silicon, while
the number of pilot and small production lines
has increased. OPV shows a combination of
unique points: lightweight, flexible design with
options for color and semi-transparency, good
performance in low and diffuse light, reduced
environmental footprint and customizable
formats which allow them to address market
niches not in direct competition with crystalline
silicon technologies. Short term applications will Figure 3: Battery powered laser pointer with OPV charger. (Source: Mekoprint)
14 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
be mostly in consumer electronic and portable
power sources. In the medium term, novel forms
of building-integrated OPV will appear. The long-
term perspective of energy generation remains
a driving vision, while novel business models
are also appearing to address unconventional
markets and channels to market.
Flexible Displays are an extension of flat panel
displays, which have had tremendous success in
replacing conventional displays such as cathode
ray tubes (CRTs) for use in computers and televi-
sions, and in enabling new products such as lap-
top and tablet computers, e-readers and smart
mobile phones. Flexible displays can dispense
with some key issues of current flat displays, such
as the presence of (breakable and relatively
heavy) glass and inability to be bent, rolled or
used with other than flat form factors. The
requirements for flexible displays depend
strongly on the intended type of use, e.g., of the
flexible displays roadmap we focus on the follow-
ing key types of use, e.g., information and signage
(conformal and lightweight is more important
than being bendable or rollable), reading (rug-
gedness, light weight and optionally bendability
or rollability are desired) or entertainment/multi-
media (where video rate, color and resolution are
critical in addition to the above factors).
The flexible display market has not developed
commercially as quickly as had been hoped,
partially due to industry restructuring and com-
petition from tablet computers, but there have
been advances as well. For example, flexible, roll-
to-roll-produced e-paper-based shelf tags have
been commercialized at a Finnish electronics
superstore chain, garnering very positive recep-
tion. Plastic Logic announced a new business
strategy, enabling the company to move beyond
the e-reader market into a variety of new markets
and applications, driven by flexible display solu-
tions. On the technology side, many of the key
players in the display market have showcased
prototypes of OLED-driven flexible displays,
including active matrix backplanes driven by
novel materials like oxide semiconductors. E Ink
has also announced flexible active-matrix EPD-
driven displays, and color EPD display prototypes
with organic TFT backplanes have been shown
(Figure 4). While simple signage is already avail-
able, we expect flexible commercial e-readers in
the near future, followed by trends to larger size,
higher resolution and full color as well as flexible
OLEDs in the future.
The Electronics and Components cluster in the
OE-A Roadmap encompasses printed memory,
flexible batteries, and active and passive devices.
These are the building blocks or toolkit out of
which future organic electronic products can be
made.
Printed memory is needed for applications where
the user is required to store and process informa-
tion. If the user wants to change the information
stored in the memory after production, a rewrit-
Figure 5: Printed addressable memory array
with transistor logic.
(Source: PARC and Thin Film Electronics ASA)
Figure 4: Flexible color e-reader display with organic TFT backplane.
(Source: Plastic Logic)
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 15
able memory, either write once read many (WORM)
or rewritable random-access memory (RAM) is
necessary. Furthermore, for many applications
without constant power, the memory needs to
be non-volatile (NV). ID devices and promotional
cards using read-only memory (ROM), WORM or
NV-RAM were already hitting the market at the
time of the last roadmap and have continued to
make headway. Reference designs of toys using
NV-RAM memory have been launched, and appli-
cations using printed memory for brand protec-
tion (i.e., anti-fraud, anti-counterfeit uses) have
also emerged recently. Printed memory will be an
important component in future integrated smart
systems (see below), and technology develop-
ment is proceeding this way. For example, a
recently presented NV-RAM that includes CMOS
(Figure 5), and showed successful integration of
a sensor, a display, memory and transistor logic in
December 2012. The future is expected to bring
applications in increasingly complex systems,
moving from simple gaming and anti-fraud
applications into ticketing, display memory and
electronic products.
Most organic electronics applications target
mobile devices, and here power supply is a key
issue. Therefore flexible batteries (Figure 6) are of
central importance to leverage this technology.
A large variety of thin and even printed batteries
are commercially available. They are available for
discontinuous use today and will be constantly
improved in capacity, enabling continuous use.
Currently, non-rechargeable zinc-carbon batteries
are predominant for printed batteries, but there
is significant development in rechargeable bat-
teries, e.g., based on lithium, as well as research
activity on printed miniature supercapacitors,
which are a kind of cross between batteries and
conventional capacitors. There will be a progres-
sion from batteries that use printed parts,
through batteries that are fully printed in sepa-
rate processes, to batteries that are printed as
part of an integrated process for printing elec-
tronic systems, as well as a progression from sin-
gle charge through rechargeable batteries and
from single cells to multicell integration. In the
longer term, batteries will also be integrated
directly in textiles and packages.
Figure 6: Roll of printed Ni metal hydride batteries. (Source: VARTA Microbattery)
Figure 7: Printed logic circuit. (Source: Holst Centre)
16 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
Active devices are electronic components which
contain a semiconductor or other parts that cre-
ate active feedback on applying electric power.
In this edition of the roadmap we primarily are
looking at transistors, diodes, logic circuits, and
display elements. Organic Thin Film Transistors
(OTFT) are a basic component for electric switch
elements or integrated circuits, and can be used
as single component to amplify a current or
combined with other transistor as integrated
circuits or logic. The current flow between source
and drain electrode is switched, depending on
the voltage applied at the gate electrode. They
are typically not products by themselves but part
of other products like smart objects or integrated
systems. Diodes are rectifying devices which
allow current to flow at a positive voltage but
block it at negative voltages, and in addition to
their special uses in OLEDs and OPV are also
relevant in devices such as RF tags or energy har-
vesting systems. In the area of printed/organic
circuits (logic), multibit microprocessors have
been demonstrated by a number of research labs
and companies, as well as logic circuits for RFID
tags and organic memory control. Key factors and
challenges for future development and appear-
ance in more complex products include scaling
laws on thickness, lateral dimensions and charge
carrier mobility.
Display elements are further active components
for system integration, which can convert an
electrical signal into optical information. In
particular, both electrochromic and electro-
luminescent elements are being included.
Printed passive components based on printable
conductors and dielectrics have been used in
electronics manufacturing for some time now.
Due to the rapid development of printable elec-
tronics materials and corresponding processes,
such applications are becoming more and more
visible on the market. Resistors, capacitors and
inductors can also be printed. A special applica-
tion in this field is a printed code detectable by
touch sensors. Printed silver paste is the mostly
used conductive material to print conductive
tracks, but other metal or carbon pastes, nano-
carbon materials, or conductive polymers are see-
ing increased interest. A special case of capacitors
seeing increased interest for printed electronics
are supercapacitors, which can be used for
interim storage of energy, have much higher
capacitance than plate capacitors but higher
cycle life than batteries, and in the best case
essentially consist only of plastic, metal, carbon,
water and salt. A range of approaches to printed
antenna manufacturing (Figure 9) has also been
applied, including direct printing, plating, and
etch resist printing.
Electroluminescent films (EL) are available as
commercial lighting products used in low inten-
sity lighting such as backlighting, decoration and
advertising panels. EL lighting offers a number of
key user advantages: bendable, fast prototyping,
printable and easy product integration. EL light-
ing is focused on illuminating specific objects in
order to highlight them or create special effects.
It is not concerned with illumination of space. EL
is especially useful where complex form factors
(bending, thin shapes) are involved, limited edi-
Figure 9: Printed antenna for RFID tags.
(Source: Fraunhofer ENAS)
Figure 8: Smart shelf incorporating electrochromic
display elements. (Source: Ynvisible)
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 17
Figure 10: Package featuring printed EL films.
(Source: Karl Knauer)
tions, e.g., in packaging (Figure 10) specific after-
market and original equipment manufacture
(OEM) car models, and for fast product execution,
e.g., in advertising or exhibitions.
An area that has seen intense activity recently is
that of transparent conductive films. Today, ITO
(indium tin oxide) is still the most widely used
transparent conductive material, which is used in
nearly all optical devices like displays, OLEDs, OPV,
EMI shielding and especially in the rapidly
increasing market of touch sensor applications.
There is a huge market demand for ITO substi-
tutes, as it is quite brittle and relatively expen-
sive, so there is need for alternatives. Numerous
flexible and lower cost alternatives are coming
into the market. The alternative approaches to
transparent conductive films can be based either
on novel transparent conductive materials (see
technology section) or on the patterning of thin
metal films (metal mesh) on flexible polymer
substrates into high resolution transparent
conductive meshes (Figure 11); some of these
approaches have also seen market introduction
recently.

Integrated Smart Systems (ISS) bring together
multiple core functionalities to perform complex,
automated tasks without the need for external
electronic hardware. As organic electronics tech-
nology progresses, the applications will become
ever more challenging and complex. Typical func-
tionalities that one will expect to see on such
systems will be power (batteries, miniaturized
fuel cells, PV), input devices (physical, chemical
and biological sensors) and output devices
Figure 11: Capacitive multitouch sensor based on printed metal mesh transparent
conductive films. (Source: PolyIC)
18 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
(displays, visual, audible or haptic interfaces and
wireless communications), with these linked
together by sophisticated logic circuits and
memory. The addition of various forms of sample
processing and fluid handling will also involve
the integration of microfluidics into some
systems. Thus, the variety of applications for such
systems will be immense, made far greater by
their potential deployment into so many new
areas of application, from smart textiles to auto-
motive, aeronautical and environmental to health
and well-being. The component technologies
underpinned by the organic electronics field will
be essential to the success of such systems.
Sensors are the means by which the environment
is detected. Many of the characteristic features of
organic and printed electronics, such as high-
throughput parallel production including screen
printing, have already been used in the develop-
ment of printed sensors, and these exist already
as stand-alone products. Future development is
related to integration of sensors with other func-
tionalities into an integrated smart system. Both
optical and electrical/electrochemical sensor
components will be used, and we expect a
progression from currently available test strips
and physical sensor arrays (Figure 12) through
disposable test strips and integration of other
functionalities such as control electronics,
memory or display readouts in the medium term,
to smart buildings and skins in the longer term.
The key challenges to be faced are related to inte-
gration of different components and especially
interfacing to printed electronic circuitry.
Smart objects combine multiple electronics com-
ponents and functions to create innovative inte-
grated systems. A key advantage of organic and
printed electronics is the possibility to use low-
cost production methods to make these smart
objects light, flexible, cheap and even disposable.
Functional printing allows the integration of
Figure 13: RF activated smart objects. (Source: PolyIC)
Figure 12: Printed touch sensor array. (Source: plastic electronic)
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 19
different devices such as sensors, transistors,
memory, batteries or displays onto one substrate.
This integration may be realized either by one
process or by a combination of several separately
produced components. Sensor tags, dynamic
price display and rewritable RF tags are all exam-
ples of applications for smart objects. Since the
last edition of the roadmap, new products have
emerged, such as RF-driven smart object cards
(Figure 13) and printed electronic systems with
rewritable memory. A number of technology
developers have demonstrated increasingly com-
plex printed RFID tags as well. The roadmap for
smart objects and printed RFID, as a whole, is
more complex than for other areas of printed
electronics. However, these products make full
use of the cost and scalability advantages inher-
ent in this new set of production methods, and
thus, are potentially the most revolutionary. The
products in this chapter will likely not show con-
tinuous, step-wise improvement but rather, the
emergence of products of greater and greater
complexity (i.e., the emergence of entirely new
product families) as manufacturing processes
improve.
Smart textiles are fabrics that are able to alter
their characteristics to respond to external
stimuli (mechanical, electrical, thermal, and
chemical). In addition, functionalities such as
communication, displays, sensors, or thermal
management can be integrated into fabric to
enable wearable electronics. By taking advantage
of organic and printed electronics, the field of
smart textiles can make important technological
advances in the future. In the coming years
though, the use of standard electronic technol-
ogy such as Si chips or LEDs may still be required
in combination with printed components, and
heterogeneous integration will be common until
sufficiently high performance and integration
can be achieved for organic and printed electron-
ics and logic. Currently, much of this field is still in
the development or prototype stage, with signifi-
cant work going into areas such as stretchability
and hybrid integration. First products are expected
around 2014 (washable textile EL, Figure 14),
with evolution to more complex systems and
applications such as OLEDs coming later.
These application scenarios are summarized in
the OE-A Roadmap for organic electronics appli-
cations in Figures 1 and 15. In Figure 15 we show,
for each of the five application clusters, products
that have entered the market and are expected to
enter the market in the short (20142016),
medium (20172020) and longer (2021+) term.
Such a summary is by necessity not detailed.
These figures provide a high-level overview for
the whole field of organic and printed electronics
that has been distilled from the individual road-
maps.
Figure 14: Demonstrator of waterproof textile EL lighting on
a high-visibility vest. (Source: Cetemmsa)
This list of products reflects the ideas from
todays point of view. Past experience of new
technology shows us that we are most likely to
be surprised by unexpected applications, and this
will almost certainly happen in the exciting but
nascent field of organic electronics. Therefore,
the technology and the market in this field will
continuously be watched and the roadmap will
be updated on a regular basis.
While we focus on clusters of applications based
on functions, organic electronics may contribute
20 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
to innovation in different industrial branches
such as automotive or health care (Figure 16)
with products covering a range of functions. For
this reason, OE-A has also begun to look at these
branches, and a roadmap for organic electronics
in health care is in preparation.
Significant progress has been made in the last
several years and first generations of products
have reached the market in significantly larger
numbers than at the time of the last roadmap.
On the other hand, growth had not yet been as
rapid as was predicted by many market research-
ers a number of years ago, which has led in some
circles to a degree of disillusionment. This report
indicates, however, that organic electronics is
indeed still moving ahead and is becoming an
industry, and the market analysis presented on
pages 34 and 35 in this brochure shows as well
that markets are being reached and will continue
to grow. Nonetheless, in order to fulfill the more
demanding specifications of more complex
future generations of products, further improve-
ment of materials, process, design and equip-
ment is necessary. In the next section, we look at
some of the main application parameters whose
development will be key to enabling future
product generations. After that, we will look at
the main technologies in organic electronics and
discuss the key technology parameters under-
lying the application parameters.
Key Application Parameters
The viability of each application or product will
depend on fulfillment of a number of parameters
that describe the complexity or performance of
the product (application parameters). For the
applications above, groups of specialists identi-
Figure 15: OE-A Roadmap for organic and printed electronics, with forecast for the market entry in large volumes (general availability) for the
different applications. The table is a further development of and update to the fourth version of the OE-A Roadmap presented in 2011.
Portable chargers
Flexible segmented
displays integrated into
smart cards, price labels,
bendable colour displays
Design projects
Primary single-cell
batteries, memory
for interactive games,
ITO-free transparent
conductive films
Garments with integrated
sensors, anti theft, brand
protection, printed test
strips, physical sensors
Existing
until 2013
Consumer electronics,
customized mobile power
Bendable OLEDs, plastic
LCD, in-moulded displays,
large-area signage,
rollable color displays
Transparent and decorative
lighting modules
Rechargeable single-cell
batteries, transparent
conductors for touch
sensors, printed reflective
display elements
Integrated systems on
garment), large-area
physical sensor arrays and
mass market intelligent
packaging
Short term
20142016
Specialized building
integration, off grid
Rollable OLEDs with OTFT,
(semi-) transparent rollable
displays, flexible consumer
electronics
Flexible lighting
Printed multi-cell batteries,
integrated flexible
multi-touch sensors,
printed logic chips
Textile sensors on fibre,
dynamic price displays,
NFC / RFID smart labels,
disposable monitoring
devices
Medium term
20172020
Building integration,
grid connected PV
Rollable OLED TVs,
telemedicine
General lighting technology
Directly printed batteries,
active and passive devices
to Smart Object
OLEDs on textile,
fibre-electronics,
health monitoring systems
and smart buildings
Longer term
2021+
OE-A Roadmap for Organic and Printed Electronics Applications
Organic
Photovoltaics
Flexible
Displays
OLED
Lighting
Electronics &
Components
Integrated
Smart
Systems
OE-A 2013
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 21
Figure 16: Printed temperature sensor tag for pharmaceutical applications.
(Source: Thin Film Electronics ASA)
fied the most important application and technol-
ogy parameters and requirements for different
generations of products. Here we list only a small
excerpt of the key application parameters that
have been identified as relevant to several of the
applications. Not surprisingly, the key application
parameters across the five application clusters
have not changed since the last edition or even
the one before that. The following list is in no
particular order since the relevance of the differ-
ent parameters varies for the diverse applications.
Complexity of the device
The complexity of the circuit (e.g., number of
transistors) as well as the number of different
devices (e.g., circuit, power supply, switch, sen-
sor, display) that are integrated have a crucial
influence on reliability and production yield.
Operating frequency of the circuit
With increasing complexity of the application
(e.g., increasing memory capacity) higher
switching speeds are necessary.
Lifetime / stability / homogeneity / reliability
Lifetime (shelf and operation), the environmen-
tal stability, stability against other materials
and solvents, and homogeneity of the materi-
als are an issue due to the intrinsic properties
of the materials.
Operating voltage
For mobile devices powered by batteries, PV or
radio frequency, it is essential to have low oper-
ating voltages (<10V).
Efficiency
The conversion efficiency of light to electricity
or electricity to light is a key parameter for
photo-voltaic cells and photodiodes or OLEDs,
and power efficiency of circuitry is also impor-
tant for many applications, especially those
which are mobile and need to be light weight.
Cost
Although most applications target new appli-
cations and markets rather than replacements,
costs have to be low. For some applications,
such as rollable displays, a cost premium over
conventional rigid displays may be accepted,
while for other applications, e.g., in packaging,
low cost will be a major driving factor.
Technology
As we have mentioned before, we use the term
organic electronics for brevity to refer to the field
of electronics beyond classical silicon approaches,
but include concepts such as large-area or flexible
circuits and printed inorganic materials. Although
some classic device concepts are used, materials,
including substrates, and patterning processes
are very different from those used in the conven-
tional electronic industry. In this section we
review key materials, processes and devices for
organic electronics and discuss the key technol-
ogy parameters that are critical for development
of future products.
22 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
Functional Materials
Organic and printed electronics rely on electri-
cally active materials that have conducting,
semi-conducting, luminescent, electrochromic or
electrophoretic properties. The materials have to
be carefully selected, since process conditions
and the interplay of the active material with
other layers such as dielectrics and passivation
materials in the device stack can greatly influence
the performance of the final device. Of the avail-
able materials there is a choice between organic
or inorganic, solution based or evaporated; the
selection of a specific material depends both on
the demands of the device application and the
choice of manufacturing technique employed. It
is very likely that in a final application several
approaches will be used in parallel.
Organic semiconductors have found uses in
active devices such as OLEDs, OPV, diodes and
transistors. Currently available materials can be
split into three classes: small molecules, amor-
phous polymers and semi-crystalline polymers.
The charge transport properties of these organic
semiconductors, which are dictated by their mor-
phologies and tendency for crystallization,
strongly depend on the deposition conditions
used. Both p-type and n-type organic semicon-
ductors have been developed, and research into
n-type materials has been increased over the past
years, due to their importance in the production
of CMOS circuits in combination with p-type
materials and matching dielectrics.
The charge carrier mobility of organic semicon-
ductors has improved dramatically in recent years
although it is still much lower than crystalline
silicon, but starting to be competitive with amor-
phous silicon. It is expected that the performance
of organic semiconductors will approach or
match polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) in coming
years (Figure 17), first in research where mobili-
ties of up to 15 cm
2
/Vs have been reported, and
some time later in commercial products such as
the next generation of large format OLED displays.
In fact, the growth in charge carrier mobilities
might soon begin to appear as a kind of scaling
law in organic electronics, comparable to the
transistor density scaling according to Moores
law in microelectronics. As development moves
toward products, processability and reproducibil-
ity as well as mobility have become increasingly
important in order to enable real-world device
production. Leading material companies in the
field have spent ever increasing efforts focusing
on evaluation and improvement of these charac-
teristics, reaching a level where the first genera-
tions of products using these materials are
expected to launch in the near future.
Figure 17: OE-A Roadmap for the charge carrier mobility of semiconductors for organic and printed
electronics applications. The values for amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)
are given for comparison.
Mobility of Semiconductors for Organic and Printed Electronics Applications
C
h
a
r
g
e

c
a
r
r
i
e
r

m
o
b
i
l
i
t
y
100
10
1
0.1
0.01
Existing Short term Medium term Longer term
(until 2013) (2014-2016) (2017-2020) (2021+)
[cm
2
/Vs]
The values refer to materials
that are available in commer-
cial quantities and to devices
that are manufactured in
high- throughput processes.
Poly-Si
a-Si
S
m
a
l
l

m
o
l
e
c
u
l
e
s
,
P
r
e
c
u
r
s
o
r
s
,
P
o
l
y
m
e
r
s
N
E
W
C
O
N
C
E
P
T
S
In
o
r
g
a
n
ic
s
, N
a
n
o
-
m
a
t
e
r
ia
ls
OE-A 2013
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 23
There has also been strong progress in materials
for OPV, where power conversion efficiencies
have now gone above 9 %, and 12 % in vacuum-
deposited devices, to be competitive with a-Si.
However, significant work remains in the transla-
tion of small-area, lab-scale cell performance into
the large-area, stable and inexpensive produc-
tion-level modules required on the market. From
a semiconductor perspective, this challenge
requires the development of materials that can
be easily and cost-effectively scaled, and which
can maintain high-power conversion efficiencies
(PCEs) over extended lifetimes when exposed to
real-world environmental conditions.
In addition to organic materials, inorganic semi-
conductors such as ZnO and IZO and new materi-
als such as carbon nanotubes or nanowires are of
growing interest. Recent developments have
shown several semiconductors in these classes
which can be processed from solution as a disper-
sion or precursor or deposited in vacuum or vapor
phase at low temperature. More recently,
graphene, a 2D monatomic sheet of carbon
atoms, has gathered a lot of attention, and
exhibits a number of properties that enable its
potential use as a functional material including
extremely high mobility. It has been explored for
applications in transistors, sensors, transparent
conductors and supercapacitors, among others.
The key challenge for graphene at the moment is
processing while maintaining the extraordinary
physical properties.
Printable conductors may be metallic, metal
oxides, organic or based on carbon nanostruc-
tures. The choice of conducting materials is
strongly dependent on their application. For high
metal-like conductivity it is still necessary to
use filled materials such as silver inks. If conduc-
tivity is needed in combination with high trans-
parency, e.g., for OPV or OLEDs, special inorganic
materials like ITO or the polymeric PEDOT:PSS
represent state of the art solutions. Transparent
organic conductors still show inferior conductivi-
ties in comparison to metal oxides like ITO but
are continuing to improve in performance and
become more competitive. The polymers allow
for wet processing, and the flexibility of the poly-
mer coatings makes them attractive candidates
for the replacement of brittle inorganic materials.
Recently, significant progress has been made on
transparent inorganic conductors, with solution-
processable materials such as carbon nanotubes,
graphene, and nanomaterial based inks (e.g.,
silver nanowires) showing excellent conductivity
and transparency in addition to improved
mechanical properties over ITO.
Printable metallic conductors, which have been
commercial for many years in the form of screen-
printable silver pastes for numerous applications,
have continued to develop, with progress in
nanostructured and precursor inks, replacement
of silver by copper, advances in photonic sinter-
ing, and improvements in formulation that have
enabled stretchable conductive inks (Figure 18).
Carbon inks have seen increased applications,
including temperature sensitive resistors.
Figure 18: Formable and stretchable ink for 3D circuitry. (Source: DuPont)
24 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
Dielectrics are passive materials, which are used
in many active and passive devices. Numerous
dielectrics are solution-processable and can be
printed. There are a number of different material
classes that can be used as dielectrics, from ther-
moplastic to thermosetting plastic polymers, and
they can be thermally or UV-curable. The dielec-
tric (e.g., thickness and dielectric constant) can
play an extremely important role in performance
of devices, and this has been extensively studied
in OTFTs, where the dielectric-semiconductor
interface is critical for optimal carrier mobility
and on/off ratio. Significant work on optimal
dielectrics for both p- and n-type OTFTs has been
done, and this has, next to improvements in the
semiconductors, been a significant factor in
improvement of OTFT performance.
Encapsulation materials are often required to
protect organic electronic systems against envi-
ronmental influences to insure sufficient shelf
and operational lifetime. This protection is, for
example, critical for OPV and OLEDs, where highly
reactive metal electrodes may be used, but also
important in other aspects of organic electronics.
In some cases water vapor transmission rates
below 10
6
g m
2
d
1
(at 20 C / 50 RH) and oxygen
transmission rates lower than 10
6
cm
3
m
2
d
1

bar
-1
are needed, but the materials need to be
transparent as well for OPV and OLEDs. Encapsu-
lation materials are either passive or active.
Active materials, or getters, are designed to
absorb water or oxygen (typically zeolites, reac-
tive metal oxides) before they can reach and
damage the active device stacks. In combination
with passive materials, they enable shelf and
operational lifetime of currently commercially
available OLED devices. Passive materials include
organic UV or thermally curable adhesives for
edge or monolithic sealing of devices typically
sandwiched between glass or engineered flexible
substrates. Flexible substrates often comprise
planar diffusion barriers, materials include silicon
oxides, silicon nitrides, silicon oxynitrites or
alumina layers. For encapsulations where a
higher transmission rate is possible, e.g., for
OTFTss, it is possible to use polymers filled with
nanoparticles or nanoflakes.
Substrates
Most organic and printed electronics devices
target the use of flexible and potentially low-cost
substrates to enable large area and/or more
rugged products with a higher freedom of design.
Since the device manufacturing process usually
starts with the substrate onto which several lay-
ers of active and passive material are deposited,
the surface needs to be compatible and to guaran-
tee processability in subsequent production steps
OE-A
Gravure Printing
Impression cylinder
Gravure
cylinder
Image elements are
equally spaced but
variable in depth and area
Blade
Ink
OE-A
Ink-jet Printing
Piezo
Transducer
Ink Orifice
Substrate
Figure 19: Rotogravure printing process. Figure 20: Screen printing process.
Figure 21: Ink-jet deposition mechanism (piezo).
Screen Printing
Squeegee
Sreen mesh
Ink Frame
Substrate Base plate (stationary)
OE-A
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 25
and of course functionality in the final applica-
tion. The numerous flexible electronics applica-
tions all have their own specific requirements,
and therefore suitable substrate solutions within
one application group can still differ over a wide
range. In general, glass and metal (stainless steel,
aluminum foil or the like) are still the only
substrates readily available with high and reliable
barrier properties a key requirement for many
applications (OLED lighting, display, organic
photovoltaics). Among the polymer films, the
polyester grades (PET, PEN) are most widely used
today in organic and printed electronics, but also
other polymers, paper, cardboard and textiles
have been utilized in these applications. Plastic
materials like PET, PEN or PC (polycarbonate) can
be tailor-made to adjust physical and surface
properties over a wide range so that they can
serve as all-round solutions. Other plastics like
polyimide (PI), polyethersulfone (PES) or poly-
etheretherketone (PEEK) are specialties and
hence higher priced materials with special advan-
tages like increased heat or chemical stability.
Patterning Processes
A wide range of large-area deposition and
patterning techniques can be used for organic
electronics. Most prominent in this context are
various printing techniques that are well known
from the graphic arts industry and enable reel-
to-reel processing.
Examples of two high-volume printing processes
are rotogravure (Figure 19) and screen (Figure 20).
Other mass printing processes are offset,
lithography or flexography. The lateral resolution
(smallest feature that can be printed) typically
ranges from 20 m to 100 m depending on
process, throughput, substrate and ink proper-
ties. Film thicknesses can range from well under
1 m to tens of m. Each process has its own
strengths, e.g., screen is excellent for stacking
multiple thick films, while gravure combines high
throughput with robust printing forms and can
deliver homogeneous thin films. These printing
processes can have enormous throughput and
low production cost but place demanding
requirements on the functional inks in terms of
properties like viscosity, and cannot correct for
issues like substrate distortion. Mass printing will
be an important production process especially for
applications where large area, high volumes and
low costs are important. Recently, there has been
progress in improving the resolution of mass
printing processes, e.g., through new screen
materials or laser-assisted etching of gravure
forms.

Ink-jet printing (Figure 21) has received growing
interest as a way to deposit functional materials.
As a digital printing process, it enables variable
printing since no printing plate is needed, and
can thus correct in-line for distortion. Ink-jet
printing head developers have continued to
develop finer and finer printing heads, which are
Figure 22: Throughput vs. feature size for a range of typical production processes.
H
i
g
h

(
>
1
)
M
e
d
i
u
m
(
0
.
0
1
-
1
)
T
h
r
o
u
g
h
p
u
t

(
m
2
/
s
)
Minimum feature size (m)
1 10 100 500
Gravure
Flexo
L
o
w

(
<
0
.
0
1
)
High Resolution (< 10 m)
MediumResolution
(10-50 m)
Low Resolution (> 50 m)
100
1
10
-2
10
-4
OE-A 2013
Xerography
Throughput vs. Feature Size for Typical Production Processes
Offset
Screen
Laser ablation
R2R
Photo
Litho-
graphy
R2R
Ink-jet
26 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
starting to enable features on the order of a few
m, and throughput is improving with the devel-
opment of multi-head printers. Recently, aerosol-
jet printing has also received a lot of attention,
and super ink-jet printing, a related process, has
claimed ability to get to micron features without
pre-patterning the substrate. Progress in increas-
ing the resolution and registration of printing
processes will be a critical step to dimensional
scaling of organic electronics, which could be of
similar importance to the scaling of photolitho-
graphy processes for silicon electronics, the
driving force behind Moores Law.
Related to volume printing are unpatterned
solution coating techniques such as slot-die or
wire bar coating. Slot-die coating in particular
has gathered significant interest, because it can
be non-contact, pre-metered and work with a
sealed system, which is useful especially for
solvent-based materials. Slot-die coating can
operate in either bead/meniscus mode or in
curtain mode.
Laser ablation, laser induced forward transfer,
large area vacuum deposition, soft lithography
and large area photolithography are further
patterning and deposition techniques. Some of
these processes are subtractive, i.e., involve
removing unwanted material from a large area
unpatterned film, while others are additive, i.e.,
only deposit material where it is wanted. Sub-m
patterning techniques such as nanoimprint
lithography and microcontact printing have
gained a good deal of attention recently but are
still primarily used in research. Pad printing, hot
stamping, xerography and surface energy
patterning are also receiving substantial atten-
tion. Each method has its individual strengths,
and in general, processes with a higher resolution
have a smaller throughput, though there has
been some progress in this area (Figure 22).
There are no single standard processes in exis-
tence today. Deciding which printing or other pat-
terning process is used depends on the specific
requirements of a particular device. In general,
different processes have to be used for subse-
quent steps of a multilayer device in order to
optimize each process step. The above mentioned
processes differ strongly with regard to e.g., reso-
lution and throughput, and one system may
require some high-throughput steps followed by
high resolution processes, e.g., deposition of large
amounts of material using coating or mass print-
ing followed by fine patterning of a small portion
of the surface using laser ablation.
Process Technology Levels
The technologies that are used in organic elec-
tronics range from batch, clean-room, etching-
based processes to mass printing processes that
are capable of deposition of square meters of
substrates per second. Here is a rough classifica-
tion of the technologies in three different tech-
nology levels:
The wafer level technology includes batch pro-
cessing, typically film substrates on a carrier. An
adapted semiconductor line is used for process-
ing. High resolution can be achieved by vacuum
deposition and/or spin coating followed by
photolithography and wet or dry etching. The
production cost is relatively high and the process
is not compatible for conversion to in-line sheet-
to-sheet or reel-to-reel processes.
Under hybrid technologies, we summarize com-
binations of processes including large-area pho-
tolithography, screen printing or printed circuit
board (PCB) technologies that make use of flex-
ible substrates (e.g., polymer films or paper).
Deposition of materials is achieved by spin coat-
ing, blade coating or large-area vacuum deposi-
tion, in some cases also partly by printing. Ink-jet
printing and laser patterning are further technol-
ogies that are grouped in the hybrids and enable
production at a medium cost level. At the
moment, hybrid appears to be possibly the most
promising technology for further market penetra-
tion in the next few years, and it could also be
combined with some amount of silicon for
specific functions in heterogeneous integration.
Fully printed means continuous, automated
mass-production compatible printing and coat-
ing techniques (flexo, gravure, offset, slot-die,
etc.), flexible substrates and reel-to-reel technol-
ogy (Figure 23). Although all-printed devices do
not yet show as high resolution or performance
as those made using wafer or hybrid processes,
mass printing has great potential for very low
cost production and will be able to deliver
extremely large numbers of products. At the
same time it requires significant volumes of
materials even for trials, and will need large-
volume applications to properly utilize such high-
throughput equipment.
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 27
Key Technology Parameters
The detailed application parameter specifications
for the different applications and product genera-
tions help define the requirements that have to
be fulfilled from technology side. The technology
parameters are more fundamental and describe
fundamental material, device or process proper-
ties. As with the application parameters, we only
list a small excerpt of the key technology param-
eters identified for the various applications,
focusing on those that are relevant to a number
of applications. As was the case with application
parameters, the same key things are important
as in the last edition.
Mobility / electrical performance (threshold
voltage, on/off current)
The performance (operating frequency, current
driving capacity) of the circuits depends on the
charge carrier mobility of the semiconductor,
the conductivity of the conductor and the
dielectric behavior of the dielectric materials.
Resolution / registration
The performance (operating frequency, current
driving capacity) and reliability of the circuits
depend on the lateral distance of the elec-
trodes (resolution) within the devices (e.g.,
transistors) and the overlay accuracy (registra-
tion) between different patterned layers.
Barrier properties / environmental stability
The lifetime depends on a combination of the
sensitivity of the materials and devices to
oxygen and moisture and the barrier properties
of protective layers, substrates and sealants
against oxygen and moisture. The necessary
barrier properties vary for the different applica-
tions over several orders of magnitude.
Flexibility / bending radius
Thin form factors and flexibility of the devices
are key advantages of organic electronics. In
order to achieve reliable flexibility and even
rollable devices, materials, design and process
have to be chosen carefully.
Fit of process parameters (speed, temperature,
solvents, ambient conditions, vacuum, inert
gas atmosphere)
In order to have a sufficient working system, it
is important to adjust the parameters of the
different materials and devices used to build
organic electronics.
Yield
Low-cost electronics in high volumes are only
possible when the processes allow production
at high yields. This includes safe processes,
adjusted materials and circuit designs as well
as an in-line quality control.

