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FREE DOOR-TO-DOOR DELIVERY IN CENTRAL VERMONT
Vol. 42, No. 36 403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 Fax (802) 479-7916 January 8, 2014
On the Web: www.vt-world.com Email: sales@vt-world.com
Spend less.
Earn more.
www.ccv.edu/save 800-228-6686
Only at CCV can you get a quality
education at the lowest cost of any
college in Vermont, and our fnancial
aid team can help you fgure out
how to cover it.
Annual Kris
Kemp Alumni
Hockey Game
Results
page 13
Third
Thursday
Lunch Series
at VT History
Museum in
Montpelier
page 5
Works by
Regis
Cumming at
the
Governors
Gallery
page 7
Medical
Calamity Has
Family On
The Brink
page 9
Many Words
Herbs
A Natural Way
to Good Health
page 15
Rural Refrains
www.capitalcityconcerts.org
www.capitalcityconcerts.org
VIOLINIST
RACHEL
BARTON PINE
with Matthew Hagle, piano
Saturday, June 1, 2013 7:30PM
Unitarian Church of Montpelier
130 Main Street, Montpelier, Vermont
An exciting, boundary-defying performer
Pine displays a power and confidence
that puts her in the top echelon.
The Washington Post
An eclectic and global programof well-known and ground-
breaking works for violin, featured are two of the great
Romantic sonatas for violin and piano: Beethovens Sonata for
violin and piano No. 3 in E-flat major, Op. 12 No. 3, and Strauss
Sonata for violin and piano in E-flat major, Op. 18.
She will also play a set of lullabies by Brahms, Ysaye,
and Clarke, as well as the Egyptian-flavored Sonata for
Solo Violin, a piece written for her by Arab-American
composer Mohammed Fairouz.
Tickets: $10 $25
At the door while supplies last or
in advance from Bear Pond Books,
Montpelier
Charge Your Tickets Online:
www.capitalcityconcerts.org
Sponsored by:
Montpelier
Pharmacy
Montpelier City
Arts Fund
www.capitalcityconcerts.org
VIOLINIST
RACHEL
BARTON PINE
with Matthew Hagle, piano
Saturday, June 1, 2013 7:30PM
Unitarian Church of Montpelier
130 Main Street, Montpelier, Vermont
An exciting, boundary-defying performer
Pine displays a power and confidence
that puts her in the top echelon.
The Washington Post
An eclectic and global program of well-known and ground-
breaking works for violin, featured are two of the great
Romantic sonatas for violin and piano: Beethovens Sonata for
violin and piano No. 3 in E-flat major, Op. 12 No. 3, and Strauss
Sonata for violin and piano in E-flat major, Op. 18.
She will also play a set of lullabies by Brahms, Ysaye,
and Clarke, as well as the Egyptian-flavored Sonata for
Solo Violin, a piece written for her by Arab-American
composer Mohammed Fairouz.
Tickets: $10 $25
At the door while supplies last or
in advance from Bear Pond Books,
Montpelier
Charge Your Tickets Online:
www.capitalcityconcerts.org
Sponsored by:
Montpelier
Pharmacy
Montpelier City
Arts Fund
SM
SEE PAGE 5
Sunday, Jan. 12
3:30 PM
Unitarian Church of Montpelier
30 Main Street, Montpelier
page 2 The WORLD January 8, 2014
40th Army
Band to
Open
Farmers
Night Series
The Vermont National Guard
and the Office of the Adjutant
General are proud to present
Vermonts Own 40th Army
Band in concert. This free per-
formance will take place on
Wednesday, January 15th at
7:30pm in the House of
Representatives at the Vermont
State House in Montpelier.
This year the 40th Army
Band will feature the musical
performance teams The Liberty
Belles, a woodwind quintet,
Ruck and Load, a big band
style ensemble, and The Power
of 10, a power rock show
band.
Members of the 40th Army
Band serve one weekend a
month and two weeks of annual
training each year in the
Vermont Army National Guard.
As civilians the rest of the year,
they are engaged in such
diverse occupations as educa-
tion, law, security, technology,
medicine, and sales.
This concert is the opener
for the annual Farmers Night
series of concerts and enter-
tainment at the State House
during the legislative session.
The 7:30pm concert is free and
open to the public.
Registration Open for Teens
for Governors Institute
February Weekend Intensives
Registration forms are now online at www.giv.org/winter for
two Governors Institutes February weekend events offering
accelerated learning opportunities to 9-12th graders from every
Vermont high school.
Young Vermonters who enjoy in-depth learning have so many
choices at this years Winter Weekends! says Governors Institutes
Executive Director Karen Taylor Mitchell. In addition to the
challenging information technology, engineering, and current
issues and leadership topicals weve offered before, Vermonts
motivated students can now choose between a new astronomy
(astrophotography) course, advanced math for girls, or five of the
summer Institutes most popular arts courses.
The weekends will take place February 7-9 and February 21-23,
and tuition including room and board is $295 (assistance is avail-
able for those with financial need.)
Traditionally, Winter Weekend visual and dramatic arts courses
have been first to fill, so this year GIV is expanding to offer five
arts courses: theatrical impro-
visation, dance improvisation,
cartooning and illustration,
silkscreening, and lighting
design and stage production
all of which build on the
strengths of the renowned sum-
mer Governors Institute on the
Arts.
All of the Governors
Institutes are about meeting
bright young artists and schol-
ars where they are and provid-
ing them with the tools they
need to blossom. At these brief,
residential winter weekends,
young people get the chance to
try out being away from home
from Friday evening through
Sunday, exploring a subject
they care about with teens from
all over the state who love the
same thing. Taylor Mitchell
notes that while the nine longer
summer Institutes require a
school nomination to attend,
winter opportunities are open
to all talented students and
enrollment is first-come, first-
serve.
Dont let geography be a
barrier, Taylor Mitchell advis-
es students, noting that every-
one spends the weekend on a
college campus where all of the
classes, meals and social activi-
ties are close together. Its
incredibly valuable practice for
college, but beyond that, its
thrilling, inspiring and just
plain fun.
Find more information about
GIV Winter Weekends at www.
giv.org/winter or by calling
802-865-4448.

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Christmas Gifts Delivered to Area Veterans
Members of Barre Elks Lodge, American Legion Post #10,
Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #790 and the Barre Area Veterans
Council gathered on Saturday December 21 to deliver fruit bas-
kets, quilts and grocery cards to area veterans. Over 60 veterans
were visited in area nursing homes, assisted living facilities or
their home. During the visit, the veteran was given a Christmas
gift of a fruit basket, quilt or grocery card. Each gift was accom-
panied by a Christmas card from each of the organizations.
Pictured here (left ro right) are Granville Paine, Stephen
Weston, Kristin Calcagni, Steve Gilman, Ann Marie Bolton, Maria
McKnight, Melvin McKnight and Leonard Normandeau.
This yearly event is sponsored by Barre Elks Lodge, American
Legion Post #10, Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #790 and the
Barre Area Veterans Council. For more information about this
event or if you know of a deserving veteran that is shut-in at
home, contact American Legion Post #10 Chaplain, Stephen
Weston, at 802-479-0497 or e-mail navyvet261@myfairpoint.net.
Pictured here (left ro right) are Granville Paine, Stephen Weston, Kristin Calcagni, Steve Gilman, Ann Marie Bolton, Maria McKnight, Melvin
McKnight and Leonard Normandeau.
n n n
Applications Available for 2014-2015
Capital City Farmers Market
Applications are currently being accepted to sell locally-pro-
duced agricultural products, prepared foods made with locally-
grown ingredients, and traditional crafts at the Capital City
Farmers Market, in Montpelier. The market application includes
vending at the 26 outdoor markets starting in May 2014 and the 10
indoor markets, starting in December 2014 and running through
April 2015. Applications are due by January 31, 2014.
The market provides area residents and visitors with a year-
round opportunity to buy the freshest produce from local growers,
and to directly support Vermonts agricultural economy. Throughout
the year, shoppers can find everything local from fresh produce,
cheeses, meats, maple syrup, honey, breads and baked goods, to a
variety of prepared foods featuring local ingredients. In addition,
the market features many locally-handmade beautiful crafts at
each market. Started in 1977, it is one of the oldest markets in
Vermont.
Applications for the Capital City Farmers Market are available
on-line on the websites vendor page at: http://www.montpelier-
farmersmarket.com/applicationvendor-info/
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page 4 The WORLD January 8, 2014
A CVMC Medical Group Practice / www.cvmc.org
Central Vermont Womens Health
30 Fisher Road / Medical Ofce Building A, Suite 1-4 / Berlin VT 05602 / 802.371.5961
Photo, from left: Colleen Horan, MD, FACOG; Sheila Glaess, MD, FACOG; Julie Vogel, MD, FACOG;
Roger Ehret, MD, FACOG; Rebecca Montgomery, CNM, MSN; Roger Knowlton, DO, FACOG.
The providers at Central Vermont Womens Health know that
every step on your path to childbirth is an important one.
We offer personalized attention and support from the early stages of family planning
through the time you are at home with your newborn.
We want you to have the birth experience you desire.
We offer natural birthing options in addition to everything youd expect from a modern,
well-equipped hospital like Central Vermont Medical Center. And although you or your baby may
never need specialized care you can take comfort in knowing that the board-certied obstetricians
at CVWH are always just a phone call away and offer the security of comprehensive care.
There is nothing more important to us than your health and the health of your baby.
Please call Nicole, Pam or Emma at 371.5961 to schedule an appointment.
We look forward to meeting you to talk about your growing family.
Pregnancy is so much more
than just your due date.
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VCLF Named
Vermont
Micro-Lender of
the Year
The Vermont Community
Loan Fund, a 501(c)3 nonprof-
it, mission-driven lender, was
recently named Vermont Micro-
Lender of the Year by the Small
Business Administration (SBA)
Vermont District Office. Seth
Goodall SBA Region 1
Administrator and Darcy
Carter, SBA Vermont District
Director presented the award to
VCLF Executive Director Will
Belongia at a gathering at
Montpeliers Capitol Plaza
Hotel.
Since 2010, when VCLF
began its collaboration with
SBA, the Loan Fund has loaned
a total of $986,959.94 in SBA
funds to 42 small businesses
and child care programs in the
state. These loans have led to
the creation of 67 new Vermont
jobs, and the preservation of 96
existing jobs. In 2013, VCLF
issued 18 SBA micro-loans
totaling almost $450,000.
The SBA Microloan Program
disburses loans of up to $50,000
to support the start-up and
expansion of small businesses
and nonprofit child care pro-
grams, often to organizations
unable to secure loans from
traditional lenders.
The U.S. Small Business
Administration provides funds
to Community Development
Financial Institutions (CDFI)
such as the Vermont Community
Loan Fund, and other commu-
nity-based organizations with
experience in lending, manage-
ment and technical assistance.
These intermediaries adminis-
ter the Microloan Program for
eligible borrowers.
Accepting the award, VCLF
Executive Director Will
Belongia said, The loan capi-
tal from SBAs Microloan
Program has provided critical
working capital and equipment
financing, reaching many of
Vermonts very small business-
es, and ultimately making sig-
nificant social and financial
impact among underserved
Vermonters, and bolstering the
states economy as well.
Along with its microloan
funding, VCLF provides bor-
rowers with business skills
training and consulting across a
variety of disciplines. The
technical assistance VCLF
offers alongside our SBA
microloans ensures borrowers
have the tools they need to suc-
ceed, whether theyre starting
up a new business or expand-
ing an existing one, said
Belongia.
January 8, 2014 The WORLD page 5

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www.capitalcityconcerts.org
VIOLINIST
RACHEL
BARTON PINE
with Matthew Hagle, piano
Saturday, June 1, 2013 7:30PM
Unitarian Church of Montpelier
130 Main Street, Montpelier, Vermont
An exciting, boundary-defying performer
Pine displays a power and confidence
that puts her in the top echelon.
The Washington Post
An eclectic and global programof well-known and ground-
breaking works for violin, featured are two of the great
Romantic sonatas for violin and piano: Beethovens Sonata for
violin and piano No. 3 in E-flat major, Op. 12 No. 3, and Strauss
Sonata for violin and piano in E-flat major, Op. 18.
She will also play a set of lullabies by Brahms, Ysaye,
and Clarke, as well as the Egyptian-flavored Sonata for
Solo Violin, a piece written for her by Arab-American
composer Mohammed Fairouz.
Tickets: $10 $25
At the door while supplies last or
in advance from Bear Pond Books,
Montpelier
Charge Your Tickets Online:
www.capitalcityconcerts.org
Sponsored by:
Montpelier
Pharmacy
Montpelier City
Arts Fund
Rural Refrains
Sunday, January 12, 3:30 PM
at the Unitarian Church of Montpelier
Hyunah Yu - soprano
Karen Kevra - ute
Daniel Gilbert - clarinet
Joy Worland - horn
Jeewon Park - piano
This wonderfully Vermonty program features the return of soprano
Hyunah Yu along with a colorful ensemble of ne instrumentalists.
They will perform Schuberts Shepherd on the Rock, Libby Larsens
Barn Dances, Roussels Fair Nightingale & Air, sky, winds,
Berliozs, The Young Shepherd, and Alec Wilders, Suite for clarinet,
horn and piano.
Franz Schubert: Shepherd on the Rock for soprano,
clarinet, & piano
Albert Roussel: 2 Poems de Ronsard (Fair nightin-
gale, & Air, Sky, Wind) for ute & soprano
Libby Larsen: Barn Dances for ute, clarinet, & piano
Hector Berlioz: The Young Shepherd for soprano, horn,
& piano
Alec Wilder: Suite for clarinet, horn, & piano
Capital City Concerts will present Rural
Refrains on Sunday, January 12, at 3:30pm at
the Unitarian Church of Montpelier. This pictur-
esque Vermonty program features the return of
soprano Hyunah Yu along with a colorful ensem-
ble of fine instrumentalists; Daniel Gilbert, for-
mer Cleveland Orchestra clarinetist; NYC pianist
Jeewon Park; and Vermonters Karen Kevra, flute
and Joy Worland, horn. The featured work is
Schuberts beloved Shepherd on the Rock,
which manages to be simultaneously deeply
moving and a show-stopper. Also on the program
is Libby Larsens Barn Dances, Roussels
Fair Nightingale & Air, Sky, Winds, Berliozs
The Young Shepherd, and Alec Wilders Suite
for clarinet, horn and piano.
A regular and favorite at Capital City Concerts,
Baltimore soprano Hyunah Yu last performed for
the series in 2008. Yus strong ties to Vermont
began in 1998 when she first appeared as a solo-
ist at the New England Bach Festival, directed by
Blanche Moyse. Soon afterward she came to
Capital City Concerts to work with Louis Moyse
and returned frequently in subsequent years to
perform and work with him.
Yu was a prize winner at the Walter Naumburg
International Competition and a finalist in both
the Dutch International Vocal and Concert Artist
Guild International competitions. She has per-
formed with major orchestras including the
Seattle Symphony, Baltimore Symphony, Boston
Baroque, Sejong Soloists, the Bournemouth and
Milwaukee Symphonies, Concerto Kln, and
Salzburg Camerata. An avid chamber musician,
Ms. Yu has sung with the Philadelphia Chamber
Music Society, Baltimores Shriver Hall Concert
Series, Lincoln Centers Alice Tully Hall, the
Capital City Concerts Presents Rural Refrains
Third Thursday Lunch Series begins
at VT History Museum in Montpelier
Beginning January 16th and continuing
monthly through May, the Vermont Historical
Society will offer presentations about historic
topics over the lunch hour at the Vermont History
Museum at 109 State Street in Montpelier.
Bring your lunch and come to the museum
for animated talks steeped in Vermont history,
said Vermont Historical Societys Public
Programs Coordinator, Amanda Gustin. Listen
to our first talk with author Judy Edwards as she
shares tales and research behind her historical
fiction.
Edwards lives in southeastern Vermont near
Mount Ascutney State Park, one of many parks
nationwide whose roads, stone buildings, and
campsites were created by the Civilian
Conservation Corps in the 1930s. The CCC was
a public work relief program created during the
Great Depression. Young men ages 15-25 from
all over America came to Vermont to work on
conservation and natural resource projects in
rural areas.
Vermont had more CCC camps per capita
than any other state, Gustin explained. The
Vermont Historical Societys collections include
photographs and objects from the CCC, some of
which are on exhibit in the Vermont History
Museum.
Pick your favorite topic or come to all Third
Thursday presentations:
* January 16, Civilian Conservation Corps
with Judy Edwards
* February 20, H.P. Lovecraft and The
Whisperer in Darkness with F. Brett Cox from
Norwich University
* March 20, Joseph Smith and Brigham
Young: A Rich New England Heritage with
Joseph Mender from the Joseph Smith
Birthplace
* April 17, Porches of North America with
UVMs Thomas Visser
* May 15, Christian Science in Vermont with
Kurt Morris
The presentations are free, and the site is
handicapped accessible. Talks will take place
from noon to 1pm in the Snelling Room at the
Vermont History Museum. For more informa-
tion, visit vermonthistory.org or contact Amanda
Gustin, Public Programs Coordinator, at amanda.
gustin@state.vt.us or (802) 828-2180.
Vancouver Recital Society, the Phillips Collection
in Washington, DC, Musicians from Marlboro
Tours, Chamber Music Northwest, at the
Bemberg Foundation in Toulouse, France, and
substituted on short notice for Dawn Upshaw at
Carnegie Hall. Most recently she sang in the
world premiere of Symphony of Meditations by
Aaron Jay Kernis with Seattle Symphony under
Gerard Schwarz.
For more info and to charge tickets ($10-$25)
go to www.capitalcityconcerts.org . Tickets may
also be purchased (cash or check only) in person
at Bear Pond Books.
n n n
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page 6 The WORLD January 8, 2014
High Honors - 4.00 or above
Spaulding
High School
FIRST QUARTER HONOR ROLL 2013-2014
SENIORS
Brenna Bedard
Karli Chouinard
Elizabeth Clark
Kacie Cressey
Jordan Dexter
Logan Jacobs
David Johns
Tiffany Joslin
Jaime Marsh
Sabrina Miller
Rachel Ornitz
Janki Patel
Christy Pelloni
Anna Prescott
Rebecca Rouleau

JUNIORS
Jesse Alger
Ethan Bean
Matthew Bean
Brooke Benoit
Emily Benoit
Emma Fischer
Alyssa Fowler
John Hardy
Morgan Keene
Duncan Lord
John McHugh
Lindsey Menard
Rose Meriam
Connor Moore
Libby Nyquist
Olivia Rebel
Carly Redmond
Collin Safford
Alexandra Simpson
Matthew Thompson
Tameka Thorpe
Eric Tucker
Alicia Violette
Emily Violette

SOPHOMORES
Brandon Aldrich
Ryan Allen
Kelsi Ensminger
Grayson Glosser
Paul Lavallee
Aidan Reardon
Jammi Roberts
Gregory Thivierge

FRESHMEN
William Bigglestone
Baylee Boucher
Brynn Boucher
Shannnon Brodie
Emily Corkery
Craig Farnham
Cody Gosselin
Katherine Gurin
Carli Harris
Isaac Hilton-VanOs-
dall
Marisela Isak
Julia Jaminet
Dominick Lacasse
Chloe Martin
Savanna Ouellette
Joseph Reese
Gianna Somarriba
Kieran Verret
The following High Honors students did not appear
correctly in the 12-25 issue of the WORLD.
Best Hospital
Central Vermont Medical Center Partner Pharmacies:
Kinney Pharmacies - ,
Montpelier Pharmacy;
The Medicine Shoppe - Barre, Wal-Mart Pharmacy - Berlin,
Rite-Aid Pharmacies - Montpelier, Barre, Hardwick,
Community Health Pharmacy - Colchester
Healthy Community
Classes
Healing Art and Writing
Free and open to all those touched by cancer or
chronic illness, including caregivers. Explore art and
writing to reduce stress and help with the challenges
of illness and healing. No experience necessary!
Workshop led by Patricia Fontaine. 225-5449.
When: Saturday, January 18
10:00 am Noon
Where: Mountainview Medical Meeting Room
CVMC Campus Building B
Tobacco Cessation Classes
Do you want to quit tobacco use (cigarettes, chew,
cigars, pipe, etc.) but need help? For many tobacco
users, support from others makes the difference in
staying tobacco-free. Special attention is given to
developing a quitting strategy, including dealing
with weight control and managing stress. These
workshops will offer ways to change your behavior
and help you start a tobacco-free lifestyle. For more
information and to register, please call 371-5945.
When: Tuesdays, January 14 - February 4
5:00 6:00 pm
Where:
160 Wall St.
*Tobacco cessation classes also offered every month at

Poulos Insurance says...


MAKE SURE YOUR INSURANCE
COVERAGE IS UP TO DATE
We are all aware by reading the nightly newspaper, watching
the news on TV or listening to the radio, that there have been
an extraordinary number of serious res in Vermont over the last
year. Homes, apartment houses and business have either been
totally destroyed or have sustained major damage. No matter
what the causethese events are happening on a frequent
basis and a majority of them occur during the colder months of
the year. This fact makes the reconstruction time even greater,
putting additional stress on the affected people who are without
homes or places to work.
Now is the time to contact your insurance agent and make sure
all of your insurance coverage is adequate to properly protect
you in the event of a serious re. Make sure your property limits
are based on replacement cost, make sure you have loss of
business income coverage and make sure all of your valuable
papers are kept in duplication off premises. Once a re happens,
its too late to review.
752 Granger Road, Berlin, VT 05641
802-229-5727 800-639-1910
www.poulosinsurance.com
Norwich Universitys Sullivan Museum and History Center
presents a new exhibition in the Civil War series, 1864: Some
Suffer So Much.
This exhibition, which opens Monday, Jan. 13, 2014, is the
fourth in a series that explores Norwich Universitys contributions
to the conflict. This exhibit presents the stories of Norwich alumni
during the bloody year of 1864.
Through objects, photos and ephemera, the exhibit examines
the role of military surgeons who treated wounded soldiers on the
battlefields and in the three Vermont Civil War hospitals in
Brattleboro, Burlington and Montpelier. It also traces the history
of post-traumatic stress disorder from the Civil War to the pres-
ent.
Norwich alumni played a significant role in the United States
Colored Troops, African American combat units that fought in
1864. Vermonts connections to the Civil War also include the
October 1864 Raid on St. Albans. In response to this Confederate
attack from Canada, the Norwich University Corps of Cadets was
mobilized to defend Vermonts northern border.
The Sullivan Museum will host a series of lunchtime presenta-
tions during the spring semester. The first of these programs will
be held on Wednesday, Feb. 5, at noon in the Museum Rotunda.
Speaker Jim Fouts, member of the 18th Vermont Regiment and
Civil War re-enactor, will present The Confederate Raid on St.
Albans. This program is sponsored by the Sullivan Museum
Associates and free and open to the public. A light lunch will be
provided.
Norwich Universitys Sullivan Museum and History Center
Presents New Civil War Exhibition
Medal of Honor recipient Edward B. Williston, NU1856. Photo courtesy
of Norwich University Archives.
GMUW & Choice Strategies Create Childrens Literacy Kits
The exhibition runs through December 2014.
The Sullivan Museum and History Center is located on
Norwichs Northfield campus and is open Monday-Friday, 8am to
4pm, and Saturdays 11am to 4pm during the academic year. Free
and open to the public. For more information call 802-485-2183.
On December 12th, as part of their holiday gift to the commu-
nity, the employees at Green Mountain United Way decided to
start a project to help promote childrens literacy. Each employee
purchased a recommended childrens book and gathered together
to make literacy kits. These kits consisted of hands-on tools per-
taining to the stories, making each book even more engaging to
each child. Most children understand and focus better when they
interact with the material as it is being read to them.
This project is part of the GMUW Early Learning initiative.
After making a half dozen kits, two GMUW staff members took
the idea to Choice Strategies, a division of WageWorks, in
Waterbury, which had expressed a keen interest in participating in
providing similar literacy kits to schools, daycare centers and
families in the area.
Choice Strategies book drive collected over 140 books, and
over a three-hour time period on December 13th, employees made
over 20 kits. It was a rewarding exercise for both GMUW and the
employees at Choice Strategies, not to mention a lot of fun.
Consequently, several children received very worthwhile materi-
als to help with their reading and comprehension.
GMUW is looking for other area companies that are interested
in holding similar team-building activities with their employees so
that more kits can be made and more children can be reached. For
more information, contact GMUW at 802-229-9532.

Let Us Know...
if you are not getting
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If you are in the greater
Barre-Montpelier Area
Call 479-2582
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January 8, 2014 The WORLD page 7
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The Vermont Mountaineers 2014