Figure 23: Reel-to-reel printing of electronic devices. (Source: 3D-Micromac)
28 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
Principle Challenges
One goal of the roadmap is to identify red brick
walls principle challenges that can only be over-
come by major breakthroughs beyond the expec-
tations of standard technology development. For
each application, the requirements for product
generations were compared with expected tech-
nology development and the key challenges were
identified and discussed. Like the key application
and technology parameters, the red brick walls
may vary for the different applications. Those
discussed below are valid for all applications and
summarize the most important ones.
A common feature of all future generations of
the different products is that the complexity and
overall size of logic circuits is increasing. In
certain cases, the applications include millions of
transistors, other combine various different elec-
tronic devices like circuit, power supply, sensors,
displays and switches. In the future, more and
more higher and higher performance compo-
nents will have to be fit into smaller and smaller
areas, which for other applications high-perfor-
mance components will have to be placed pre-
cisely over large areas, up to a few square meters.
At the same time, wafer level processing will not
in the longer term be a commercially viable
approach for a number of applications and hybrid
or fully printed processes will need to be used.
Based on the above considerations and the
results of the work of the application and tech-
nology groups, we believe that major break-
throughs in the following areas are absolutely
necessary:
Materials need to be improved concerning elec-
trical performance, processability and stability
Charge carrier mobilities of above
510 cm
2
/Vs in printable commercially
available materials for both n- and p-type
semiconductors are needed to address
more complex applications. While there is
progress in this area, commercially viable
materials are still missing
In addition to high champion mobilities,
materials that can be processed to create
highly uniform devices are critical
Improved processability, especially formula-
tions in non-toxic solvents, is urgently needed
for many materials
Materials need improved environmental
stability to enable operation in more robust
environments and to reduce barrier require-
ments
Processes: resolution, registration, uniformity
and characterization improvements are needed
Higher resolution and registration are needed
to improve performance and reduce
footprint of complex circuits, to lead to
scaling of devices in a similar way to that
observed in silicon
Uniformity over large areas need to be
improved especially for applications such
as lighting, OPV and displays
High-throughput in-line electrical
characterization of devices is needed to
guarantee product performance, and is
simply not available for many applications
Encapsulation:
While there has been progress, barrier
properties of flexible, low-cost encapsulation
need to be strongly improved to enhance
lifetime of the devices
In particular, achieving flexible, transparent
barriers at low cost continues to be a
challenge
Existing standards and regulations for classical
electronics do not address specifics for organic
and printed electronics
Complying with standards developed for
Si-based electronics appears extremely
difficult in many applications, and does
not actually reflect the application needs
Defining new standards specifically for
organic and printed electronics is highly
challenging
The key challenges cannot be treated indepen-
dently since they depend on each other. Improved
materials may reduce encapsulation require-
ments; resolution and registration accuracy
depend on various patterning techniques and
may vary even within a technique depending on
throughput.
A key reason to identify red brick walls is to help
the organic electronics community align its
efforts to solve the most pressing problems.
Longer-term strategies, funding and new partner-
ships along the value chain are necessary to over-
come the red brick walls.
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 29
Summary and Outlook
Organic and printed electronics is a versatile plat-
form technology that enables fresh electronic
applications in many fields, such as interactive
toys, RFID-tags, sensors, lighting, rollable displays
or flexible solar cells, which are now entering the
market. With this fifth version of the OE-A Road-
map, we have updated and expanded the infor-
mation about our view of the developments in
this field. We have analyzed the progress and
roadmap for five clusters of applications, seen
that products have entered the market in more
application areas than at the last roadmap and
updated the technological and business develop-
ment status. We have looked at key parameters
and expected technology development for them
and used this updated information to identify the
key challenges, which we call red brick walls, and
found that the key issues are mostly the same,
though some challenges are starting to be met.
We have also tried to bring the basic information
together to a relatively simple picture of the main
developments in this field from the application
and technology point of view.
The technology has achieved enough market
penetration to start to qualify as an industry,
albeit a nascent one, even though market devel-
opment was not as quick as expected some years
ago. Since the last edition of the roadmap, the
number of products and the range of applications
where organic electronics is reaching the market
have increased. Mass markets are not yet there,
with the possible exception of OLED displays for
mobile phones, but could be reached in the near
future; this will depend on progress in the fields
of material, equipment, processes and device
design. Some of this progress will be straightfor-
ward, while we have identified some areas where
breakthroughs will be needed.
For example, materials need to continue to be
improved not only in terms of performance but
also processability, uniformity and stability.
Improved patterning processes with high resolu-
tion, registration, and uniformity are needed for
future product generations, as are in-line electri-
cal performance testing methods. Encapsulation
materials, while performance has improved, still
need to become high performance at low cost.
The challenge of developing standards suitable
for organic electronics needs to be addressed.
Organic electronics is beginning to be an indus-
try, and we are beginning to see some key trends,
namely:
Mobility of organic semiconductors,
conductivity of printed conductors and
efficiency of OPV materials are continuing
to increase rapidly
Patterning processes are being scaled to
smaller dimensions
Hybrid processing and heterogeneous integration
of printed and silicon-based components show
promise of leading to new products
Flexible, lightweight, mobile electronic
products are starting to enter the market,
enabled by organic electronics
Applications in intelligent packaging and
smart textiles are starting to appear.
However, some questions remain open; for exam-
ple, we have not yet been able to define a simple
Moores law for organic electronics or identify a
killer application in the longer term, though
there are indications that progress in mobilities
and in resolution of printing and patterning could
possibly lead to scaling laws in the future.
Although there are many fascinating applications,
it is still too early to tell which of these or new
ones we have not yet thought of will turn into a
killer application, or if gradual market penetra-
tion in a variety of areas within the diverse and
complex field of organic electronics is more likely.
Organic and printed electronics is now in the
market and has great potential for further
growth.
We will continue to follow the developments to
find the major trends. The roadmap is an ongoing
task and key activity of the OE-A and its mem-
bers. A more detailed presentation of the road-
map will be published as a White Paper later in
2013 and will be available from OE-A.
Organic and printed electronics is a disruptive
technology that will create a wealth of new
products that we cannot even think of today.
OE-A will keep you updated.
30 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
The integration of thin and flexible electronics
opens up new possibilities for classically printed
products. Light, sound, displays, power or sensors
can be integrated into traditional print products
like journals, brochures or packaging, thereby
enhancing their functionality. Interactive print
products provide additional functionality and new
possibilities for industries such as advertising.
In order to illustrate new possibilities, the limited,
special edition of the OE-A brochure boasts an
interactive cover page which gives you a feeling
for the next generation of electronics: enabling
new applications that are thin, lightweight,
flexible and produced at low cost. The functional
cover page is an impressive example of this
emerging technology and came about as part
of the OE-A demonstrator project.
More than 4,000 samples were produced by two
teams from the Munich University of Applied
Sciences and Chemnitz University of Technology.
OE-A members
DuPont Microcircuit Materials,
DuPont Teijin Films,
Enfucell,
Fraunhofer ENAS,
Fraunhofer ISIT,
Schoeller Technocell and
THIEME
were additional partners on this project. The
demonstrator illustrates the versatility that
organic and printed electronics can offer in terms
of scalability, miniaturization, adaptability,
manufacturability, integration, complexity and
high technical yield.
Experience the bright future of organic and
printed electronics!
Technology and Process
A major benefit of organic and printed electronics
is the ability to automatically integrate different
electronic devices into a complex system by
making use of high-throughput production
processes.
The project was coordinated by the Munich
University of Applied Sciences which also led one
of the project teams and designed the layout of
the demonstrator. The interactive cover page
combines screen-printed electronic circuitry,
a printed zinc/manganese dioxide battery, a
printed push button and four green light-emit-
ting diodes. As a first step, the project team at
the Munich University of Applied Sciences
charges THIEME with screen printing the conduc-
tive circuitry using a silver ink from DuPont
The Future of Printed Products Interactive Cover Page
Figure 1: Interactive cover page of the 2013 OE-A brochure.
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 31
Microcircuit Materials. The substrate consists of
thin modified photo paper (p_e:smart) by
Schoeller Technocell. After curing the ink by air-
drying or using a low-heat drying technique, an
entirely automated process is in place at Fraun-
hofer ISIT to position, then affix the low-current
LEDs to the printed silver contacts using a
conductive adhesive.
The total thickness of the components is only
0.7 millimeters, so the electronics are barely
noticeable. Finally, the printed zinc/manganese
dioxide battery from Enfucell and the printed
push button are mounted by the Munich
University of Applied Sciences.
The project team at Chemnitz University of
Technology prints conductive lines and the cur-
rent collector of the battery on plactic substrate
provided by DuPont Teijin Films with commercial
carbon ink. Using zinc as an anode and manga-
nese dioxide as a cathode, the materials are
printed on dedicated areas on top of the current
The picture on the cover page shows an aircraft marshaller with
electronics integrated into his safety jacket. One application for
organic and printed electronics is smart textiles. The ability to inte-
grate smart textiles has already been demonstrated by several
OE-A member companies and institutes. Integrating electronics
such as lighting, sensors, batteries or photovoltaics into fabrics
enables a wealth of new options in fashion, sports, medical, health
care or automotive applications.
collector. Next, the LEDs are attached to the
conductive circuitry using the automated process
mentioned above. In the meantime, the comple-
mentary part of the demonstrator, including the
remaining electrodes and a printed push-button
that is part of the embedded circuitry, are printed
on the same Schoeller Technocell substrate as in
the other project team. The two parts of the
demonstrator are then combined with an
electrolyte and a separator between the anode
and cathode materials. Three battery cells are
connected in series. This way, a fully integrated
solution is manufactured without having to sepa-
rately interconnect components. The capacity of
the printed batteries from Enfucell and the
Chemnitz University of Technology is sufficient to
operate the four LEDs on the cover page for one
second more than 2,000 times.
We hope that you will find this demonstrator
useful and that you will come to appreciate
how far organic and printed electronics has come
as a technology enabling new applications.
For more information, please visit
www.oe-a.org/interactive-cover-page
Discover the possibilities enabled
by mass- produced, printed electronics!
www.oe-a.org/interactive-cover-page
32 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
Organic and printed electronics carries great
potential for multiple applications. The goal of
the OE-A Demonstrator Group is to illustrate the
potential of this emerging technology and to
foster cooperation among OE-A members. Since
the working group was formed in 2005, an
increasing number of project teams from Europe,
North America and Asia have worked together on
a variety of demonstrators.
OE-A Toolbox for Organic and Printed Electronics
The OE-A Demonstrator team developed the
OE-A Toolbox for Organic and Printed Electronics
in 2010. It provides the opportunity to develop
and build new applications and integrated smart
systems by using organic and printed electronics
components.
Organic and Printed Electronics:
OE-A Demonstrators Illustrate the Potential
The OE-A Toolbox includes more than 25 different
organic and printed electronic devices, from sen-
sors to solar cells and paper to transparent films
or plastic substrates. The OE-A Toolbox continues
to be expanded on a regular basis. Consequently,
the Toolbox represents the state-of-the-art of
organic and printed electronic components.
Figure 2: OE-A Toolbox with more
than 25 different components.
Figure 1: OE-A Demonstrator projects 20062013.
Organic and Printed Electronics: OE-A Demonstrators Illustrate the Potential
2013
OE-A 2013
2006 2007 2008
2009
2010 2011
2012
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 33
OE-A Demonstrator Competition
The OE-A Demonstrator Group started a competi-
tion in four different categories which is open to
universities and research institutes as well as to
companies. OE-A members and non-members
can enter the competition in the form of func-
tional demonstrators or design concepts.
The university competition gives young engineers
and scientists the opportunity to design creative
new products utilizing components from the
Toolbox. By providing a set of devices from the
OE-A Toolbox, the OE-A offers contestants the
opportunity to build demonstrations of visionary
applications in organic and printed electronics by
making use of its unique features: thin, light-
weight, flexible, robust and produced at low cost.

The category Freestyle Demonstrator is open to
OE-A members only; a functional demonstrator
utilizing organic and printed electronics has to be
submitted.
To assist with the dissemination process of
publicly funded project demonstrators, the
OE-A Demonstrator Group included the category
Publicly Funded Project Demonstrators.
In the category Design Competition, designers
or students at a university for design are invited
to submit posters, films, models or a functional
demonstrator that develops new applications or
improves existing product concepts.
All demonstrators and concepts that have been
submitted will be presented to the worldwide
community at LOPE-C, and the best demonstrator
in each category will be awarded during the
LOPE-C Dinner.
In 2011, the first place was awarded to the
Munich University of Applied Sciences for an
interactive childrens book. The student team
integrated printed electrochromic displays, laser-
structured electroluminescent displays, OLEDs,
printed conductive lines, laser-structured push
buttons, an RFID power supply as well as a solar
cell power supply.
In 2012, the OE-A received more than 50 func-
tional demonstrators and design concepts as
entries in the competition. The prizes for the best
demonstrators in each category were awarded to
an inkjet graphene biosensor from Merck, Japan;
a printed digital white board from Hochschule
der Medien, Stuttgart, Germany; a remote-
controlled toy car with a printed pyroelectric
infrared sensor and a printed piezo sensor for the
protection of drivers and pedestrians from the
EU project 3PLAST; and finally, design concepts
for electroactive polymer applications from the
University College West Flanders, Belgium.

In 2013, the demonstrator initiative has been
expanded. A limited edition OE-A brochure
featuring an interactive front page with inte-
grated organic and printed electronics has been
produced (see article on page 26). 19 functional
demonstrators and ten design concepts have
been submitted to the OE-A competition for
multifunctional demonstrators.
Outlook
The demonstrator project is a key activity of the
OE-A. State-of-the-art concepts in organic and
printed electronics are realized by combining the
competence of several partners in the fields of
materials, processes and devices to produce more
and more complex and integrated systems which
will ultimately become the products of the future!
Figure 3: Award Ceremony at LOPE-C.
34 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
For many industries, the ability to create elec-
tronics based on inexpensive and abundant mate-
rials, using simple printing processes, is a dream.
So too is the idea that flexible electronics could
be integrated in new ways, from packaging labels
to wearable devices. Yet recent developments
suggest that this dream of printed and organic
electronics is beginning to turn into reality.
Towards the end of the last decade, the plastic
electronics industry could be forgiven for feeling
as though its opportunity was slipping away. The
mid-2000s had seen printed and organic elec-
tronics generate a great deal of hype, as a coming
revolution in the way electronic devices are
manufactured and integrated into things.
What followed, in terms of commercial successes,
did not compare to the industrys vision. The
high-profile technology push from developers
had grabbed the attention of potential integra-
tors. Yet the technologies needed to realize many
of the concepts envisaged were found wanting.
The toolkit was not in place. Excitement turned
to disillusionment.
The picture in 2013 is better. OLED displays have
become a standard bearer for organic electronics,
and flexible or, at least initially, glass-free
displays have injected renewed enthusiasm in
those outside the plastic electronics community
who can see value in the unique proposition of
robust, lightweight flexible screens (though
interest in fully flexible or rollable, display-based
products is less clear).
Market for Organic and Printed Electronics
By Adam Page, Smithers Pira
Projections
Smithers Pira estimates the global market for
plastic and printed electronics to be worth some
US$ 7 9 billion in 2012, and forecasts it will
grow to US$ 190 billion, but not until 2025. There
have been many over-optimistic estimates on the
market potential published, but these have not
come to pass. This is partly through the travails of
a largely stalled world economy; but the perfor-
mance of many early systems has not been good
enough or reliable enough too. There are estab-
lished businesses using the technology to
produce high volumes of displays and various
electronic components, leveraging their printing
skills. Smithers Pira forecasts low, but steady,
growth for the rest of the decade, with adoption
growing faster afterwards.
The main drivers for this growth are the improved
capability of printed items, as developers produce
more efficient end-use products with econom-
ics that are difficult to ignore. New functionality,
linked with drives toward sustainability across
the lifetime of products are making end-users
look for alternative solutions, and printing elec-
tronics certainly provides many benefits over
traditional silicon based electronics and tradi-
tional lighting and photovoltaics.
The end-use applications are only limited by the
imagination, with displays, energy harvesting,
lighting, sensors and circuitry now coming to the
market. Car manufacturers are developing whole
new instrument panels and interior lighting
systems, while totally new lighting systems are
being developed for homes, workplaces and pub-
lic buildings. Consumer products are innovating;
the quality of smart phone, computer and tablet
devices has greatly improved over the past few
years that push consumer expectations and
demands.
Displays
These developing customer requirements change
the expectation for various products, such as
displays, one of the reasons for low take-up of
printed displays. Markets for novel displays
should be understood in the context of high-
volume versions in consumer electronics.
Smithers Pira is the worldwide authority on the packaging, paper
and print industry supply chains. It was originally established in
1930 as the Printing Industry Research Association. It provides
market reports, consultancy, books, publications, events, member-
ship and testing. A new report on the future of plastic electronics
will be published later in 2013.
www.smitherspira.com
Smithers Pira
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 35
Amazons Kindle reader is now available for
US$ 100, a sum within the reach of most
consumers (at least in higher income regions).
The Retina displays on new Apple products are
very high quality and a major selling point so it
looks like the prospect for plastic paper readers
has evaporated. There are applications in shelf
signage for instantly updateable information, but
these are not finding the market uptake that has
been expected, with few stores using them.
Smaller displays can be used in different areas.
Smart cards, for example, offer one chance of
showing the benefits of including printed elec-
tronics in various everyday items. Proponents say
this can show an account balance in real time or
generate a one-time passcode for cardholder not
present transactions.
With mobile banking an account balance can be
seen in great detail on a mobile phone, and this
could easily contain an app to get the passcode.
Merchants will have to have the capability of
entering and validating this code, demanding
new systems. If a card is stolen, there will be a
window for the thief to use the code: it will limit
the opportunities for a card number fraud, but is
not a totally secure solution. So it is not easy to
determine real business benefits.
Packaging
There are new developments and innovative
ideas still being explored and shown. Getting a
large packaging company on board may prove to
be a key step to commercialize the technology,
and grow the market. The printed electronic label
consists of printed memory, sensor and logic,
detects the property and records data about the
product history for later retrieval and display.
One of the first applications is temperature
sensing this is a practical example of intelligent
packaging, a concept that has been discussed for
many years but has yet to break through.
Evaluate
As the technology improves and develops, the
fledgling companies have to scale up laboratory
results, produce pilot products and build a cus-
tomer base. On this path to a fully working
product that can be manufactured without any
surprises, there are various technical hurdles to
overcome.
There are solid businesses based on printing elec-
tronics, the markets mainstream electronics, with
small displays and touch screens for mobile
devices faring well. There are many mind-blowing
technology demonstrations, but many are a long
way from being successful commercial products.
Uses are ever-widening: in displays and lighting,
for packaging and labels, for power harvesting, in
security, sensor monitoring, in automotive and
homes and offices. The business benefits behind
these are less well defined.
Printed electronic developers need a killer appli-
cation, where the new technology provides
significant cost or functional improvements over
existing alternatives. The other route is to invent
a need and fulfill it, but this is much higher risk
and more difficult to accomplish. Developers
have been facing the harsh reality of a global
recession that has hampered early adoption.
The markets will grow significantly, as more
partnerships bring business benefits to manu-
facturers, and end-consumers.
Figure 1: Global market for plastic electronics, US$ billion (2010-2025).
(Source: Smithers Pira)
Global Value of Printed Electronic Products (US$ Billion)
200
150
100
50
0
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025
36 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
www.oe-a.org
List of OE-A Members Represented
Research Institutes
79 Acreo Swedish ICT
80 CEA LITEN
79 CeNTI Centre for Nanotechnology and Smart Materials
81 The Centre for Process Innovation CPI
81 CETEMMSA Technological Centre
83 CSEM
83 CSIRO
84 CTP Centre Technique du Papier
84 ENEA UTTP-NANO
85 EPFL IMT SAMLAB cole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne
85 Fontys University of Applied Sciences
86 Fraunhofer COMEDD
86 Fraunhofer Research Institution for Modular Solid-State Technologies EMFT
87 Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems ENAS
87 Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP
88 Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT
88 Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation IPA
89 Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE
89 Fraunhofer Institute for Silicon Technology ISIT
90 Fraunhofer Alliance POLO
90 Georgia Tech Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics
91 Holst Centre
91 IK4-CIDETEC
92 InnovationLab
93 JOANNEUM RESEARCH
93 Johannes Kepler Universitt Linz LIOS
94 LCPO Universit de Bordeaux
94 LTFN Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
96 NanoTecCenter Weiz
95 NRC Printable Electronics
96 PARC Palo Alto Research Center
97 pmTUC Chemnitz University of Technology
97 Printable Electronics Research Center PERC
98 Quebec Institute of Graphic Communications QIGC
98 Swansea University WCPC
99 Technische Universitt Darmstadt
99 TOPIC Thailand Organic and Printed Electronics Innovation Center
100 University of Leeds Centre of Industrial Collaboration
100 University of Novi Sad
101 University of West Bohemia RICE
101 VTT
Companies
37 3D-Micromac
38 adphos Digital Printing
39 Agfa-Gevaert
40 AIXTRON
42 ALTANA
41 ARJOWIGGINS CREATIVE PAPERS
44 BASF New Business
45 Beneq
46 Ceradrop
47 Coatema Coating Machinery
48 cynora
49 DOWA HD Europe
50 DuPont Microcircuit Materials
51 DuPont Teijin Films
52 EXAKT Advanced Technologies
53 Felix Schoeller
54 FUJIFILM Dimatix
55 Heraeus Precious Metals
56 HNP Mikrosysteme
57 IDAM INA Drives & Mechatronics
58 KAMMANN Maschinenbau
59 Karl Knauer
60 KROENERT
61 Mekoprint
62 Merck
63 Next Energy Technologies
64 NovaCentrix
65 Novaled
66 PolyIC
67 SAES Getters
68 SAFC Hitech
69 Soligie
70 SOLVAY Organic Electronics platform
71 SunaTech
72 Teknek
73 Thin Film Electronics
74 TSE Troller
75 VARTA Microbattery
76 VDL FLOW
77 Xenon Corporation
78 Ynvisible
3D-MICROMAC 37
3D-Micromac AG develops and manufactures
highly efficient state-of-the-art laser microma-
chining systems and innovative coating and
printing technologies. As stand-alone or inte-
grated solutions, the systems are suitable for the
digital fabrication of flexible electronics, e.g.
RFID, OPV and OLED. On demand, 3D-Micromac
also develops new processes and technologies.
Laser competence
Since its founding, 3D-Micromac has gained an
established position in international markets
with sales and service partners in North America,
Asia and Europe. The companys original compe-
tence is grounded in laser micromachining.
Extremely precise positioning systems and inno-
vative beam-delivery concepts, as well as numer-
ous process monitoring methods, offer the high-
est possible process reliability and a maximum
machining speed.
Roll-to-roll processing
Due to an increased demand on the market for
systems to process flexible thin-film substrates,
3D-Micromac developed the microFLEX
TM
pro duct
family. The systems work with a roll-to-roll
process guaranteeing high throughput and are
able to reduce the cost and effort of device pro-
duction. The companys excellent laser processing
competence is thereby fully utilized. The modular
design of microFLEX
TM
ensures high flexibility
regarding different fields of flexible, organic com-
ponent production. 3D-Micromac is thus able to
deliver complete production lines for the manu-
facturing of flexible electronics, from the raw
materials to encapsulated products.
Laser processing, printing and coating tech-
niques, like ink-jet printing, rotary screen printing
and slot die coating, as well as a manufacturing
execution system (MES) can be integrated. The
modular design is ideal for an individual adjust-
ment of the system to the requirements of the
customer. Areas of application include flexible
solar cells, on CIS/CIGS and organic standards,
flexible LED and OLED illumination and rollable
display technologies, the semiconductor industry,
microsystems technology, RFID and printed
batteries.
3D-Micromac AG First Choice in Micromachining
3D-Micromac AG
Technologie-Campus 8 09126 Chemnitz Germany
Phone +49 371 40043-0 E-Mail info@3d-micromac.com
Internet www.3d-micromac.com
38 ADPHOS
adphos a leading engineering company for
thermal processes, like drying, curing, sintering
and others has developed the company-owned
adphosNIR-technology, a widely patented,
photonic energy-based process technology.
It is one of the fastest growing thermal process-
ing technologies for ink jet printing and coatings
application technologies, particularly for water-
based applications. adphos has pioneered the
technology and enhanced its output to provide a
very high power density for the ink or coating
film, leaving the paper and plastic substrate
largely unaffected by this energy. The high power
density found at this particular wavelength drives
out the water (or solvent) and, if necessary, also
sinters or cures very rapidly, ensuring that the
print or coating is dry within a very small foot-
print. This ensures that production machinery
can include an efficient drying as well as thermal
process system without taking up excessive
amounts of machinery or shop floor space.
adphos is a world leader in the design, develop-
ment and supply of drying and thermal process
systems. Working together with coating machine
manufactures, adphos can allow customers to
enter the world of printed electronics without
compromise to substrate and running speed.
The focus of the adphos group lies in applications
of thermal processes for drying and heating
and the distribution of standard components
for lab to fab conditions (NIR drying and heating
modules). The group can also offer the design
and engineering of special purpose machines
and offer its application center for R + D-tests,
pilot productions and production process
demonstrations.
No matter the difficulty of the application needs,
adphosNIR-technology can provide:
Drying within seconds or even
within milliseconds
Defined controlled and reproducible
thermal processes
Drying on temperature sensitive materials
Energy efficiency and affordability!
Our target is to provide our customers with
optimum solutions and provide them with high
added value output. Therefore, the needs and
requirements of our customers always have
priority.
Photonic Drying and Sintering From Lab to Fab Solutions
adphos Digital Printing GmbH
Bruckmhler Str. 27 83052 Bruckmhl/Heufeld Germany
Phone +49 8061 395 100 E-Mail info@adphos.de
Internet www.adphos.de
AGFA-GEVAERT 39
ORGACON is the portfolio of proprietary materi-
als, developed and produced within the Advanced
Coatings & Chemical Business group of Agfa
Materials. ORGACON products show a unique
combination of conductivity, high transparency,
flexibility and processability that is not matched
by other conductive materials.
The ORGACON products line consists of water-
borne dispersions and solvent-dispersible PEDOT/
PSS, ready to coat and print (screen and inkjet
inks) materials for manufacturing transparent
flexible electrodes for display devices, capacitive
touch sensors, organic photovoltaics, and other
printed electronics applications. Our products can
be customized and joint-development of coated
film is possible.