Key Note Speaker:
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News from Ainsworth Public Library
APL will be closed for Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday,
January 20th. Take a few minutes and reflect on the life of this
great American and all he did for civil rights. Better yet, come in
and read one of the more than half dozen books about Martin
Luther King Jr.
Did you know your the library gets 20 to 30 new books and
other materials every month? Its true. Here are some we added in
December:
Books on CD: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg
Larsson, The Matchmakers by Debbbie Macomber, and Split
Image by Robert B. Parker.
Movies on DVD: The Big Sleep, Hostage, and Zero Dark
Thirty.
Fiction: I am Half Sick of Shadows by C. Alan Bradley, Hero at
Large by Janet Evanovich, The Valley of Amazement by Amy
Tan.
For the kids: Whaling
Season by Peter Lourie,
Dork Diaries Tales From
a Not So Graceful Ice
Princess by Rachel Renee
Russell, and If You Take a
Mouse to the Movies by
Laura Joff Numeroff.
Come in and check out
these and many more new
and not so new books and
other materials for all ages
at APL.
The next Board of
Trustees meeting is
Tuesday, January 21st at
6pm in the library. All are
welcome.
See the library blog, www.ainsworthpubliclibrary.wordpress.
com or call the library at 433-5587 for details on any of these and
the many other activities offered at the Library.
Remember, the library is located at the intersection of Routes 14
& 64 in Williamstown.
Year-round library hours are: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday
& Friday: 2pm to 6pm (most Tuesdays to 7pm, call to check);
Wednesday: 9am to 6pm; and Saturday: 9am to 1pm.
Lee Lillys landscape photography show
is on display now at the Montpelier Senior
Activity Center. An example of Lees
work is pictured here. Taking pictures is a
lifelong passion for Lee Lilly, who began
doing photography when he was sixteen
years old. Lee began taking films with an
eight-millimeter movie camera of the scen-
ery around Vermont and wherever he travelled with his family.
Years later, a photography course got him seriously interested in
still photography. He began to take close-up photos of flowers
using slow speed film and a tripod to capture their color and fine
detail. The show will be hanging at MSAC until January 30th, so
come and see it while you can.
This Saturday, January 11th, the areas first Memory Caf will
take place at MSAC. The caf is designed to encourage interac-
tion, offer an enjoyable social experience, share information about
Alzheimers disease and related disorders, and provide an oppor-
tunity to interact with Caf volunteer staff in a safe, supportive,
and stress-free setting for people with early and mid-stage
Alzheimers and dementia and their caretakers. The first caf will
include introductions among the participants, refreshments, a per-
formance by singer/guitarist Eric Friedman, friendly volunteer-led
conversations in small groups, and a chance to tell us what youd
like to see and do at future Memory Cafs.
Dr. Bere Meisen started the first Memory Caf at Leiden
University in the Netherlands in 1997. The movement has since
spread throughout Europe and the United States. Jeanne Kern,
Family Caregiver Coordinator at Central Vermont Council on
Aging, says, Too often when we hear the word dementia we
focus on the losses an individual, a family, will experience. A
Memory Caf provides an opportunity to enjoy the now, this
moment. We dont stop being fully human; we still need to enjoy
the company of others, to sing, to dance to experience joy. The
Caf will meet monthly, from 10 to 11:30am and will be free and
open to the public. For more information, contact Lisbeth Dodd at
229-9630.
Montpelier Senior Activity Center
Ainsworth
Public Library
Williamstown
Winter Afternoon, Montpelier, Vermont, Acrylic on Canvas
Places & Faces on a Journey:
Works by Regis Cumming at the
Governors Gallery
The Governors Gallery has announced its first exhibition of
2014. Montpelier artist Regis Cummings show, Places & Faces
on a Journey, will be open to the public from January 6th to March
28th. The Governors Gallery is located on the 5th floor of the
Pavilion Office Building in Montpelier and is open Monday
through Friday from 8am to 4:30pm. The Gallery will be open for
the Montpelier Art Walk on Friday, February 7th until 7pm. A
public reception will be held on Wednesday, January 22nd from
3pm to 5pm. Photo identification is required for admittance, which
is free of charge.
Cummings has been practicing his art for more than 40 years.
He cites the French-Russian modernist Marc Chagall as one of his
major inspirations. Chagalls blending of the sacred in the ordi-
nary, and the sacredness in everyday life speaks to my understand-
ing and reflection on the meaning and purpose of religion, myth,
politics and art in our lives, explains the artist. Chagalls influ-
ence is obvious in Cummings work. Both artists employ a wide
variety of media and cannot easily be stylistically defined.
Cummings has lived in Montpelier since 1975. Over the past
four decades, he has played an active role in the community. A
deacon at St. Augustine Church, he has served his parishioners
devoutly and draws on his religious convictions as a source of
artistic inspiration.
We also have a great series coming up called How to Retire
(Without Going Broke). It will be held on five Wednesdays from
5:30-6:30, starting on January 15th. The challenges for those who
are retired or about to do so are significant. With no sales pitches
or product promotions, this class - led by David Carris, a financial
advisor with 19 years of experience helping people navigate retire-
ment - will take a look at how to create a sustainable income for
the rest of your life. Youll look at a variety of techniques, examine
recent academic thinking on the topic, touch on some of the risks
along the way, and wrap up with a look at how to put your plan
into action and manage it.
Finally, wed like to make you aware of a series on diabetes
prevention on Tuesdays from 5-6 pm beginning on January 21st at
MSAC. For more info, call 225-5680 or email Lisa.willette@
cvmc.org.

Thought for the Day:
Research is what Im doing
when I dont know what Im
doing. -- Wernher Von Braun
(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.
CENTRAL
VERMONT

OF BARRE
Our 31st Year ~ Over 4500 Children Served
Central Vermont Rotary Club &
The Salvation Army of Barre
2013 WORLD SANTA PROJECT
SPECIAL THANKS TO:
Vermont State Grange, Errol Briggs, Master
for Handmade Mittens, Gloves and Scarves
page 8 The WORLD January 8, 2014
Exercise Benefits The Brain, Too
Tips For Yoga Beginners
T
he news about D -- the sunshine vitamin
that loves your bones, nerves, muscles,
heart, blood sugar and may even help fight
cancer -- just got a little better right in time for
cold and flu season. In a headline-grabbing
report, Japanese researchers found that taking
1,200 IU of D-3 supplements daily can cut
your risk of catching influenza A by 50 per-
cent. And even though theres been recent
press about a French meta-study that casts
doubt on Ds disease-fighting ability, were
still devoted to vitamin D-3 -- from food, sun
and supplements. We think that study didnt
look at the results of serious deficiency -- and
its estimated that overall around 42 percent of
adults have D-3 levels below 20 ng/ml (in general, levels below 30
ng/ml are too low for bone health), while 82 percent of blacks and
70 percent of Hispanics are deficient. Theres plenty of solid
research showing the real benefits from vitamin D-3 -- which
wont harm you if taken at recommended doses. A daily dose of at
least 600 IU (800 IU if youre 71 or older), but no more than 4,000
IU, helps your body absorb and use more calcium (great for
bones), discourages cancers of the colon, breast and prostate, low-
ers your risk for autoimmune disorders such as Type 1 diabetes
and can assist with blood pressure control, too. Theres also grow-
ing evidence that having sufficient D-3 helps your cells absorb
blood sugar properly.
One reason were excited by the Japanese study of D-3s impact
on the flu is that it highlights how vitamin D-3 boosts immune
cells ability to spot and pick off invaders, such as viruses. But
D-3s no substitute for a flu vaccine. Go get one (its not too late!),
then do this:
Get your doc to check your D level. Levels below 20 ng/ml --
thats where almost half of all North Americans come in -- are
dangerously low, raising the risk for thinning bones and surgical
complications. We recommend aiming for 50-80 ng/ml. If your
levels are low, your doctor may prescribe a high-dose D-3 supple-
ment for a few months, then test your blood again.
Aim for 1,000 IU daily. Make sure your supplement is D-3, also
known as cholecalciferol. Its more stable
and does a better job of raising D blood lev-
els, and thats what counts. Its also smart to
reach for D-3-rich foods: fortified dairy
products (fat-free milk, low-fat cheese, low-
fat, no-sugar-added yogurt) have D-3; so do
fortified breakfast cereals and orange juice.
Salmons a rich natural source with a whop-
ping 447 IUs in a 3-ounce serving. But, it
would be tough getting enough every day
just from food.
Mix brands. After a recent analysis found
big variations in the actual amount of D-3 in
many supplements, Dr. Mike started taking
D-3 from more than one brand. Switching
back and forth on different days could help average out low or
high levels in supplements.
Take it with lunch or dinner. A study at the Cleveland Clinic,
home of Dr. Mikes Wellness Institute, says you can increase vita-
min D-3 absorption 50 percent by taking it with your biggest meal
of the day, since D-3 is fat-soluble.
Dont rely on the sun. Older people, those with darker skin and
anyone living in Canada and the northern half of the U.S. (where
the suns rays are weaker) just cant make enough D-3 from the
sun during the winter. If you live further south or just about any-
where during spring, summer and fall, expose your face, hands
and arms for 15 minutes to get a natural dose. (Skip this step if
youre at high risk for skin cancer.) Then apply a sunscreen with
an SPF of 30 that protects against UVA and B. A light-skinned
person in the Northeast can stimulate the release of around 20,000
IU of D-3 into the bloodstream with 15 minutes of sun exposure
on face, arms and legs, without sunscreen. Dark-skinned people
generate half or less of that amount.
* * *
Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of The Dr. Oz Show, and Mike Roizen,
M.D. is Chief Wellness Officer and Chair of Wellness Institute at
Cleveland Clinic. To live your healthiest, tune into The Dr. Oz
Show or visit www.sharecare.com.
(c) 2013 Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D.
Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
Vitamin D: Still Good For You
BY MICHAEL ROIZEN, M.D., AND MEHMET OZ, M.D.
The Basics Of Boosting Metabolism
M
en and women looking to shed a few pounds and keep those
pounds off often look for ways to boost their metabolisms.
Some may not know just what metabolism means, and though it is
a complicated combination of processes, metabolism is perhaps
best explained as the sum of those processes, each of which is
instituted to convert food into energy. So its no surprise that so
many people, especially men and women whose metabolisms have
begun to slow down, want to boost their metabolism and turn that
food into energy more quickly.
Though metabolism is a collection of complicated processes,
boosting metabolism can be rather easy. The following are a hand-
ful of ways to do so, which can help men and women reach their
fitness goals.
Eat the right foods and eat more often. Many adults have been
turned on to the concept of grazing, an approach to diet wherein
adherents eat small portions of food every two to three hours
instead of the more traditional three square meals per day. But
grazing is only effective when men and women eat the right foods.
Each small meal should still have nutritional value just as if it were
a large meal. When eating smaller meals, include healthy sources
of protein and fiber. Vegetables tend to be especially beneficial
because they are high in fiber, a nondigestible carbohydrate that is
hard for the body to break down. As the body works hard to break
down fiber, its burning energy and boosting its metabolism along
the way. Fish is another potentially beneficial food for those look-
ing to boost their metabolisms, as studies have shown that the
omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oils increase the levels of fat-
burning enzymes in the body while decreasing the bodys level
offat-storage enzymes.
Eating more often benefits the body because doing so stimulates
metabolism, reassuring the body that food will be coming on a
regular basis. When meals are skipped or there are long intervals
between meals, the body reacts as if it might run out of food and
begins to store fat.
Add some lean muscle. Lean muscle can boost metabolism, so
a workout dominated by cardiovascular exercise wont have as
positive an impact on metabolism as one that includes a combina-
tion of weight training and aerobic exercise. When muscles are
worked hard, the body needs to work hard to recover and rebuild
R
egular exercise can
benefit the body in
many ways, helping men
and women maintain
healthier weights and
lower their risks for
developing potentially
deadly diseases. Though
many people are quick
to associate exercise
with its physical bene-
fits, those hours spent on
the treadmill also can
boost brain power.
According to Dr.
Barry Gordon, professor
of neurology and cogni-
tive science at Johns
Hopkins Medical
Institutions and coauthor
of Intelligent Memory:
Improve the Memory
That Makes You
Smarter, exercise has a direct impact on the
brain. Thats because exercise works directly on
brain tissue, improving the connections between
nerve cells, creating new synapses, growing new
neurons and blood vessels, and improving cell
energy efficiency. So while many people may
begin an exercise regimen with a goal of trim-
ming their waistlines or toning their bodies, they
might be happy to know that those physical ben-
efits are accompanied by several cognitive ben-
efits as well.
As the American Psychological Association
acknowledges, the connection between exercise
and mental health is hard to ignore, and the APA
notes that the following are just a few of the
mental benefits men and women might reap from
regular exercise.
Improved mood
Many people feel great after exercising, espe-
cially if that exercise comes at the end of a par-
ticularly stressful day. However, those extra laps
on the track or those hours spent on the treadmill
dont just pay short-term dividends. In a con-
trolled trial overseen by Duke University
researcher and clinical psychologist James
Blumenthal, sedentary adults with major depres-
sive disorder were assigned into one of four
groups: supervised exercise, home-based exer-
cise, antidepressant therapy, or a placebo pill.
Those in the exercise and antidepressant groups
had higher rates of remission than those in the
placebo group, and Blumenthal concluded that
exercise was generally comparable to antidepres-
sants for men and women with major depressive
disorder. In addition, in following up with
patients a year later, Blumenthal found that those
who continued to exercise had lower depression
scores than those participants who were less
active.
Blumenthals study
was not the only one to
conclude that exercise
can have a positive
impact on mood. In a
review of 11 studies
that examined the
effects of exercise on
mental health, Boston
University professor of
psychology Michael
Otto and his colleagues
found that exercise
could be a powerful
tool when treating clin-
ical depression, and
even recommended cli-
nicians include exer-
cise as part of their
treatment plans for
depressed patients.
Antidote to anxiety
Some researchers, Otto included, have begun
to examine the effects of exercise on treating and
possibly preventing anxiety. The bodys nervous
system responds quickly when people feel fright-
ened or threatened, often causing the bodys
heart rate to increase and sweating and dizziness
to occur. Those people who are especially sensi-
tive to anxiety respond to these feelings with
fear, and that makes them more likely to develop
panic disorders. But Otto and fellow researcher
Jasper Smits of the Anxiety Research and
Treatment Program at Southern Methodist
University studied the effects that regular work-
outs might have on people prone to anxiety.
Since exercise produces many of the same
physical reactions, such as sweating and an ele-
vated heart rate, the body produces when
responding to fear or threats, Otto and Smits
wanted to determine if exercise might help peo-
ple prone to anxiety become less likely to panic
when experiencing fear or threats. In studying 60
participants withheightened sensitivity to anxi-
ety, Otto and Smits found that the subjects who
participated in a two-week exercise program
exhibited marked improvements in anxiety sen-
sitivity compared to those participants who did
not take part in the exercise program. Otto and
Smith concluded that this improvement was a
result of the exercise group participants learning
to associate the symptoms common to both fear
and exercise, such as sweating and an elevated
heart rate, with something positive (exercise)
instead of something negative (anxiety).
Regular exercise benefits the human body in
numerous ways, not the least of which is its
impact on the brain. More information on the
link between exercise and improved mental
health is available at www.apa.org.
T
hough it might once
have been considered a
trend, yoga has long since
moved on from trendy ter-
ritory to become a more
widely accepted discipline
that is practiced by millions
for its positive impact on
mental and physical health.
Though yoga is an ancient
practice, only recently has
it become so popular in the
western hemisphere, where
Sports Marketing Surveys
found that roughly 20 mil-
lion Americans over the
age of 18 practiced yoga in
2012. Thats a considerable
increase from just four
years earlier, when just
under 16 million Americans
admitted to practicing
yoga.
The growing popularity
of yoga likely comes as no surprise to its many
practitioners, who often credit yoga with reliev-
ing stress and improving overall fitness. In addi-
tion, yoga can also help alleviate chronic pain
and, according to the Mayo Clinic, reduce risk
factors for chronic conditions such as heart dis-
ease and high blood pressure.
While yoga is beneficial in many ways, its
important that men and women not mistake yoga
for medical treatment. Though yoga may be part
of an individuals treatment plan, its still neces-
sary that men and women with medical condi-
tions rely on their health care providers for treat-
ment. For example, doctors may recommend
yoga to individuals dealing with elevated stress
levels, but doctors also may want their patients
to take certain medications in order to lower
those stress levels. Yoga on its own may be
effective, but men and women should still seek
professional medical treatment when dealing
with health problems.
Its also important that men and women begin-
ning a yoga regimen not take it lightly. Though
the atmosphere in a typical yoga studio tends to
be serene, yoga is a physically demanding disci-
pline, and those unprepared to deal with such
demands often find themselves suffering from
injuries. According to the American Academy of
Orthopaedic Surgeons, injuries to the neck,
shoulders, spine, legs, and knees are possible
when practitioners of yoga do not exercise
proper technique and caution. So it pays for
beginners to heed the following warnings when
beginning a yoga regimen.
Work with a professional. No matter how
long your neighbor insists he or she has practiced
yoga, its still best that you learn the discipline
from a certified instructor. Your neighbor might
know all of the poses, but
an instructor with creden-
tials can help men and
women with preexisting
medical conditions avoid
poses that can exacerbate
such conditions. Novices
might not know that certain
poses can increase injury
risk for sufferers of osteo-
porosis, spinal problems
and high or low blood pres-
sure. When trying yoga for
the first time, always work
with a professional, making
sure to discuss any preex-
isting medical conditions
before your initial session.
Take things slowly. Its
reputation as a calming dis-
cipline often gives begin-
ners the mistaken impres-
sion that yoga is an easy
discipline to grasp.
However, its best for beginners to take things
slowly before attempting to perform difficult
stretches and poses. Yoga is not a competition, so
give yourself adequate time to learn proper
breathing techniques and figure out ways to
maintain your balance. Once you have mastered
such techniques, you can then begin to try your
hand at more advanced poses.
Warm up before each session. Men and
women should warm up before beginning any
exercise regimen, and yoga is no exception. Stiff,
cold muscles can lead to serious injury whether
youre playing basketball or stretching into a
yoga pose. Warm up your muscles with a few
minutes of light cardiovascular exercise before
beginning a yoga session to reduce your risk of
muscle tears or pain when you start stretching or
posing.
Dress appropriately. Flexibility is essential
when practicing yoga, so make sure your cloth-
ing is not restrictive. Women can buy pants made
specifically for yoga that stretch easily, making it
easier to perform various poses and stretches.
Men may also be able to find pants made spe-
cifically for yoga, but if not, athletic shorts or
track pants can work just as well.
Stop if you feel any physical problems. It is
not uncommon, especially for beginners, to
experience feelings of dizziness or feel as if your
body is becoming overheated during yoga. In
such instances, stop immediately, as yoga is sup-
posed to be a pain-free discipline. Ask the
instructor for help the moment you start to feel
faint, dizzy, overheated, or injured. Physical
problems during yoga may be a byproduct of
dehydration, so be sure to begin your session
fully hydrated and remain so throughout your
workout.
continued on page 15
n n n n n n
January 8, 2014 The WORLD page 9
Phone: 802-476-6882
Email: secondchancetogo@aol.com
Website: www.vermontpinecraft.com
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Locally Owned & Operated
For more than eighteen years now my humble column has
appeared, on a bi-weekly basis, in The WORLD, Central
Vermonts favorite newspaper. (Note: If you looked for the
column every other week, but started on the wrong week,
you missed it completely.) This book is a collection of many
of those writings, so you have another chance. The earliest
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By Tom Herzig
On November 10, while visiting relatives in Rutland, 14-year-
old Nathan Ettouzar of East Montpelier suffered an ischemic
stroke a blood clot interrupted his brains blood supply.
My daughter Sarah and I went into the Diamond Run Mall,
Nathans mother Teresa Ettouzar said. When we came back out
to the car, we found Nathan sweating heavily and crying. The right
side of his face was drooping and he had no feeling in his right arm
or leg.
Nathan was rushed to the Rutland Regional Medical Center.
Later that evening, he was transported to Dartmouth-Hitchcock
Medical Center. He was eventually brought to the stroke unit of
Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston. He returned home
December 8.
He has made good strides, his mother said, for which Im
very grateful. We saw children at Spaulding Rehab that were far
worse off than Nathan. It gives you perspective. Im thankful that
he knows who we are and is not experiencing the depression that
is so common among stroke survivors.
Teenage strokes, referred to as pediatric strokes, are estimated
to occur at the rate of six per 100,000 children. While high blood
pressure and hardening of the arteries are major causes of strokes
in adults, common risk factors for pediatric strokes include infec-
tions, abnormal blood clotting and cardiac disorders.
During his treatment, Nathan was found to have a heart condi-
tion known as patent foramen ovale, an opening in the heart often
present at birth. PFOs are not rare nor always problematic, but in
Nathans case, it has been determined that non-invasive heart sur-
gery is necessary. He is scheduled to undergo the procedure in
February.
Thirty neurologists met at Dartmouth-Hitchcock to evaluate
the results of Nathans MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and
MRA (magnetic resonance angiogram), Teresa Ettouzar said.
Its not known whether or not there was a direct connection
between Nathans heart condition and the stroke.
Two years ago, Nathan started to exhibit what was diagnosed
as Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), his mother said. ODD
children develop a persistent pattern of angry, disruptive behavior
that is treated with therapy and medication. Its possible the condi-
tion was an early symptom of physical distress in Nathans brain.
Its not clear what the connections, if any, were, Teresa said.
Nathan had also been suffering from migraines, but no blood
clotting around his brain had been detected. Since the stroke
though, Nathan has become a lovable teddy bear, a real sweet-
heart. Hes very happy to be home. He has started physical, speech
and occupational therapy five appointments a week! Hes doing
great, but he still needs constant supervision because he can only
focus on one thing at a time. He misjudges what hes capable of
and he has fallen several times.
Nathans blood clot is still present in his brain. He is on blood
thinners and is at risk for a recurrent stroke. Since the source of
the clot in his brain has never been determined there isnt any way
to predict whether or not it might occur again, Ettouzar pointed
out.
Teresa Ettouzar is a single, unemployed mom. Nathans hospi-
talization, medical treatments and rehabilitation costs are primar-
ily covered by Medicaid, but the family is being overtaken by
daily living expenses.
I dont have any respite care and I need to be with Nathan
constantly, she said. Sarah has medical issues of her own,
including severe chronic asthma. She is a brittle diabetic and
although shes willing and capable of watching over Nathan, I
cant put her in the position of being responsible for him for long
periods at a time.
I have received help from numerous people and Im very
grateful, Ettouzar said. Jason Reichert of U-32 set up a fundrais-
ing web site. Robin Copping and the East Montpelier Fire
Department, Janet and Steve Connor, Michelle and Matt Lavigne
and others have been very supportive. My last full-time job ended
in April. Im not eligible for unemployment. Were not going hun-
gry, but I have no income and Im behind on the mortgage.
The Ettouzars live in an East Montpelier ranch house they pur-
chased 10 years ago through the Vermont Land Trust and
Community National Bank.
Our house was built on top of an aquifer, Ettouzar said.
There has been a constant influx of water in the basement, which
has resulted in persistent problems with black mold. I think the
mold issue has contributed to both Nathans recurring illnesses
and Sarahs asthma. Eliminating the moisture and the mold, or at
least controlling it, is a top priority. I dont have the knowledge or
the resources to do it myself. The only other option is to move
somewhere, but then theres the problem of finding a place on
short notice, raising enough money to satisfy down payment or
damage deposit/rent requirements while trying to sell the house to
pay off the mortgage without it being condemned.
Ettouzar says making mortgage payments to forestall foreclo-
sure is a big hurdle. Other challenges are sustaining daily transpor-
tation and covering the electric bill. I have a 2000 Dodge Caravan
which is inspected and runs ok, but I have no snow tires (205-
70R15), she said. The internet and phone service has been shut
off. Im posting updates on the fund-raising web site and the East
Montpelier Front Porch Forum whenever Nathan is not too tired
for extra travel and I can get to the library.
If someone was available to assist me, show me how to explore
options through various agencies and organizations and the most
effective way to process, track and account for donations that
would make a big difference, Ettouzar said. Im also in need of
basic house repairs, especially sagging ceilings and the wet base-
ment.
Nathan Ettouzars fundraising web site address is http://www.
youcaring.com/HelpNathanHeal.
Teresa Ettouzar can be contacted directly 55 Pauls Square
East Montpelier 05601, via cell phone 802-279-5345 or email -
tlettou@yahoo.com.
Medical Calamity Has Family On The Brink
Sarah, Nathan and Teresa Ettouzar Sarah and Nathan Ettouzar





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Come check out our new look and shop for the holidays!
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your patronage.
Closed for Renovations
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page 10 The WORLD January 8, 2014
Tax Preparation
abacusvt.com 79 River Street, Suite 204
Montpelier, VT 05602 225-8907
Abacus Bookkeeping
& Tax Service
Denice K. Brown, EA
Accountant, Owner, Tax Specialist
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A Loud Cry for More Business
Editor:
The results of a recent Community Survey in Moretown
focussed on what residents liked and disliked about their town,
and if they are reflective of the rest of the state, they are a loud
wake-up call for Vermonts power structure.
Residents have shouted that something has to be done about
crippling taxes and that the best way to do that is more business
development.
The message runs counter to Vermonts anti-business attitude,
with the realization that Vermont as a state cannot continue to
depend on a tax base that consists chiefly of small farms and busi-
nesses, homes, and out-of-state tourists. The most significant
barometer of the continuing failure of that driving force is the
shrinking number of youngsters enrolled in our elementary and
high schools.
According to the annual Town Reports, in the past 10 years,
enrollment in the Moretown school has dropped about 18 percent,
significantly worse than the state average shrinkage of 10.5 per-
cent.
Why are these numbers so disturbing? A respondent to the sur-
vey perhaps answered correctly, citing the decline in younger
families moving here. The majority of the surveys respondents
reasoned that business development is the best way to restore
health to the town.
In Vermont, the priorities set forth by the state are to give gov-
ernment the power to protect the earth and care for the poor.
Promoting business is not included in that agenda. Without a
proper and balanced tax base, these are noble programs built with
troublesome consequences. Fear of growth will keep us poor,
wrote one Moretown respondent.
Vermonts policies are so firmly fixed in place they almost guar-
antee annual increases in poverty, dragging the middle class down
to a level where very few future generations of young people will
be able to go to college, buy a home or own a new car. They will
be paying off grandpas debts.
As pointed out by the non-partisan, independent news site,
vtdigger.org, yearly income in 2012 in Vermont was about $1,000
lower than in 2011.
Vermont is one of the most beautiful places to live on earth, a
fantastic place to raise children. Yet, because of a deficit in jobs,
young families are either leaving or declining to live here. These
conditions telegraph that perhaps it is time for legislators and other
elected officials to begin thinking about changing the face of the
tax and development structure in Vermont. Judging from the
Moretown survey, their taxpaying constituents are way ahead of
them.
John Hilferty, Chairman
Moretown Republican Committee
Thanks to Montpelier Public Works
Department
Editor:
In the late afternoon of January 2 as the temperature headed
below zero, a water pipe burst on Elm St. in Montpelier, flooding
the street and causing the city to turn off the water. My apartment,
along with many other homes, was affected.
Because the apparent water main break happened right in front
of my home, I had a birds eye view of the efforts of the Montpelier
Public Works Dept. as they jack-hammered their way through the
frozen street to find and repair the break. While many of the rest
of us were retreating from the frigid temperatures, these men were
in the full brunt of it trying to restore water service to this heavily
populated area. Within 12 hours of losing water service, they had
it restored!
My sincere thanks and appreciation to the men from the crew
last night. I dont know your names but Im very thankful for what
you did, especially under extremely difficult conditions.
Anne E. Buttimer
Montpelier
The Wolf of Wall Street