Competence in Organic Electronics
More than 20 years ago, the photographic film
industry started to investigate more robust
solutions than the existing antistatic material,
resulting in the first synthesis of PEDOT/PSS by
Agfa-Gevaert. The first synthesis invention was a
breakthrough for using intrinsically conducting
polymers, already known for several decades,
but limited by their processability. This shortly
came into application at Agfa-Gevaert, who
coated several hundred millions of square meters
of antistatic layer on PET film each year. This
experience led to the development of higher-
performance grades used in a variety of appli-
cations like display, lighting and sensing devices.
Based on its expertise in film manufacturing
and coating processes, Agfa is also investigating
the manufacturing of advanced transparent
electrodes design on flexible substrates.
What We Make is Clearly Conductive,
What We Do is More
Agfa-Gevaert NV c/o Dr. Frank Louwet
Septestraat 27 2640 Mortsel Belgium
Phone +32 3444 3250 E-Mail frank.louwet@agfa.com
Internet www.agfa.com/orgacon
40 AIXTRON
AIXTRON offers technologies for controlled depo-
sition of organic small molecules and polymer
thin films. Organic Vapor Phase Deposition
(OVPD) is a technology for the thin film depo-
sition of organic small molecules based on the
gas phase transport principle. Polymer Vapor
Phase Deposition (PVPD) is used for the
controlled deposition and in situ formation of
polymer-based thin film structures. These
patented processes improve process inspections,
reproducibility and operating costs.
Organic Vapor Phase Deposition (OVPD)
AIXTRONs proprietary OVPD process allows for
the deposition of organic semiconductor materials
used in OLEDs and flexible electronics suitable for
the manufacturing of OLED displays and lighting,
as well as other semiconductor applications.
The basic concept of OVPD was developed and
patented by Prof. Stephen R. Forrest at Princeton
University, USA. The US-based Universal Display
Corp. (UDC) holds the usage rights for the
OVPD patents, and licensed them exclusively
to AIXTRON. In adding its patented Close Cou-
pled Showerhead (CCS) technology, AIXTRON
has added free scalability to the OVPD baseline
principles.
Polymer Vapor Phase Deposition (PVPD)
This technology is geared toward the deposition
of functional thin film structures and is able to
implement various polymerization processes in a
scalable procedure. PVPD technology is based
on the principle of carrier gas-supported gas
phase deposition. The precursor materials, gener-
ally consisting of monomers, are vaporized in
specially optimized source systems and supplied
to the deposition process via an inert carrier gas.
Utilizing the CCS technology, this process is
scalable to any substrate size and can be used in
batch-based procedures, as well as continuous
inline or roll-to-roll processes. The ability to
precisely control the composition of the supplied
materials enables the deposition of complex
compounds, e.g., by means of controlled
co-polymerization.
Production Technology for Organic Displays, Lighting and Electronics
Novel organic electronics devices by OVPD or PVPD
AIXTRON SE
Kaiserstr. 98 52134 Herzogenrath Germany
Phone +49 241 8909-0 E-Mail info@aixtron.com
Internet www.aixtron.com
ARJOWIGGINS CREATIVE PAPERS 41
ARJOWIGGINS CREATIVE PAPERS is one of the
worlds leading manufacturers of fine and
technical papers. Innovation and creativity coupled
with a profound desire to be eco-responsible are
what guide us in our ongoing quest to find unique
new ways of responding to the diverse needs of
the market. To this end, we have developed
POWERCOAT a revolutionary and award-winning
paper dedicated to printed electronics.
POWERCOAT outperforms even the best
plastics, making it the perfect sustainable choice
for printed electronics.
POWERCOAT is a unique cellulosic
formulation and coating process
that provides an ultra-smooth,
flexible, highly sustainable sub-
strate for printed electronics,
giving you:
unprecedented, polymer-like
surface smoothness for optimum
conductivity and reduced ink
consumption.
high thermal stability for control
over sintering behavior, thereby
promoting excellent conductivity.
excellent sintering behavior: POWERCOAT
shows no noticeable change in its physical
characteristics in high temperature sintering.
As a result, printing can be carried out much
faster, particularly with photonic and flash cur-
ing techniques.
improved control over electronic layer adhesion
superior stability in roll-to-roll processing:
its impressive thermal and roll-to-roll stability
allow printed electronics and printed graphics
to be integrated in a single process, using exist-
ing pressroom environments.
reduced overall production costs thanks to
reduced ink consumption and faster printing
speeds.
a recyclable and biodegradable solution for all
your printed electronics needs: POWERCOAT
contains NO plastics whatsoever, and is FSC
(Forest Stewardship Council) certified, meaning
that pulp is sourced from responsibly managed
forests.
Performance
POWERCOAT allows any solution-based electronic
layer to be printed using various techniques,
including inkjet, gravure and screen printing. It is
an ideal substrate for laser lithography of high
resolution patterning using organic semiconduc-
tors, metallic inks, nanoparticles, nanotubes and
much more.
Applications
integration of intelligent functionality
in disposable labels and packaging
more efficient production of RFID antennae
using less ink
resistors, capacitors, self-inductance and
other passive components
lighting and display circuitry compatible
with large area flexible products
battery electrodes, sensing technology
POWERCOAT: Energizing Paper
ARJOWIGGINS CREATIVE PAPERS
32, avenue Pierre Grenier 92 517 Boulogne Billancourt France
Phone +33 157 759100 E-Mail info@powercoatpaper.com
Internet www.arjowigginscreativepapers.com www.powercoatpaper.com
42 ALTANA
The name ALTANA AG represents a global
specialty chemical group. It comprises the hold-
ing company ALTANA AG and four operating
divisions: ELANTAS Electrical Insulation, ECKART
Effect Pigments, BYK Additives and Instruments
and ACTEGA Coatings and Sealants.
The four divisions occupy a leading position in
their target markets with respect to quality,
product solution expertise, innovation and ser-
vice. Products made by companies in the ALTANA
Group are sold in over 100 countries and their
quality has earned us an outstanding reputation
amongst our customers as a valuable partner.
The exchange of technology and know-how
between the decentralized companies of the
division as well as the corporate culture of
ALTANA AG focused on markets, service and
innovations makes us a preferred supplier for
very different industries worldwide. Our strength
is offering customized solutions and specialty
products that create added value for our
customers.
ELANTAS develops and produces wire enamels,
impregnating resins, sealing compounds, confor-
mal coatings and casting resins, which are used
for the insulation of electric motors, generators,
printed circuit boards, sensors and electronic
modules.
ECKART is the world market leader for gold and
silver effects for the coatings and graphic arts
industry. The product portfolio contains: alu-
minum pigments for silver effects, brass and
copper pigments for gold effects, mica and glass
pigments for pearly and sparkling effects.
BYK-Chemie is one of the worlds leading suppli-
ers in the additive sector. The additives can opti-
mize viscosity, wetting, foaming, flocculation, as
well as scratch resistance and gloss. BYK additives
are applied in coatings, printing inks, plastics and
paper coatings.
ACTEGA is the market leader in overprint var-
nishes, sealing compounds, UV adhesives and
coatings for flexible packaging. These coatings
not only offer an appealing finish to printing
products but also guarantee longer freshness for
the packed product, scratch resis tance or water
tightness.
Ink Solutions for Printed Electronics
ALTANA 43
ELANTAS Beck GmbH
Grossmannstr. 105 20539 Hamburg Germany
Phone +49 40 78946 231 E-Mail Mark.Abendroth@altana.com
Internet www.altana.com/innovation/printed-electronics.html
Platform laboratory
For strengthening the R & D activities in this area,
the cross-divisional ALTANA Technology Platform
Printed Electronics was established and an inter-
disciplinary application laboratory was installed
at ELANTAS Beck in Hamburg. The existing print-
ing and coating equipment enables the in-house
fabrication of functional films as well as elec-
tronic devices. Flexo, gravure and screen printing
machines cover all common printing processes. In
addition, several test facilities are available for
physical characterization and environmental
stress testing of respective films and devices. We
develop and produce for the printed and organic
electronics industry: dielectrics and insulators,
encapsulation and barrier materials, glues,
conductive and magnetic inks, functional inks
and special additives. Our ALTANA Technology
Platform Printed Electronics, as well as our sub-
sidiaries are always open for cooperation.
44 BASF NEW BUSINESS
BASF New Business GmbH is a wholly-owned
subsidiary of BASF SE. Operating globally, the
company aims to create technology-driven,
forward-looking businesses with above-average
growth rates that go beyond BASFs current activ-
ities. BASF New Business works closely together
with technology leaders, start-up companies,
potential customers and a network of industrial
and academic partners to successfully develop
material systems suiting the needs of the emerg-
ing industries. BASF New Business is responsible
for BASFs activities in Organic Electronics.
Printed electronics enable new
attributes and applications
BASF is working on printable
material systems for thin film
transistor applications. Low
temperature printing processes
will enable direct deposition on
plastic substrates in a sustainable,
cost-competitive manner.
In the display field, printed backplanes will
facilitate innovative new display attributes, such
as lightweight, robust, conformable and even
flexible panels.
Complimentary n- and p-channel semiconductor
systems will enable printed circuits suitable for
a broad range of applications incl. RFID, sensors,
and CMOS.
Efficient blue phosphorescent emitter
for OLEDs
OLED technology offers a paradigm shift for
both display and lighting markets enabling thin,
flat form factors, transparent and even flexible
devices. As a result, new applications are
expected to emerge.
BASF is developing and commercializing materi-
als for OLED, focusing on phosphorescent
material stacks which demonstrate the highest
energy efficiency. Our deep blue phosphorescent
emitter developments address the needs of the
OLED industry for improved energy efficiency
and lifetime for lighting applications.
Chemical Solutions for Electronics in a Connected World
BASF New Business GmbH
4. Gartenweg Z 25 67063 Ludwigshafen Germany
Phone +49 621 60-76811 E-Mail info@basf-new-business.com
Internet www.basf-new-business.com
BENEQ 45
Beneq is a premier supplier of industrial pro-
duction and research equipment for thin film
coatings. The companys equipment is used in
flexible and organic electronics, photovoltaics,
strengthened glass and other emerging appli-
cations. Applications include encapsulation of
OLEDs and flexible ultra-barrier films, improving
the efficiency of crystalline silicon and thin
film solar cells, producing TCO-coated glass and
making touch screen glass more durable.
A breakthrough in industrial-scale
OLED encapsulation
Beneq has introduced several
revolutionary and unique thin film
innovations, including true roll-to-
roll atomic layer deposition (ALD)
and high-yield atmospheric aerosol
coating (nAERO).
Beneq WCS 500 Roll-to-Roll ALD system
for flexible coatings
The need for efficient moisture and oxygen
barrier films is a major challenge in flexible and
organic electronics, of which organic light
emitting diode (OLED) based displays and lighting
as well as organic photovoltaics (OPV) are typical
applications. Conventional thin film barrier
deposition techniques are incapable of producing
barrier layers with a low enough water vapor
transmission rate (WVTR) at affordable cost. To
supply this need, ALD-based Beneq nCLEAR
single-layer barrier films offer superior properties
and complete solutions for the industry.
Beneq nCLEAR inorganic barrier films are
deposited with ALD, which creates extremely
dense thin films with very low pinhole density. As
a result, ALD films provide unique single-layer
barrier properties. Beneq has more than thirty
years of experience in using ALD in industrial
production and can provide high-performance
nCLEAR barriers based on proprietary nano-
laminates. nCLEAR ultra-barrier films can be
integrated into production either as a batch
production routine for rigid substrates or as Roll-
to-Roll coating for flexible webs.
Beneq ALD Barrier Coatings
for Flexible and Organic Electronics
Beneq Oy
P.O. Box 262 01511 Vantaa Finland
Phone +358 9 7599 530 E-Mail info@beneq.com
Internet www.beneq.com
46 CERADROP
Ceradrop is an innovative company that designs,
manufactures and sells inkjet equipment for digi-
tal manufacturing of components (printed elec-
tronics and green power). Ceradrops equipment
enables high accuracy multi-materials printing
(both 2D and 3D). A key feature of the Ceradrop
team is that it has its origins not in the graphic
arts but rather in materials science and compo-
nent engineering. This background enables
Ceradrop to provide an exclusive approach to
inkjet processes, entirely devoted to device and
material problem solving.
CeraSlice from CAD files to print scripts
CeraSlice revolutionizes print script generation.
Thanks to its bottom-up approach, printing param-
eters can be defined according to material and
component design characteristics (splat diameter,
layer thickness, filling strategy, droplet pattern...).
All parts or subparts of the component can have
their own set of printing parameters, without limi-
tation, to address all possible situations without
compromise. CeraSlice provides the quickest direct
route to a functional component.
CeraPrinter versatile multi-material inkjet printer
CeraPrinter is a high-accuracy inkjet deposition sys-
tem. The equipment is designed for advanced appli-
cations, allowing the user to manage and under-
stand the entire process. The equipment is based on
a patented technology that can print on up to three
materials with any discrete resolution thanks to
automated printhead switching and orientation.
The system is built around industrial printhead
technology, thus allowing high process repeatability,
high jetting accuracy and a wide range of material
compatibility. Our printer can integrate a wide range
of printheads from different manufacturers and
easily embed the last generation of curing systems.
Customer support a wide range of services
A powerful and adaptable printer is necessary to
obtain an efficient inkjet manufacturing process
but, on its own, this is not enough. Ink formulation,
printing strategy definition, pre and post process,
conditions and anticipation of needs and require-
ments for process upscaling are critical points that
should not be neglected to ensure a successful
conclusion. In this context, Ceradrop provides its
customers with a unique process support and
enables to make easier inkjet printing techno-
logy for printed electronics, all around the world.
Ceradrop: Disruptive Solutions for Inkjet
Ceradrop Headquarters and production site
Ester Technopole 32, rue de Soyouz 87 068 Limoges France
Phone +33 555 382 696 E-Mail contact@ceradrop.fr
Internet www.ceradrop.fr
COATEMA COATING MACHINERY 47
Coatema offers mechanical engineering and R&D
for coating, printing and laminating plants for
R2R and S2S applications. For almost 40 years
Coatema has been delivering solutions to a wide
range of markets. Coatema offers lab units, pilot
plants and entire turn-key production solutions
for coating, printing and laminating of flexible or
rigid substrates.
Since more than a decade plants for
the development and production
of organic and printed electronics
belong to Coatemas product port-
folio. The combination of conven-
tional coating technologies and
the targeted use of electronic func-
tions are made possible by units
from Coatema. The competence
of covering the entire spectrum is made obvious
by 2 plants: the Smartcoater and the PrintoCent
Production Line, which was inaugurated in Finland
in 2012.
The Smartcoater is a compact and multifunctional
small-scale coating unit with various application
systems. Complex products can be produced with
a working width starting at 100 mm, a wide range
of coating applications and production speed
with a minimum use of substrate and chemistry.
The base unit offers a 5-in-1 coating module with
slot die, knife, dipping (foulard), micro-roller and
engraved roller. In addition other modules are
being added rapidly including: screen printing;
flexo printing; UV spraying and others.
In comparison, the PrintoCent Production Line
appears enormous: it includes as inline process
on two floors all needed printing, coating and
other steps to manufacture large area printed
electronic devices. This allows a R2R mass pro-
duction from lab to fab. Built by Coatema in close
cooperation with VTT who established PrintoCent
the line is equipped with interchangeable printing
and coating units: gravure and reverse gravure,
rotary screen, flexography and slot die. Additional
processes such as hot embossing, plasma treat-
ment, lamination, rotary die cut, hot air drying
and UV crosslinking as well as an automatic regis-
tration are included. The line with a working
width of 300 mm and running with an operation
speed of up to 30m/min.
A wide variety of Coatema equipment offers
the following processes for Large Area Printed
Electronics: Web Treatment, Etching, Printing,
Coating, Laminating, Nano Imprinting, Hot
Embossing and Laser Patterning.
Coatema Offers Lab and Production Plants
for Organic and Printed Electronics
Coatema Coating Machinery GmbH
Roseller Str. 4 41539 Dormagen Germany
Phone +49 2133 9784-0 E-Mail info@coatema.de
Internet www.coatema.de
48 CYNORA
cynora GmbH offers optoelectronic solutions
for application in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes
(OLEDs). These solutions involve concepts for
devices with excellent performance either from
vacuum-based or solution-based multilayer
deposition.
cynoras Singlet Harvesting technology offers
several advantages over currently used emissive
materials. Both kinds of excitons (singlet and
triplet) produced during device operation can be
used for light generation, which is necessary for
efficient current-to-light conversion. Singlet
Harvesting does not require heavy metals such
as iridium for this transformation. In addition,
this process is perfectly suitable for increasing
the emission energy, i. e. achieving deep blue
emission, which is still a challenge in the field
of OLED materials.
cynoras optoelectronic solutions also enable our
customers to produce efficient OLEDs via conven-
tional vacuum-processing as well as printing or
coating techniques. Solution-based deposition is
becoming more and more important while large-
area OLED devices gain more interest. By using
cynoras technology, our customers have no need
to adjust the materials to their process, we are
there to assist! Accordingly, instant ink mixtures
can be customized in terms of emission color and
solubility in specific solvents.
cynoras proprietary materials are being devel-
oped, tested and optimized in-house to ensure
that the customers needs are addressed properly.
The individual ink or material composition is
tested in devices in cynora labs prior to shipment.
This way, we can ensure the best support
possible for our customers during the evaluation
and implementation of new material sets.
For most recent information and to discuss
your individual optoelectronic solution, please
visit our website www.cynora.com or contact us
directly via info@cynora.com.
cynora Optoelectronic Solutions
cynora GmbH
Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, Geb. 717 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen Germany
Phone +49 721 60829112 E-Mail info@cynora.com
Internet www.cynora.com
DOWA HD EUROPE 49
DOWA is a Japanese smelting firm and DOWA
Electronics Materials is an established manufac-
turer of various materials such as silver/copper/
zinc/iron powder for electronic devices and
semiconductor wafer/LED, with an annual revenue
of about USD 4.5 billion. We focus on new func-
tional materials, nano-size particles, and silver
coated alloy powder (copper zinc/copper nickel
zinc) for printed electronics.
About DOWA
We at DOWA HD Europe GmbH are
a member of DOWA Holdings Co.,
Ltd. (Japan). Our main activity is to
promote the products of DOWA HD
and to expand the business region
in Europe. DOWA HD supplies
materials and services to a broad
range of businesses, including
nonferrous metals, environmental management
and recycling, electronic materials, metal-
processing, and heat treatment, with an aim
toward enhancing the quality of life. DOWA was
founded in 1884 as a smelting company. Since
our foundation, we have made the transition to
higher technologies. DOWA Electronics Materials
Co., Ltd. in particular, also a member of DOWA HD
Co., Ltd., supplies semiconductors, conductive
materials and magnetic materials which are all
based on nonferrous metals.
Functional powder materials technology
Functional powder materials technology is one of
our competencies. We are competitive in design-
ing the particles and manufacturing at low cost.
For particle design, we can control not only size
(nm-m) and shape (sphere, flake and agglom-
eration), but also surface treatment (hydrophilic
or hydrophobic). And we can provide silver,
copper, zinc and alloy powders. In addition,
concerning manufacturing methods, we have
both liquid and dry systems to manufacture
powders in mass production. Especially in the
case of nano-size particles, we can apply the
same method and equipment used in producing
micron-size powders. This will make Printed
Electronics more competitive and developed
worldwide in the near future.

Technology scouting
For the printed and organic electronics industry, it
is necessary to integrate some elemental technol-
ogies. For example, for functional conductive ink,
the elements of materials, formulations and
printing methods need to be considered at the
very least, while the properties of conductive ink
strongly depend on processing and applications.
From this point of view, we are looking to find
potential partners for technological collaboration
or even to offer financial support to.
DOWA Can Provide the Noble Materials You Want!
DOWA HD Europe GmbH
Ostendstr. 196 90482 Nuremberg Germany
Phone +49 911 5698932 0 E-Mail info@dowa-europe.com
Internet www.dowa.co.jp/index_e.html www.dowa.co.jp/en/jigyo/electronics_summary.html
50 DUPONT MICROCIRCUIT MATERIALS
DuPont Microcircuit Materials (MCM) has been a
major supplier to the printed electronics industry
for nearly 50 years and has become a global
leader in low temperature curing inks for flexible
substratesa position it owes to its broad
experience in materials science, chemistry, fine
powder technology and polymer chemistry.
Material families
DuPont MCM manufactures a wide range of inks
and pastes for printed electronics applications.
Silver highly conductive fine resolution screen
and flexographic inks for connecting lines, bus
bars and grid lines. These are typically used in
applications such as printed RFID antennae,
membrane switches, smart packaging, photo-
voltaics, OLEDs and touch screens. A new range
of formable, flexible Ag inks has recently been
introduced for in-mold electronics and
capacitive switches.
Silver alloys and copper inks to counter the
increasing cost of silver metal, a range of high
performance low cost screen inks are available
for many printed electronics applications.
Special photonic curing formulations for
increased throughput and conductivity have
recently been introduced.
Silver/silver chloride inks for reliable and
stable reference electrodes for amperometric
biosensors and drug delivery patches.
Gold low temperature gold inks for inert
high performance and reliability, especially
in diagnostic biosensors.
Carbon cost-effective carbon screen and
flexographic formulations for overprints,
connecting lines, resistors, medical electrodes
and self-regulating PTC heaters.
Dielectric both solvent based and UV curing
screen printable dielectric formulations for
insulating layers and cross-overs in multiple
applications.
Phosphor screen printing pastes for
AC electroluminescent lamps.
Innovating for the future
DuPont Microcircuit Materials global R&D
laboratories are producing customizable
speciality materials for the next generation of
inks. Our scientists are developing novel binder
systems for improved performance on multiple
substrate types, new fine powders for advanced
conductors and a technology platform suitable
for multiple deposition techniques including
screen, flexography, gravure and ink-jet.
Leading Printed Electronics Materials Supplier
DuPont Microcircuit Materials
Bristol Business Park Coldharbour Lane, Frenchay Bristol, BS16 1QD United Kingdom
Phone +44 117 931 3191 E-Mail mcm.sales@dupont.com
Internet http://mcm.dupont.com
Printed RFID antennae an additive process Self-limiting heater on flexible substrate Printed biomedical sensors
Formable and stretchable inks
for 3D circuitry
DUPONT TEIJIN FILMS 51
DuPont Teijin Films is a world-leading
manufacturer of high performance PET and
PEN polyester films for flexible and printed
electronic applications.
The trusted brand
Melinex, Mylar and Teonex brands are the
substrates of choice for precise registration and
dimensional control. Our wide range of stabilized
films are strong and flexible with excellent resist-
ance to heat, abrasion, chemicals and moisture.
Continuous innovation
As the world changes, DuPont Teijin Films contin-
ues to develop new and innovative products to
meet the demands of a rapidly evolving market.
New planarized PET films have smooth, clean
surfaces that are ideal for ITO sputtering and other
optical coatings. Thermally stabilized grades of
planarized PET film offer excellent registration and
flatness.
High performance Teonex PEN film
Teonex PEN films are a high performance
extension to the existing range of Melinex and
Mylar polyester film products and bridge the
gap between price and performance for polyester
and other polymeric substrates.
Surface-engineered, optical quality film for the
most demanding flexible display and electronics
applications.
Teonex is the substrate of choice for demanding
flexible display applications, such as high perfor-
mance touch screens, flexible OLEDs, e-paper,
high-barrier flexible substrates, flexible micro-
electronics and TFTs. Teonex provides superior
performance, including excellent dimensional
control and improved hydrolytic stability for
applications requiring exposure to extreme heat
or harsh chemicals.
Innovative Film Solutions for Flexible Electronics Applications
DuPont Teijin Films
BP 1681 1016 Luxembourg Luxembourg
Phone +352 2616 4004 E-Mail europe.films@gbr.dupont.com
Internet www.dupontteijinfilms.com
Heat stabilised films
Glass Transition
Temperature
Haze %
Moisture absorption
20
o
C, 40%RH
Youngs Modulus
20
o
C
Youngs Modulus
150
o
C
MD Shrinkage
150
o
C / 30 mins
Upper processing temp
120
o
C
180-220
o
C
18-20
0.02%
1000ppm
0.7%
150
o
C
0.1%
5GPa
3GPa
CTE ppm/
o
C
0.7%
1000ppm
1GPa
78
o
C
20-25
PEN
PET
4GPa
DuPont Teijin Films is at the forefront of innovation and future developments.
Our films are already key components in devices used in our daily lives.
We are now inventing new films for the products and markets of tomorrow.
52 EXAKT
EXAKT designs and produces Precision Three Roll
Mills providing a definable dispersion process to
realize the specific functional properties of smart
materials.
Utilizable for example via silk screen printing in
flexible batteries or capacitors, dye solar cells,
flexible displays, sensors, MLCCs and other elec-
tronic components, EXAKT Precision Three Roll
Mills are particularly well suited for:
conductive/resistive pastes
thermal compounds
polymer paste for contact elements in
keyboards, switches, shields, resistors, etc.
functional inks and coatings of many kinds
that are applied in layers of 6 to 50 m in thick-
ness (wet).
Dispersions are critical phase systems, whether
as a precursor with specific working properties,
as part of a composite, or as a final product.
The quality of a dispersion and its processing
determines the quality of the final product.
Critical to the quality of the dispersion are a
defined, absolutely homogeneous particle size
and distribution as well as the preservation of
particle structure and function.
Particles tend to agglomerate, but only when
homogeneously separated can they develop their
specific characteristics. Also, the degree of sepa-
ration defines the function of the final product.
This requires precise processing and control.
EXAKT is engaged in various application projects
like InnoCNT or OE-A, to provide sustained practi-
cal feasibility for present and future needs, com-
bined with technical expertise and dedication in
engineering and the production of precision
processing equipment made in Germany.
EXAKT Precision Three Roll Mills:
realize defined functional characteristics
of dispersions
control the process and enable reproducibility
shorten time to market in R&D
enable consistent production
EXAKT Defined Dispersion to Govern
the Functional Properties of Smart Materials
EXAKT Advanced Technologies GmbH
Robert-Koch-Str. 5 22851 Norderstedt Germany
Phone +49 40 529560-0 E-Mail info@exakt.de
Internet www.exakt.de
Copyright EXAKT Advanced Technologies GmbH
FELIX SCHOELLER 53
The Osnabrck-based Felix Schoeller Group has
been developing and manufacturing high-quality
specialty papers and coatings for specialized
applications for over 110 years.
With its high level of technological competence
and outstanding innovative strength, the company
is now a market leader in its main areas of
business: imaging and decor papers. Alongside
existing markets, we are now also turning our
attention to building and consolidating new busi-
ness areas. An example of this is p_e:smart a
range of papers that has been specially developed
for the printed electronics sector.
High-precision coating gives us the edge
in competency
Printing electronic elements requires a substrate
that has an extremely smooth surface and spe-
cific surface properties, particularly when organic
inks are used. High-precision coating draws
together all the know-how in terms of products,
recipes, processes and technologies that the Felix
Schoeller Group has acquired over more than two
decades: in other words, extensive knowledge in
the field of developing and producing high-end
inkjet papers for photographic applications. High-
precision coating involves applying several thin,
technologically sophisticated layers some of
them containing nano particles to paper webs
using ultramodern coating technology.
p_e:smart means better dimensional stability
Printing organic circuits requires high register
accuracy to achieve the desired result. Conven-
tional films have only a limited degree of dimen-
sional stability, which makes it difficult to build
multilayer systems. The name of our innovative
and groundbreaking solution is p_e:smart.
These are papers whose fiber structure produces
high dimensional stability, which in turn means
significantly less breakage when constructing
printed transistors. High dimensional stability
combined with a film-like surface appearance
results in the leading edge in the market of
printed electronics.
An extremely smooth surface, dimensional
stabili ty, high purity and consistent quality from
reel to reel make p_e:smart a very convincing
product.
p_e:smart: New Markets Based on Established Core Competencies
Felix Schoeller Holding GmbH & Co. KG
Burg Gretesch 49086 Osnabrck Germany
Phone +49 541 3800-0 E-Mail info@Felix-Schoeller.com
Internet www.Felix-Schoeller.com
54 FUJIFILM DIMATIX
SAMBA is a piezo, grayscale printhead built
using proprietary Silicon micro-electromechanical
system (MEMS) fabrication techniques. Silicon is
used for its resistance to mechanical abrasion,
tolerance of high temperatures and robustness
against chemical attack. MEMS, in this case,
describes processes used to sculpt and assemble
integrated circuit-sized structures. The techniques
to fabricate SAMBA printheads have been field-
proven by cartridges used in Dimatix Materials
Printers.
2048 individually addressable nozzles are
arranged in a matrix array. This enables SAMBA
printheads to be placed adjacent to each other
to form integrated, wide-width printbars.
Ideal for sheet and roll-based single-pass designs,
SAMBA provides stability, uniformity, maintaina-
bility and scalability in one compact package.
Unlike others, SAMBA isolates its piezoelectric
(PZT) actuators from the path of jetting fluids.
Its PZT is sputtered onto a thin silicon membrane
atop the ink channel to form the pumping
chamber as a single monolithic structure.
Using VersaDrop jetting technology, SAMBAs
high frequency response is enhanced with
customizable waveforms to accommodate a wide
range of fluid characteristics. Waveforms of
varying amplitude are also used to form variable
sized drops (grayscale) with no compromise in
productivity.
SAMBAs unique nozzle shape addresses two
challenges to jetting accuracy and uniformity. This
design has resulted in higher drop placement
accuracy over greater throw distances with drop
sizes from 10 to less than 1 picoliter.
Continuous fluid recirculation at the nozzle as
well as use of a non-wetting coating on its silicon
nozzle plate provides fast start-up, high frequency
jetting and non-stop operation, even with difficult
or fast drying fluids.
An exceptionally wide range of applications is pos-
sible with this technology. These include deposit-
ing liquid silver and organics onto surfaces such as
flexible substrates, flat panel and flexible displays
and printable electronics, bioscience, and even the
transfer of UV, aqueous, and solvent-based inks
onto paper, plastics, ceramics and textiles.
A Breakthrough in Drop-on-Demand Inkjet for Deposition Applications
FUJIFILM Dimatix, Inc.
2250 Martin Avenue Santa Clara, California 95050-2704 USA
Phone +1 408 565-9150 E-Mail printinginfo@dimatix.com
Internet www.dimatix.com
HERAEUS PRECIOUS METALS 55
Delivering Innovation
As the team that invented
PEDOT:PSS, the Heraeus Conduc-
tive Polymers Division stands in a
unique position in the develop-
ment, production and delivery of
commercially available Clevios
conductive polymer materials and
formulations for electronics.
Clevios PEDOT:PSS - poly(3,4-ethylene-
dioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) prod-
ucts start with antistatic Clevios P and go
through to highly conductive CleviosPH1000
(1000S/cm or ca. 200 Ohm/sq). The range also
includes Clevios hole injection materials.
Conductivity, flexibility, transparency and ease-
of-use permit a broad range of applications in
electronics.
Printable Conductivity
All Clevios PEDOT:PSS products are printable.
Formulations such as Clevios FE-T and SV3
can be printed to <50 um line width and to
<200 Ohm/sq. Printing methods include slot-die,
gravure, screen, and ink jet, as well as spraying,
dip and spin coating.
Touch Screens
As an ITO electrode alternative, Clevios PH1000
can be coated onto substrates such as PET,
polycarbonate and paper. Flexible, durable and
with a high transmission, economic PH1000
offers major opportunities in touch technologies.
Clevios can be patterned using a masking
agent Clevios SET along with Clevios Etch.
The smooth conductive patterns are almost
invisible.
OLEDs and Solar Cells
Clevios water and solvent-based hole injection
(HIL) and electrode materials are offered for
OLED display/lighting and organic solar cells.
Clevios HIL-E, which combines HIL and elec-
trode properties, has been developed for OLED
lamps. Optimized formulations for OPVs, such as
Clevios HTL Solar, are also available.
Heraeus Conductive Polymers
Clevios: Conductive, Transparent and Flexible Polymers
Heraeus Precious Metals GmbH & Co. KG, Conductive Polymers Division
B202, Chempark 51368 Leverkusen Germany
Phone +49 214 3026718 E-Mail clevios@heraeus.com
Internet www.clevios.com www.heraeus.com
56 HNP MIKROSYSTEME
HNP Mikrosysteme develops,
manufactures and markets
pumps worldwide which dose
small amounts of liquids fast and
accu rately. Fields of application are
analytical instrumentation,
mechanical and plant engineering
and chemical and pharmaceutical
process engineering, as well as in
new markets like fuel cells or biotechnology,
organic electronics or aerospace.
High precision low pulsation
Micro annular gear pumps are characterized by
low pulse delivery and minimal dead volume.
They are precise, with long service life and small
dimensions, made from ultra-hard materials and
easy to maintain. The hermetic inert series has
been specially conceived to fulfill the most
challenging tasks in chemical processing, mini
plant and flow chemistry. The rotor sets of this
pump series are made from partially stabilized
zirconium dioxide, further functional parts
consist of aluminium oxide or tungsten carbide.
These materials, recognized for their high chemi-
cal resistance, allow for pump use with oxidizing
and reducing liquids, acids, bases and solvents,
while at the same time showing excellent resist-
ance to wear. SSiC has been used as shaft and
bearing material and the body consists of alloy
C22 or stainless steel. Versions made from
tantalum or titanium are available. The pump
is hermetic due to the use of a fully encapsulated
magnetic NdFeB coupling.
mzr-pumps and organic electronics
Micro annular gear pumps are utilized from
beginning to end in organic electronics, feeding
reactors in intensified chemical processes as well
as printing devices or slot dies in roll-to-roll
processes. Available volume flow rates range from
a few l/min to 1 l/min.
Micro Annular Gear Pumps for Dosing
and Metering Applications
HNP Mikrosysteme GmbH
Bleicherufer 25 19053 Schwerin Germany
Phone +49 385 52190-347 E-Mail info@hnp-mikrosysteme.de
Internet www.hnp-mikrosysteme.de
Courtesy of Coatema Coating
Machinery GmbH
HNP Mikrosysteme develops, manufactures and
markets pumps worldwide which dose small
amounts of liquids fast and accurately. These
micro annular gear pumps are utilized from
beginning to end in organic electronics, feeding
reactors in intensified chemical processes as
well as printing devices or slot dies in roll-to-roll
processes. Available volume flow rates range
from a few l/min to 1 l/min.
INA DRIVES & MECHATRONICS 57
In the electronics manufacturing sector,
INA Drives & Mechatronics AG & Co. KG (IDAM)
supplies drive systems for manufacturing organic
electronic circuits. The manufacturing of these
components requires extremely high levels of
cleanliness, which means direct drive technology
is particularly suitable for these applications
since it is free from wear. Ready-to-fit single and
two-axis drive systems from IDAM configured to
each specific application are highly dynamic, and
free of wear and contamination. They make a
convincing case due to their precision, high
repeat accuracy and high acceleration capacity.
IDAM products can be found in the
following applications in the elec-
tronics sector in particular
in wafer printing machines in
the manufacture of solar panels
(planar motors)
in rotary tables in machines for
manufacturing semiconductors
(torque motors)
in wafer positioning systems
and circuit board testing
systems (linear motors)
IDAM is a Schaeffler Group company and a
specialist for direct drive technology. Its product
range includes not only linear and torque motors
and two-coordinate direct drives in a wide range
of sizes and power ratings, but also the electronic
subassemblies required for their operation. These
volume-produced products are complemented by
customer-specific high-performance multi-axis
systems. IDAM not only has extensive experience
in the machine tool and manufacturing machin-
ery sectors, but also in automation technology,
electronics manufacturing and measuring and
medical technology.
Schaeffler, with its brands INA, LuK, and FAG and
around 76,000 employees, is a leading global
provider of rolling bearings, plain bearings, and
linear and direct drive products. We supply
components and systems as well as application
support and services to the automobile sector
and around 60 sectors of industry via our world-
wide organization with close market proximity.
Close interdisciplinary collaboration within the
Schaeffler Group enables us to develop direct
drive positioning systems of the highest perfor-
mance level possible worldwide. They offer the
best technical and most cost-effective solution
for every application. Schaeffler system solutions
are available for every motor series that includes
motors, bearing supports/
guidance systems and sensor
systems.
IDAM Direct Drives: Clean, Dynamic, Precise.
INA Drives & Mechatronics AG & Co. KG
Mittelbergstr. 2 98527 Suhl Germany
Phone +49 3681 7574-0 E-Mail idam@schaeffler.com
Internet www.idam.de
58 KAMMANN
Dedicated to advanced functional printing,
KAMMANN takes pride in its ability to build ultra-
precise roll-to-roll equipment for the Printed Elec-
tronics / Functional Printing industry worldwide.
Printing, drying, laminating, stamping/cutting
whatever it takes, we provide know-how and
technology to produce functional devices today.
A unique platform strategy ensures accuracy,
speed, consistency and flexibility. We enable
customers to integrate their equipment into our
product line or vice versa integrate our
machines into their production environment.
KAMMANN has been a partner of the industry
in a variety of projects involving:
Disposable Medical Devices
Industrial Heat Transfers
Membrane Switches
Medical Electrodes
Touch Display Components
Customers appreciate KAMMANNs high-end flat
screen printing technology as an essential core
component in many functional printing applica-
tions. Additionally, a wide range of modules for
drying and converting allows for individual
process adaptation. Flexibility matters!
From sheet-fed to roll-fed
An important part of our strategy is to help
customers up-scale their processes (lab-to-fab) as
well as enhancing existing production by going
from sheet to roll. In functional printing, roll-to-
roll has proven to be a means to boost both
productivity and profitability. It takes knowledge,
experience and expertise to understand the
dynamics of a moving web. Technical issues can
arise that may not be concerns in slower sheet-
based application; processes such as dryer dwell
times, material strain, register accuracies, quality
inspection, etc. are routinely solved by our
engineers. KAMMANN is always happy to share
their expertise with customers engaging in roll-
to-roll technology. Involve us!
Made in Germany at its best
Deeply rooted in the Westfalian area of Germany,
we produce machines with 170 highly-skilled
employees in Bad Oeynhausen, a city between
Hannover and the Ruhr. The company was
founded in 1955 by Werner Kammann and has
been specializing in printing ever since.
Committed to Functional Printing
KAMMANN Maschinenbau GmbH
Bergkirchener Str. 228 32549 Bad Oeynhausen Germany
Phone +49 5734 5140-0 E-Mail mail@kammann.de
Internet www.kammann.de
KARL KNAUER 59
The Karl Knauer KG, with its two business
locations in Germany and Poland, is among the
leading suppliers for innovative packaging and
advertising material in Europe, as well as
prod ucing gift packaging made of cardboard,
corrugated cardboard and paper. We combine
broad know-how with a high level of specializa-
tion. Our customers, from both the globally
acting brand name and service industry and high
performance medium-sized companies through-
out Europe, benefit from our versatile compe-
tence and large vertical range of manufacture.
And have done for 75 years!
Competences
Our core competences are innovative packaging
solutions with the highest demands on function-
ality. The production is enhanced by consultation
and integrated services, for example: develop-
ment, logistics concepts, co-packing, artwork
management, and product protection & smart
packaging. In this way, Karl Knauer covers all
processes of integrated packaging management
as a service provider and producer.
Innovation
We at Karl Knauer see innovation as a continuous
improvement of what we do today, in order to
fulfill all customer requirements and needs.
Whether its packaging design and functionality,
logistics or processing techniques: solutions and
development by Karl Knauer are future-oriented
and individually customer-oriented.
Competence in organic electronics
Karl Knauers competence in organic electronics
is to offer the cost-effective integration of printed
electronics in packaging. Our aim is to provide
additional value for the consumer with smart
packaging. Therefore, we run different projects to
develop and evaluate printing technologies for
polymeric and organic inks. We are also engaged
in various activities concerning conductive
polymer technology.
A current project comprises the packaging for the
high-quality spirit Bombay Sapphire that is
probably the first freely available packaging with
printed illuminants. The packaging was developed
and implemented on the basis of the innovative
technology HiLight printed electronics and has
already been awarded numerous prizes, such as
the iF packaging design award 2013 in gold.
Karl Knauer Impressively Different
Karl Knauer KG
Zeller Str. 14 77781 Biberach/Baden Germany
Phone +49 7835 7820 E-Mail info@karlknauer.de
Internet www.karlknauer.de
60 KROENERT
KROENERT in Hamburg/Germany has been
developing and building innovative, specialized
coating, printing and laminating machinery since
1903, and is the oldest company in this field
worldwide. More than a century of experience
definitely pays off! We at KROENERT have laid
down our values and norms in a corporate philos-
ophy intended not only to keep the company
functioning for decades, but to preserve its
identity. The proposition of customer benefit
remains in the foreground.
All lines are the result of expertise,
inventiveness and knowledge. We
understand quality and reliability
and guarantee the highest levels of
efficiency and a long service life in
production with minimal mainte-
nance costs. Further education and
training in technical and commer-
cial professions ensure high quality
for generations. The market of large area organic
printed electronics is in rapid development to
increase efficiency and quality as well as to fur-
ther lower the costs. In order to make the final
products more affordable and feasible pricewise,
but at the same time highly accurate, roll-to-roll
(R2R) production on flexible transparent polymer
substrates is the way to move forward in the
future.
KROENERT offers state-of-the-art-high-end print-
ing and coating R2R machines, techniques and
processes to the market, suitable for a laboratory
scale of up to 500 mm working width. However,
production scale machines with larger working
widths are also available.
In the case of printed electronics, customized
machine solutions and processes of the utmost
precision and accuracy are required, which in their
turn are based on standard machine components.
These comprise mainly:
unwinding and rewinding units
coating/printing heads
dryers
laminators as well as
auxiliary equipment
The components themselves have to be precise
and must be easily operable and maintainable to
fulfil the demands of the printed electronics
industry. One further aspect is the versatility and
flexibility of the R2R equipment, regardless of
whether the machine is used in R&D institutes,
laboratories, start-ups or by industrial customers.
The expert support KROENERT offers, both theo-
retical and practical training, also forms a major
part of our success. Further, KROENERT offers a
R&D technology center with various machines, like
e.g. the LabCo, where the production of up-scaling
from lab-to-fab can also be demonstrated.
KROENERT Experts in R2R Coating and Printing
KROENERT GmbH & Co. KG
Schtzenstr. 105 22761 Hamburg Germany
Phone +49 40 85393 01 E-Mail info@kroenert.de
Internet www.kroenert.de
MEKOPRINT 61
Key benefits:
In-house automated R2R manufacturing in high
volumes; state-of-the-art screen and digital
printing technology; slot die coating for
advanced printed electronics; R2R post-process-
ing such as lamination, stamping, embossing,
laser cutting, SMD mounting, etc.; development
and innovation organization with expert know-
ledge; quality management
Mekoprint is a certified manufac-
turer of 100 % customized high-
quality solutions for industrial and
electro nic companies. Solutions
include user interfaces, roll-to-roll
(R2R) printed plastic foils, flexible
printed circuits (FPCs), organic solar
cells, metal processing and EMC
shielding.
Partner-based innovation
Cooperation with customers on product develop-
ment is a trademark of Mekoprint. Our partner-
based innovation is a combination of rational
product development and ongoing development
of the partnership with customers. The goal is
increased productivity and competitiveness
for both parties.
R2R flexible printed circuits and ITO patterning
Mekoprint has more than 20 years experience in
developing and producing single and double-
sided FPCs. We have in-house R2R equipment to
screen print circuits and pattern copper or trans-
parent conducting oxides such as ITO by wet
etching flexible substrates. Advanced equipment
combined with a high degree of engineering
knowledge in development and production allows
Mekoprint to deliver customized solutions. FPCs
go through a systematic design-for-manufacturing
process in close cooperation with the customer
and end in a lean manufacturing process charac-
terized by high automation and quality. The
result is low cost with complex structures in high
volumes, high precision and high repeatability
benefitting our customers and making Mekoprint
competitive among suppliers worldwide, inclu-
ding low-cost Asian manufacturers.
Customized solutions
for international manufacturing
Our customers are research institutes and com-
panies within organic, functional electronics as
well as international customers within the
telecom, medico and manufacturing industries.
Together with customers we have realized
solutions for applications such as antennas and
loudspeakers for mobile phones as well as RFID
tags, safety labels, heating elements, flow meters,
and sensors.
Advanced R2R Manufacturing of Printed Electronics
Mekoprint A/S
Hermesvej 4 9530 Stvring Denmark
Phone +45 9936 5600 E-Mail info@mekoprint.dk
Internet www.mekoprint.com
62 MERCK
Merck is a leading industrial supplier of Organic
Electronic (OE) materials and formulations. From
our state-of-the-art R&D center in the UK
through to large scale manufacturing facilities,
we have the capability to provide stable, high
performance organic electronic materials in
ready-to-use, easily processable formulations.
These formulations can be customized to target
specific requirements and are compatible with mass
production techniques, including spin coating, inkjet
printing, slot die coating, gravure and flexographic
printing. Scale-ups of our materials and formula-
tions are carried out under stringently controlled
conditions; these manufacturing facilities are lo-
cated at our headquarters in Darmstadt, Germany.
lisicon making the future flexible
Mercks material offerings within the OE field
include organic semiconductor and dielectric
materials for organic thin film transistors which
enable fully flexible display concepts as well as
multiple functionality and complex circuitry.
Other key applications include organic photovol-
taics and organic photodetectors/sensors.
Mercks materials are developed to enable high
functionality and simple production processes,
enabling new and innovative electronic devices.
Merck is your innovative material supplier with
pioneering spirit and expertise derived from dec-
ades of experience in development, scale-up and
production of advanced materials for high-tech
applications. Our reputation in the OE area is
founded on the capability to develop application-
oriented formulations with a customer-focused
approach. We believe that success in this emerg-
ing area can only be achieved through collabora-
tion and partnerships, thereby enabling innova-
tive applications across different industries.
About the Chilworth Technical Centre
Located in the Southampton Science Park, South-
ampton, UK, Merck established an R&D center in
2000. This state-of-the-art facility has a dedicated
Organic Electronic (OE) technical team with
expertise in key areas such as synthetic chemis-
try, material formulation, printing, device fabrica-
tion and device physics. We are dedicated to the
development of new advanced materials for
emerging technologies.
Merck Chemicals Ltd. (Organic Electronics)
University Parkway, Southampton SO16 7QD
Great Britain, Phone +44 23 8076 3321
E-Mail Giles.Lloyd@merckgroup.com
Merck Chemicals Your Innovative Material Supplier
Merck KGaA (Headquarters)
Frankfurter Str. 250 64293 Darmstadt Germany
Phone +49 6151 7223718 E-Mail jan-roman.stilling@merckgroup.com
Internet www.merck-performance-materials.com
NEXT ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES 63
Elegant, Featherweight, Flexible Solar Material
with Limitless Integration Potential and Exceptional Value
Next Energy Technologies Inc.
5385 Hollister Avenue, #115 Santa Barbara, CA 93111 USA
Phone +1 805.222.4546 E-Mail info@nextenergytech.com
Internet www.nextenergytech.com
Next Energy Technologies Inc. (NEXT) is develop-
ing an entirely new generation of ultra low-cost
photovoltaics based on proprietary organic semi-
conducting inks made from solution-processed
small molecules (SSM). These stable, scalable,
and low cost organic semiconductors can be
printed or coated onto conventional plastic sheets
to fabricate extremely inexpensive, lightweight,
and flexible solar cells that can be processed
roll-to-roll and used in both conventional and
innovative applications.
NEXTs lightweight, flexible OPV has the potential
for an exceptionally low-cost and small environ-
mental footprint relative to conventional silicon
and thin film solar cells due to:
Low energy and low-cost roll-to-roll processing
Ultra-low capital cost production facilities
Inexpensive, abundant, and non-toxic raw
materials
Low installation, transportation and storage
costs
The soluble small molecules (SSMs) at the heart
of this organic photovoltaic (OPV) technology
uniquely enable NEXT to overcome development
barriers of polymer-based OPVs. While having all
the advantages of solution-based, low-cost
processing known to semiconducting polymer-
based OPVs, soluble small molecules (SSMs)
also have the advantages of molecular control
and uniformity, as well as ease of synthesis,
purification, and scalable production. We find
that SSM-OPV materials can be optimized to
demonstrate equivalent film forming quality of
polymeric materials.

NEXTs proprietary materials have resulted in
devices with efficiencies that are not only the
highest published for solution processed small
molecules, but also competitive with the best
polymer solar cells. NEXT is the first company to
demonstrate the feasibility of this technology,
and to undertake the development and
manufacturing of solution-processed semi-
conducting small molecule solar cells for
commercial applications.
64 NOVACENTRIX
NovaCentrix supports all aspects of printed and
flexible electronics, including research, develop-
ment, and manufacturing. Our products are the
PulseForge photonic curing tools, Metalon
electrically conducting inks, SimPulse thermal
simulation software, and various nanomaterials.
We are also introducing our new contract print
manufacturing service.
PulseForge Photonic Curing Tools
The PulseForge tools use patented photonic
curing to process high-temperature materials on
low-temperature substrates such as plastic and
paper. This means off-the-shelf inks as well as
new formulations can be processed at tempera-
tures from room temperature to > 1000 C on
polymers such as PVC, PET, polyethylene, and oth-
ers, and also on paper, cardstock, and cardboard.
Types of materials processing includes drying,
sintering, annealing, and reacting.
Key PulseForge Tool Features and Capabilities
Ability to process depositions >30 microns
User-selected pulse durations in 1 ms increments
User-selected pulse intervals in 1 ms increments
Built-in pulse shaping: the ability to create
and save custom optimized pulse structures
Water-cooling for longer component life
and higher delivered power
Advanced touch interface
Included bolometer for real-time pulse energy
measurement
The PulseForge Tool Family
We offer tools optimized for each development
phase, linked by sharing the same advanced
pulse control capabilities.
PulseForge 1200: Low-cost tool with specific
advanced features for R&D use.
PulseForge 1300: R&D tool with higher
power delivery, and includes SimPulse
Thermal Simulation.
PulseForge 3200: wide-range tool for R&D,
scale-up, and full production at line speeds
> 100 meters/minute.
PulseForge 3300: high-power tool for R&D,
scale-up, and full production.
Metalon Conductive Inks
NovaCentrix offers a full line of high-performance
and low-cost electrically conductive inks. Silver is
a standard ink type, as is the innovative ultra-
low-cost copper-oxide reduction ink. All print
formats are supported.
Contract Functional Print Manufacturing Services
NovaCentrix is now offering contract functional
print manufacturing services based on the use
of an in-house AquaFlex 6-station flexographic
printer. Two rotary screen stations as well as post-
print lamination are also included. Web width is
52 cm. Full-width PulseForge tools are also inte-
grated. Inquire directly for additional details and
pricing.
Advancing the State of the Art for Processing Tools and Materials
NovaCentrix
NCC Nano, LLC 400 Parker Drive Suite 1110
Austin, TX 78728 USA
Internet www.novacentrix.com
NOVALED 65
Novaled is the company to trade with, work for
and invest in. The company offers its proprietary
organic materials and complementary innovative
technologies for superior OLEDs in display and
lighting and for further high performance
Organic Electronics (OE).
Novaled AG is a leader in the research, develop-
ment and commercialization of technologies and
materials that enhance the performance of
OLEDs (organic light-emitting diodes) and other
organic electronics. Novaled offers OLED product
manufacturers a unique combination of propri-
etary technology, materials and expertise, and
is currently the only company licensing and
selling organic conductivity doping technology
and materials for use in the commercial mass
production of display products in the OLED industry.
Novaled has developed strategic partnerships
with key OLED innovators and producers
throughout the world and, with a broad portfolio
of more than 500 patents granted or pending,
has a strong IP position in OLED technologies,
structures and materials. Commercially active
since 2003, Novaled was founded in 2001 as a
spin-off of the Technical University and the
Fraunhofer Institute of Dresden. Novaled is head-
quartered in Dresden with sales offices in Korea
and Japan.
For more information, please visit
www.novaled.com or contact us
directly.
Novaled A Leading OLED Player
Novaled AG
Tatztberg 49 01307 Dresden Germany
Phone +49 351 79658-0 E-Mail info@novaled.com
Internet www.novaled.com/contact
Novaled has branch offices in South Korea and Japan.
Please visit www.novaled.com/contact
Novaled Japan Branch office:
Ark Mori Building 12F
1-12-32 Akasaka, Minato-ku
Tokyo, Japan 107-6012
Mr. Michael Hofmann
Phone +81 3 4360 9110
Mobile +81 90 1458 3417
E-Mail michael.hofmann@novaled.com
Novaled Korea Branch office:
Novaled AG Branch Office South Korea
3th Floor Namdo Bldg. 12, Jangmun-ro
Yongsan-gu, Seoul, 140-809,
Dr. Andreas Haldi
Phone +82 2 2276 0511
Mobile +82 10 4097 5878
E-Mail andreas.haldi@novaled.com
66 POLYIC
PolyIC develops and markets products based on
platform technology printed electronics: on the
basis of this technology, PolyIC offers products
from the fields Touch Sensors & Passive Devices
as well as Printed Electronics & Displays. The
three present product lines are called PolyTC,
PolyLogo and PolyID. Leonhard Kurz Stiftung
& Co. KG is the parent company of PolyIC, which
results in excellent synergy in the fields of
decoration and function.
Printed Electronics
Printed electronics is a new
technology platform that has
progressed from fundamental
research to specific product classes
in recent years. It offers an
enormous range of opportunities
because it allows thin, flexible and
economical electronic components
to be manufactured in large quantities.
Touch Sensors & Passive Devices
Touch sensors based on the PolyTC technology
offer a high optical transparency, conductivity,
structures with high resolution and flexible
possibilities for touch screens and capacitive
operating elements of all kinds. Furthermore, this
technology enables the setup of flexible circuit
structures as passive devices for a huge variety of
further applications. The highlight is the possibil-
ity of an easy integration process: for example,
the combination of decoration and function to
achieve a maximum of design flexibility, plus a
high efficiency due to the combined IML/IMD
process.
Printed Electronics & Displays
In connection with the PolyLogo product line,
printed smart objects offer interesting possibili-
ties such as radio activated displays in the field of
marketing. Printed RFIDs with the brand name
PolyID enable thin and flexible applications of
radio frequency identification. In the future,
Organic Photovoltaics (OPV) will make energy
harvesting possible.
PolyIC focuses on its expertise in materials, and
on new adapted chip design methods, as well as
mature and newly developed mass production
processes of roll-to-roll printing, in order to
develop and market this new technology.
PolyICs webpage is accessible at
www.polyic.com.
PolyIC GmbH & Co. KG
Smart and Flexible Printed Solutions
PolyIC GmbH & Co. KG
Tucherstr. 2 90763 Fuerth Germany
Phone +49 911 20249-0 E-Mail press@polyic.com
Internet www.polyic.com
SAES GETTERS 67
The SAES Group is a world leader in a wide
range of scientific and industrial applications for
more than seventy years. Its wide technological
and product portfolio enables the supply of hi-tech,
high quality and reliable solutions for organic
electronics, scientific and industrial applications
and NiTinol-based shape memory products for the
industrial and medical markets.
Through a soundtechnology base, the SAES Group
delivers a wide variety of advanced solutions to
prevent corrosion of conductive parts and fogging
of optical components by blocking moisture
transport across the edges and/or irreversibly
capturing it inside the devices.
DryPaste
DryPaste air-printable dryers work as irreversible
moisture traps. DryPaste-G is a high capacity
dispensable dryer with a thermal curing process.
DryPaste-V is a family of high viscosity gel formu-
lations which do not require curing.
ZetaFill
TM
ZetaFill is a new family of curable or no-curing
active filler materials specifically designed for
Dam & Fill and ODF processes. Proprietary engi-
neered nano-zeolites are mixed with different
polymer matrixes making ZetaFill compatible
with virtually any production process and device
architecture.
AqvaDry
AqvaDry is a line of dryers that are optically trans-
parent and only visible during moisture adsorp-
tion. UV or thermally curable, AqvaDry can be
used as a film, but also as filler between the two
substrates of OLED devices.
ZeoGlue
ZeoGlue is a UV curable dispersion of SAES Getters
proprietary engineered nano-zeolites in an epoxy
glue boosting an exponential increase of break-
through time.
AlkaMax
To enhance efficiency and reduce power
consumption of OLED devices, the AlkaMax
technology allows a controlled and reproducible
release of ultra-high pure alkali and alkaline earth
metals. AlkaMax products ensure safe handling
in any condition, thanks to the unique nature of
the metal precursors.
SAES Group: Solutions for Organic and Plastic Electronics
SAES Getters S.p.A.
Viale Italia, 77 20020 Lainate MI Italy
Phone +39 0293178285 E-Mail organic_electronics@saes-group.com
Internet www.saesgroup.com
68 SAFC HITECH
In an increasingly digitally-driven world, new
markets, new economies and new dynamics are
accelerating technological advances as never
before. Across applications as diverse as
communications, power generation and storage,
detection technologies, and LEDs for backlit
displays, architectural, automotive and solid-
state lighting, there are significant growth
opportunities for chemistry and electronic
materials innovation. At the forefront of this
wave of innovation, SAFC Hitech is delivering
unmatched expertise in advanced chemistries
and chemical delivery systems for emerging
technologies.
Deep collaborative relationships from R&D
through to commercial scale-up are at the
heart of our business, allied to our unique ability
to develop tailored chemistry for deposition
processes and delivery systems, guided by an
intimate understanding of customer needs.
As a problem solver and solutions provider, our
integrated approach to materials development
and unparalleled application and chemistry
knowledge is backed by a global supply infra-
structure with local knowledge and support.
Find out for yourself how SAFC Hitech is deliver-
ing functional performance that breaks new
boundaries, enabling technology, touching lives
and driving innovation for a better future.
SAFCHitech.com
SAFC Hitech Performance Materials:
Supporting the Complete Chemistry Lifecycle for Semiconductors,
Optoelectronics and Energy Markets
SAFC Hitech
Power Road Bromborough CH62 3QF United Kingdom
Phone +44 151 482 7230 E-Mail HitechInfo@sial.com
Internet www.safchitech.com
SOLIGIE 69
Gain a competitive advantage by making your
products lighter, thinner, safer, more flexible,
more informative more useful. Integrate
printed electronics to create new products that
offer more or better functionality. Soligie can
help you design, develop and manufacture high-
quality products to meet or exceed your
specifications and your customers expectations.
Soligie was founded in 2005 with
the goal of providing design,
development and manufacturing
services to the emerging printed
and flexible electronics market. For
the first 18 months, Soligie devel-
oped a variety of printing and
converting skill sets that comple-
mented the electronics design and
manufacturing experience of the employees. In
2007 Soligie relocated to Savage, MN, a suburb of
Minneapolis, where production and test equip-
ment was acquired. In addition, a quality man-
agement system was developed enabling Soligie
to become ISO 9001 and ISO 13485 certified.
As a wholly owned subsidiary of Taylor Corpora-
tion, Soligie is backed by a company with over
$ 1 billion in revenue per year. Taylor Corp. operates
in eight countries and employs approximately
10,000 people. Investments in Soligie by Taylor
Corp. have enabled the purchase of a customized
large scale roll-to-roll printing press used for both
product development and volume manufactur-
ing. Soligie is uniquely positioned as a design
engineering and product development services
company with high volume manufacturing capa-
bilities in-house. This means that Soligie applies
a manufacturing mindset early on in the product
development process.
Soligies vision:
To be the premier resource for advancing
programs to commercialization with our partners
by leveraging expertise and innovation in flexible
electronics.
Soligies mission:
We deliver comprehensive solutions by opti-
mizing, applying, and integrating technologies,
enabling our customers to realize successful new
products. This innovation and resulting differen-
tiation drive growth for Soligie and our partners.
Soligie Inspiring Form, Function and Results
Soligie
8647 Eagle Creek Parkway Savage, MN 55378 USA
Phone +1 952 818-8300 E-Mail info@soligie.com
Internet www.soligie.com
70 SOLVAY
Solvay is a supplier of high added value
materials and inks for OLED, OFET and OPV.
Our rapid development pace relies on an open
innovation model based on 3 pillars: academic
and applied research centers (e.g. Holst), innova-
tive start-ups (Plextronics, Polyera) and internal
capabilities:
Our new laboratory (Brussels, B) is specifically
dedicated to this R&D field, in order to provide
the missing link between innovative ideas and
the marketing of manufactured products.
Furthermore, since the acquisition of Rhodia, new
competencies have been added in the fields of
formulation (Bordeaux, F), process upscaling and
optimization (Lyon-F), and transparent electrodes
(Bristol, USA).
Our Specialty Polymers development team
(Milano, I) optimizes the Solvene EAP range of
materials which can be used in printable memo-
ries, energy harvesting, sensors and actuators,
and the amorphous fluoropolymer Hyflon AD for
gate dielectric and interlayer.
About SOLVAY
SOLVAY is an international chemical Group com-
mitted to sustainable development with a clear
focus on innovation and operational excellence.
Its recent acquisition of specialty chemicals
company Rhodia created a much larger player,
which is realizing over 90% of its sales in markets
where it is among the top 3 global leaders.
Solvay offers a broad range of products that con-
tribute to improving the quality of life and the
performance of its customers in markets such as
consumer goods, construction, automotive,
energy, water and environment, and electronics.
The Group is headquartered in Brussels, employs
about 29,000 people in 55 countries and
generated EUR 12.4 billion in net sales in 2012.
Developing Sustainable Solutions for the Future
SOLVAY Organic Electronics platform
rue de Ransbeek 310 1120 Brussels Belgium
Phone +32 2 264 21 11 E-Mail organic.electronics@solvay.com
Internet www.solvay.com
SUNATECH 71
With a broad arsenal of chemical building blocks
for organic electronic materials to choose from,
SunaTech is now ready to supply OPV polymers
useful for the development of large area printing
processes. From spin coating to R2R, SunaTech
helps make the transition.
Incorporated in 2008 and located in the Suzhou
Industrial Park, one of the most dynamic areas in
China, SunaTech Inc. is committed to providing
support for the R&D in a number of advanced
technological sectors, such as organic photovolta-
ics, organic light emitting diodes, OTFT, bioanalytics
and medical diagnostics. Since its incorporation,
SunaTech has established an international cus-
tomer base and has become a member of OE-A.
SunaTech supplies high quality chemicals/materi-
als and offers problem-solving solutions to the
rapidly developing field of organic electronics.
SunaTechs products include luminescent metal
complexes, organic conductors and monomers/
intermediates for low bandgap OPV conducting
polymers.
The company also provides custom synthesis and
contract research for both academia and industry
under confidential agreements. Operated by
experienced chemists, who obtained degrees and
experience in Europe, North America and Japan,
SunaTech understands its customers desire for
confidentiality and has established policies to
protect its customers interest in the way it pro-
tects its own interest in order to conduct high
quality contract research.