The stock market is way too complicated for you to deal


with. Just trust us with your life savings. Were professionals.
Sincerely, your money manager
The full service brokerage industry is an absolute scam.
They scare you into thinking that the stock market is an unruly
beast that you cant possibly con-
trol. And then they promise that
they have found a way to tame
that beast and use it to make you
rich with very little risk.
The truth is that nobody knows
for sure which stocks are going
to go up.
And if there really is a man
who can awlessly predict the
future of the market, he is prob-
ably sitting on a beach in the Cayman Islands right now, day-
trading on his Mac Book Pro with a beautiful 19-year-old on
each arm. Hes certainly not on the phone trying to get money
out of you.
I am not saying that you will do great as an investor. Im say-
ing that if you do some research, your guess will be as good as
theirs.
Plus, you have two advantages over a professional broker: you
genuinely care about your money and they dont. And you wont
charge yourself a fee to do the work and they will.
Under the best of circumstances, you are better off not paying
a money manager to manage your money.
So imagine how foolish it is under the worst of circumstanc-
es.
The Wolf of Wall Street tells the outrageous but true story
about a shameless salesman who made a fortune swindling
chumps out of their life savings.
It was the late 80s, and Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio)
began selling penny stocks by phone. Penny stocks are shares
of tiny, unprotable companies that he sold on 50% commis-
sion. What that means is: the poor investor put in $10,000 and
got $5,000 in worthless pieces of paper. And Jordan got $5,000
in cash. He was on the road to riches.
Along with his stock broker buddies, Jordan founded the
respectable-sounding rm Stratton
Oakmont so he could take his swin-
dling to a higher level.
In 1993, he pulled off his big-
gest scam: the Steve Madden IPO.
Steve Madden shoes was denitely
a legit company, but the way Strat-
ton Oakmont released the IPO was
not. Jordan had his crew of brokers
pressure clients to buy Steve Mad-
den stock at an inated price with-
out telling them that the rm actually owned most of the shares
and had bought them at a much lower price. It was immoral,
illegal, and immensely protable.
The Wolf of Wall Street is the uncensored story of real
guys who bilked retirees out of their nest eggs and partied like
rock stars with the loot.
The movie is half Goodfellas and half Animal House,
with more sex and drugs than I have ever seen before in an
American movie.
The Wolf of Wall Street never gets preachy. To his credit,
director Martin Scorsese doesnt demonize Jordan and buddies
or portray them as villains. They simply were villains.
And remember: villains like this exist in real life. And they
are after your money right now.
So dont trust them. Invest yourself!
Handmade Clocks
The Frugal Boutique, owned by Carol,
is a cute little store in Barre, Vermont
(across from Dollar General).
~ Lots of intriguing items ~
Now carrying handcrafted
carriage-style clocks. Will make special
clocks to order.
Please call Tom
the Clockmaker
for more details
about the clocks
at 498-7964
Justine Macris, RTRP, ERO
Phone: (802) 479-1040

Doing TAXES Right. No Joke.