While serving its customers, which range from
academia to industry and from organic electron-
ics to bioanalytics, SunaTech is also building its
expertise and developing technologies in collabo-
ration with its partners in multiple sectors.
SunaTech is looking for investors and strategic
partners to expand its R&D and business areas.
For customers in North America and Europe,
please contact our representative:
Rubipy Scientific Inc. 880 Taylor Creek Drive
Ottawa, ON K1C 1T1 Canada
Phone +1 613 216 1242 Fax +1 613 590 0462
E-Mail info@rubipy.com Internet www.rubipy.com
From Chemicals to Materials
SunaTech Inc. 398 Ruoshui Road
bioBAY, Suzhou Industrial Park Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, 215123 P. R. China
Phone +86 512 6287 2180 E-Mail info@sunatech.com
Internet www.sunatech.com
SunaTech Inc.
72 TEKNEK
High Yields in Plastic Electronics
Teknek Ltd River Drive Inchinnan Business Estate Inchinnan
Renfrewshire PA9 4RT United Kingdom
Phone +44 141 568 8100 Fax +44 141 568 8101
Internet www.teknek.com
Delivering knowledge
Teknek originally developed
the concept of a contact
cleaning system for use in
the PCB sector. It comprises
a transfer process where
dry unattached particles
are removed from the substrate by a polymer
roller, which in turn is deposited on a reverse
wound adhesive roll. The system has been proven
to remove particles as small as 1 micron from
substrates. Most installations are positioned
inside existing clean rooms. Teknek has a current
installed base of over 19,000 machines world-
wide. The Teknek laboratories, fitted with testing
and measurement equipment, ensure that the
company fully understands the science of clean-
ing. The best cleaning core configuration is then
applied to the films and coatings that are used in
the plastic electronics sector.
Delivering innovation
Teknek continually develops its products. This
policy provides a number of new innovations in
the cleaning core technology and the delivery
systems that process the materials.
Recent innovations:
Nanocleen polymer roller products, silicone
free contact cleaning solutions that remove
Nano sized particles.
EcoFilm and EcoPaper adhesive products,
both are environmentally friendly.
The CM8 platform machine suitable for pro-
cessing multifunctional films at the assembly
stage of smart phones, tablets and LCDs.
Wide web cleaning applications up to
4 meters wide. Allows cleaning of primary
films used in flexible electronics.
Teknek works with international research
groups, sharing the knowledge on cleaning
and processing multifunctional films.
Teknek is the only company to manufacture
the polymer rollers and adhesive roller systems
in-house.
Delivering value
Teknek consistently delivers yield improvement
for the manufacturer. The yield gains are meas-
ured in a number of different ways: improved
quality, reduced downtime, increased production
speeds; but in each case the ROI model is short.
Teknek contact cleaning systems are proven for use
with multifunctional films that are currently used
in the manufacture of modern plastic electronics.
THIN FILM ELECTRONICS 73
Thinfilm is a leader in the production of commer-
cial printed memory and is now driving the devel-
opment of fully integrated printed systems, with
a particular focus on smart tag and sensor-related
applications.
Thinfilm is developing a line of intelligent labels
that will sense information and store data for a
tenth to a hundredth of the cost of conventional
electronics. Thinfilms memory catalyzes the Inter-
net of Things, making ordinary objects smart.
Time-Temperature sensor
The Thinfilm Time-Temperature Sensor provides
digital temperature and exposure information
for perishable products, at a price point that
competes with qualitative color change labels.
Sensor platform
Temperature sensing is one of many types of
tags that Thinfilm envisions as part of its road-
map. Together with its partners, Thinfilm is creat-
ing the first commercial library of printed logic,
increasing the functionality that can be delivered
on a single tag.
Bemis intelligent packaging platform
Bemis Company, a Fortune 500 company manu-
facturing over 200 billion packages annually, has
selected Thinfilms sensor tags as the basis for the
Bemis Intelligent Packaging Platform. Bemis is
working closely with Thinfilm to extend the core
sensing architecture to include additional sensors
of particular interest to their customer base.
Blood oxygen sensor
Thinfilms sensor tag architecture was selected as
a foundational component in a FlexTech Alliance
program to create a blood oxygen sensor that can
measure and store data on a single tag. The
program brings together work at the University of
California, Berkeley, PARC, and Thinfilm.
On the Path to Integrated System Products
Thin Film Electronics ASA, Norway
Henrik Ibsens gate 100 P. O. Box 2911 Solli 0230 Oslo Norway
Phone +47 23 27 51 59 E-Mail info@thinfilm.no
Internet www.thinfilm.no
74 TSE TROLLER
More than 50 years of know-how in the develop-
ment and production of premetered coating
dies have made TSE TROLLER a world-leading
specialist in the applied coating technology
sector. TSE has developed advanced coating
solutions which pave the way for the future.
Competences
TSE uses the most precise equipment for produc-
ing and measuring the dies in order to guarantee
the highest possible quality of the equipment.
Beside precision and surface quality, it is the
design of the cavities that plays a crucial role in
achieving superb die performance. TSE has wide-
ranging know-how in modeling different liquids.
The target of the dual cavity distribution system is
a uniform cross profile of the coated film, as well
as long intervals between die cleaning cycles, to
achieve high coating line efficiency for a wide
range of applications from water to honey with
the same dies, without any calibration of course.
TSE-TableCoater
When designing new products in the field of
flexible electronics, the appropriate components
of the coating liquids are often only available in
very limited quantities and are correspondingly
expensive.
Thus, the hold-up volume of the entire system is
very important to allow for economic develop-
ment. TSE coating dies achieve exactly this by the
customer-specific design of the internal distribu-
tion system.
In order to ensure the scale-up from the labora-
tory to a subsequent roll-to-roll process, the
same application process should be used from
the beginning. This requires bridging the gap
between the lab scale of the development labora-
tory on one hand and well-proven coating
processes on the other.
Often only a few samples of a new development
step are sufficient in order to analyze their func-
tionality, efficiency and other features. Neverthe-
less, the conditions of the experimental setup
should be comparable with later production runs,
to minimize risks.
For this purpose, TSE has devel-
oped a modular coating system.
For technical details just ask.
Worlds Most Precise Slide, Slot and
Curtain Dies for Premetered Coating
TSE Troller AG
Aareweg 6 4853 Murgenthal Switzerland
Phone +41 62 917 40 10 E-Mail info@tse-coating.ch
Internet www.tse-coating.ch
TSE-TableCoater with single layer slot die TSE-TableCoater with flow box, enclosure
and base frame
Dual layer slot die
VARTA MICROBATTERY 75
VARTA Microbattery is one of the worlds leading
battery manufacturers. With production facilities
and sales subsidiaries worldwide, we supply our
customers in more than 100 countries with high-
quality battery products. The company has its
headquarters in Ellwangen, Germany. We develop
and produce batteries comprising many electro-
chemical systems and cell geometries. As a global
system supplier, we are in a position to fulfill our
customers requirements all over the world.
Manufacturing for more than 125 years, VARTA is
partner to numerous innovative developments in
the energy sector. The company established a
joint venture with Volkswagen AG in 2009, the
Volkswagen VARTA Microbattery Forschungs-
gesellschaft. At its Ellwangen location the com-
pany develops efficient lithium-ion batteries for
electromobility. It is striving to develop a battery
that offers enhanced performance compared to
the models that are currently available for this
market segment.
The energy storage solutions developed by VARTA
Storage ensure that home-produced energy is
available just when you need it, regardless of the
time of day or weather. The integrated energy
management system optimizes the utilization of
the solar power. Depending on a households
requirement, it provides the power for home use,
or feeds it into the grid.
VARTA Microbattery is engaged in various
research projects which also cover printed
batteries; for example, the projects A3Ple and
FLEXIBILITY. The A3Ple team is developing a thin
and flexible sensor fully printed on a paper tag.
The aim of the project FLEXIBILITY is to establish
printed electronics in new markets like smart
tags and smart textiles.
Please visit us for more information at
www.varta-microbattery.com
VARTA Microbattery The Energy Solution Specialist
VARTA Microbattery GmbH
Daimlerstr. 1 73479 Ellwangen Germany
Phone +49 7961 921-0 E-Mail http://contact.varta-microbattery.com
Internet www.varta-microbattery.com
76 VDL FLOW
VDL FLOW is a newly established enterprise
within the VDL Enabling Technologies Group
(VDL ETG), The Netherlands.
VDL FLOW is an original equipment manufac-
turer focusing on the development and supply
of high-performance roll-to-roll (R2R) and sheet-
to-sheet (S2S) production equipment for printed
electronics applications such as flexible solar
panels, OLED lighting, displays, sensors and
batteries. FLOW, in the name of the company,
stands for Functional Layers On Web.
VDL FLOW started under the umbrella of VDL ETG,
which already consisted of 6 companies, in order
to benefit from the exis tent know-how in the
handling and positioning of substrates and webs.
Through the years, this technical heritage posi-
tioned the parent company as one of the main
suppliers of integrated mechatronic solutions to
high-tech businesses like semiconductor manu-
facturing, electronic microscopy, analytical
chemistry and medical sectors, photovoltaic and
LED manufacturing industries.
As an original equipment manufacturer (OEM),
VDL FLOW leverages on key expertise areas
already present at its parent company in preci-
sion machining, extremely accurate positioning
of substrates and webs down to micrometer and
nanometer levels, vacuum and cleanroom tech-
nologies, and final integration and qualification
of highly complex systems.
The core activity of VDL FLOW is to specify, design
and manufacture primarily roll-to-roll production
lines that respond to cutting-edge requirements
for the deposition of functional materials on flex-
ible substrates. The business scope of VDL FLOW
extends generally to the system integration of
modules and subsystems needed in the printed
electronics industry and to the turnkey delivery of
such integrated projects. The business partners of
VDL FLOW are active in key technical areas like
conductive polymers, flexible sensors, thin-film
batteries, printed logic circuitry, or other compo-
nents based on the deposition and patterning of
functional materials that are known to require
dedicated manufacturing processes under
extreme specifications.
Global Leadership in Roll-to-Roll Equipment
for Mass Manufacturing of Printed Electronics
VDL FLOW
Achtseweg Noord 5 5651 GG Eindhoven The Netherlands
Phone +31 40 2638777 E-Mail info@vdlflow.com
Internet www.vdlflow.com
XENON CORPORATION 77
Xenon Corporation, worldwide leader in Pulsed
Light Technology designs, develops and manufac-
tures for photonic sintering of conductive inks.
The Sinteron family of products includes high-
energy pulsed light delivery systems that allow
precise control of the energy delivery by adjust-
ment of peak energy of pulsed light. In the
printed electronics industry, Xenons Sinteron
systems are used to rapidly dry and prepare
conductive inks at room temperature, making it
possible to print on heat-sensitive flexible sub-
strates such as PET and paper.
The Sinteron 2010 adds pulse width adjustment
and double pulse configurations where even
more precise control is required. These tools have
primarily been targeted towards the R&D market.
Xenon developed the Sinteron 5000 for high
volume roll-to-roll production. This system incor-
porates up to 10 lamp stages.
Xenon understands that successful deployment
of photonic sintering requires collaboration with
multiple technology groups. Xenon also produces
high-performance pulsed UV systems for applica-
tions in decontamination and UV curing. With
over 45 years of experience in pulsed light, Xenon
Corporation has thousands of systems operating
24/7 in industrial production lines worldwide.
Xenon has led the formation of a consortium of
manufacturers, integrators and universities called
Printed Electronics Test Network (PETN) which
includes 10 US and 12 international sites. These
sites offer laboratory, equipment and expertise to
develop printed electronic solutions.
Please visit www.xenoncorp.com for more
information.
Xenon Sheds Light on Sintering
Xenon Corporation
37 Upton Drive Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887-1018 USA
Phone +1 978 661-9033 E-Mail info@xenoncorp.com
Internet www.xenoncorp.com
78 YNVISIBLE
Ynvisible develops and markets interactive
solutions for everyday printed items.
The company was founded in 2010 with the
vision to bring everyday objects and surfaces to
life, making them more useful and enjoyable to
people. Ynvisible adapts functionalities familiar
to consumers from on-line / digital experiences
and applies these to physical (printed) objects.
Ynvisible operates at the cross-section of the
converging digital and physical worlds. The
company specializes in combining printed
electronics technologies with both traditional
printed graphics products and traditional
electronic components, to design and enable
interactive solutions for everyday printed items.
Ynvisibles solutions deliver consumer experiences
to physical items that are as engaging and
interactive as those in the digital world.
Ynvisibles first printed interactive graphics
solutions are based on electrochromics technology
combined with novel consumer
activation/interaction mechanisms.
These elements bring life and movement to
printed graphics, i.e. the graphical image changes
between different states through user activation.
Ynvisible combines technologies with graphics,
electronics and industrial design know-how, and
pilot production services to build and deliver first
products/solutions for its customers an under
addressed function within the current printed
electronics value chain.
Ynvisible supplies brand owners with tailored
interactive solutions to their specific marketing
and product development needs. In order to build
complete customer solutions and products,
Ynvisible also partners with
3rd party technology suppliers
to integrate their technological
offerings into customer products.
Headquarters Rua Mouzinho de Albuquerque, 7 2070-104 Cartaxo Portugal
R&D Center Edif. YDreams, Madan Parque Sul 2825-149 Caparica Portugal
Phone ++351 21 031 4000 Fax +351 21 031 4001
Internet www.ynvisible.com www.ynvisible.com/shop
INSTITUTES 79
Printed Electronics at Acreo Swedish ICT focuses
primarily on three application areas: packaging,
internet of things and health care. We have
established a platform of printed electronics
components consisting of displays, transistors,
diodes, and energy sources which can be
integrated into products, creating innovative
functionality. The platform is easy to integrate
and is manufacturable in high volume.
We work in close collaboration with Linkping
University (LiU), where LiU is responsible for
fundamental research and Acreo for refining the
research results into demonstrators, manufactur-
ing processes and prototypes. We also have print-
ing facilities for the development of prototypes
and small-scale production. Here the industry can
test the viability of Printed Electronics for new
applications.
We are also working with LiU and KI to develop
a set of bio-electronic components and corre-
sponding manufacturing routes. Together we
have the competence to create novel materials as
well as integrated systems and manufacturing,
with all kinds of applications, from active displays
and ion pumps for cell communication to switch-
able (bio-)surfaces for cell growth.
Acreo Swedish ICT
Acreo Swedish ICT AB
Printed Electronics Box 787 Bredgatan 34 601 17 Norrkping Sweden
Phone +46 11 20 25 00 Fax +46 11 20 25 01 Internet www.acreo.se
CeNTI Centre for Nanotechnology and Smart Materials
CeNTI Centre for Nanotechnology and Smart Materials
Rua Fernando Mesquita 2785 4760-034 VN Famalico Portugal
Phone +351 252 104 152 E-Mail centi@centi.pt Internet www.centi.pt
CeNTI is an institute for new technologies and
innovative products that provides, in a business
to business approach, applied R&D, engineering
and scaling-up production of innovative smart
materials and devices.
CeNTIs special focus is on electronics (organic
electronics and embedded systems), polymers
(fibres and coatings), functional materials
(nanomaterials and processes) and final product
design and engineering. Main applications of the
Smart Materials and Solutions program include
printed and bulk sensor-actuators, biosensors,
OPVs, OLEDs, heating bands, supercapacitors,
electrochromic devices and integrated systems
in conventional everyday applications.
Key Technologies in-house
Roll-to-roll (500 mm): plasma treatment, hot-
melt slot-die, CVD, AC/DC Sputtering, Metal
evaporation, Polymer Multilayer deposition w/
E-beam, Plasma enhanced ultrasonic spraying
with UV curing
Thermal Evaporation Units (150x150 mm) for
small molecules and metals
Roll-to-roll etching, screen printing,
engraved roller, slot-die, drying and laminating
(100 mm and 300 mm web)
80 INSTITUTES
CEA-LITEN has the role of developing printed
organic electronics for smart systems on foils
(e.g. sensors, OTFT, photovoltaic energy, energy
scavenging, storage). CEA-LITEN is developing a
new generation of materials and processes to
prepare final printed electronic devices (through
integration, characterization).
CEA-LITEN performs feasibility studies and pilot
scale production. Thanks to the sheet-to-sheet
printing open platform PICTIC for the scale-up
of technologies from laboratory demonstrators to
product prototypes. The PICTIC platform facili-
tates the transfer to industrial partners. The
PICTIC tool set includes: inkjet and US spray, flat
screen, gravure press, slot die, lasers dedicated to
the development of inks and printing processes.
Portfolio of printed electronic devices
Sensors: organic photodiodes, temperature,
pressure
OTFT: CMOS for digital & analog circuits
OLED for signage and lighting devices
Passive devices: RF filters, antenna

Targeted applications
Intelligent smart systems
Sensor arrays
Human machine interface
Ambient Intelligence
Thin batteries
Development and optimization of materials
(nanomaterials nanopowders, etc.) for
advanced lithium batteries flexible substrates
(polymer, paper, etc.) ambient intelligence con-
cept longer lifetime packaging.
Thin film technologies
for photovoltaic and thermoelectric systems
Miniature energy recovery technology silicon
nanofibers multiquantum wells scavenging
high gradient temperature environment
nanopowder technology thin film technology.
Large area organic solar cells: flexible substrate
device architecture longer lifetime
encapsulation printing.
CEA-PICTIC: Isabelle Chartier, Printed Electronic
Business Developer, Phone +33 686 12 86 07,
isabelle.chartier@cea.fr
CEA LITEN CEA Centre de Grenoble
17 rue des Martyrs 38054 Grenoble France
Phone +33 438 783706 E-Mail bertrand.fillon@cea.fr
Internet www-liten.cea.fr
CEA-LITEN Performes Feasibility Studies and Pilot Scale Production
INSTITUTES 81
CPI is home to the National Printable Electronics Centre, a state-of-the-art design,
development and prototyping facility. CPI works with clients to bring new products
to market quickly and efficiently, by offering facilities and expertise that help to
reduce the levels of R&D risk capital investment.
Services: Prototyping and product scale up; materials investigation; product and
process development; consultancy; business and funding support; incubator space
Facilities: 1,250m
2+
of cleanroom and laboratory space; reel-to-reel wet coating
prototyping; full lithography patterning suite; ink-jet and aerosol printers; batch and
continuous sputter coating for metal and metal oxide deposition; state-of-the-art
measurement and characterization equipment; Integrated Smart Systems line integrating
printing process with electronic components & pick and place technology;
Atomic Layer Deposition; Larger scale process development toolsets for OLED and
OPV applications including UV stepper exposure tool and CD and overlay measurement
capability
CPI The UKs National Printable Electronics Centre
The Centre for Process Innovation (CPI)
Thomas Wright Way NETPark Sedgefield County Durham United Kingdom
Phone +44 1740 625700 E-Mail info@uk-cpi.com
Internet www.uk-cpi.com
We Strongly Believe in Printed Electronics
CETEMMSA Technological Centre Av. dErnest Lluch 36
Parc Cientfic i de la Innovaci TecnoCampus 08302 Matar
Barcelona Spain Phone +34 93 741-9100
E-Mail cetemmsa@cetemmsa.com Internet www.cetemmsa.com
CETEMMSA is a technology center focused on the
applied research of surface treatments on flexible
substrates for the development of smart devices.
To achieve this goal, we mainly rely on printing/
coating techniques for smart device development,
and integration techniques for smart objects and
product development.
CETEMMSAs know-how covers the following:
printing of electroluminescent panels on textiles,
hybrid LEDs, organic flexible photovoltaic panels;
printing of electronic circuits and components
over flexible substrates including textiles,
hybridization of silicon components, printing of
heating elements; development and integration
of printed pressure sensors, printed sensors for
biosignals, printed sensors for human kinematic
analysis; universal bioplatform development,
biomarker patterning on flexible substrates;
development of textiles with heating properties,
high mechanical resistance textiles, conductive
and electromagnetic shielding textiles, surface
treatment for enhancement of textile properties.
CETEMMSA is part of the Smart Textiles Group and
the Healthcare Group of the OE-A and contributes
to the development and dissemination of printed
organic electronics. The center also promotes and
coordinates the Spanish Flexible Organic and Large
Area Electronics and Photonics (FOLAEP) group and
is member of the Commercialization of Organic
and Large Area Electronics (COLAE) project.
The consortium brings together world leaders in complemen-
tary fields of chemical synthesis, characterization and device
assembly with industry players who are leaders in solar cell
manufacture, lifetime testing, materials, substrates and
printing. The consortium aims to produce prototype BHJ and
DSSC solar cells printed on plastic substrates within 3 years.
Currently we produce 30 cm x 30 cm BHJ modules on flex-
ible substrates using reel-to-reel process, and both BHJ and
DSSC on glass and steel substrates using a semi-continuous
batch process.
The combined capabilities of the core research partners; the
University of Melbourne, Monash University and the CSIRO,
exceed 80 chemists, physicists, engineers and printers with
expertise in:
Modeling electronic structure, band-gap, etc.
Design and synthesis of novel dyes,
n-type and p-type materials
Design and synthesis of novel monomers
and polymers
Scale-up, including flow chemistry
Spectroscopy & characterization
Device fabrication & testing
Module manufacture, indoor accelerated
and outdoor field-testing
Reel-2-reel printing, spray deposition,
evaporation
Rapid and efficient materials discovery is complemented by
a dynamic manufacturing program featuring an array of
traditional printing and spray-deposition techniques. Tight
feedback loops between both these programs ensure
efficient knowledge transfer and rapid progress.
The consortium has received long-term support from the
Victorian State Government and the Australian Solar Institute
as well as our industrial partners, BlueScope Steel,
Securency International, Innovia Films (UK) and Robert
Bosch SEA (Singapore).
We have flexible business models and we have developed
strong collaborations with an international network of leading
universities and corporations in Europe, the US and SE Asia.
Address:
Dr David Jones, VICOSC Program Co-ordinator,
Bio21 Institute, University of Melbourne
30 Flemington Road
Parkville, Victoria
3010
Phone +61 383442371
Fax +61 383442384
Mobile +61 0403520114
E-Mail djjones@unimelb.edu.au
Internet www.vicosc.unimelb.edu.au
The Victorian Organic Solar Cell Consortium
The Victorian Organic Solar Cell Consortium (VICOSC) is a collaboration between academia
and industry based in Victoria, Australia. It was established in 2007 through funding from the
Victorian Governments Sustainable Energy Research and Development Initiative.
ADVERTISEMENT
INSTITUTES 83
CSEM offers custom-made innovative solutions
in micro-systems, surface engineering and
integrated devices. Our mission is to develop
and transfer microtechnologies to the industrial
sector.
The CSEM polytronics center is located in the
Basel area: a strategic innovation and production
hub in the heart of Europe.
CSEM realizes the following on a project basis:
characterization of printable electronic materials,
first-of-a-kind realization, process development,
and optical device design. Our expertise includes
light management, sensor devices and industrial
technologies. Our clean room facilities include:
ink-jet, gravure and screen printing, bar and slot
die coating, lithography, NIL, and replication, as
well as equipment for OLED, OPV and OTFT solu-
tion processing and characterization.
CSEM Polytronics Center Muttenz
CSEM
Tramstr. 99 4132 Muttenz Switzerland
Phone +41 61 690 6000 E-Mail info@csem.ch
Internet www.csem.ch
CSIRO is Australias National Research Laboratory.
It has >6,000 staff working on areas of national
and global significance, bridging the gap
between academia and industry.
The Flexible Electronics Group builds on decades of successful R&D
in materials science and engineering. Our core competency is the
tight integration of chemists, physicists and engineers combined
with our state-of-the-art facilities. We provide end-to-end solu-
tions for our clients based on our expertise in theory, synthesis &
scale-up, materials characterization, device architecture, fabrica-
tion & testing, large format printing and lifetime testing.
We develop OPVs and hybrid devices for low-cost, lightweight
power, OLEDs for solid-state lighting and displays, and thin-film
transistors for flexible electronics.
We have flexible business models and collaborate with an interna-
tional network of leading universities and corporations in Europe,
the US and SE Asia.
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO)
CSIRO, Future Manufacturing Flagship
Private Bag 33 Clayton South MDC Victoria 3169 Australia
Phone +613 9545 2205 E- Mail Gerry.Wilson@CSIRO.au
Internet www.csiro.au/flexibleelectronics
84 INSTITUTES
CTP is your industrial partner for paper and printing applied research,
consultancy, testing laboratories and training courses CTP is
independent and impartial, with a high level of scientific expertise in:
Lignocellulose chemistry
Bio-based materials
Health and safety applications
Packaging of the future
Printed electronics Smart paper
New value for recovered paper & board
Water Energy
Printed Communication
Industrial performance
CTP helps create innovative products & processes at the lab,
pilot and industrial scale; develops knowledge and makes you
more competitive!
CTP Innovate for the Future!
CTP Centre Technique du Papier Domaine Universitaire
CS 90250 Cedex 9 38044 Grenoble France
Phone +33 4761540-15 E-Mail infoCTP@webCTP.com
Internet www.webCTP.com
ENEA UTTP-NANO is organized as a lab-scale full processing line
for simulation, design, fabrication and testing of FOLAE materials,
devices and systems; some activities are dedicated to the prepara-
tion of new polymeric transparent conductors, as well as studying
the recovery and recycling of valuable materials from waste, and
to support the SMEs.
The main focus is on OLEDs, OTFTs, OPVs, sensors,
and their integration. Available processes are:
photolithography and photo-masks preparation,
UV-NIL, vacuum evaporation, ALD, printing tech-
niques, sputtering, laser assisted deposition, etc.,
and several electro-optical and physical charac-
terization techniques.
General targets are the improvement of the
devices performance, the increase of their life-
time and stability, and to reduce the energy and
the materials consumption for their preparation.
ENEA UTTP-NANO The Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Devices
UTTP-NANO Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Devices
p.le Enrico Fermi no. 1 80055 Portici (NA) Italy
Phone +39 0817723289 E-Mail paolo.tassini@enea.it
Internet www.enea.it
INSTITUTES 85
High-performance, ultra-low power sensors
are co-integrated with electronic components
and power sources on foil to create energy
autonomous smart systems.
Our state-of-the-art foil pro-
cessing and printing platform
and our unique expertise in
microsystems at EPFL-SAMLAB
allow cutting-edge R&D on
foil-based smart systems.
We develop sensors, energy
harvesting and integration
technologies for the fabrication of energy efficient systems on
polymeric, cellulosic and biodegradable substrates. Sensing,
energy scavenging and storage, printing, and integration tech-
nologies for multi-foil and hybrid systems are our core activities.
We also have extended experience in transferring technology
from R&D into viable products and processes for industry.
Energy Autonomous Smart Sensing Systems on Foil
EPFL IMT SAMLAB
Microcity Maladire 71b 2000 Neuchtel Switzerland
Phone +41 32 720 5564 E-Mail danick.briand@epfl.ch
Internet http://samlab.epfl.ch/enviromems
The research group Thin Films and Functional
Materials at the Fontys University of Applied
Sciences cooperates with companies and
research institutes to gain knowledge on
application of functional materials with thin
film deposition techniques.
Examples of projects are inkjet printing of
polymers and nanoparticles, pre-treatment
of substrates with micro-plasma printing,
nanostructured surfaces with anti-reflective
properties, transparent conductive coatings
and easy-to-clean surfaces.
Students participate, individually or in groups,
in these projects and obtain practical training
on the equipment available in our laboratory.
This equipment, which includes inkjet printing,
micro-plasma printing, spin coating, sputtering
and vacuum evaporation, is also used for joint
(subsidized) research with companies.
Fontys Thin Films and Functional Materials
Fontys University of Applied Sciences Expertise Centre Thin Films and Functional Materials
Rachelsmolen 1 P. O. Box 347 5600 AH Eindhoven The Netherlands
Phone +31 8850 74280 E-Mail j.bernards@fontys.nl
Internet www.fontys.nl/lectoraten/funmaterials
86 INSTITUTES
Fraunhofer COMEDD was founded as an inde-
pendent research institution of the Fraunhofer-
Gesellschaft in order to transfer research and
development results in the field of organic
materials and systems to production.
The institution combines research and develop-
ment works for the production, integration and
technology of organic electronic devices. The
focus of Fraunhofer COMEDD lies in customer-
and application-oriented research, development
and pilot fabrication of novel module concepts
and fabrication methods for these devices.
Fraunhofer COMEDD is a leading European pro-
duction-related research and development center
for organic semiconductors focusing on organic
light-emitting diodes and vacuum technology.
The COMEDD infrastructure is composed of
different pilot lines in several cleanrooms with
a unique vacuum coating line for the production
of OLED and OLED integration on silicon
substrates as well as a research line for a roll-to-
roll production on flexible substrates.
Fraunhofer COMEDD offers a wide range of
research, development and pilot production
options, especially for OLED lighting, organic
solar cells and OLED microdisplays.
We Shape the Light!
Fraunhofer COMEDD
Maria-Reiche-Str. 2 01109 Dresden Germany
Phone +49 351 8823 238 E-Mail info@comedd.fraunhofer.de
Internet www.comedd.fraunhofer.de
The Fraunhofer EMFT has long-term experience
in poly tronics research with special focus on
efficient fabrication technologies for plastic film
devices and systems.
One of our main topics is to integrate different
foil components, such as organic circuits, photo-
voltaic cells, printed batteries, displays, sensors
and ultra thin ICs, into smart flexible systems.
Current research activities also cover advanced
deposition and patterning of functional layers
and self-assembly of components.
Processing plays a key role for large-area systems
and cost-efficient manufacturing of plastic film
systems. Fraunhofer EMFT offers its expertise and
an excellent equipment platform for cooperation
with industry. Roll-to-roll fabrication and test
infrastructure are available. Different levels of
cooperation are possible, from processing services
to contract research and collaborative projects.
Electronic Systems on Plastic Films
Fraunhofer Research Institution for Modular Solid-State Technologies EMFT
Hansastr. 27d 80686 Mnchen Germany
Phone +49 89 54759-510 E-Mail contact@emft.fraunhofer.de
Internet www.emft.fraunhofer.de
INSTITUTES 87
The department Printed Functionalities of the Chemnitz Fraunhofer ENAS success-
fully carries out research and development in the field of flexible, large area, organic
and printed electronics in close cooperation with the Digital Printing Group of the TU
Chemnitz. We call this informal alliance of R&D experts Baumann Printing Research.
Our main fields of research are printed functionalities, digital fabrication and hybrid
R2R printing system applications such as conductive, semiconductive or dielectric layers
for active and passive printed electronics, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and
printed batteries applications. At DRUPA 2012 in Dsseldorf, we demonstrated, in close
cooperation with industrial partners, the R2R process of manufacturing conductive
copper patterns on paper by inkjet, screen printing and photonic sintering on the
microFLEX
TM
hybrid printing system. We are equipped with the most modern digital
and traditional printing systems forming the Chemnitz Inkjet-Technikum. This Inkjet-
Technikum allows joint projects with R&D partners as well as providing a chance for all
sizes of companies to try out first steps into the field of printed electronics and digital
fabrication without the risk of own initial investment. We offer hands-on training for
interested parties in appropriate technologies on certain pieces of equipment.
Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems ENAS
Department Printed Functionalities Technologie-Campus 3 09126 Chemnitz Germany
Phone +49 371 45001-0 E-Mail info@enas.fraunhofer.de
Internet www.enas.fraunhofer.de
Fraunhofer IAP has been active in organic
electronic research over the past 20 years,
focusing on solution-processed devices with
applications in OLEDs, OTFT and OPV. The main
focus is on the synthesis of novel materials
with improved optoelectronic properties as
well as on device design and manufacture.
Our concentration is on solution-processible systems which can be
manufactured by area or digital printing techniques. In a large
clean-room environment, several processing techniques are avail-
able, from spin coating for material evaluation in lab devices up to
advanced processing techniques such as inkjet printing and high
precision slot die coating on a robot controlled S2S manufacturing
line where devices can be processed on a pilot scale in sizes up to
150 x 150 mm. The line includes thermal and e-beam evaporation
of metals as cathode materials, as well as organic or inorganic
materials as interlayers and an atomic layer deposition for thin film
encapsulation. Current issues for the development of OLED, OPV
and OTFT go into the design of flexible devices for signage, for
security applications and energy harvesting. One focus is on the
combination of different organic electronic devices such as OTFT
driven OLEDs or OPV powered OLEDs.
Printed Devices through Solution Processing
Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP
Geiselbergstr. 69 14476 Potsdam-Golm Germany
Phone +49 331 568 1910 E-Mail info@iap.fraunhofer.de
Internet www.oled-forschung.de
88 INSTITUTES
Fraunhofer ILT is working on industrial laser manufacturing processes and the
related laser equipment.
The researchers in Aachen provide innovative solutions for flexible, high speed, high
resolution patterning of thin films. With laser wavelengths from UV to infrared and
pulse lengths from femto- to microseconds, specific optical properties of different
organic and inorganic materials can be utilized for micromachining of complex devices.
Laser joining is a versatile technology for encapsulation of organic electronic devices,
e.g., by novel laser glass soldering processes for glass substrates and high-speed
plastic welding for flexible materials.
Thin layers of conductors and semiconductors can be modified using high-speed
laser sintering or deposited by laser-induced forward transfer and laser metal transfer.
Laser ablation of ITO on flexible PET substrate
Innovative Laser-Processing for Organic Electronics
Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT
Steinbachstr. 15 52074 Aachen Germany
Dr. Arnold Gillner Phone +49 241 8906-148 E-Mail arnold.gillner@ ilt.fraunhofer.de
Internet www.ilt.fraunhofer.de
Fraunhofer IPA is an internationally renowned
center of excellence in the field of production
processes conducted under cleanroom condi-
tions and in the field of digital 2-D/3-D printing
and additive technologies. We develop and
automate customized processes and equipment
for efficient and reliable manufacturing:
Handling of thin and small devices: solutions for
separation, transport, storage and feeding, e.g.
for thin wafer and foil substrates; qualification of
tools, e.g. feeder and gripper.
Selective surface cleaning: cleaning and activa-
tion of local surface areas by using CO
2
snow-jet
cleaning and plasma technology.
2-D/3-D digital printing technology: process
development for selective coating applications
based on inkjet and electrophotographic printing
and dispensing technologies; processing of con-
ductive and non-conductive substances; additive
technologies (3-D printing) for micro components
and technical applications.
High precision assembly: solutions to mount
and connect small devices into highly integrated
and multifunctional plastic film and foil-based
systems.
Cleanliness technology: planning, design and
qualification of equipment for contamination-
critical manufacturing; Fraunhofer TESTED
DEVICE certification.
Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation IPA
Nobelstr. 12 70569 Stuttgart Germany
Phone +49 711 970 1633 E-Mail udo.gommel@ipa.fraunhofer.de
Internet www.ipa.fraunhofer.de
INSTITUTES 89
Organic solar cells show great potential due to their low production costs and
mechanical flexibility characteristics which open up a new range of solar cell
applications.
For the implementation and mass dissemination of organic solar cells, manufacturing
costs, efficiency and long term stability play a key role. Addressing these issues is the
main focus of the research activities on organic solar cells at Fraunhofer ISE. We develop
new types of solar cell concepts focusing on ITO-free architectures. We also work to
increase solar cell efficiency and minimize production expenses by using light trapping
structures, more cost-effective materials, and efficient manufacturing technologies. In
close co-operation with material developers, we investigate and optimize suitable
material systems. Further, we investigate the long term stability of solar cells. We
review aging processes as a whole. Then, under defined aging conditions, we examine
and analyze single components of organic solar cells, as well as sealing materials.
ITO-free organic photovoltaic module on a flexible
substrate. Fraunhofer ISE
Organic Photovoltaics
Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE
Heidenhofstr. 2 79110 Freiburg Germany
Phone +49 761 4588-5386 E-Mail uli.wuerfel@ise.fraunhofer.de
Internet www.ise.fraunhofer.de
The combination of conventional silicon circuits with organic electronic components
and digital functional printing techniques exploits the specific advantages of both
technology platforms (e.g. bendable displays with integrated memory).
For many years Fraunhofer ISIT has developed an advanced technology portfolio
around silicon based microelectronic and microsystem production, as well as
advanced packaging and connecting techniques.
Functional inkjet printing as a new and flexible electrical connecting technique is
opening new fields in application. Since ink and conductive glue curing temperatures
are much lower than in conventional soldering processes, functional inkjet printing
can be applied to less expensive substrates including paper and PET foils. Thermal
sensitive components such as flexible batteries can also be integrated into the pro-
duction process. This saves energy and lowers module costs. Overall, this expands
traditional rigid PCB production via low price flexible electronic module generation.
A binary clock on paper substrate. The inset shows
a glue-assembled SMD-LED on printed silver lines.
Hybrid Fabrication of Electronic Modules
Fraunhofer Institute for Silicon Technology ISIT
Dr.-Ing. Thomas Knieling Fraunhoferstr. 1 25524 Itzehoe Germany
Phone +49 4821 17-4605 E-Mail thomas.knieling@isit.fraunhofer.de
Internet www.isit.fraunhofer.de
90 INSTITUTES
The Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics
(COPE) at Georgia Tech is a leading research and
educational center that creates new technologies
based on organic photonic and electronic materi-
als that have a positive impact on the quality and performance
of products in the telecommunications, energy, information tech-
nology, and defense industries.
COPE takes a team approach to successfully focus on challenging
projects and provide innovative solutions in areas such as OLEDs
for lighting and displays, organic and hybrid photovoltaics for port-
able power, energy storage, and printable organic transistors.
COPE brings together multiple expert perspectives from across the
Georgia Tech campus seven Georgia Tech schools
and 35 faculty members and also partners with an
international network of leading universities and
corporations.
Excellence in Education, Research, and Innovation
Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics
901 Atlantic Dr. Atlanta, GA 30332-0400 USA
Phone +1 404 385 3138 E-Mail Jason.martin@chemistry.gatech.edu
Internet www.cope.gatech.edu
Fraunhofer POLO is your one-stop shop for new technologies and materials for
the surface functionalization of polymers. We offer our extensive experience
and know-how for developing new concepts, innovative processes, and modern
materials based on the surfaces of polymers.
The flexible, transparent, high and ultra-high barrier films developed by Fraunhofer
POLO belong to the best currently available on the marketplace. Combining
inorganic layers (e.g. Al
2
O
3
) with inorganic-organic hybrid coatings (ORMOCERs)
gives barrier films with extremely low permeability of gases and vapours:
water vapour transmission rate 2 x 10
4
g/(m
2
d) (at 38C and 90 % rel. hum.) on
commercially available standard PET film. This material is available as sample sheets
and as roll material (500 m, 460 mm width). On request, further functions (e.g. ITO)
can be added.
OLED with Fraunhofer POLO ultra-barrier film
encapsulation.
Cutting Edge Ultra-high Barrier Films now Available on Pilot-scale
Fraunhofer Alliance POLO
Geiselbergstr. 69 14476 Potsdam Germany
Dr. Andreas Hollnder Phone +49 331 5681404
E-Mail andreas.hollaender@polo.fraunhofer.de Internet www.polo.fraunhofer.de
INSTITUTES 91
Holst Centre is an independent open-innovation R&D centre that
develops generic technologies for wireless autonomous sensor
technologies and for flexible electronics. A key feature of Holst
Centre is its partnership model with industry and academia based
around shared roadmaps and programs. It is this kind of cross-
fertilization that enables Holst Centre to tune its scientific strategy
to industrial needs.
Holst Centre was set up in 2005 by imec (Flanders, Belgium)
and TNO (of the Netherlands) with support from the Dutch and
Flemish Governments.
Located at High Tech Campus Eindhoven, Holst Centre benefits
from, and contributes to, the state-of-the-art on-site facilities.
Holst Centre has over 170 research staff members with approxi-
mately 28 nationalities and commitments from more than
40 industrial partners.
Our research covers all enabling technologies and processes
for roll-to-roll fabrication of flexible electronic devices, such as
OLED lighting and displays, OPV
Holst Centre
High Tech Campus 31 5656 AE Eindhoven The Netherlands
Phone +31 4040204-00 E-Mail contact@holstcentre.com
Internet www.holstcentre.com Open Innovation by imec and TNO
IK4-CIDETEC is a technological center addressing the design of specific inks,
large-area pressure sensors, printed electrochemical sensors, and all-plastic
electrochromic devices.
IK4-CIDETEC is a technological center focused on materials, energy and surfaces.
It was created in 1997 as a non-profit foundation whose mission is to serve the
industry by enhancing its competitiveness through the implementation of inno-
vative procedures and products.
IK4-CIDETECs know-how covers the design of new specific inks and the
manufacturing of Plastic Electronics based devices. Specifically:
tailor-made nanomaterials and specific inks
flexible large-area pressure sensor devices
printed electrochemical sensors
flexible all-plastic electrochromic devices
Technological Center Expert in the Design
of Plastic Electronics Based Technologies
IK4-CIDETEC Parque Tecnolgico de San Sebastin
Paseo Miramn 196 20.009 San Sebastin Spain
Phone +34 943 309022 E-Mail eochoteco@cidetec.es
Internet www.cidetec.es
IK4 CIDETEC
Research Alliance
92 INSTITUTES
iL is an application-oriented research and transfer
platform of business and science in the Rhine-
Neckar Metropolitan region. Organized in the
form of a public-private partnership, all of iLs
partners share the common goal of driving
innovation to market faster. A laboratory has
been set up that is unique worldwide, in which
academic scientists and industrial researchers
from various disciplines work together on the
development of organic electronics.
iL collaborates with its 28 part-
ners (18 companies, including
3 DAX-listed companies, and
10 universities & research
institutes) across disciplines
along the entire value chain in
order to create novel solutions.
The company is a crucial part
of the Forum Organic Electro-
nics strategy, a cluster which was awarded the
title of Leading-Edge Cluster (Spitzencluster) and
40 million by the German Ministry of Education
and Research in September 2008.
The Forum Organic Electronics focuses on joint
research and the transfer of ideas into market-
able products, as well as the development and
implementation of educational programs.
The companies and universities involved share
three strategic goals:
to become a world leader in the field of
organic electronics by integrating research,
development and production
to become a world-leading innovation
incubator for the transfer of knowledge and
for start-up companies
to be recognized as one of the most
attractive locations for young and experienced
researchers
The variety of collaborators enables the cluster
to operate in the following fields:
Organic photovoltaics
Organic logic and memory
Organic sensors
Organic light-emitting diodes
All activities in these main areas are based
on printing technology, enabling low cost mass
production. Additionally, these areas are
supported by five competence centers within iL:
simulation, synthesis, analytics, printing techno-
logy and device physics.
InnovationLab (iL) A Unique Cooperation
between Business and Science
InnovationLab GmbH
Speyerer Str. 4 69115 Heidelberg Germany
Phone +49 6221 5419-100 E-Mail info@innovationlab.de
Internet www.innovationlab.de
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INSTITUTES 93
MATERIALS Institute for Surface Technologies
and Photonics is an integral part of national
and international cooperation and networks
in the field of nanotechnology.
Around 70 employees focus on the development of (opto)electronic
(OTFTs, OPDs) and photonic components (LEDs, integrated optics)
and chemical and physical sensors on the basis of organic and
inorganic materials. Our methods and processes:
Nanoimprint Lithography (UV-NIL, Hot Embossing , R2R), Photo
Lithography, 3D-Laser Lithography, Electron Beam Lithography;
CVD, PVD, Aerosoljet, Inkjet, Screen Printing, Gravure Printing, SEM,
AFM, Surface Profiler; XPS, UPS; Electric characterization, Photo-
current measurement; Ellipsometry, UV-VIS-NIR Spectroscopy,
Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Photogonio-Spectrometry; Optical
Simulation: ASAP, FDTD Solutions, Zemax, Virtual Lab.
We offer R&D partnership in funded research programs as well as
bilateral R&D for industrial or commercial customers: cooperation
in Scientific Programs; Process development, device assembly;
Consulting: in organic and printed electronics in submitting research
proposals; Characterization techniques: as a service for partners.
JOANNEUM RESEARCH Forschungsgesellschaft mbH
MATERIALS Institute for Surface Technologies and Photonics
Franz-Pichler-Str. 30 8160 Weiz Austria
Phone +43 316876 3000 E-Mail materials@joanneum.at
Internet www.joanneum.at/materials
Johannes Kepler Universitt Linz
Altenberger Str. 69 4040 Linz Austria
Phone +43 732 2468-8752 E-Mail serdar.sariciftci@jku.at
Internet www.lios.at
Physics and Chemistry of Organic Semiconductors:
1. Photoexcited spectroscopy
2. Photoconductivity
3. Thin film characterization
4. Nanoscale engineering
5. Nanoscale microscopy (AFM, STM )
6. In situ spectro-electrochemistry
Incubator for small high tech spin-off companies
Plastic Solar Cells
Bio-Organic-
Field Effect Transistors
and Electronics
Organic/Inorganic
Hybrid
Solar Cells
CO
2
recycling to
synthetic fuels
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Linz Institute for Organic Solar Cells (LIOS)
Employees: 40
Turnover: 1,2 million euro
94 INSTITUTES
Synthesis and characterization of macromolecular architectures
with designed functionalities
Design of nano-structured functional materials for:
Microelectronics (polymers for nano-lithography)
Information (memory, magnetic storage)
Communication (electrophoretic displays, OLEDs)
Energy (photovoltaics, thermoelectricity)
Polymer facilities (chemistry and physical chemistry).
Polymer particles from nanometer to micrometer size.
Optoelectronic inks. Reactor in clean room. Flexible electrode.
Functional Polymers for the Emerging Information,
Communication and Energy Technologies
Laboratoire de Chimie des Polymres Organiques, (LCPO, UMR 5629)
Universit Bordeaux 1 B8 Avenue des Facults 33405 Talence France
Phone + 33 5 40 00 27 46 E-Mail hadzii@enscbp.fr
Internet www.lcpo.fr/wordpress
LTFN is established in the Aristotle University of
Thessaloniki and is internationally acknowl-
edged as a specialist in Organic Electronics (OEs),
Thin Films and Nanomaterials Technology,
Nanometrology and in novel optical monitoring
techniques for quality control.
Our unique know-how and expertise includes the
development and optimization of polymer and
small molecule organic semiconductors, inor-
ganic & polymer transparent electrodes as well
as barrier nano-layers for device encapsulation
onto rigid and flexible polymeric substrates. LTFN
core competences include thin film deposition
by vacuum, printing (roll-to-roll and inkjet) and
gas transport pilot lines. We provide excellence in
in-line and real-time optical sensing techniques
and modeling to correlate synthesis parameters,
film morphology and functional properties.
LTFN has strong collaborations and worldwide
networks, coordinates many EU & national pro-
jects, a cluster on OE, and organizes international
conferences, summer schools and exhibitions on
nanotechnology and OEs.
Lab for Thin Films, Nanosystems & Nanometrology (LTFN)
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Physics Department
Lab for Thin Films Nanosystems & Nanometrology 54124, Thessaloniki Greece
Phone +30 2310 998174 E-Mail logot@auth.gr
Internet www.ltfn.gr
INSTITUTES 95
The National Research Council of Canada (NRC)
is the Government of Canadas premier organiza-
tion for research and development. NRC partners
with industry to take research impacts from the
lab to the marketplace, where people can
experience the benefits. Each year our scientists,
engineers and business experts work closely with
thousands of firms, helping them bring new
tech nologies to market.
NRCs PE research and development is delivering
functional inks and printing processes that will
enable production of electronic circuits by the
billions to be integrated into everyday objects.
NRC partners are global leaders engaged in each
of the three crucial segments of the printed
electronics value chain: producers of functional
film and ink materials; designers and fabricators
of PE devices and systems; and users of these
devices in the packaging, commercial printing
and security printing sectors. With established
strengths in materials, inks, printing equipment
and prototyping, as well as ICT and electronic
manufact uring capacity, NRC partners are able
to provide innovative products and services to
capture a significant share of the emerging
PE market. NRCs multidisciplinary research
expertise and experience help existing busi-
nesses find the synergies they need to navigate
this promising new field.
NRCs PE strengths lie in three areas:
Functional materials: conductive and
semiconductive ink, scalable processes
Functional devices: logic circuits, memory,
conductors, RFID and NFC
Functional imprinting: innovative interactive
optical features for security printing
NRC PE prototyping capability provides industry
with the expertise and state-of-the-art equip-
ment to mitigate R&D risk and succeed in devel-
opment, manufacturing and deployment to
market. NRC provides design and prototyping of
PE components and systems for industry.
NRC Printable Electronics (PE)
NRC Printable Electronics 1200 Montreal Road
Building M-50 Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6 Canada
Phone +1 613 990-8069 E-Mail Thomas.Ducellier@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca
Internet www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca
96 INSTITUTES
The NanoTecCenter Weiz Forschungsgesellschaft mbH (NTCW)
is a non-profit R&D center for Organic Optoelectronics and
Sensorics founded in 2006 (shareholders: JOANNEUM RESEARCH
Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Graz University of Technology).
Research Focuses and the Know-How Background of NTCW:
Development of inkjet technology-based graphic & electronic
applications at industrial level.
R&D of (organic) (opto-)electronic and sensor devices (solar
cells, OLEDs, OTFTs, memory elements, (bio)sensor applications).
R&D of basic organic semiconductor material properties
(structure-to-property relations, degradation, reliability).
Contract work for the development & fabrication (lithography,
inkjet-printing, etc.) of electrical/optical test structures & devices.
Most modern R&D facilities and demonstrator examples at NTCW.
NanoTecCenter Weiz Forschungsgesellschaft mbH
NanoTecCenter Weiz Forschungsgesellschaft mbH
Franz-Pichler-Str. 32 8160 Weiz Austria
Phone +43 316 876 8003 E-Mail ntcw@ntc-weiz.at
Internet www.ntc-weiz.at
Practicing open innovation, PARC, a Xerox company, provides custom
R&D services, technology, expertise, best practices, and IP to Fortune 500 and
Global 1000 companies, startups, and government agency partners.
To help our clients realize the potential for both flexible and printed electronics,
PARC deploys its expertise in development and optimization of materials and devices
for applications such as displays, sensing, and processing; design and fabrication of
proof-of-concept level demonstrators; and full system prototyping, including
thin-film electronics elements.
To learn more and work with us, please visit
www.parc.com/fe&pe
PARC, a Xerox Company
PARC Palo Alto Research Center
3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto California 94304 USA
Phone +1 650 812 4000 E-Mail engage@parc.com
Internet www.parc.com
INSTITUTES 97
In-house printing plant for the production of electronic paper products.
Customer ideas for innovative printed applications become reality.
pmTUC, global leader in mass-printed polymer electronics, offers an in-house printing
service for the production of paper electronics. With this service, companies can try
out their ideas for innovative print products, equipped with electronic functionalities
or devices. These flexible, low-cost, environmentally friendly applications, printed on
substrates like paper or foil, promise high-volume market opportunities, e.g. for
advertising, packaging or medicine. The printing plant is a crucial step towards
commercialization of past research results. Research activities of pmTUC concentrate
on adapting conventional offset, gravure and flexo printing technologies to the
requirements of mass-printed electronics. Basic research focuses on the formulation
of functional inks as well as circuitry design, while applied research includes the
development of mass-printed solar cells, loudspeakers, sensors and other applications.
Print Service for Electronic Paper Products
pmTUC Professorship Print Media Technology
Prof. Dr. Arved C. Hbler Chemnitz University of Technology Faculty of Mechanical Engineering
Reichenhainer Str. 70 09126 Chemnitz Germany
Phone +49 371 531-23610 E-Mail pminfo@mb.tu-chemnitz.de Internet www.tu-chemnitz.de/pm
Printed electronics R&D at PERC is focused on the following areas:
Synthesis of printable organic and inorganic materials for
electronics
Printing technology and equipment development
Printable field effect transistors, solar cells and light emitting
devices
Encapsulation and packaging of printed electronic devices
Engineering and prototyping of devices and applications
PERC puts a great emphasis on industrialization and commercializa-
tion of printed electronics, with the Suzhou NanoGrid Technology
(NGT) Ltd. as its industrial base. NGT has developed a proprietary
technology for manufacturing flexible transparent conductive films
which can be used to make touch panels for mobile phones and
tablet computers.
Printable Electronics Research Center (PERC)
Printable Electronics Research Center (PERC) Suzhou Institute of Nanotech (SINANO)
Chinese Academy of Sciences Ruoshui Road 398, Suzhou Industrial park
215123 Suzhou China Phone +86 512 62872705 E-Mail zcui2009@sinano.ac.cn
Internet www.perc-sinano.com, www.sinano.cas.cn
98 INSTITUTES
The Quebec Institute of Graphic Communications (QIGC) is an integrated
technological and expertise center specialized in graphic communications and
printability, whose mission consists in supporting industrials and their employees
in their technological and commercial evolutions.
Founded 17 years ago, its facility gathers high tech labs to tag and dope materials
and to formulate encapsulation processes and printing presses (offset, flexo, screen,
gravure, inkjet), complemented in 2014 by an R2R hybrid web press made of
5 stations offering a total flexibility of printing and drying technologies.
In 2012, QIGC launched an initiative entitled Impressions 2020 gathering a
consortium of 28 industrials and aiming to develop printed electronics. Also, the
QIGC is a member of the NRC consortium involved within the flagship program
dedicated to printed electronics.
The Quebec Institute of Graphic Communications
Quebec Institute of Graphic Communications
999 Emile-Journault East Montreal (Quebec) H2M 2E2 Canada
Phone +1 514 389-5061 ext. 258 E-Mail ccanet@icgq.qc.ca Internet www.icgq.qc.ca
Contact person: Christine Canet, consulting and R&D manager
The Welsh Centre for Printing and Coating
(WCPC) College of Engineering, Swansea
University, is a world renowned research centre
dedicated to advancing the understanding and
productivity of printing and coating.
WCPC has comprehensive open access laborato-
ries that cover all printing processes, ink develop-
ment and print analysis. With multi disciplinary
staff from both industrial and academic back-
grounds, WCPC has expertise in the fundamental
printing science and its practical application to
new manufacturing techniques and improving
process productivity across all technology
readiness levels. WCPC employs a staff of around
25 post-doctoral and PhD researchers.
WCPC is one of the four UK government recog-
nized academic centres of excellence and partner
in the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacture
in Large Area Electronics. It is also a partner in the
Swansea University Centre for Nano Health
where it is looking at the medical, health and
bio-sensing applications of printing.
WCPC is open to all forms of collaborative R&D from
prototype manufacture to large EU funded projects.
Printing, an Advanced Manufacturing Process
WCPC College of Engineering Swansea University
Singleton Park Swansea SA2 8PP United Kingdom
Phone +44 1792 295634 E-Mail g.r.davies@swansea.ac.uk
Internet www.wcpcswansea.com
INSTITUTES 99
Conventional and Digital Printing
Our research aim is to contribute significantly to
the scientific understanding of printing processes.
We analyze printing processes in terms of their
suitability for printing functional materials, and
recommend possible improvements. Our printing
laboratory is separated into three stages; at every
stage, equipment for the most important printing
processes such as offset, gravure, screen, flexo-
graphy, and inkjet printing is used. At the first
stage, the printability of functional materials
is tested. At the second stage, we print on sub-
strates up to DIN A4 in size. In addition, all printing
tests can be performed in a climatized laboratory.
At the third stage, functional materials can be
printed on the Gallus RCS 330-HD. This is a
customized industrial web-fed printing press
that can be used for all of the printing processes
listed above. Extensive laboratory equipment is
available to analyze homogeneity, wettability,
curing, rheology, and topography.
Institute of Printing Science and Technology
Technische Universitt Darmstadt Institute of Printing Science
and Technology Magdalenenstr. 2 64289 Darmstadt Germany
Phone +49 6151 16-2132 E-Mail office@idd.tu-darmstadt.de
Internet www.idd.tu-darmstadt.de
TOPIC is an innovation center supported by the National Science
and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), aiming at fast-
growing technology, organic and printed electronics. Our focus is
on oxide-free graphene-based conductive ink, OLED, electro chromic
display, and printed bio-sensors. And we expand our researches in
their applications, ready for a technology transfer.
Taking a holistic view, we at TOPIC see ourselves as a key player
connecting R&D and industry, thus making commercialization easier.
Ready now for booking, 10 reserved R&D spaces are available for
private companies who need to work closely with TOPIC and its
strong partnership.
Top (l. to r.): emitter, printed bio-sensor, electrochromic display
Bottom (l. to r.): OLED, bio-sensor printing, organic materials
TOPIC Thailand Organic and Printed Electronics Innovation Center
TOPIC Thailand Organic and Printed Electronics Innovation Center
112 Thailand Science Park Pathumthani Thailand 12120
Phone +66 2564 7200 ext. 5040 E-Mail thinnakorn.hanchana@tmc.nstda.or.th
Internet www.topic.in.th
100 INSTITUTES
The Centre of Industrial Collaboration is based within the Colour Chemistry
department which is recognized globally for its world leading reputation and
over 100 years of experience in color, dyes, pigments and formulation.
Over the last 5 years we have applied our expertise in formulation to provide
innovations in the technology areas of: photovoltaics, lithium ion batteries,
dielectrics, organic semiconductors, RFID and technical textiles.
More recently, linking with the Universitys expertise in medicine, we have created
bio and gas sensors that combine printed conductive carbon electrodes with
electrical impedance. In addition, we have unique capabilities in high value chemical
manufacturing scale-up, from batch or continuous production. Our group has
a proven record of successful collaboration with industry in many areas and at a
global level.
University of Leeds
Centre of Industrial Collaboration Department of Colour Chemistry
University of Leeds Leeds, LS2 9JT United Kingdom
Phone +44 113 3432792 E-Mail T.lambourne@leeds.ac.uk
Internet www.digitalprintcic.com
University of Novi Sad (UNS) is the second largest
university in Serbia with more than 45000 students
and around 4000 employees. The Faculty of Tech-
nical Sciences (FTS) is the biggest faculty in Serbia,
possessing a high quality of human, material and
organizational capacities. Our expertise in areas
of interest to OE-A members includes:
Design and fabrication of components, circuits
and systems on flexible and rigid substrates;
Design, modeling, simulation and fabrication
of different types of sensors (temperature,
pressure, humidity, linear/angular position);
Testing and characterization of electrical and
mechanical properties of different types of
electronic materials;
Design of embedded systems.
Equipment: NovaCentrix Pulse Forge 3200;
Dimatix DMP-3000; LPKF Protomat S100; Agilent
Vector Network Analyzer N5230A; RF Wafer Probe
Station (PM5); HP4194A Impedance Analyzer;
HMS-3000 Hall Effect Measurement System;
Tektronix 576 Curve Tracer; Spectrum Analyzer HP
8590A; Nanoindenter G200, SEM JEOL 6460LV,
AFM. Projects: FP7 (APOSTILLE, SENSEIVER,
EMPhAtiC, SmartCoDe, MultiWaveS), EUREKA
(IPCTECH, METASENSE), TEMPUS (WBCInno,
WBC-VMnet), Bilateral projects. Interesting results:
Active shelf (prototype for detecting number of
products on shelves at stores). Eddy current sensor
with ink-jet printed flexible inductor. Flexible
Sierpinski carpet fractal antenna on a Hilbert slot
patterned ground. Cylindrical capacitive angular
position sensor with interdigitated plates.
UNIVERSITY OF NOVI SAD Faculty of Technical Sciences
Laboratory for printed and nano electronics Trg Dositeja Obradovica 6
21000 Novi Sad Serbia Phone +381 21 4852552 E-Mail sgoran@uns.ac.rs
Internet www.cimc.rs www.apostille.rs
Inductive position sensor fabricated
on flexible substrate
INSTITUTES 101
The Regional Innovation Centre for Electrical
Engineering (RICE) based in the University of
West Bohemia aspires to provide a full range
of research activities from theoretical research
and modeling to the production of samples or
prototypes and their testing.
The main research objective in the field of organic
and printed electronics is the identification of
materials and functional structures suitable for
production of sensors and electronic components.
Our activities cover the development of low cost
gas and vapor sensor elements on flexible subst-
rates, microcalorimetric sensors, resin hardening
sensors, organic transistors and embedded
components. Target applications include safety
systems for personal protection, smart textile
products and smart labeling.
University of West Bohemia/RICE
University of West Bohemia/RICE
Univerzitni 8 306 14 Pilsen Czech Republic
Phone +420 377 634 503 E-Mail rsoukup@rice.zcu.cz
Internet www.rice.zcu.cz
VTT is a world-leading R&D center in the field of
printed intelligence. Technical services include
material formulation, roll-to-roll processing of
components and systems, and pilot production.
In addition, VTT can also offer expertise in product concept
realization and new business model development.
Key competences of VTT R&D and innovation services are:
printed OLED and photovoltaics
roll-to-roll processing in pilot factory facilities
diagnostics, indicators and functional paper
printed electronic components and system
roll-to-roll integration of LEDs, chips and
components to flex substrates
foil integration to flexible and 3D electronics
Find out what printed intelligence means to your business!
VTT The Leading R&D Center in Printed Intelligence
VTT P.O. Box 1100 02044 VTT Finland
Phone +358 20 722 111 E-Mail antti.kemppainen@vtt.fi
Internet www.vttprintedintelligence.fi
102 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 103
Companies C
o
m
p
a
n
y
p
r
o
f
ile
o
n
p
a
g
e
C
o
r
e
c
o
m
p
e
t
e
n
c
e
c
o
d
e
Substrates Materials Encapsulation Equipment / Processes Devices Integration Test Applications by Industry Applications Others
Companies p
a
p
e
r
p
la
s
t
ic
m
e
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a
l
g
la
s
s
t
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p
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c
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(e
.g
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, b
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)
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(e
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, r
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s
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)
in
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r
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c
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O
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s
c
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/
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c
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p
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(e
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c
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)
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(e
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m
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c
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, g
a
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R
F
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s
p
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m
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m
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R
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a
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a
n
d
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t

3D-Micromac AG 37 3D-Micromac AG
adphos Digital Printing GmbH 38 adphos Digital Printing GmbH
Advantech US, Inc. Advantech US, Inc.
Agfa-Gevaert N.V. 39 Agfa-Gevaert N.V.
AIXTRON SE 40 AIXTRON SE
ALTANA AG 42 ALTANA AG
Arjowiggins Creative Paper SAS 41 Arjowiggins Creative Paper SAS
BASF NewBusiness GmbH 44 BASF NewBusiness GmbH
Beneq Oy 45 Beneq Oy
Bosch Rexroth AG Bosch Rexroth AG
Brckner Maschinenbau GmbH &Co. KG Brckner Maschinenbau GmbH &Co. KG
BST International GmbH BST International GmbH
Bundesdruckerei GmbH Bundesdruckerei GmbH
CERADROP 46 CERADROP
Coatema Coating Machinery GmbH 47 Coatema Coating Machinery GmbH
Coherent GmbH Coherent GmbH
Conductive Compounds Inc. Conductive Compounds Inc.
Coruna Printed Electronics GmbH Coruna Printed Electronics GmbH
Coveme Spa Coveme Spa
cynora GmbH 48 cynora GmbH
Dinema SpA Dinema SpA
DOWA HD Europe GmbH 49 DOWA HD Europe GmbH
Dr. Schwab Inspection Technology GmbH Dr. Schwab Inspection Technology GmbH
DuPont Microcircuit Materials 50 DuPont Microcircuit Materials
DuPont Teijin Films (UK) Ltd. 51 DuPont Teijin Films (UK) Ltd.
Eight19 Ltd. Eight19 Ltd.
ELANTAS Beck GmbH ELANTAS Beck GmbH
Enfucell Oy Ltd. Enfucell Oy Ltd.
ERSA GmbH ERSA GmbH
etifix GmbH etifix GmbH
Evonik Industries AG Evonik Industries AG
EXAKT Advanced Technologies GmbH 52 EXAKT Advanced Technologies GmbH
Faubel &Co. Nachfolger GmbH Faubel &Co. Nachfolger GmbH
Products & Services Directory
Competence Matrix
products &services
competence
Products & Services Directory of OE-A members
in the organic and printed electronics sector.
Please refer to the company profile or the member
registry for more detailed information.
Also see www.oe-a.org
Core competence color code
Material supplier
Device manufacturer
End-user
Equipment manufacturer
Consulting &other services
R&D institute
University
104 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 105
Companies C
o
m
p
a
n
y
p
r
o
f
ile
o
n
p
a
g
e
C
o
r
e
c
o
m
p
e
t
e
n
c
e
c
o
d
e
Substrates Materials Encapsulation Equipment / Processes Devices Integration Test Applications by Industry Applications Others
Companies p
a
p
e
r
p
la
s
t
ic
m
e
t
a
l
g
la
s
s
t
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x
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t
in
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e
n
e
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g
y
b
u
ild
in
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a
n
d
a
r
c
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c
t
u
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lo
g
is
t
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s
t
e
x
t
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s
a
n
d
f
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s
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n
o
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p
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s
lig
h
t
in
g
s
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s
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r
s
s
o
la
r
c
e
lls
s
m
a
r
t
o
b
je
c
t
s
(e
.g
. s
m
a
r
t
c
a
rd
s
, g
a
m
e
s
, g
a
d
g
e
t
s
)
R
F
ID
s
p
e
a
k
e
r
s
s
m
a
r
t
t
e
x
t
ile
s
o
t
h
e
r
s
t
e
c
h
n
ic
a
l c
o
n
s
u
lt
in
g
b
u
s
in
e
s
s
c
o
n
s
u
lt
in
g
m
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t
o
f
R
&
D
f
u
n
d
in
g
p
r
o
g
r
a
m
s
R
e
s
e
a
r
c
h
a
n
d
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t