taxmax.vt@gmail.com
January 8, 2014 The WORLD page 11
ALTERATIONS & REPAIRS
NEW LOCATION:
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(former NECI Building)
MONTPELIER
Mon.-Fri 10AM to 5PM,
Saturday By Appointment
229-2400
Patty Morse
Something Sew Right Something Sew Right
Buying gold, silver
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We will evaluate your estate jewelry, sterling
atware, tea sets and coin collections.
We will answer any question you have about
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is authentic or costume, we will test your gold,
platinum, silver and diamonds to nd out its purity
and if it's real. We base the value on the piece,
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platinum when you walk in the door.
John Kirby, Owner (802) 777-5550
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Owner John Kirby is a 1997 graduate of the American Numismatic Association,
Colorado Springs, for coin grading, certication and authentication.
Green Mountain
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Happy New Year!
B
oy, this last year went by in a fash
and I am assuming that this year
will, too. As I have told you before,
Malcolm and I have never gone out to cel-
ebrate the coming of the new year. I guess
we are just not a fun couple who enjoys
large crowds of people who are celebrating in a way that they will
fnd embarrassing the next morning! In fact, I am almost embar-
rassed to tell you that we seldom make it to midnight to watch the
ball drop. Now that we are old this doesnt seem so strange, but I
cant really remember a year when we did stay up, even when we
were younger. Oh, well. The new year comes whether we are up to
cheer its arrival or not. And hopefully this year will fnd all of us
even happier and healthier!
I was trying to think what the new year actually means to me and
all I can think of is that I am going to try and enjoy every single
day that is given to me. The older I get, the more I understand that
life is too short to waste it being a crab! And although it is diffcult
to think about or realize, you just never know when you will be
called home. Nobody likes to think about their own mortality,
but if you make it your resolve to enjoy yourself every day and be
thoughtful and kind to everyone, not just your loved ones, when
your time comes you will know that you had a wonderful life.
After I began to mature I never made another resolution for the
new year. And that was because I realized that I was always frus-
trated because I could never keep them. So, instead of resolving to
do something that was too hard or way out of my comfort zone,
I promised myself never to torture myself that way. Instead, I al-
ways think of the new year as a clean slate on which I can try and
do things that I will ultimately be proud of. And what I mean is
just try and be a good person every single day. Instead of trying to
think of good deeds, I just try and keep my slate as clean as pos-
sible and not do anything that I ashamed of when I look back. As I
think about it, maybe this is my best resolution of all. And what a
relief not to have to worry about resolving to diet, exercise more,
keep my house cleaner, etc. etc. Because regardless of how hard I
tried, I always broke those self-serving resolutions almost as soon
as the sun came up!
My advice for myself and for you is just about the same. Try and
treat everyone that you come in contact with, with patience and
kindness, or the same way you would like to be treated. Nothing
makes better interactions than being pleasant. Think about it, how
many times in the past few days has someone been very nice and
kind to you? Even if it was just opening a door for you or picking
up something for you that you have dropped. Small examples, I
know, but if you take that and pay that kindness forward, you will
be surprised at how well that works. Think about it, what is a bet-
ter way to begin the new year than having kindness and niceness
spread throughout your family, town, and eventually your state and
then the world! Can you just imagine a world flled with kindness?
Boggles the mind, right?
Well, in this new year, kindness can start with you and I assure
you that it will spread. So, take a deep breath and put aside all
those negative thoughts that are lurking in your mind and replace
them with small acts of kindness. And then sit back and watch
them spread!
From me to you and from our house to yours, may you all have a
very Happy New Year. And may this happiness last throughout this
new year. And remember you have a clean slate so dont scribble
all over it!
Fondly, Judy Reiss.
The following are important issues that
must be faced by the 2014 Legislature:
1. Jobs and the Economy
2. Budget
3. Substance Abuse
Jobs and the Economy
Vermont continues to have a low unemployment rate at 4.6%.
Vermont is the 6th lowest nationally and lower than any other New
England state.
This year the legislature will attempt to strengthen those in tech-
nical felds to be successful in starting Vermont businesses. We
have to offer young people training needed in software, informa-
tion technology and health care and other jobs that will be cre-
ated in the future. The legislature must work to achieve a balance
between higher education system and our K-12 system. We have
to teach young people to be critical thinkers and provide specifc
training for employment opportunities.
The Budget
The budget is the key issue that has to be dealt with this year.
Over the past fve years, Vermont has been increasingly reliant on
federal funds which puts us at a risk for federal fund reductions.
This last year the federal government provided for mandatory se-
questration with across the board reductions unless other reduc-
tions are negotiated. The areas that consume the largest resources
are Medicaid at 28% and education at 32%. The estimated general
fund budget gap is projected at $72 million, which is the result of
the use of one-time funds in previous years and decreasing federal
participation in the Medicare program. Areas that will require ad-
ditional funds are corrections, current use and state police.
A new trend in state government is called results-based bud-
geting. Under this system, different areas of government evaluate
their programs by asking questions about the effectiveness of the
program and how they beneft people. The results based budgeting
is the way to bend the curve of rising costs. In the future more
states will move in this direction.
Substance Abuse
The use of opiates and heroin is a major public health challenge
in Vermont. Reducing the prevalence of those at the risk of sub-
stance abuse or mental illness is a legislative goal. Vermont was
the highest in the nation for illicit drug use in 2010 and 2011. Over
$27 million is spent through the states Medicare program for sub-
stance abuse annually and $6 million is specifcally for outpatient
treatment. People being treated also have substance abuse, medical
and health conditions.
Senator Bill Doyle serves on the Senate Education Committee
and Senate Economic Affairs Committee, and is the Senate Assistant
Minority Leader. He teaches government history at Johnson State
College. He can be reached at 186 Murray Road, Montpelier, VT
05602; e-mail wdoyle@leg.state.vt.us; or call 223-2851.
Reisss Pieces
By Judy Reiss
Senate Report:
Issues Relating to the 2014 Legislature
by Senator Bill Doyle
n n n
n n n
n n n
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Teach and model healthy behaviors
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For more information about becoming a mentor:
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Or contact Wendy Freundlich at 229-4798
M
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See participating merchants list at: www.ShopCentralVt.com
Subscribe online at: www.ShopCentralVermont.com
Delicate Decadence
Lennys Show & Apparel
M&M Beverage
Next Chapter Bookstore
R&L Archery
Ts Pantry
A Quilters Garden
Bagitos
Global Gifts
Incognito Salon
The Book Garden
The Knitting Studio
Chilas Salon
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Next Chapter Bookstore
R&L Archery
Ts Pantry
A Quilters Garden
Bagitos
Global Gifts
Incognito Salon
The Book Garden
The Knitting Studio
Chilas Salon
The Tiny Acorn
page 12 The WORLD January 8, 2014
MITCHELL, STEPHEN O., 83, of Duxbury, passed
away at Central Vermont Medical Center on December 25. Born
in Muncie, Indiana, on May 11, 1930, he was the son of the late
Omer and Euva Mitchell. Stephen grew up in Muncie and contin-
ued his education at Purdue University, later received his master's
degree from the University of Michigan and then his Ph.D. from
the University of Indiana. He served his country during the Korean
War as a commissioned officer with the U.S. Army. Stephen had a
fulfilling career in higher education administration, most recently
at Central Connecticut State University. Retiring in 1995, he and
his wife, Caroline, had made their home in Duxbury. His many
hobbies included gardening, model garden railroading, wood-
working, creating stained glass and reading. Stephen is survived
by his wife of 43 years, Caroline Mitchell of Duxbury; his five
children and their families that include five grandchildren, Stephen
T. Mitchell of Midland, Tex., Leslie Mitchell of Altadena, Calif.,
Judy Mitchell of Gloucester, Mass., Daisy Mitchell of Minneapolis,
Minn., and Jesse Mitchell of Denver, Colo.; two brothers, Joseph
Mitchell of Everett, Wash., John Mitchell of Cape May, N.J.; as
well as nieces, nephews and extended family.
BOUCHARD, REBA ANNA RAYMOND, 89, of
Stowe and recently of Berlin Health and Rehabilitation
Center, passed away on December 28. Born on June
6, 1924, in Underhill, she was the daughter of the
late Ruby and Delia (Garrett) Raymond. Reba was
the middle child of five children. She attended gram-
mar school in Waterbury Center and Waterbury High
School. On August 3, 1946, she married Stewart P. Bouchard Sr.
of Stowe. Together, they had three children. Reba worked at the
Fork and Spoon Co. in Stowe, taught Sunday school at Stowe
Community Church, and later was a cashier for the new Grand
Union in Stowe. She and her family traveled extensively through-
out the United States in their Volkswagen camper pop-up travel
trailer and later, in their motor home. Together, they traveled to all
50 states. She is survived by her husband and caregiver, Stewart P.
Bouchard Sr. of Stowe; her son, Stewart P. Bouchard Jr. and wife,
Priscilla of Stowe; her son, Jody Bouchard of Waterbury; three
grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Also surviving is her
sister, Irene Raymond Eastman of Moretown. Reba was prede-
ceased by her son, Keven J. Bouchard; two brothers, Henry and
Phillip Raymond; and a sister, Shirley Raymond Durett. Reba
loved spending time with her family, watching her grandchildren
play sports, bowling, raising ducks, geese, and goats, and tending
her flower gardens. She enjoyed spending time outdoors.
MOULTON, LOIS VIRGINIA WHITMORE, 95,
died December 25, at Lincoln House in Barre. She
was born on July 6, 1918, to Charles F. and Sara
(Steans) Whitmore in Upper Montvale, N.J., but
grew up in Mifflinburg and Lewisburg, Penn., and
graduated from Lewisburg High School in 1935. She attended
Maryville College in Tennessee and then the University of
Pennsylvania School of Nursing, graduating in 1941 as a regis-
tered nurse. She married William Monroe Moulton on March 27,
1943. During their married life, they lived in six states and several
countries, including Mexico, Turkey and Lebanon. They divorced
in 1967. In 1966, she moved to Brattleboro, where she remained
until recent years. While in Brattleboro, she returned to nursing
and worked for about 20 years at the Brattleboro Memorial
Hospital and the Brattleboro Retreat. Starting in the 1930s, she
continued a lifelong love of listening to the Metropolitan Opera
Saturday afternoon live broadcasts. She also pursued a late-bloom-
ing interest in photography and was active in the Brattleboro
Camera Club for several decades. Some of her photos were pub-
lished by Vermont Life. She leaves behind five children: William
Moulton and wife, Kathie, in Plainfield; Lawrence Moulton and
wife, Margaret, in Lopez Island, Wash., and their two sons; Robert
Moulton and wife, Rebecca, in Ashuelot, N.H.; Allen Moulton and
wife, Marcie, in Johnson, and his ex-wife, Carla Van Hoy, and son;
and Sara Moulton and husband, David Tanner, in Montpelier.
CHAMBERS, BURTON E., 95, of
Williamstown, passed away on December 31, at
Central Vermont Medical Center. Born in Berkshire,
Vt., on Feb. 4, 1918, he was the son of the late Elwin
and Mabel (Benway) Chambers. Burton attended
school in Berkshire. After his schooling, he enlisted
in the Conservation Corps and later served in the U.S. Army dur-
ing World War II in the South Pacific, from June of 1941 to June
of 1945. After the service, he returned home to help his father on
the family farm in Elmore. On April 12, 1946, he married Mary
Newcomb in St. Johnsbury, and in 1954 came to Morristown,
where he and his wife owned and operated a farm until 1971,
when he sold the farm and moved to Williamstown, where they
owned and operated a farm until 1978, when he retired. Burton
had a passion for maple sugaring and enjoyed fishing, bowling and
scenic drives on Vermont back roads, especially during fall foli-
age. Survivors include his wife of 67 years of marriage, Mary
Chambers, of Williamstown; three children, Duane Chambers and
wife, Linda, of Brookfield, Sharlene Pratt and husband, Leslie, of
Cape Coral, Fla., and Elwin Chambers, of Warren. He is also sur-
vived by five grandchildren; as well as eight great-grandchildren;
and many nieces and nephews. Besides his parents, he was prede-
ceased by two brothers and two sisters.
FREEMAN, WILBUR LOUIS, 88, of
Berlin, died on December 26, at his home, sur-
rounded by his loving family. He was born on Feb.
15, 1925, in Montpelier, the son of Donald and
Eleanor (Currier) Freeman. While attending St.
Michael's High School in 1944, Wilbur enlisted in
the U.S. Army and served with the 142nd Infantry Regiment and
was subsequently awarded the Purple Heart for wounds received
during combat action in southern France. He was honorably dis-
charged on May 30, 1945. He was employed by the Barre-
Montpelier Railroad from 1945, working in a number of positions,
until his retirement in 1983. After his retirement from full-time
employment, he worked as a part-time delivery driver for Bond
Auto Parts, Fisher and S&L Auto Parts. On June 26, 1948, he mar-
ried Dorothy Farnham at St. Augustine Church. Survivors include
his wife of 65 years, Dot Freeman, of Berlin; one son, Robert
Freeman, and wife Teresa, of Barre; three daughters, Susan and
husband Greg Boyd, of Northfield, Carol and husband Terry
Edwards, of Roxbury, and Jayne and husband Richard Hall, of
Barre; a sister, Genevieve Potter, of White River Junction; eight
grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren; several nieces and
nephews. He was predeceased by a sister, Katherine "Kitty"
Collins, and his twin brother, William Freeman. He enjoyed camp-
ing with his family, playing cribbage, and his beloved New York
Yankees. He was always eager to spend time with his grandchil-
dren and great-grandchildren. In later years after he no longer was
able to drive, he enjoyed riding around the Vermont countryside
with his family. Mr. Freeman was a member of St. Augustine
Church and the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 792.
WILLIAMS, ARTHUR, 87, of Fayston, died
December 28, at Copley Woodlands in Stowe, sur-
rounded by his family and caregiver. He was a long-
time civic leader, polo enthusiast, skier, sailor, and
devoted father, brother and friend. Arthur was born
July 3, 1926, in Bath, Maine, the son of John
Winslow Williams and Emma Kaiulani Sewall. His
childhood years were spent at the family's summer home in Small
Point, Maine, and their primary residence in Baltimore, Md.,
where he attended Gilman School. Arthur graduated from the
Clark School in Hanover, N.H., in 1946, and received his bache-
lor's degree in English and American history from Bowdoin
College in 1951. He joined the American Field Service during
World War II, where he served as an ambulance driver for the
French Army. After teaching for a few years at private schools in
Connecticut and New York, Arthur and his wife, Hanne, moved to
the Mad River Valley in 1958 and taught together in one-room
schoolhouses in Moretown and Fayston. Arthur was one of the
original investors in Sugarbush Resort. He served three two-year
terms as town representative from Fayston and then was appointed
chairman of historic sites and the first executive director of the
state Council on the Arts. He retired from the arts council in 1986
and stayed on as curator of the Vermont State House to oversee the
State House restoration project. He later founded the Friends of
the Vermont State House to support the ongoing financial needs of
the restoration project. Arthur was also the original founder of The
Community Fund, which was set up to meet the needs of Mad
River Valley residents. Arthur was an avid polo player. He and a
group of longtime friends founded the first professional polo
league in the Mad River Valley, and he played in tournaments
throughout New England and in Canada. He always loved an
adventure, whether exploring the Maine coast in a favorite boat,
skiing at Sugarbush or playing in a polo game. Later in life, he
discovered a love for painting and completed dozens of oil paint-
ings of maritime scenes. He also loved to write and recently com-
pleted his memoir. Being active and enjoying the outdoors were
always priorities in his life, along with a deep devotion to his fam-
ily and friends. He was well-loved for his sense of humor and car-
ing, sensitive nature. As his health began to fail over the past year,
Arthur greatly appreciated the phone calls and visits from his many
friends in the Mad River Valley and the State House. He often said
that his friends and family were what made life worth living.
Survivors include his sister, Anne Winter; sister-in-law, Ann
Williams; his children, Astrid, John and Nate; four grandchildren;
and many nieces and nephews. His wife of 55 years, Hanne Nielsen
Williams, and his two brothers, Jack and Sewall, died earlier. A
celebration of his life will be held Jan. 18, 2014, at the Round Barn
Farm in Waitsfield at 4pm, with a reception to follow.
MATTSON, ENES PELLEGRINI, 92, passed
away on December 27, at Woodridge Nursing Home
in Berlin. She was born on March 6, 1921, in
Montpelier, to John and Louisa (Adami) Pellegrini.
Enes grew up in Montpelier, attended schools there,
and graduated from Montpelier High School in
1939. In the late 1940s, she worked for the American
Fidelity Insurance Co., Montpelier, where she met and then mar-
ried Carl Mattson on May 27, 1950. Enes and Carl resided their
entire married lives in Barre, where they raised their two children.
After Carl's passing in 2000, she returned to live in Montpelier at
the Westview Meadows Retirement Community, and then for the
past several years at The Gardens in Williamstown. Enes was a
great mother and wonderful friend to many. She had a feisty spirit
and a good sense of humor. She loved music and had a lovely sing-
ing voice. She enjoyed being a part of the Westview Meadows
Chorus. She was an excellent cook, loved good food, reading and
doing various types of needlework. She is survived by her daugh-
ter, Janis Mattson, and her longtime partner, Douglas Aja, of East
Montpelier; her brother, Dino Pellegrini of Berlin; nieces, neph-
ews, close cousins; friends she considered her extended family;
and her cat, Cleo. She was predeceased by her husband, Carl, and
son Jeffrey.
MORSE, GRACE ELIZABETH "BETTE," 79,
of Waterbury, passed away in the comfort of her
family at Central Vermont Medical Center, on
December 28. Born on Verona Island, Maine, on
May 12, 1934, she was the daughter of the late
William F. and Mary F. (Eaton) White. On Dec. 28,
1985, she married Leslie M. "Skipper" Morse in
Bucksport, Maine. Bette graduated from high school in 1952 and
then went on to work as a waitress at the Jed Prouty Tavern in
Maine and then later at Camp Meade in Middlesex. All who met
her admired her love for people. Bette's true passion in life was the
love of her family. The closeness of family was seen and felt by
anyone who knew her. Throughout the years, Bette enjoyed teach-
ing Sunday school, bowling, ceramics, playing cards with family
and friends, Sudoku and word search puzzles. The time and events
with friends at the Waterbury Area Senior Citizens center would
always bring a smile to her face. Her cards and letters sent to
many, never forgetting anyone, was a gift treasured by those who
received them. She savored the years as a snowbird traveling to
Florida for the winter, spending time with family and making
lifelong friends. Bette is survived by her husband of 28 years,
Skipper Morse of Waterbury; her children, William Walters and
wife Cheryl of Bucksport, Maine, Herbert Walters of Bucksport,
Maine, Mary Taylor and husband Jim of Carterville, Ill., Anita
Kirkland of Crestview, Fla., Melinda Sargent and husband Gary of
West Bend, Wis., Steven Morse and wife Esta of Springfield,
Stanley Morse and his companion Patricia Senzel of South
Burlington, Mark Morse of Ascutney, and Michael Morse of
Chester; 20 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; two sisters,
Doris Grant of Warren, Maine, and Mary Beth Dumont and hus-
band Mike of China, Maine; her brother, Frank White of
Claremont, Calif.; her special cousin, Myrtle Pendleton of Orland,
Maine; as well as nieces, nephews and extended family. Bette was
predeceased by two sons, Daniel and David Walters.
NORWOOD, ELINOR M. "ELLIE," 85, of
Montpelier and Craigville, Mass., passed away gen-
tly December 31, at Woodridge Nursing Home due
to complications following a recent stroke. Born
Aug. 20, 1928, in Worcester, Mass., she was the
daughter of John and Etheldred (Wilmott) McKinley.
She spent her formative years in Worcester, Mass.
and graduated from North High School in 1946 and then attended
Mount Holyoke College, from which she matriculated in 1950
with her bachelor's degree in English literature. Ellie was an
accomplished flutist and chorale member during these years and
continued to stay active with Mount Holyoke as an alumna. Ellie
pursued a career in editing in New York City from 1950 through
1960 working for Morehouse and Barlow publishing. She spent
time attending Broadway shows, traveling and enjoying much
time with good friends, friendships she maintained throughout the
rest of her life. On Oct. 1, 1960, Ellie married Granger W.
Norwood in New York City. The Norwoods made their home first
in Conway, Mass., then settled in Worcester, Mass., to be close to
family. Elinor was a stay-at-home mother and a substitute teacher
before she and her husband fulfilled their dream of purchasing the
Walberg & Auge Music Co. in Auburn, Mass. They lovingly oper-
ated this business for many years, providing musical rentals and
repairs to students and professionals alike. They relocated the
store to Worcester, Mass. and eventually changed its name to
Norwood Music. They were extremely active members of the All
Saints Episcopal Church. Ellie was the first woman to be elected
to the church vestry. After many years in Worcester, they were able
to retire to their beloved cottage on Cape Cod, where Ellie sum-
mered with the children before making it her permanent home, and
graciously hosted many family and friends through the years. She
continued to occupy her caring and active mind with philanthrop-
ic endeavors such as the Alzheimer's Association of Cape Cod,
elder care for many in her area, as well as donating much of her
time to the Centerville Library. She loved the ocean and her beauti-
ful cottage and felt fortunate to have been able to spend so many
continued on next page
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January 8, 2014 The WORLD page 13
years in this beautiful place. Ellie consumed multiple books and
newspapers each week, including completing the daily New York
Times crossword puzzle in pen. She enjoyed a wide variety of
literary genres, her favorite stories being mysteries and romances.
She was always up on the current news and loved a strong debate;
her quick wit and strong will were a tough match. She was pre-
ceded in death by her parents and her husband, Granger. She is
survived by her brother and his wife, John and Bea McKinley, of
Kensington Md.; her children, Nancy and Ray Daigle, of Moretown,
Deborah N. Ruane, of San Diego, Calif., Guy and Diane Norwood,
of East Barre, and Jennifer M. Norwood, of West Chatham, Mass.
She also loved her seven grandchildren. She also leaves behind her
sister-in-law and her husband, Nancy and Norman Vester, of St.
Albans, and six beloved nieces and nephews.
WESTOVER, HARLAND D.E. SR., 87,
of Moretown, passed away at Berlin Health and
Rehabilitation Center on December 26, following
several months of declining health. Born in Richford
on March 8, 1926, he was the son of the late Charles
and Anna (Martin) Westover. On Feb. 9, 1948, he
married the former Theresa M. Corriveau in Waterbury. Theresa
predeceased Harland on Jan. 5, 2010. Harland grew up in
Rochester and went on to serve his country during World War II
with the U.S. Navy. Following his discharge from the service,
Harland worked for 35 years as a crusher operator for the Eastern
Magnesia Talc Co. in Moretown and then retired from Huntington
Homes, where he had been employed for five years as a painter.
Harland's memberships included the Harry N. Cutting American
Legion Post 59 and the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 10034, both
of Waterbury. Harland's family lovingly remembers him for his
lifelong dedication to the Red Sox, his love of fishing, and the
absolute joy he felt cutting wood; truly, nothing made him happier.
Harland is loved and mourned by his son, Harland D. Westover Jr.,
and his longtime companion, Penny Chartier, of Middlesex; two
grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; his sisters-in-law, Lillian
Sherman and husband, Robert, of Moretown, and Rita Abair, of
Essex Junction; as well as nieces, nephews and extended family.
Harland was predeceased by six sisters, Mabel Houghton, Alice
Gavin, Doris Bowen, Theresa Bruce, Genevieve Deyette, Hazel
Collins, and two brothers, Lawrence Westover Sr. and Edmond
Westover.
BOWEN, RUTH LEACH, 87, of Northfield, died
December 26, at Gifford Medical Center in
Randolph. She was born in Plainfield Jan. 4, 1926,
the daughter of Walter and Bessie (Wild) Leach. She
graduated from Spaulding High School in 1944. She
had been married to George Bowen. Ruth had
worked for the auditor of accounts for the state of
Vermont as a payroll clerk for many years, the Rock of Ages
capacitor plant, Reynolds and Son in South Barre, and later for
Goddard College. Ruth enjoyed collecting porcelain dolls, cook-
ing, doing craft work and was an accomplished artist and painter.
Ruth's paintings had been displayed in many art exhibits and gal-
leries in central Vermont. She is survived by two children, Marcia
Bowen Guidera, of Northfield, and Debbie Bowen Duggan
(Richard), of Anderson, S.C.; two brothers, Rodney Leach
(Barbara), of Barre, and Roderick Leach, of Plainfield; one grand-
daughter; two great-grandchildren; and several nieces and neph-
ews. She is predeceased by two siblings, Rachel White and Robert
Leach; one grandson, Jason Wright; and a sister-in-law, Joan
Leach.
WHITE, BERNICE SARAH, 98, a lifelong resi-
dent of Waterbury Center, passed away in the com-
fort of her family on December 30. Born in Little
River in Waterbury on Aug. 3, 1915, she was the
daughter of the late Bert E. and Phebe M. (Dalley)
Downing. Bernice was previously married to Ermont
Lawrence. On July 6, 1936, she married Gordon H.
White in Woodsville, N.H. Gordon predeceased Bernice on July 1,
1987. Bernice started school at Little River in Waterbury. After her
parents sold their farm due to the construction of the flood control
dam and purchased the Marble Farm in Duxbury, she attended the
Red School on Duxbury Hill. She later attended Waterbury High
School. Her father died suddenly while she was in high school so
she left her studies to help save the family farm. Following her
marriage, Bernice was not only busy and happy as a homemaker
and raising her family, she also worked as a housekeeper for many
Waterbury area families. She later was employed at the Colby
Nursing Home in Waterbury, later worked for Lloyd and Guila
Squier as a housekeeper, as well as for Squier Maple Products, and
then retired in 1978 from Ladd Hall at the Vermont State Hospital.
Bernice was a member of the Waterbury Center Community
Church and Ladies Aide, the Waterbury Area Senior Citizens,
Waterbury Grange #237, the 88 Card Club, the Waterbury
Ambulance Service, the Waterbury Historical Society and Emerald
Rebekah Lodge #33. In her leisure time, she enjoyed gardening
and tending to her plants and flowers. Bernice is mourned and
loved by her children, Mary White of Montpelier, Margaret
Corriveau and husband, Earl, of New Smyrna, Fla., Theresa King
and husband, James, of Waterbury, Gloria Mayo of Montpelier,
Richard White and wife, Anne, of Waterbury Center, Berton White
and wife, Patricia, of Ascutney, David White and wife, Jane, of
Barre; 19 grandchildren, 33 great-grandchildren and 12 great-
great-grandchildren; as well as nieces, nephews and extended
family. Bernice was predeceased by her daughter, Ermona Austin;
her sister, Blanche DeCelle; and a nephew, Robert DeCelle.
DEFORGE, FAITH E. "JUDY" MORROW, 88,
of North Barre Manor, passed away peacefully, after
a short illness, on December 29, at Central Vermont
Medical Center. Born on Feb. 21, 1925, in Bolton,
she was the daughter of Ernest and Lena (May)
Morrow. On Aug. 7, 1943, Judy married Warren
Francis DeForge in Dodge City, Kan. After the end of World War
II, they moved back to Vermont, where she lived until her passing.
He died on Nov. 27, 1956. Judy is survived by her six children,
Sandra McGrath (Frank), of Kentucky, David DeForge (Eileen),
of Tennessee, Wanda Cotnoir, of Vermont, Patsy Quimby (Robert),
of New York, Steven DeForge, of Maine, and Virginia Mears
(Maurice), of Tennessee; 14 grandchildren, 21 great-grandchildren
and one great-great-grandson; a brother, Robert Pecor (Joanne), of
Vermont; and a sister, Barbara Pritchard, of Vermont. Besides her
parents and her husband, two grandsons predeceased her. Judy
was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 790 Auxiliary
of Barre for nearly 50 years. Her passion was crocheting, espe-
cially her crocheted doll collection. She also enjoyed bingo, play-
ing cards, jigsaw puzzles and watching golf on television. She
loved her family and getting together with them.
continued from previous page