Felix Bttcher GmbH &Co. KG Felix Bttcher GmbH &Co. KG
FUJIFILM Dimatix, Inc. 54 FUJIFILM Dimatix, Inc.
Fusion UV Systems GmbH Fusion UV Systems GmbH
GENESINK GENESINK
Giesecke &Devrient GmbH Giesecke &Devrient GmbH
GP Solar GmbH GP Solar GmbH
GRT GmbH &Co. KG GRT GmbH &Co. KG
GSI Technologies GSI Technologies
Heliatek GmbH Heliatek GmbH
Heraeus Precious Metals GmbH &Co. KG 55 Heraeus Precious Metals GmbH &Co. KG
HNP Mikrosysteme GmbH 56 HNP Mikrosysteme GmbH
IDAM INA Drives &Mechatronics AG &Co. KG 57 IDAM INA Drives &Mechatronics AG &Co. KG
InkTec GmbH InkTec GmbH
InnoPhysics BV InnoPhysics BV
InovisCoat GmbH InovisCoat GmbH
Inside2Outside Ltd. Inside2Outside Ltd.
ISORG ISORG
ISOVOLTAIC AG ISOVOLTAIC AG
Janssen Pharmaceutica N.V. Janssen Pharmaceutica N.V.
JT International Germany GmbH JT International Germany GmbH
Kammann Maschinenbau GmbH 58 Kammann Maschinenbau GmbH
Karl Knauer KG 59 Karl Knauer KG
Klar Folien GmbH Klar Folien GmbH
KROENERT GmbH &Co. KG 60 KROENERT GmbH &Co. KG
KSG Leiterplatten GmbH KSG Leiterplatten GmbH
Leonhard Kurz Stiftung &Co. KG Leonhard Kurz Stiftung &Co. KG
LG Technology Center Europe LG Technology Center Europe
Liquid X Printed Metals Liquid X Printed Metals
M. Braun Inertgas-Systeme GmbH M. Braun Inertgas-Systeme GmbH
MEGTEC Systems, Inc. MEGTEC Systems, Inc.
Mekoprint A/S 61 Mekoprint A/S
Merck KGaA 62 Merck KGaA
MicroChemCorp. MicroChemCorp.
Products & Services Directory
Competence Matrix
products &services
competence
Products & Services Directory of OE-A members
in the organic and printed electronics sector.
Please refer to the company profile or the member
registry for more detailed information.
Also see www.oe-a.org
Core competence color code
Material supplier
Device manufacturer
End-user
Equipment manufacturer
Consulting &other services
R&D institute
University
106 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 107
Companies C
o
m
p
a
n
y
p
r
o
f
ile
o
n
p
a
g
e
C
o
r
e
c
o
m
p
e
t
e
n
c
e
c
o
d
e
Substrates Materials Encapsulation Equipment / Processes Devices Integration Test Applications by Industry Applications Others
Companies p
a
p
e
r
p
la
s
t
ic
m
e
t
a
l
g
la
s
s
t
e
x
t
ile
s
o
t
h
e
r
s
u
b
s
t
r
a
t
e
s
o
r
g
a
n
ic
c
o
n
d
u
c
t
o
r

in
o
r
g
a
n
ic
c
o
n
d
u
c
t
o
r

p
-
t
y
p
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a
n
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y
p
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c
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n
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b
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r
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f
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p
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c
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n
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x
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p
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in
k
je
t
p
r
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g
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e
r
p
r
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t
in
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p
h
o
t
o
lit
h
o
g
r
a
p
h
y
la
s
e
r
a
b
la
t
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n
la
s
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r
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s
f
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p
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n
s
p
u
t
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e
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in
g
o
r
g
a
n
ic
v
a
p
o
r
p
h
a
s
e
d
e
p
o
s
it
io
n
s
p
in
c
o
a
t
in
g
c
o
a
t
in
g
(e
.g
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ip
, b
la
d
e
)
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n
c
a
p
s
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la
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n
c
le
a
n
r
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m
o
t
h
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r
s
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r
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n
s
is
t
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r
s
d
io
d
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p
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s
s
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e
s
(e
.g
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a
p
a
c
it
o
r
s
, r
e
s
is
t
o
r
s
)
in
t
e
g
r
a
t
e
d
c
ir
c
u
it
s
O
L
E
D
s
e
le
c
t
r
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c
h
r
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m
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d
is
p
la
y
s
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c
t
r
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p
h
o
r
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t
ic
d
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p
la
y
s
t
o
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c
h
s
c
r
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n
s
/
s
u
r
f
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c
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s
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c
t
r
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m
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s
c
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d
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p
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c
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h
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ic
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m
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b
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c
t
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l c
o
n
t
a
c
t
in
g
(e
.g
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lip
-
c
h
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)
la
m
in
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t
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n
in
t
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r
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p
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p
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o
p
t
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l c
h
a
r
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c
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t
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n
s
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la
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n
/
c
ir
c
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/
p
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g
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n
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y
b
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in
g
a
n
d
a
r
c
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c
t
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lo
g
is
t
ic
s
t
e
x
t
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s
a
n
d
f
a
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n
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t
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r
s
t
r
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n
s
is
t
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r
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d
is
p
la
y
s
lig
h
t
in
g
s
e
n
s
o
r
s
s
o
la
r
c
e
lls
s
m
a
r
t
o
b
je
c
t
s
(e
.g
. s
m
a
r
t
c
a
rd
s
, g
a
m
e
s
, g
a
d
g
e
t
s
)
R
F
ID
s
p
e
a
k
e
r
s
s
m
a
r
t
t
e
x
t
ile
s
o
t
h
e
r
s
t
e
c
h
n
ic
a
l c
o
n
s
u
lt
in
g
b
u
s
in
e
s
s
c
o
n
s
u
lt
in
g
m
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t
o
f
R
&
D
f
u
n
d
in
g
p
r
o
g
r
a
m
s
R
e
s
e
a
r
c
h
a
n
d
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t

Mitsubishi Polyester FilmGmbH Mitsubishi Polyester FilmGmbH
M-Solv Ltd. M-Solv Ltd.
Mhlbauer, Inc. Mhlbauer, Inc.
Nanograde AG Nanograde AG
Next Energy Technologies, Inc. 63 Next Energy Technologies, Inc.
Nissha Europe GmbH, Frankfurt Branch Nissha Europe GmbH, Frankfurt Branch
NovaCentrix 64 NovaCentrix
Novaled AG 65 Novaled AG
nTact (FAS Holdings Group) nTact (FAS Holdings Group)
Ohio Gravure Technologies Inc. Ohio Gravure Technologies Inc.
sterreichische Staatsdruckerei sterreichische Staatsdruckerei
Oxford Advanced Surfaces Group PLC Oxford Advanced Surfaces Group PLC
PChemAssociates Inc. PChemAssociates Inc.
plastic electronic GmbH plastic electronic GmbH
Plastic Logic Plastic Logic
Plextronics, Inc. Plextronics, Inc.
Polyera Corporation Polyera Corporation
PolyIC GmbH &Co. KG 66 PolyIC GmbH &Co. KG
PolyPhotonix Ltd. PolyPhotonix Ltd.
Printcolor Deutschland GmbH Printcolor Deutschland GmbH
Printed Electronics Ltd. Printed Electronics Ltd.
Quantumatica srl Quantumatica srl
RK Siebdrucktechnik GmbH RK Siebdrucktechnik GmbH
S1 Optics GmbH / IST METZ S1 Optics GmbH / IST METZ
SAES Getters S.p.A. 67 SAES Getters S.p.A.
SAFC Hitech 68 SAFC Hitech
SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC
Schneidler Grafiska AB Schneidler Grafiska AB
Schoeller Technocell GmbH &Co. KG 53 Schoeller Technocell GmbH &Co. KG
Schreiner Group GmbH &Co. KG Schreiner Group GmbH &Co. KG
Sihl GmbH Sihl GmbH
Solarmer Energy Inc. Solarmer Energy Inc.
Soligie 69 Soligie
Products & Services Directory
Competence Matrix
products &services
competence
Products & Services Directory of OE-A members
in the organic and printed electronics sector.
Please refer to the company profile or the member
registry for more detailed information.
Also see www.oe-a.org
Core competence color code
Material supplier
Device manufacturer
End-user
Equipment manufacturer
Consulting &other services
R&D institute
University
108 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 109
Companies C
o
m
p
a
n
y
p
r
o
f
ile
o
n
p
a
g
e
C
o
r
e
c
o
m
p
e
t
e
n
c
e
c
o
d
e
Substrates Materials Encapsulation Equipment / Processes Devices Integration Test Applications by Industry Applications Others
Companies p
a
p
e
r
p
la
s
t
ic
m
e
t
a
l
g
la
s
s
t
e
x
t
ile
s
o
t
h
e
r
s
u
b
s
t
r
a
t
e
s
o
r
g
a
n
ic
c
o
n
d
u
c
t
o
r

in
o
r
g
a
n
ic
c
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n
d
u
c
t
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r

p
-
t
y
p
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a
n
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c
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c
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(e
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s
(e
.g
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a
p
a
c
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r
s
, r
e
s
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o
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)
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r
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c
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s
O
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c
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F
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s
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Solvay 70 Solvay
Sumitomo Chemical Co. Ltd. Sumitomo Chemical Co. Ltd.
SunaTech Inc. 71 SunaTech Inc.
Surteco SE Surteco SE
Suss Microtech Tamarack Scientific Co., Inc. Suss Microtech Tamarack Scientific Co., Inc.
Teknek Ltd. 72 Teknek Ltd.
THIEME GmbH &Co. KG THIEME GmbH &Co. KG
Thin FilmElectronics ASA 73 Thin FilmElectronics ASA
Toppan Printing Co. (UK) Ltd. Toppan Printing Co. (UK) Ltd.
TSE Troller AG 74 TSE Troller AG
VARTA Microbattery GmbH 75 VARTA Microbattery GmbH
VAST Films Ltd. VAST Films Ltd.
VDI/VDE Innovation + Technik GmbH VDI/VDE Innovation + Technik GmbH
VDL FLOW 76 VDL FLOW
Vestech Taiwan Corp. Vestech Taiwan Corp.
VITA-PRINT LTD VITA-PRINT LTD
Viva Developments S.L. Viva Developments S.L.
XAAR plc XAAR plc
Xenon Corporation 77 Xenon Corporation
YD Ynvisible, S.A. 78 YD Ynvisible, S.A.
Zeon Corporation Zeon Corporation
R&D Institutes R&D Institutes
Acreo Swedish ICT AB 79 Acreo Swedish ICT AB
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTh) LTFN 94 Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTh) LTFN
BRNO University of Technology BRNO University of Technology
California Polytechnic State University California Polytechnic State University
CEA Liten-PICTIC 80 CEA Liten-PICTIC
CeNTI Centre for Nanotechnology &Smart Materials 79 CeNTI Centre for Nanotechnology &Smart Materials
Centre Microlectronique de Provence Centre Microlectronique de Provence
Cetemmsa 81 Cetemmsa
Cluster PEC4 Cluster PEC4
CSEM Centre Suisse dElectronique et de Microtechnique SA 83 CSEM Centre Suisse dElectronique et de Microtechnique SA
Products & Services Directory
Competence Matrix
products &services
competence
Products & Services Directory of OE-A members
in the organic and printed electronics sector.
Please refer to the company profile or the member
registry for more detailed information.
Also see www.oe-a.org
Core competence color code
Material supplier
Device manufacturer
End-user
Equipment manufacturer
Consulting &other services
R&D institute
University
110 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 111
R&D Institutes C
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p
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R&D Institutes p
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m
a
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c
a
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a
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a
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R
F
ID
s
p
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a
k
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s
s
m
a
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R
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a
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h
a
n
d
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t