Annual Kris Kemp Alumni Hockey Game Results
Mens Blue Team. Front Row (l to r): Jason Fielder, Kyle Elliott, Stu Laperle, Steve Gonyaw, Corey Johnson,
Kenny Bresette, Jake Ricker, Matt Murray, Mike Bresette. Back Row (l to r): Jake Miller, Justin Kelty, Craig
Frazier, Peter Koval, Chris Butsch, Brock Allen, Issac Beaupre, Chris Kane, Pat Butsch, Kyle Ferguson, Jason
Merrill.
21st Annual Mens Game
Blue Team wins 9 to 8
Mens White Team. Front Row (l to r): Tyson Leno, Travis Pierce, Keith Jones, Jamie Laquerre, Ronnie Mercier,
Cooper Hatch, Jordan Blais, Shane Smith. Back Row (l to r): Joey Nailor, Derek Pryce, Cole Mugford, Spencer
Pryce, Mike Moran, Dylan Fongeallaz, Peter Turley, Mike Goss, Colvin Rice, Forrest Smith.
5th Annual Womens Game
Purple team wins 6 to 2
Womens Pink Team. Front Row (l to r): Alicia Danyew, Jessie Gay, Alyssa Turley, Molly Estabrook. Kellie
Whitcomb, Brittney Clark. Back Row (l to r): Meg Ryan, Sid Champigne, Faith Dudley, Lauren Shepheard, Katie
Murray, Natalie Lavigne, Stacey Woolaver.
Womens Purple Team. Front Row (l to r): Rachel Ebersole, Mary Cain, Jyneva Pickel, Emily Aylward, Katie
Kreis. Back Row (l to r): Erika Gonyaw, Emilie George, Nell Peterson, Ally Kane, Gabby Coletti, Esther
Peterson.
The game is held annually in memory
of Kris Kemp, an alumnus of U-32.
The proceeds of this game benefit the
Kris Kemp Scholarship Fund which
is awarded annually at U-32.
page 14 The WORLD January 8, 2014
Domey-Kreis
Mr. and Mrs. John Domey of Plainfield are pleased to announce
the engagement and forthcoming wedding of their daughter,
Megan Angel Domey, to Ryan Benjamin Kreis. Ryan is the son of
Bradley Kreis of Barre and Kristin and Larry Gilbert of
Woodbury.
The bride-to-be is a graduate of Twinfield Union School and the
University of Vermont. Ms. Domey is currently a registered nurse
at Fletcher Allen Health Care on the Cardiothoracic Unit
in Burlington. The groom-to-be is a graduate of Hazen Union School
and is working as an electrical apprentice for Gould Electric out of
Stowe. Mr. Kreis is also a volunteer firefighter for Barre Town.
The couple resides in Plainfield.
A wedding is planned for August 2014.
Happy 80
th
Birthday
CARD
SHOWER
JANUARY 9
Joyce Fowler
P.O. Box 104
Plaineld
VT 05667
2 x 6.1315
BOTANICA FLORALS
HAPPY ANNIVERSARY
Mail this coupon to: The WORLD
c/o Happy Anniversary
403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641
Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week.
Plus, we will draw one (1) couple each week for a Gift Certificate from Botanica
Florals. No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior
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of fresh owers from Botanica Florals
in Montpelier. No obligation, nothing to
buy. Just send anniversary names two
(2) weeks prior to anniversary date, to
The WORLD, c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY,
403 U.S.Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641.
Please provide name, address & phone
number for prize notication.
Happy
Anniversary
10 St at e St reet
Mont pel i er
802-229-9885
www. bot ani caf l or al svt . com
f l ower s@bot ani caf l or al svt . com
Please Send Us Your January & February
Anniversaries & Be Automatically Registered
To Win A Gift Certificate from Botanica
LUCKY WINNING COUPLE FOR THIS WEEK:
On JANUARY 1, PAUL & KATHY GAGNE
of RANDOLPH Will Celebrate 20 Years of Marriage
DECEMBER 15
Heidi & Demetericius Campbell, 12 yrs, Websterville
DECEMBER 31
Stephen & Beth Cody, 14 yrs, Barre
Dont forget...
1-14 Brandon McLeon, 22,
Hardwick
1-15 Peggy Zurla, 50, Mayaez,
Puerto Rico
1-15 Shawn Kasulka, E.Mplr
1-19 Kevn Sare, 32, Cabot
(no I)
1-31 Wayne Michaud, 66,
Bristol
2-1 Nancy Prescott, Barre
2-6 Bob Edwards, 71
2-8 Warren Lanigan
2-12 Joe Richardson ,
Moretown
2-13 Sandy Salvas, Barre
2-14 Laura Rappold, East
Montpelier
2-19 Kevin Lawson, 45, W.
Topsham
3-5 Rebecca Lefcourt, 34
3-16 Chubb Harrington, Barre
3-16 Roxie D. Gonet, 7,
Chelsea
3-17 Pat Wieja, Baltimore, MD
3-22 Nicholas Salvas, 21,
Barre
3-25 Zarek Michael Gonet, 6,
Charlestown, NH
4-1 Adam Lefcourt, 34
4-12 Daisy, 11
4-12 Meredith Page, 58,
Croyden, NH
4-20 Jessie Phillips, 22, E.
Mplr.
4-30 Lillian Kasulka, 4, E.
Montpelier
4-30 Darlene Callahan, 52,
Barre
5-4 Katie Hodgdon, 6,
Waterbury
5-6 Gary Villa, Washington
5-6 Jim Elliott, 47, Barre
5-13 Kristen Lee Evans, 26,
Mentor, OH
5-14 John, Chelsea
5-20 Bill Boyce, Chelsea
5-20 Mary Lefcourt, Burlington
5-22 Ruth Madigan P., Bethel
5-27 Candy McLeon
6-3 Lil Joey, Wby Ctr, 35
6-5 Rob Salvas, 52, Barre
6-6 Heather Holmes, 46,
Woodbury
7-7 Marti Elliott, Barre
7-9 Pierce Salvas, 29, Barre
7-11 Joslyn Richardson, 26,
Waterbury, VT
7-11 Marcus Hass, 25
7-12 Emily Rappold, Plainfield
7-16 Belle D. Gonet, 9,
Chelsea
7-18 Mike Jacques, So. Barre
7-24 Fran Houghton,
Lyndonville
7-28 Lew Perry, Lyndonville
8-2 Grace Hodgdon, 8, Jericho
8-2 Andy Fournier, Glover
8-8 Gary
8-8 Shirley Combs, Randolph
8-9 Bob Evans, 60, Clark, NJ
8-15 Dolly Fournier, Glover
8-16 CHARLOTTE EDWARDS,
BARRE TOWN
8-20 Rachel Salvas, 20, Barre
8-21 Chriiis
8/22 Tanya Bryan, 43, Barre
8-24 Terry Spaulding,
Lewiston, ME
8-26 Joshua McLeon, 24,
Hartford, CT
8-26 Darcy Hodgdon,
Waterbury
8-29 Connie Spaulding, Minot,
ME
9-5 Sally Fontaine, Walden
9-8 Arlo Benjamin Lefcourt, 4
9-15 Deborah Phillips
9-28 Jessica McLeon, 25,
Hardwick
10-4 Bret Hodgdon, Jericho
10-5 Lisa Companion,
Waterbury
10-6 Steven Lefcourt, 30,
Burlington
10-10 Chris McLean, 44,
Haverhill, NH
10-15 Gavin Hodgdon, 6,
Jericho
10-18 KAY
10-24 Joeys Mommy
10-29 Eric Evans, 29,
Plymouth
11-7 Karen Evans, 60,
Plymouth
11-7 Jillian Hass, 24, E. Mplr.
11-15 Tyler Hass, 27
11-15 Bob Spaulding, Minot,
ME
11-15 Becky Hall, Greensboro
Bend
11-18 Stephen Wilson, 25,
Burlington
11-19 Henry Kasulka, 10, E.
Mplr
11-22 Ruth Pearce, 66,
Chelsea
11-23 Jason Lowe, 25, Wby
11-28 Neil, 25, Burlington
12-3 Peter Lefcourt, 41, Barre
12-3 DOT! 61, Calais
12-7 Armour Moodie, 60,
Stannard
12-8 Thelma Forkey, Waterbury
12-16 Lonny McLeon, 48,
Hardwick
12-25 Jenna Companion, 16,
Waterbury
12-31 Chelsea Phillips, 26,
Manassas, VA
1-4 Betsy Cody, 58, Barre
1-10 Curt McLeon, 47
Dont forget to
change this date
to the Thursday
after issue
date...
FROM
BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.
Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone special a
Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. Well publish the names in this
space each week. Plus, well draw one (1) winner each week for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE
from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send birthday names two
(2) weeks prior to birthdate, to The WORLD, c/o BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin,
Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your name, address & phone number for prize notification.
WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) at 479-9078 and ask for
Sharon Hebert (Bakery Mgr.) or Beverlee Hutchins or Penny Millette
(Cake Decorators) by Thursday, Jan. 9 to arrange for cake pick-up.
PRICE CHOPPER
BIRTHDAY DRAWING
Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake
403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin
Barre, VT 05641
Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will
publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) name each week
for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin,
VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior
to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.
BIRTHDATE______________________________
NAME___________________________________
AGE (this birthday)_________________________
ADDRESS________________________________
________________________________________
PHONE__________________________________
JANUARY 3
Peter R. Warner, 56, Plainfield
JANUARY 5
Ian Geller, 32, Baltimore, MD
Griffin Gauvin, 5, St. Albans
Ryan Thygesen, 26, Graniteville
JANUARY 6
Lucas Adam Roberts, 10, Plainfield
JANUARY 8
Jessica Jonee, 16, Barre
Carter Verdon, 8, Williamstown
Susan Day, 48, East Montpelier
This Weeks Cake Winner:
Jan. 11, TAYLOR AUSTIN GAGNE of BARRE will be 15 YEARS OLD!
Happy Birthday!
2 x 6.4722
JANUARY 9
Vicki Woodard, 41, Barre
Robert Gilbert, 48, Barre
Korey Bean, 25, Northfield/Raleigh, NC
JANUARY 10
Bill Durkee, 55, Woodbury
Curt McLeon, 46
JANUARY 11
McKenna Booth, 4, Marshfield
Rose Willis, 49, Barre
JANUARY 12
Betty Durkee, 46, Plainfield
Its hard to believe that you left us two
years ago. Sometimes it feels like just yesterday.
We miss seeing you, hearing your shing stories
and receiving your crazy gifts. We miss sharing
stories with you of your nephews. Muka misses your
ear rubs. Jacob and Ryan miss building forts and
having aming car wars with their
adventurous uncle.
To the world, Steve was just one person,
but to us he was the world.
Mom, Dad, Muka, Amy, Julie, Chris, Jacob,
Ryan, Molly, Mom and Dad Lane
SAVE $$$$!
SATURDAYS
JONES BROS. WAY
near VT Granite Museum &
Faith Community Church
in Barre
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for 2 or more at
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See You 7:30AM to 1PM!
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JJ
Call Or Text 802-793-7417
160 N. Seminary St. in Barre
(near Yipes Stripes)
M
en's & W
om
en's
Hair Care
Whoever said being
a parent is easy?
For help call
Circle of Parents
TM
1-800-CHILDREN
1-800-244-5373
ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
Romantic aspects are high at
this time for single Lambs
looking for love. Warm and
fuzzy feelings also are at
enhanced levels for Rams and
Ewes in paired relationships.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) This week favors what Taureans
dote on -- namely, love and money. Look for more meaningful
relationships for both singles and pairs, as well as an improved
financial outlook.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) All lingering shreds of that recent
bout with boredom are dissipated as you eagerly accept a chal-
lenging offer. Your positive mood persuades others to join you in
this venture.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You might need validation for a
possible solution to a situation involving someone close to you.
Consider asking a trusted friend or relative to help you with this
problem.
LEO (July 23 to August 22) Investigate carefully before agreeing
to assist a friend or colleague with a personal problem. There
might be hidden factors that could emerge later that will create
problems for you.
VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Your decision to work with
an associate rather than go it alone, as you first proposed, brings
an unexpected bonus. Be careful not to be judgmental. Allow for
free and open discussion.
LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A loved ones health prob-
lem could, once again, make demands on your time and attention.
But this time, make some demands of your own, and insist that
others pitch in and help.
SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) This is a good time for
the traditionally staid Scorpion to plan adjustments in your day-to-
day schedules. Be more flexible and allow for more impromptu,
off-the-cuff actions.
SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Avoid creating
unnecessary fuss over a situation you dont approve of. If its
going to work, it will do so despite your objections. If it fails, it
will do so without a push from you.
CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Working with a
trusted colleague could open your mind to exploring some consid-
erations you previously dismissed out of hand. The weekend
brings news from a loved one.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Resolving a recent prob-
lem leaves you in a good position to strengthen your influence on
how things get done. But continue to encourage ideas and sugges-
tions from others.
PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A new friend suggests an
interesting opportunity. But check it out before you snap at it. It
might be a good deal for some people, but it might not work in
helping you reach your goals.
BORN THIS WEEK: You have a way of helping people solve their
problems, making you a most-respected counselor and trusted
friend.
(c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.
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TUXEDO RENTALS
THANK YOU FOR SAYING
I SAW IT IN
403 US Rte. 302-Berlin
Barre, VT 05641
802-479-2582
or 1-800-639-9753
Tell the
whole WORLD
that you want
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someone a
Happy
Birthday!
1 col. x 2 1/2
AD in the issue
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January 8, 2014 The WORLD page 15
Vitamin D and
Fewer Falls
Poor balance, which may lead to
falls, is often a problem for older
adults. However, the risk of falling
may be reduced by increasing intake
of Vitamin D. A study in the Journal
of American Geriatrics Society
reported that nursing home residents
who took higher amounts of Vitamin
D had fewer falls. Vitamin D intake
has been associated with better mus-
cle function and also helps the body
use calcium to build bone strength.
The form of Vitamin D recommend-
ed is D3, cholecalciferol. Talk with
your doctor or pharmacist regarding
your levels of Vitamin D before
beginning any supplementation.
Weekly
Health Tip
20 South Main Street
Barre 479-3381
M-F 8:30am-6pm, Sat. 8:30am-1pm
by Edward Ferrari Jr., R.Ph.
FOR 1-8-14
Vitamin D and
FOR 1-15-14
First Aid Kit
FOR 1-22-14
Soluble Fiber
FOR 1-29-14
Iron Affects
FOR 2-5-14
Cloudy Apple Juice
FOR 2-12-14
Omega-3s Slow
The Yankee Chef
TM
My name is James Bailey and I AM THE YANKEE CHEF! I have been cooking since the age of 14 years,
when my Dad opened his third restaurant in Maine. I currently write food columns for several New England
newspapers, The Maine Edge (found online at themaineedge.com) and the Villager Newspaper (found onlne
at villagernewspaper.net). I have written several cookbooks and I blog at theyankeechef.blogspot.com. Find
me on Twitter and check out my youtube videos. I am also a Yankee Food Historian and a professional
genealogist. Visit my website at www.theyankeechef.com
Yanked Smoky Spicy Shrimp Grits
Polenta, Grits or Mush? If youre a Yankee, it would be
mush. From the South? Then grits would be in front of you.
Dining in Italy? Polenta is the talk of the town there. Here
in New England, cornmeal is yellow and is used extensively
in many savory and sweet dishes. The grain is ner than the
while corn that is dried in the South. Grits, that Southern
cornmeal, is also larger grained and more coarsely ground,
although you can nd ne, medium and large grind for
both dried corn products. Now, what about hominy grits?
Contemporarily, hominy is the same as corn, but years ago,
it referred to a special process in which lye was used to
soften the husk and germ for easier removal. I decided to
Yank this Southern mainstay to make it more pleasing to
the taste buds.
1 cup instant/quick grits*
3 cups chicken or vegetable broth
4 slices pepper bacon, diced
3 tablespoons minced onion
8 ounces Maine(or salad) shrimp
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 cup milk, half-and-half or light cream
1/2 (8-oz.) jar roasted bell peppers, chopped
1 cup extra-sharp Cheddar cheese, shredded
Salt and black pepper to taste
Following package directions, prepare the grits us-
ing chicken or vegetable broth instead of water.
Meanwhile, place the bacon and onion in a large
skillet and cook over medium heat until the bacon
is the crispness you enjoy. Carefully strain to re-
move fat and add the shrimp. cook 1 minute, or until
shrimp is just done.
Add the chopped peppers and stir until combined.
Remove shrimp/bacon mixture from heat. Gently
add the grits to the skillet along with the milk and
cheese, stir until mixed well and the cheese has be-
gun to melt. Serve immediately. Serves 4
*If you dont want to take the easy route, buy the coarser
grind, but it will take about 30 minutes to prepare. You can
also use yellow or white, regular grind, cornmeal as well.
Offering
Large
Scanning
& Printing
32 Main Street, Montpelier (in the Aubuchon bldg.) 802-223-0500
39