CSIRO 83 CSIRO
CTP Centre Technique du Papier 84 CTP Centre Technique du Papier
ECN Solar Energy ECN Solar Energy
ENEA C. R. Portici UTTP-NANO 84 ENEA C. R. Portici UTTP-NANO
EPFL 85 EPFL
Fontys University of Applied Sciences 85 Fontys University of Applied Sciences
Fraunhofer Alliance POLO 90 Fraunhofer Alliance POLO
Fraunhofer COMEDD 86 Fraunhofer COMEDD
Fraunhofer EMFT 86 Fraunhofer EMFT
Fraunhofer ENAS 87 Fraunhofer ENAS
Fraunhofer IAP 87 Fraunhofer IAP
Fraunhofer ILT 88 Fraunhofer ILT
Fraunhofer IPA 88 Fraunhofer IPA
Fraunhofer ISC Fraunhofer ISC
Fraunhofer ISE 89 Fraunhofer ISE
Fraunhofer ISIT 89 Fraunhofer ISIT
Friedrich Schiller University Jena Friedrich Schiller University Jena
Georg-Simon-OhmUniversity of Applied Sciences Nuremberg Georg-Simon-OhmUniversity of Applied Sciences Nuremberg
Georgia Tech Center for Organic Photonics &Electronics 90 Georgia Tech Center for Organic Photonics &Electronics
Ghent University Ghent University
Hochschule der Medien IAF, IAD Hochschule der Medien IAF, IAD
Holst Centre 91 Holst Centre
ICGQ 98 ICGQ
IK4-CIDETEC 91 IK4-CIDETEC
IMB-CNM (CSIC) IMB-CNM (CSIC)
InnovationLab GmbH 92 InnovationLab GmbH
Institut fr Mikroelektronik Stuttgart Institut fr Mikroelektronik Stuttgart
Instytut Technologii Elektronowej Instytut Technologii Elektronowej
JOANNEUM RESEARCH Forschungsgesellschaft mbH 93 JOANNEUM RESEARCH Forschungsgesellschaft mbH
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)
Kent State University Kent State University
KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, iPack KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, iPack
LIOS 93 LIOS
Products & Services Directory
Competence Matrix
products &services
competence
Products & Services Directory of OE-A members
in the organic and printed electronics sector.
Please refer to the company profile or the member
registry for more detailed information.
Also see www.oe-a.org
Core competence color code
Material supplier
Device manufacturer
End-user
Equipment manufacturer
Consulting &other services
R&D institute
University
112 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 113
R&D Institutes C
o
m
p
a
n
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p
r
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f
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p
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C
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R&D Institutes p
a
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Munich University of Applied Sciences Munich University of Applied Sciences
NanoTecCenter Weiz Forschungsgesellschaft mbH 96 NanoTecCenter Weiz Forschungsgesellschaft mbH
National Centre for Sensor Research National Centre for Sensor Research
National Research Council Canada 95 National Research Council Canada
NPL National Physical Laboratory NPL National Physical Laboratory
OMIC, University of Manchester OMIC, University of Manchester
parc (Palo Alto Research Center) 96 parc (Palo Alto Research Center)
pmTUC Professorship Print Media Technology of Chemnitz University of Technology 97 pmTUC Professorship Print Media Technology of Chemnitz University of Technology
Politehnica University of Bucharest Politehnica University of Bucharest
RWTH Aachen University ITA RWTH Aachen University ITA
SIMTech Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology SIMTech Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology
Suzhou Institute of Nanotech 97 Suzhou Institute of Nanotech
Tampere University of Technology Tampere University of Technology
Technische Universitt Darmstadt IDD 99 Technische Universitt Darmstadt, IDD
TEI Technological Educational Institute of Athens TEI Technological Educational Institute of Athens
TOPIC Thailand Organic and Printed Electronics Innovation Center 99 TOPIC Thailand Organic and Printed Electronics Innovation Center
TU Dresden, IAPP TU Dresden, IAPP
Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona
Universitt zu Kln Universitt zu Kln
University of Applied Sciences Bielefeld University of Applied Sciences Bielefeld
University of Bordeaux 1 / LCPO-UMR5629 94 University of Bordeaux 1 / LCPO-UMR5629
University of Cambridge University of Cambridge
University of Leeds 100 University of Leeds
University of Ljubljana University of Ljubljana
University of Novi Sad 100 University of Novi Sad
University of Pardubice University of Pardubice
University of the West of England University of the West of England
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland 101 VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland
WCPC, Swansea University 98 WCPC, Swansea University
Products & Services Directory
Competence Matrix
products &services
competence
Products & Services Directory of OE-A members
in the organic and printed electronics sector.
Please refer to the company profile or the member
registry for more detailed information.
Also see www.oe-a.org
Core competence color code
Material supplier
Device manufacturer
End-user
Equipment manufacturer
Consulting &other services
R&D institute
University
114 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
3D-Micromac AG
Technologie-Campus 8
09126 Chemnitz
Germany
Phone +49 371 400 430
Fax +49 371 400 4340
gebhardt@3d-micromac.com
www.3d-micromac.com
A
Acreo Swedish ICT AB
Bredgatan 34
60221 Norrkping
Sweden
Phone +46 11 20 20 00
Fax +46 11 20 25 01
goran.gustafsson@acreo.se
www.acreo.se
adphos Digital Printing GmbH
Bruckmhler Str. 27
83052 Bruckmhl
Germany
Phone +49 8061 395 100
Fax +49 8061 395 110
Kai.Baer@adphos.de
www.adphos.de
Advantech US, Inc.
160 Industry Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15275
USA
Phone +1 412 706 5400
Fax +1 412 706 5406
slauer@advantechus.com
www.advantechus.com
Agfa-Gevaert N.V.
Orgacon Electronic Materials
Septestraat 27
2640 Mortsel
Belgium
Phone +32 3444 3250
Fax +32 3444 7662
frank.louwet@agfa.com
www.agfa.com/orgacon
AIDO, Technological Institute of
Optics, Colour and Image
c/ Nicols Coprnico, 7 13
Parque Technolgico
46980 Paterna (Valencia)
Spain
Phone +34 96 1318051
Fax +34 96 1318007
sotero@aido.es
www.aido.es
AIXTRON SE
Kaiserstr. 98
52134 Herzogenrath
Germany
Phone +49 241 8909 6986
Fax +49 241 8909 40
j.kreis@aixtron.com
www.aixtron.com
ALTANA AG
Abelstr. 43
46483 Wesel
Germany
Phone +49 4078 946 231
Fax +49 4078 946 349
Mark.Abendroth@altana.com
www.altana.com
Aristotle University of
Thessaloniki (AUTh)
Lab for Thin Films Nanosystems
& Nanometrology (LTFN)
University of Thessaloniki,
Physics Department
54124 Thessaloniki
Greece
Phone +30 2310 998 174
Fax +30 2310 998 930
logot@auth.gr
http://ltfn.physics.auth.gr
Arjowiggins Creative Papers SAS
32 avenue Pierre Grenier
92100 Boulogne-Billancourt
France
Phone +33 1 57 75 91 00
Fax +33 1 57 75 91 91
frederic.kern@powercoatpaper.com
www.powercoatpaper.com
B
BASF New Business GmbH
4. Gartenweg, Z 25
67063 Ludwigshafen
Germany
Phone +49 621 60 44 739
Fax +49 621 60 6644 739
heike.pfistner@basf.com
www.basf-new-business.com
BAYER MaterialScience AG
Building D208, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Allee
51368 Leverkusen
Germany
Phone +49 214 307 5066
Fax +49 214 304 7233
karsten.dierksen@bayer.com
www.bayermaterialscience.de
Beneq Oy
Ensimminen Savu 2
01510 Vantaa
Finland
Phone +358 9 759 9530
Fax +358 9 759 95310
mikko.soderlund@beneq.com
www.beneq.com
Bosch Rexroth AG
Brgermeister-Dr.-Nebel-Str. 2
97816 Lohr am Main
Germany
Phone +49 9352 18 0
Fax +49 9352 4077
andreas.fritzsche@boschrexroth.de
www.boschrexroth.de/printing
Botest Systems GmbH
Reichencker 11
97877 Wertheim
Germany
Phone +49 9342 93551 0
Fax +49 9342 93551 19
tdaeubler@botest.com
www.botest.com
BRNO University of Technology
Purkynova 118
61200 Brno
Czech Republic
Phone +420 5 411 494 84
Fax +420 5 412 116 97
weiter@fch.vutbr.cz
www.materials-research.eu
Brckner Maschinenbau
GmbH & Co. KG
Koenigsberger Str. 57
83313 Siegsdorf
Germany
Phone +49 8662 63 99516
Fax +49 8662 63 9642
roland.lund@brueckner.com
www.brueckner.com
BST International GmbH
Heidsieker Heide 53
33739 Bielefeld
Germany
Phone +49 5206 999 0
Fax +49 5206 999 999
marketing@bst-international.com
www.bst-international.com
Bundesdruckerei GmbH
Oranienstr. 91
10969 Berlin
Germany
Phone +49 30 2598 0
Fax +49 30 2598 2205
info@bundesdruckerei.de
www.bundesdruckerei.de
C
California Polytechnic State
University
1 Grand Ave.
San Luis Obispo, CA 93407
USA
Phone +1 805 756 2500
Fax +1 805 756 7118
mkeif@calpoly.edu
www.printedelectronics.calpoly.edu
Cambridge Display
Technology Ltd.
2020 Cambourne Business Park
Cambridge, CB23 6DW
United Kingdom
Phone +44 1984 713600
Fax +44 1984 713620
jurroughes@cdtltd.co.uk
www.cdtltd.co.uk
Carnegie Mellon University
5000 Forbes Ave.
Warner Hall 608
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
USA
Phone +1 412 268 1180
Fax +1 412 268 2330
rm5g@andrew.cmu.edu
www.cmu.edu
CEA LITEN PICTIC
Centre de Grenoble
17 rue des Martyrs
38054 Grenoble
France
Phone +33 438 783 981
isabelle.chartier@cea.fr
www.cea.fr
CeNTI Centre for Nano-
technology & Smart Materials
Rua Fernando Mesquita, 2785
4760-034 VN Famalico
Portugal
Phone +351 252 104 152
Fax +351 252 327 358
jgomes@centi.pt
www.centi.pt
Centre for Process Innovation Ltd.
National Printable Electronics
Centre
Thomas Wright Way, NETPark,
Sedgefield
Co. Durham, TS213FG
United Kingdom
Phone +44 1740 625700
Fax +44 1740 625763
petec@uk-cpi.com
www.uk-cpi.com/petec
Centre Microlectronique de
Provence
880, Av. de Mimet
13541 Gardanne
France
Phone +33 4 42 61 66 10
Fax +33 4 42 61 65 91
collot@emse.fr
www.cmp.emse.fr
CTP Centre Technique du Papier
Domaine Universitaire BP 251
38044 Grenoble Cedex 9
France
Phone +334 476 154 015
Fax +334 476 154 016
gept@webCTP.com
www.webCTP.com
CERADROP
32, rue de Soyouz
87068 Limoges
France
Phone +33 555 382696
Fax +33 555 381751
contact@ceradrop.fr
www.ceradrop.fr
Cetemmsa
Av. dErnest Lluch 36
08302 Matar, Barcelona
Spain
Phone +34 93 741 9100
Fax +34 93 741 9228
eloscos@cetemmsa.com
www.cetemmsa.com
Cluster PEC4
QC-0040, Engineering School,
campus UAB
E08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona)
Spain
Phone +34 935 814 964
Fax +34 935 813 033
david.marin@pec4.net
www.pec4.net
Coatema Coating Machinery
GmbH
Roseller Str. 4
41539 Dormagen
Germany
Phone +49 2133 9784 135
Fax +49 2133 9784 170
tkolbusch@coatema.de
www.coatema.de
Coherent GmbH
Hans-Boeckler Str. 12
37079 Gttingen
Germany
Phone +49 551 69390
Fax +49 551 68691
rainer.paetzel@coherent.com
www.coherent.com
Conductive Compounds Inc.
17 Hampshire Drive Unit 8
Hudson, NH 3051
USA
+1 603 595 6221
+1 603 595 6228
ryanb@conductivecompounds.com
www.conductivecompounds.com
Coruna Printed Electronics GmbH
Lindenbergstr. 5
5618 Bettwil
Switzerland
Phone +41 5666 721 31
j.biegel@coruna.ch
www.coruna.ch
Coveme Spa
Via Emilia 288
40068 San Lazzaro Di Savena (BO)
Italy
Phone +39 0 51 62 26 11 1
Fax +39 0 51 62 26 201
lmarras@coveme.com
www.coveme.com
OE-A Members
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 115
CSEM Centre Suisse
dElectronique et de
Microtechnique SA
Tramstr. 99
4132 Muttenz
Switzerland
Phone +41 61 690 6030
Fax +41 61 690 6000
giovanni.nisato@csem.ch
www.csem.ch
CSIRO
Bayview Avenue
VIC 3168 Melbourne
Australia
Phone +61 3 95 45 22 05
Fax +61 3 95 45 29 63
Gerry.Wilson@csiro.au
www.csiro.au/flexibleelectronics
cynora GmbH
Hermann-von-Hemlholtz-Platz 1
Geb. 717
76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen
Germany
Phone +49 721 6082 9007
Fax +49 721 6082 9030
mydlak@cynora.com
www.cynora.com
D
Dinema SpA
Via San Polo 183
25124 Brescia (BS)
Italy
Phone +39 030 2300492
Fax +39 030 2300833
mauro.coccoli@dinema.it
www.dinema.it
DOWA HD Europe GmbH
Ostendstr. 196
90482 Nrnberg
Germany
Phone +49 911 56989 320
Fax +49 911 56989 3250
yutaka.hisaeda@dowa-europe.com
www.dowa.co.jp/en/jigyo/
electronics_summary.html
DOWA International Corporation
370 Lexington Avenue Suite 1002
New York, NY 10017
USA
Phone +1 212 697 3217
Fax +1 212 697 3902
kimitaka@dicny.com
www.dicny.com
Dr. Schwab Inspection Technology
GmbH
Industriestr. 9
86551 Aichach
Germany
Phone +49 8251 9008 0
Fax +49 8251 8119 4
johann.ostermayer@
schwabinspection.com
www.schwabinspection.com
DuPont Microcircuit Materials
Coldharbour Lane, Frenchay
Bristol, BS161QD
United Kingdom
Phone +44 117 9313 191
Fax +44 117 9313 131
kerry.adams@dupont.com
http://mcm.dupont.com
DuPont Teijin Films (UK) Ltd.
Wilton Centre
Redcar, TS90 4RF
United Kingdom
Phone +44 1642 572 000
Fax +44 1642 572 128
angela.gardner@gbr.dupont.com
www.dupontteijinfilms.com
E
ECN Solar Energy
High Tech Campus 5
Eindhoven 5656 AE
The Netherlands
Phone +31 885 154 734
Fax +31 885 158 214
j.kroon@ecn.nl
www.ecn.nl
Eight19 Ltd.
9A Science Park
Cambridge, CB4 0FE
United Kingdom
Phone +44 1223 437 437
info@eight19.com
www.eight19.com
ELANTAS Beck GmbH
Grossmannstr. 105
20539 Hamburg
Germany
Phone +49 40 78946 231
Fax +49 40 78946 349
mark.abendroth@altana.com
www.elantas.com/beck
ELON Technologies, s.r.o
U Pruhonu 40
170 00 Prague 7
Czech Republic
Phone +420 607 688 282
Fax +420 25 51 536
pavel.benes@elontech.eu
www.elontech.eu
ENEA C. R. Portici UTTP-NANO
p.le E. Fermi, 1
80055 Portici (NA)
Italy
Phone +39 081 7723 289
Fax +39 081 7723 344
paolo.tassini@enea.it
www.enea.it
Enfucell Oy Ltd.
Petikontie 10
01720 Vantaa
Finland
Phone +358 45 120 6030
Fax +358 9 276 5040
info@enfucell.com
www.enfucell.com
EPFL
Rue de la Maladire
2000 Neuchtel
Switzerland
Phone +41 32 720 5564
Fax +41 32 720 5711
danick.briand@epfl.ch
http://samlab.epfl.ch/enviromems
ERSA GmbH
Leonhard-Karl-Str. 2
97877 Wertheim
Germany
Phone +49 9342 800 236
Fax +49 9342 800 320
juergen.friedrich@kurtzersa.de
www.ersa.de
etifix GmbH
Riedericher Str. 68
72661 Grafenberg
Germany
Phone +49 7123 382 0
Fax +49 7123 382 101
wdudzik@etifix.com
www.etifix.com
Evonik Industries AG
Paul-Baumann-Str. 1
45764 Marl
Germany
Phone +49 2365 49 59 33
Fax +49 2365 49 80 59 33
juergen.steiger@evonik.com
www.evonik.com
EXAKT Advanced Technologies
GmbH
Robert-Koch-Str. 5
22851 Norderstedt
Germany
Phone +49 40 529 5600
Fax +49 40 524 9959
info@exakt.de
www.exakt.de
F
Faubel & Co. Nachfolger GmbH
Schwarzenberger Weg 45
34212 Melsungen
Germany
Phone +49 5661 7309 100
Fax +49 5661 7309 199
k.zachmann@faubel.de
www.faubel.de
Felix Bttcher GmbH & Co. KG
Stolberger Str. 351353
50933 Kln
Germany
Phone +49 221 4907 509
Fax +49 221 4907 510
gerhard.bartscher@
boettcher-systems.com
www.boettcher-systems.com
Fontys University of
Applied Sciences
Rachelsmolen 1
5612 MA Eindhoven
The Netherlands
Phone +31 877 87 4280
j.bernards@fontys.nl
www.fontys.nl/lectoraten/
funmaterials
Fraunhofer COMEDD
Maria-Reiche-Str. 2
01109 Dresden
Germany
Phone +49 351 8823 309
Fax +49 351 8823 266
ines.schedwill@ipms.fraunhofer.de
www.comedd.fraunhofer.de
Fraunhofer Alliance POLO
Geiselbergstr. 69
Potsdam
Germany
Phone +49 3315 681 404
andreas.hollaender@iap.fraunhofer.de
www.polo.fraunhofer.de
Fraunhofer-Einrichtung
fr modulare
Festkrpertechnologien EMFT
Hansastr. 27d
80686 Mnchen
Germany
Phone +49 89 547 59 510
Fax +49 89 547 59 550
polytronicsystems@emft.fraunhofer.de
www.emft.fraunhofer.de
Fraunhofer IAP
Geiselbergstr. 69
14476 Potsdam-Golm
Germany
Phone +49 331 568 1910
Fax +49 331 568 3910
info@iap.fraunhofer.de
www.oled-forschung.de
Fraunhofer Institute for
Electronic Nano Systems ENAS
Technologie-Campus 3
09126 Chemnitz
Germany
Phone +49 371 45001 0
Fax +49 371 45001 101
info@enas.fraunhofer.de
www.enas.fraunhofer.de
Fraunhofer Institute Laser
Technology ILT
Steinbachstr. 15
52074 Aachen
Germany
Phone +49 241 8906 148
Fax +49 241 8906 121
arnold.gillner@ilt.fraunhofer.de
www.ilt.fraunhofer.de
Fraunhofer Institute for
Manufacturing Engineering and
Automation IPA
Nobelstr. 12
70569 Stuttgart
Germany
Phone +49 711 970 1633
Fax +49 711 970 1007
udo.gommel@ipa.fraunhofer.de
www.ipa.fraunhofer.de
Fraunhofer Institut fr
Siliziumtechnologie ISIT
Fraunhoferstr. 1
25524 Itzehoe
Germany
Phone +49 4821 17 4605
Fax +49 4821 17 4250
thknieli@isit.fraunhofer.de
www.isit.fraunhofer.de
Fraunhofer ISC
Neunerplatz 2
97082 Wrzburg
Germany
Phone +49 931 41 00 551
Fax +49 931 41 00 559
domann@isc.fraunhofer.de
www.isc.fraunhofer.de
Fraunhofer ISE
Heidenhofstr. 2
79110 Freiburg
Germany
Phone +49 761 4588 0
Fax +49 761 4588 9000
uli.wuerfel@ise.fraunhofer.de
www.ise.fraunhofer.de
Friedrich Schiller University Jena
Humboldtstr. 10
07743 Jena
Germany
Phone +49 3641 948220
Fax +49 3641 948202
jolke.perelaer@uni-jena.de
www.schubert-group.com
FUJIFILM Dimatix, Inc.
2250 Martin Avenue
Santa Clara, CA 95050
USA
Phone +1 408 565 9150
Fax +1 408 565 9151
ewang@fujifilm.com
www.dimatix.com
Fusion UV Systems GmbH
Carl-Zeiss-Ring 1113
85737 Ismaning
Germany
Phone +49 89 899 6310
Fax +49 89 899 63110
dskinner@fusionuv.com
www.fusionuv.com
G
GENESINK
24, Av. Gaston Imbert
13106 Rousset Cedex
France
Phone +33 442 370 585
Fax +33 442 200 703
corinne.versini@genesink.com
www.genesink.com
116 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
Georg-Simon-Ohm University of
Applied Sciences Nuremberg
Wassertorstr. 10
90489 Nrnberg
Germany
Phone +49 911 5880 1082
Fax +49 911 5880 5109
marcus.reichenberger@
www.ohm-hochschule.de
Georgia Tech-Center for Organic
Photonics and Electronics
901 Atlantic Dr.
Atlanta, GA 30332-0400
USA
Phone +1 404 385 3138
Fax +1 404 894 8956
jason.martin@chemistry.gatech.edu
www.cope.gatech.edu
Ghent University
Technologiepark 907
9052 Ghent / Zwijnaarde
Belgium
Phone +32 9 264 5419
Fax +32 9 264 5831
lieva.vanlangenhove@ugent.be
www.textiles.ugent.be
Giesecke & Devrient GmbH
Prinzregentenstr. 159
81607 Mnchen
Germany
Phone +49 89 4119 0
michael.boehm@gi-de.com
www.gi-de.com
GP Solar GmbH
Reichenaustr. 21
78467 Konstanz
Germany
Phone +49 7531 3610 4601
Fax +49 7531 3610 4610
eric.rueland@gpsolar.de
www.gpsolar.de
GRT GmbH & Co. KG
Goorweg 14
59075 Hamm
Germany
Phone +49 2381 98 766 10
Fax +49 2381 98 766 19
rw@grt-gmbh.de
www.grt-gmbh.de
GSI Technologies
311 Shore Drive
Burr Ridge, IL 60527
USA
Phone +1 630 325 8181
Fax +1 630 325 8197
info@gsitech.com
www.gsitech.com
H
Heliatek GmbH
Treidlerstr. 3
01139 Dresden
Germany
Phone +49 351 213 034 30
Fax +49 351 213 034 40
sayhello@heliatek.com
www.heliatek.com
Heraeus Precious Metals
GmbH Co. KG
Chempark B 202
51368 Leverkusen
Germany
Phone +49 214 30 26718
Fax +49 214 30 56284
john.bayley@heraeus.com
www.clevios.com
HNP Mikrosysteme GmbH
Bleicherufer 25
19053 Schwerin
Germany
Phone +49 385 52190 300
Fax +49 385 52190 333
carsten.damerau@hnp-mikrosysteme.de
www.hnp-mikrosysteme.de
Hochschule der Medien IAF, IAD
Nobelstr. 10
70569 Stuttgart
Germany
Phone +49 711 8923 2144
huebner@hdm-stuttgart.de
www.hdm-stuttgart.de/iad
Holst Centre
High Tech Campus 31
PO Box 8550, 5605 KN
The Netherlands
Phone +31 40 40 20 400
Fax +31 40 40 20 699
contact@holstcentre.com
www.holstcentre.com
I
ICGQ
999 Emile Journault East
Montreal (Qubec) H2M 2E2
Canada
Phone +1 514 389 5061
Fax +1 514 389 5840
ccanet@icgq.qc.ca
www.icgq.qc.ca
IDAM INA Drives & Mechatronics
AG & Co. KG
Mittelbergstr. 2
98527 Suhl
Germany
Phone +49 9132 82 2392
Fax +49 9132 82 45 2392
guenter.schmid@schaeffler.com
www.idam.de
IK4-CIDETEC
Parque Tecnologico de San Sebastin
Paseo Miramn 196
20009 San Sebastin
Spain
Phone +34 43 309022
Fax +34 43 309136
eochoteco@cidetec.es
www.cidetec.es
IMB-CNM (CSIC)
Campus UAB Bellaterra
8193 Cerdanyola del Valls
Spain
Phone +34 935 947 700
Fax +34 935 800 267
Lluis.Teres@imb-cnm.csis.es
www.imb-cnm.csic.es
InkTec GmbH
Am Hasenbiel 35
76297 Stutensee
Germany
Phone +49 7244 7330 310
Fax +49 7244 6081 20
mikereif@horn-gmbh.com
www.Ink-Tec.de
InnoPhysics BV
Fransebaan 592a
Eindhoven, 5627 JM
The Netherlands
Phone +31 40 2484774
alquin.stevens@innophysics.nl
www.innophysics.nl
InnovationLab GmbH
Speyerer Str. 4
69123 Heidelberg
Germany
Phone +49 6221 54 19 100
Fax +49 6221 54 19 110
info@innovationlab.de
www.innovationlab.de
InovisCoat GmbH
Rheinparkallee 3
40789 Monheim am Rhein
Germany
Phone +49 2173 10144 0
Fax +49 2173 10144 199
eulenburg@inoviscoat.de
www.inoviscoat.de
Inside2Outside Ltd.
Fenstanton
Cambridge, PE28 9HU
United Kingdom
Phone +44 1480 498 297
Fax +44 1480 498 303
robert.carpenter@inside2outside.co.uk
inside2outside.co.uk
Institut fr Mikroelektronik
Stuttgart
Allmandring 30a
70569 Stuttgart
Germany
Phone +49 711 21855 0
Fax +49 711 21855 111
richter@ims-chips.de
www.ims-chips.de
Instytut Technologii Elektronowej
Zablocie 39
30-701 Krakow
Poland
Phone +48 12 656 5183
Fax +48 12 656 3626
wzaraska@ite.waw.pl
www.ite.waw.pl
ISORG
17 rue des Martyrs, ISORG c/o CEA
38000 Grenoble
France
Phone +33 609 45 73 70
laurent.jamet@isorg.fr
www.isorg.fr
ISOVOLTAIC AG
Isovoltastr. 1
8403 Lebring
Austria
Phone +43 5 9191 9961
albert.plessing@isovoltaic.com
www.isovoltaic.com
ITRI Industrial Technology
Research Institute
195 Chung Hsing Rd., Sec. 4
Chu Tung, Hsin Chu, 310, R.O.C.
Taiwan
Phone +886 3 591 8291
Fax +886 3 582 0093
cctsai@itri.org.tw
www.itri.org.tw/eng
J
Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH
Campus Ring 8
28759 Bremen
Germany
Phone +49 421 200 3225
Fax +49 421 200 49 3225
v.wagner@jacobs-university.de
www.jacobs-university.de/directory/
vwagner/
Janssen Pharmaceutica N.V.
Turnhoutseweg 30
2340 Beerse
Belgium
Phone +32 1460 2959
esnoeckx@its.jnj.com
http://en.janssenpharmaceutica.be
JOANNEUM RESEARCH
Forschungsgesellschaft mbH
Franz-Pichler-Str. 30
8160 Weiz
Austria
Phone +43 316 876 2721
barbara.stadlober@joanneum.at
www.joanneum.at
JT International Germany GmbH
Diedenhofener Str. 30
54294 Trier
Germany
Phone +49 651 686 1115
Fax +49 651 686 22 1115
juergen.kuempel@jti.com
www.jti.com
K
Kammann Maschinenbau GmbH
Bergkirchener Str. 228
32549 Bad Oeynhausen
Germany
Phone +49 5734 5140 0
Fax +49 5734 5140 130
maas@kammann.de
www.kammann.de
Karl Knauer KG
Zellerstr. 14
77781 Biberach
Germany
Phone +49 7835 7820
Fax +49 7835 3598
info@karlknauer.de
www.karlknauer.de
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
(KIT)
Kaiserstr. 12
76131 Karlsruhe
Germany
Phone +49 721 608 3765
Fax +49 721 608 43490
wilhelm.schabel@kit.edu
www.kit.edu
Kent State University
145 Cartwright Hall, PO Box 5190
Kent, OH 44242-0001
USA
Phone +1 330 672 0732
Fax +1 330 672 7991
mbloom11@kent.edu
www.kent.edu/research/
Klar Folien GmbH
Ebernhahner Str. 22
56428 Dernbach
Germany
Phone +49 260 280 071
Fax +49 260 2106 105
vertrieb@klar-folien.de
www.klar-folien.de
Konkuk University FDRC
1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu
Seoul 143 701
Korea
Phone +82 2 450 3072
Fax +82 2 447 5886
khshin@konkuk.ac.kr
www.fdrc.re.kr
KROENERT GmbH & Co. KG
Schuetzenstr. 105
22761 Hamburg
Germany
Phone +49 40 853 93 01
Fax +49 40 853 93 171
frank.schaefer@kroenert.de
www.kroenert.de
KSG Leiterplatten GmbH
Auerbacher Str. 35
09390 Gornsdorf
Germany
Phone +49 3721 266 0
Fax +49 3721 266 101
ralph.fiehler@ksg.de
www.ksg.de
KTH, Royal Institute of
Technology, iPack
Isafjordsgatan 39
16440 Kista
Sweden
Phone +46 8 790 4118
Fax +46 8 751 1793
alinam@kth.se
www.ipack.kth.se
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 117
Leonhard Kurz Stiftung & Co. KG
Schwabacher Str. 482
90763 Frth
Germany
Phone +49 911 7141 830
Fax +49 911 7141 507
christian.schumacher@kurz.de
www.kurz.de
L
LG Technology Center Europe
Hammfelddamm 3
41460 Neuss
Germany
Phone +49 2131 366 6437
Fax +49 2131 366 6459
s.proemmel@lgtce.com
www.lgtce.com
LIOS
Altenberger Str. 69
4040 Linz
Austria
Phone +43 732 2468 8752
Fax +43 732 2468 8770
serdar.sariciftci@jku.at
www.lios.at
Liquid X Printed Metals
4400 Fifth Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
USA
Phone +1 412 268 3136
Fax +1 412 268 3136
bvasy@liquid-x.com
www.liquid-x.com
M
M. Braun
Inertgas-Systeme GmbH
Dieselstr. 31
85748 Garching
Germany
Phone +49 89 32669 0
Fax +49 89 32669 105
info@mbraun.de
www.mbraun.de
manroland AG
Mhlheimer Str. 341
63075 Offenbach
Germany
Phone +49 69 8305 0
Fax +49 69 8305 1440
info@manroland.com
www.manroland.com
MEGTEC Systems, Inc.
830 Prosper Rd.
De Pere, WI 54115
USA
Phone +1 920 339 2787
Fax +1 920 339 2793
mvanvonderen@megtec.com
www.megtec.com
Mekoprint A/S
Hermesvej 4
9530 Stvring
Denmark
Phone +45 9936 56 00
Fax +45 9936 56 04
electronics@mekoprint.dk
www.mekoprint.dk/solar
Merck KGaA
Frankfurter Str. 250
64293 Darmstadt
Germany
Phone +49 6151 72 7747
Fax +49 6151 72 91 7747
christian.kloft@merck.de
www.merck.de
MicroChem Corp.
90 Oak Street PO Box 426
Newton, MA 02464
USA
+1 617 965 5511
+1 617 965 5818
jcollins@microchem.com
www.microchem.com
Mitsubishi Polyester Film GmbH
Kasteler Str. 45
65203 Wiesbaden
Germany
Phone +49 611 962 3486
Fax +49 611 962 9413
hiroyuki.nishikawa@m-petfilm.de
www.m-petfilm.com
M-Solv Ltd.
Unit 8 Oxonian Park
Kidlington, OX5 1FP
United Kingdom
Phone +44 1865 844070
Fax +44 1865 844071
taku.sato@m-solv.com
www.m-solv.com
Muehlbauer, Inc.
226 Picketts Line
Newport News, VA 23603-1366
USA
Phone +1 757 947 2820
Fax +1 757 947 2930
info@muhlbauer.com
www.muhlbauer.com
Munich University of
Applied Sciences
Lothstr. 34
80335 Mnchen
Germany
Phone +49 89 1265 1567
Fax +49 89 1265 1502
ulrich.moosheimer@hm.edu
www.hm.edu
N
Nanograde AG
Wolfgang-Pauli-Str., PO Box 239
8093 Zrich
Switzerland
Phone +41 44 633 62 39
Fax +41 44 633 15 71
samuel.halim@nanograde.ch
www.nanograde.ch
NanoTecCenter Weiz
Forschungsgesellschaft mbH
Franz-Pichler-Str. 32
8610 Weiz
Austria
Phone +43 316 876 80 03
Fax +43 316 876 80 40
emil.list@ntc-weiz.at
www.ntc-weiz.at
National Centre for
Sensor Research
Dublin City University
Collins Avenue, Dublin 9
Ireland
Phone +353 1 700 8821
Fax +353 1 700 8021
ncsr@dcu.ie
www.dcu.ie/ncsr/
National Research Council
Canada
1200 Montreal Road, Bldg. M-50
Ottawa, K1A 0R6
Canada
Phone +1 613 993 8061
Diane.Franchi@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca
www.nrc.ca
Next Energy Technologies, Inc.
5385 Hollister Ave., Bldg. 6, Ste. 115
93111 Santa Barbara, CA
USA
Phone +1 805 222 4546
Fax +1 805 852 2530
daniel@nextenergytech.com
www.nextenergytech.com
Nissha Europe GmbH,
Frankfurt Branch
Mergenthalerallee 45, 4. OG
65760 Frankfurt
Germany
Phone +49 6196 96731 0
Fax +49 6196 96731 29
ryuhei.sakaguchi@euro-nissha.com
www.nissha.co.jp/english
NovaCentrix
400-B Parker Drive
Austin, TX 78728
USA
Phone +1 512 491 9500 (ext. 210)
Fax +1 512 491 0002
stan.farnsworth@novacentrix.com
www.novacentrix.com
Novaled AG
Tatzberg 49
01307 Dresden
Germany
Phone +49 351 796 580
Fax +49 351 796 5829
info@novaled.com
www.novaled.com
NPL National Physics Laboratory
Hampton Road
Teddington, TW11 0LW
United Kingdom
Phone +44 208 977 3222
fernando.castro@npl.co.uk
www.npl.co.uk
nTact (FAS Holdings Group)
10480 Markison Rd.
75238 Dallas, TX
USA
Phone +1 214 343 5300
Fax +1 214 343 5350
m.friedrich@nTact.com
www.nTact.com
O
Ohio Gravure Technologies Inc.
1241 Byers Road
Miamisburg, OH 45342
USA
Phone +1 937 439 1582
Fax +1 937 439 1592
sales@ohiogt.com
www.ohiogt.com
OMEC University of Manchester
Oxford Road
Manchester, M13 9PL
United Kingdom
Phone +44 161 275 14 21
stephen.yeates@manchester.ac.uk
www.omec.org.uk
sterreichische Staatsdruckerei
Tenschertstr. 7
1239 Wien
Austria
Phone +43 206 66
Fax +43 206 66 100
findeisen@staatsdruckerei.at
www.staatsdruckerei.at
Oxford Advanced Surfaces Group
PLC
Centre for Innovation & Enterprise,
Begbroke Science Park, Sandy Lane
Yarnton, OX5 2PF
United Kingdom
Phone +44 1865 85 48 07
jon-paul.griffiths@oxfordsurfaces.com
www.oxfordsurfaces.com
P
parc (Palo Alto Research Center)
3333 Coyote Hill Road
94304 Palo Alto, CA
USA
Phone +1 650 812 4000
engage@parc.com
www.parc.com
PChem Associates Inc.
3599 Marshall Ln. Suite D
Bensalem, PA 19020
USA
Phone +1 215 244 4603
Fax +1 215 689 2694
gjablonski@nanopchem.com
www.nanopchem.com
Photonics Research Institute AIST
Higashi 1-1-1
305-8565 Tsukuba, Ibaraki
Japan
Phone +81 29 8 61 63 06
Fax +81 29 8 61 63 06
k.yase@aist.go.jp
www.aist.go.jp/index_en.html
plastic electronic GmbH
Lunzerstr. 89
4030 Linz
Austria
Phone +43 732 65 20 30
contact@plastic-electronic.com
www.plastic-electronic.com
Plastic Logic
322 Cambridge Science Park
Cambridge, CB4 0WG
United Kingdom
Phone +44 1223 706 000
Fax +44 1223 706 006
info@plasticlogic.com
www.plasticlogic.com
Plextronics, Inc.
2180 William Pitt Way
Pittsburgh, PA 15238
USA
Phone +1 412 423 2030
Fax +1 412 423 2049
sales@plextronics.com
www.plextronics.com
pmTUC Professorship Print
Media Technology of Chemnitz
University of Technology
Reichenhainer Str. 70
09126 Chemnitz
Germany
Phone +49 371 531 23610
Fax +49 371 531 23619
pminfo@mb.tu-chemnitz.de
www.tu-chemnitz.de/pm
Politehnica University of
Bucharest
UPB-CETTI
Splaiul Independentei, 313, sector 6
60042 Bucharest
Romania
Phone +40 21 411 6674
Fax +40 21 411 5182
Andreea.Bonea@cetti.ro
www.cetti.ro
Polyera Corporation
8045 Lamon Avenue, Suite 140
Skokie, IL 60077
USA
Phone +1 847 261 4657
sales@polyera.com
www.polyera.com
118 ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS
PolyIC GmbH & Co. KG
Tucherstr. 2
90763 Frth
Germany
Phone +49 911 20 249 0
Fax +49 911 20 249 8001
info@polyic.com
www.polyic.com
PolyPhotonix Ltd.
Thomas Wright Way
Sedgefield, County Durham, TS21 3FG
United Kingdom
Phone +44 1740 625 700
richard@polyphotonix.com
www.polyphotonix.com
Printcolor Germany GmbH
Josef-Baumann-Str. 39
44805 Bochum
Germany
Phone +49 234 687 190
Fax +49 234 687 1919
peter.paul@printcolor.eu
www.printcolor.ch
Printed Electronics Ltd.
Hedging Lane, Dosthill
Tamworth, DE11 9RW
United Kingdom
Phone +44 1827 26 33 38
steve.jones@printedelectronics.co.uk
www.printedelectronics.com
Q
Quantumatica srl
via Verdi 11
21057 Olgiate O. (va)
Italy
Phone +39 0331 649 409
Fax +39 0331 315 118
gadr@quantumatica.com
www.quantumatica.com
R
Rambus Inc.
255 Santa Ana Court
Sunnyvale, CA 94089
USA
Phone +1 408 462 8000
Fax +1 408 462 8001
mmcconnaughey@rambus.com
www.rambus.com
Ris DTU National Laboratory
for Sustainable Energy
Frederiksborgvej 399
4000 Roskilde
Denmark
Phone +45 46 774 798
Fax +45 46 774 791
tdni@risoe.dtu.dk
www.risoe.dk
RK Siebdrucktechnik GmbH
Nubaumweg 31
51503 Rsrath
Germany
Phone +49 220 594 9970
Fax +49 220 5949 9777
winter@rk-siebdruck.de
www.rk-siebdruck.de
RWTH Aachen University ITA
Otto-Blumenthal-Str. 1
52074 Aachen
Germany
Phone +49 241 80 234 00
Fax +49 241 80 224 22
Anne.Schwarz@ita.rwth-aachen.de
www.ita.rwth-aachen.de
S
S1 Optics GmbH / IST Metz
Lauterstr. 1418
72622 Nrtingen
Germany
Phone +49 7022 6002 471
Fax +49 7022 6002 775
hansjoerg.richter@ist-uv.com
www.ist-uv.com
SAES Getters S.p.A.
Viale Italia 77
20020 Lainate
Italy
Phone +39 02 93 17 82 85
Fax +39 02 93 17 83 20
stefano
_
tominetti@saes-group.com
www.saesgetters.com
SAFC Hitech
Power Road
Bromborough, CH62 3QF
United Kingdom
Phone +44 151 482 7230
SAFCHitech@sial.com
www.SAFCHitech.com
Samsung C & T Germany GmbH
Am Kronberger Hang 6
65824 Schwalbach
Germany
Phone +49 6196 66 59 91
Fax +49 6196 66 53 33
jan.hidzow@samsung.com
www.samsung.de
SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC
35 rue Joseph Monier
92500 Rueil-Malmaison
France
Phone +33 1 41 29 70 00
Fax +33 1 46 99 71 00
cecile.venet@schneider-electric.com
www.schneider-electric.com
Schneidler Grafiska AB
Malaxgatan 1
16493 Kista
Sweden
Phone +46 86 325 000
bjjo@schneidler.se
www.schneidler.se
Schoeller Technocell
GmbH & Co. KG
Burg Gretesch
49086 Osnabrck
Germany
Phone +49 541 3800 853
Fax +49 541 3800 981 853
wschmidt@felix-schoeller.com
www.felix-schoeller.com
Schreiner Group GmbH & Co. KG
Bruckmannring 22
85764 Oberschleissheim
Germany
Phone +49 89 31584 5634
Fax +49 89 31584 5305
info@schreiner-group.com
www.schreiner-group.com
Schweizer Electronic AG
Einsteinstr. 10
78713 Schramberg
Germany
Phone +49 7422 512 214
Fax +49 7422 512 398
IEL@seag.de
www.seag.de
Sihl GmbH
Kreuzauer Str. 33
52355 Dueren
Germany
Phone +49 2421 597 0
bernd.robertz@sihl.de
www.sihl.de
SIMTech Singapore Institute of
Manufacturing Technology
71, Nanyang Drive
Singapore 638075
Singapore
Phone +65 679 38 507
Fax +65 7922 779
cwlu@SIMTech.a-star.edu.sg
www.SIMTech.a-star.edu.sg
Solarmer Energy Inc.
3445 Fletcher Ave.
El Monte, CA 91731
USA
Phone +1 626 4 56 8090
Fax +1 626 4 56 8082
info@solarmer.com
www.solarmer.com
Soligie
8647 Eagle Creek Parkway
Savage, MN 55378
USA
Phone +1 952 818 8300
Fax +1 952 808 3266
mark.litecky@soligie.com
www.soligie.com
Soluxx GmbH
Greinstr. 4
50939 Kln
Germany
Phone +49 221 99 55 99 46
Fax +49 221 99 55 99 47
jb.bonekamp@soluxx.de
www.soluxx.de
Solvay
rue de Ransbeek, 310
1120 Brussels
Belgium
Phone +32 2 264 2111
Fax +32 2 264 2455
organic.electronics@solvay.com
www.solvay.com
Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd.
27-1, Shinkawa 2-chome, Chuo-ku
104-8260 Tokyo
Japan
Phone +81 3 5543 5156
Fax +81 3 5543 5909
kimuram5@sc.sumitomo-chem.co.jp
www.sumitomo-chem.co.jp/english/
SunaTech Inc.
398 Ruoshui Road
Suzhou, 215125
P. R. China
Phone +86 512 62 872 180
Fax +86 512 62 872 181
nan.wu@sunatech.com
www.sunatech.com
Sunchon National University
315 Maegok
Sunchon
Korea
Phone +82 61 750 3585
Fax +82 61 750 5450
gcho@sunchon.ac.kr
www.rrc.sunchon.ac.kr
Surteco SE
Beisenstr. 50
45964 Gladbeck
Germany
Phone +49 2043 979 748
s.schunck@surteco.com
www.surteco.com
Suss Microtech
Tamarack Scientific Co., Inc.
220 Klug Circle
Corona, CA 92880
USA
Phone +1 951 817 3700
Fax +1 951 817 0640
matt.souter@suss.com
www.suss.com
Suzhou Institute of Nanotech
398 Ruo Shui Road
215123 Suzhou
P. R. China
Phone +86 512 6287 2705
+86 512 6260 3089
zcui2009@sinano.ac.cn
www.perc-sinano.com
T
Tampere University of Technology
Korkeakoulunkatu 1
33101 Tampere
Finland
Phone +358 3311 511
donald.lupo@tut.fi
www.tut.fi
Technische Universitt
Darmstadt IDD
Magdalenenstr. 2
64289 Darmstadt
Germany
Phone +49 6151 16 2132
Fax +49 6151 16 3632
sauer@idd.tu-darmstadt.de
www.idd.tu-darmstadt.de
Technische Universitt
Hamburg-Harburg
Technologiezentrum Hamburg-
Finkenwerder
Nepriel 5
21129 Hamburg
Germany
Phone +49 40 42 878 8293
ralf.god@tu-harburg.de
www.tu-harburg.de/et7/
TEI Technological Educational
Institutions of Athens
Ag Spyridonos & Pallikaridi
12111 Aegaleo
Greece
Phone +30 693 23 600 63
Fax +30 210 99 38 97 4
nomic@aegean.gr
www.smartprintmedia.com
Teknek Ltd.
River Drive
Inchinnan, PA4 9RT
United Kingdom
Phone +44 141 568 8100
sheilah@teknek.com
www.teknek.com
THIEME GmbH & Co. KG
Robert-Bosch-Str. 1
79331 Teningen
Germany
Phone +49 7641 583 0
Fax +49 7641 583 110
harry.goetz@thieme.eu
www.thieme.eu
Thin Film Electronics ASA
PO Box 2911 Solli
0230 Oslo
Norway
Phone +46 13 460 2400
Fax +46 13 460 2499
info@thinfilm.no
www.thinfilm.no
TOPIC Thailand Organic and
Printed Electronics Innovation
Center
112 Thailand Science Park
12120 Pathumthani
Thailand
Phone +66 2564 7200 ext. 5040
thinnakorn.hanchana@
tmc.nstda.or.th
www.topic.in.th
ORGANIC AND PRINTED ELECTRONICS 119
Toppan Printing Co. (UK) Ltd.
128 Queen Victoria Street
London, EC4V 4BJ
United Kingdom
Phone +44 207 213 0502
Fax +44 207 248 1078
shepherd@toppan.co.uk
www.toppan.co.uk
TSE Troller AG
Aareweg 6
4853 Murgenthal
Switzerland
Phone +41 62 917 4010
Fax +41 62 917 4015
maick.nielsen@tse-coating.ch
www.tse-coating.ch
TU Dresden, IAPP
01062 Dresden
Germany
Phone +49 351 463 34389
Fax +49 351 463 37065
info@iapp.de
www.iapp.de
U
Universitat Autnoma de
Barcelona
Office QC-2088, Engineering School,
campus UAB
08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona)
Spain
Phone +34 93 581 4892
Fax +34 93 581 3033
Eloi.Ramon@uab.cat
www.uab.cat
Universitt zu Kln
Luxemburger Str. 116
50939 Kln
Germany
Phone +49 221 470 32 75
Fax +49 221 470 51 44
klaus.meerholz@uni-koeln.de
www.meerholz.uni-koeln.de
University of Applied Sciences
Bielefeld
Department of Engineering Sciences
and Mathematics
Wilhelm-Bertelsmann-Str. 10
33602 Bielefeld
Germany
Phone +49 521 106 7307
Fax +49 521 106 7168
dirk.zielke@fh-bielefeld.de
www.fh-bielefeld.de/fb3/zielke
University of Bordeaux1 /
LCPO-UMR5629
Avenue des facults, B8
33405 Talence
France
Phone +33 540 002 674
Fax +33 540 003 083
hadzii@enscbp.fr
www.lcpo.fr/wordpress/
University of Cambridge
Electrical Engineering Division
9 J J Thomson Avenue
Cambridge, CB3 0FA
United Kingdom
Phone +44 1223 767880
Fax +44 1223 748342
chris.rider@eng.cam.ac.uk
www.cikc.eng.cam.ac.uk
University of Leeds
DP Centre of Collaboration
Leeds, LS1 2AL
United Kingdom
Phone +44 113 34 32 792
Fax +44 113 34 32 947
t.lambourne@leeds.ac.uk
www.digitalprintcic.com
University of Ljubljana
Snezniska 5
Ljubljana SI 1000
Slovenia
Phone +386 1 2003 200
Fax +386 1 2003 270
marica.staresinic@ntf.uni-lj.si
www.ntf.uni-lj.si
University of Novi Sad
Trg Dositeja Obradovica 6
21000 Novi Sad
Serbia
Phone +381 21 4852552
Fax +381 21 4750572
sgoran@uns.ac.rs
www.cimc.rs
University of Pardubice
Studentsk 95
53210 Pardubice
Czech Republic
Phone +420 466 038 031
Fax +420 466 038 031
tomas.syrovy@upce.cz
www.upce.cz
University of West Bohemia
Univerzitn 8
30614 Plze n
Czech Republic
Phone +420 377 634 533
Fax +420 377 634 502
hamacek@ket.zcu.cz
www.zcu.cz/en/
University of the West of England
Coldharbour Lane
Bristol, BS16 1QY
United Kingdom
Phone +44 117 328 2147
tony.killard@uwe.ac.uk
www.uwe.ac.uk
V
VARTA Microbattery GmbH
Daimlerstr. 1
73479 Ellwangen
Germany
Phone +49 7961 921 432
martin.krebs@varta-microbattery.com
www.varta-microbattery.com
VAST FILMS Ltd.
101 Aid Drive
Darlington, PA 16115
USA
Phone +1 724 827 8827
Fax +1 724 827 2020
w.decker@vastfilm.com
www.vastfilm.com
VDI/VDE Innovation + Technik
GmbH
Steinplatz 1
10623 Berlin
Germany
Phone +49 30 310 078 0
Fax +49 30 310 078 223
olae@vdivde-it.de
www.vdivde-it.de
VDL FLOW
Bldg. AK, Achtseweg Noord 5
5651 GG Eindhoven
The Netherlands
Phone +31 402 638 777
info@vdlflow.com
www.vdlflow.com
Vestech Taiwan Corp.
3FL-1., 28, Sec. 3, Nanking E. Rd.,
10489 Taipei, R.O.C.
Taiwan
Phone +886 2508 4765 ext. 11
Fax +886 2508 4763
frank@vestech-taiwan.com.tw
www.vestech-taiwan.com.tw
VITA-PRINT LTD
13, Beketova str
603057 Nizhniy Novgorod
Russian Federation
Phone +7 831 412 32 17
Fax +7 831 278 60 03
gendir@vita-nn.ru
www.vita-print.com
VIVA DEVELOPMENTS S.L.
Avenida Juan Carlos I, 12, floor 4
30800 Lorca (Murcia)
Spain
Phone +34 868 10 96 96
Fax +34 901 70 72 96
info@vivainnova.es
www.vivainnova.es
VTT Technical Research
Centre of Finland
Kaitovyl 1
90571 Oulu
Finland
Phone +358 40 820 5076
Fax +358 20 722 2320
antti.kemppainen@vtt.fi
www.vttprintedintelligence.fi
W
WCPC, Swansea University
Singleton Park
Wales, SA2 8PP
United Kingdom
Phone +44 1792 29501
g.r.davies@swansea.ac.uk
www.wcpcswansea.com
Werner Blase GmbH & Co. KG
Borsigstr. 8
32312 Lbbecke
Germany
Phone +49 5741 3299 0
Fax +49 5741 3299 19
kommunikationstechnik@blase.de
www.blase-gruppe.de
Windmller & Hlscher KG
Mnsterstr. 50
49525 Lengerich
Germany
Phone +49 5481 14 0
Fax +49 5481 14 2649
info@wuh-group.com
www.wuh-group.com
X
Xaar plc
316 Science Park
Cambridge, CB4 0XR
United Kingdom
Phone +46 8 580 88760
Fax +46 8 580 88777
werner.zapka@xaar.com
www.xaar.com
Xenon Corporation
37 Upton Drive
Wilmington, MA 01887
USA
Phone +1 978 661 9033
Fax +1 978 661 9055
LAPanico@xenoncorp.com
www.xenoncorp.com
Y
YD Ynvisible, S.A.
Rua Mouzinho de Albuquerque, 7
2070-104 Cartaxo
Portugal
Phone +351 24 310 3174
Fax +351 24 310 7367
sofia.martins@ynvisible.com
www.ynvisible.com
Z
Zeon Corporation
1-6-2 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku
100-8246 Tokyo
Japan
Phone +81 3 3216 0590
Fax +81 3 3216 1827
M.Matsuda@zeon.co.jp
www.zeon.co.jp
Editor
Dr. Klaus Hecker
OE-A (Organic and Printed Electronics Association)
VDMA The German Engineering Federation
Lyoner Str. 18
60528 Frankfurt am Main
Germany
Phone +49 69 6603-1336
Fax +49 69 6603-2336
E-Mail info@oe-a.org
Internet www.oe-a.org
Authors
Dr. Klaus Hecker and Dr. Sven Breitung, OE-A,
unless stated otherwise.
The chapter OE-A Roadmap for Organic and
Printed Electronics has been compiled with
the continued support of Prof. Dr. Donald Lupo,
Tampere University of Technology, Tampere,
Finland and Dr. Wolfgang Clemens, PolyIC GmbH
& Co. KG, Frth, Germany.
Publisher
VDMA Verlag GmbH
Lyoner Str. 18
60528 Frankfurt am Main
Germany
Phone +49 69 6603-1232
Fax +49 69 6603-2232
E-Mail verlag@vdma.org
Internet www.vdma-verlag.com
Copyright 2013
VDMA Verlag GmbH,
Frankfurt am Main, Germany
Production
VDMA Verlag, www.vdma-verlag.com
Printing
h. reuffurth gmbh, Mlheim am Main
Cover picture
gettyimages
Lester Lefkowitz
Pictures in figure 1 in Roadmap article
on page 11:
BASF SE
G24i Power, Ltd
Heliatek GmbH
Holst Centre
Karl Knauer KG
OSRAM GmbH
Plastic Logic GmbH
PolyIC GmbH & Co. KG
Samsung Group
Thin Film Electronics ASA
Acknowledgement
This compilation would not have been possible
without the large knowledge base and picture
pool members gave us access to nor the dedicated
help of numerous professionals from industry
and research. We want to express our sincere
thanks to all those who supported us in writing
and reviewing this brochure.
Attention!
Please remove and recycle the battery in the
interactive cover page appropriately before
recycling this brochure.
Imprint
Imprint
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OE-A (Organic and Printed Electronics Association)
A working group within VDMA
Lyoner Str. 18
60528 Frankfurt am Main
Germany
Phone +49 69 6603-1336
Fax +49 69 6603-2336
E-Mail info@oe-a.org
Internet www.oe-a.org
www.oe-a.org