Digital Files, Email


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COLOR
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Greeting Cards Layout & Design
Mailbox Rentals Packing
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Copies - Black & White or Color
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COMMITTING TO MEMORY
If there is one thing that worries seniors, it is the prospect of developing
signs of dementia. These fears prompt many to visit Internet websites
that allege to provide online tests for Alzheimers disease. While these
Internet tests may do a good job of presenting their material in an
understandable and usable form for seniors, research reveals them to
be inaccurate. According to a study presented at a recent Alzheimers
Association International Conference, the online Alzheimer tests are
inaccurate, unscientifc, and
unethical. As a result, those
relying on them may draw
unreliable conclusions that
produce needless worry,
delay needed treatment,
and/or prompt purchases
of ineffective dietary
supplements. Diagnosing
Alzheimers disease requires
a range of tests and expert
interpretation.
P.S. Those who have concerns
about their memory should
discuss them with their doctor.
A careful evaluation of patients with
symptoms of dementia is important
because some causes of cognitive
impairment are treatable or reversible.
At ROWAN COURT HEALTH & REHAB
CENTER, we strive to make the later
years of life some of the very best for our
residents. Our care approach is patient-
centered and involves an integrated
program of therapies that address the
total well-being of each individual. For
more information, please call 476-4166.
We are located at 378 Prospect St.
1-8
Life is an interesting jour-
ney with many twists and
turns along the way and this is
especially true of how Rosa-
lene Bussiere came to recently
open Many Words Herbs at
First In Fitness in Berlin.
Bussiere, a certifed thera-
peutic herbalist and also a
Reiki II practitioner, had suf-
fered since childhood from
acute arthritis in many parts of
her body but especially hands
and hips. One doctor even
thought she might have lupus.
The older I got, the worse
I felt, states Bussiere, who
worked in business/offce related jobs for over 25 years. What
fnally changed my life was realizing had a sensitivity to chemical
toxicity. I started to get my life back on track, especially the last
year when I left the business profession and focussed on herbalism
and my Reiki.
Bussiere, now 44, has lost 50 pounds and more important, is
managing the crippling joint symptoms she had since age 4 by
feeding her body the right nutrients that boost her immune system
for better physical and mental health.
I started by taking practicing herbal classes from Melody Os-
borne of Thyme to Heal in Lisbon, N.H. and ended up with over
120 hours of study and I am now a Certifed Therapeutic Herbal-
ist, explains Bussiere.
Therapeutic herbalism is the understanding, practice and
knowledge as to how herbs and each body system work together
to promote healing, she says, adding, It is a beautifully blended
science with a holistic approach that composes the chemistry and
physiology specifc for each clients needs and includes diagnostic
techniques, herbal profling, herbal preparations, formulation of
medicinal plants, case studies and even applied kinesiology. My
specialties are Auto-immune diseases, degenerative diseases, in-
fammatory diseases, chemical sensitivities and much more.
The energetic Bussiere admits that her own transformation from
traditional medical/medicines (to which she always had a negative
sensitivity or reaction) did not happen overnight: I had been in
failing health for some time. Ultimately, my body had been talking
to me; it had sent plenty of warning symptoms that I ignored for
many years thinking pain was normal. Now I realized that through
pain I needed to make a change and start celebrating life and to
take better care of myself.
My goal is to successfully manage an herbal/Reiki practice that
will not only help my clients manage illness and pain but also edu-
cate them to share this knowledge to future generations.
Rosalene Bussiere, besides kinesiology, also has a passion for
refexology, Chinese cupping and energy healing. She also learns
from regional Indian tribes and shamans.
Bussiere opened Many Words Herbs in a nicely fashioned suite
at First In Fitness in Berlin and is open Monday - Friday 9-5. For
more information, call 802-793-9371 or visit her on Facebook or
email: Manywordsherbs@yahoo.com.
Many Words Herbs
A Natural Way to Good Health
n n n
Reduce the Rivalry When a New Sibling Arrives
Parents who are expecting their second
child often expect me to tell them what to
do to prepare a sibling for a new baby.
Well, I labored a while on this one in order
to deliver some information to you.
This is often a difficult time for a
younger brother or sister. You might com-
pare it to the feeling you would have if
your partner came home and said, I love
you so much, Ive decided to get another partner and love them
just as much as I love you. Thats a tough one for any of us to
handle and for a toddler, it is difficultresulting in their express-
ing feelings or fear of no longer being loved, often through tan-
trums or signs of regression.
What do you do to prevent this? Here are some ideas:
Prepare your child in advance by talking about the arrival of the
new baby. There are wonderful books about becoming an older
brother and sister that you can read with your child. Check in with
your prenatal class provider to find out if they offer sibling pre-
paredness programs.
If you are going to have to change his or her room or move your
child from crib to bed, do it before the baby arrives rather than
after. Refer to the baby as your little brother or sister rather than
as Mommys new baby. Talk about the roles and responsibilities
of being a big brother or sister.
When the baby arrives, have your child pick out a gift for your
new baby. Also, have a gift waiting for your child from your baby.
Have your child meet your baby at the hospital. Keep in mind the
first visit may go better if baby is in the bassinette rather than in
Moms arms. Have a picture of your older child next to you in the
hospital so the child sees you have a picture of them when they
visit the baby.
Once baby is home, make sure you still build what I call spe-
cial time into your daily schedule where you do things with the
older sibling that they enjoy and do not involve the baby. This
allows your child to have some control over what can be a difficult
adjustment situation.
Try to keep your older childs routines in place as much as pos-
sible around the time of bringing your new baby into the home.
Another idea is to hold a big brother/big sister party to celebrate
your older sibling a month or two after your baby is born and to
reinforce the responsibilities that being an older sibling carries.
Be sure to praise the big brother/big sister behaviors and ignore
the baby-like behaviors so they disappear quickly.
Hopefully tips like this will rival for your attention when it
comes to preparing your child for the birth of a sibling.
Lewis First, M.D., is chief of Pediatrics at Vermont Childrens
Hospital at Fletcher Allen Health Care and chair of the Department
of Pediatrics at the UVM College of Medicine. You can also catch
First with Kids weekly on
WOKO 98.9FM and WPTZ
Channel 5, or visit the First
with Kids video archives at
www. Fl e t c he r Al l e n. org/
firstwithkids
The Basics Of Boosting Metabolism
continued from page 8
those muscles, burning more calories and boosting metabolism as
a result.
Dont believe everything you read or hear. Suggestions
abound as to ways to significantly improve metabolism.
Unfortunately, many of these suggestions boost metabolism but
not enough to help people lose weight, which is the ultimate goal
of many people looking to boost their metabolisms. For example,
green tea has its proponents who feel it can have a significant
impact on metabolism thanks to EGCG, a compound found in the
tea that has been proven to elevate metabolism. However, the
impact of EGCG on boosting metabolism is negligible, and there-
fore wont make much of an impact on a persons weight. The
same can be said about capsaicin, an active component found in
chili peppers that some feel boosts metabolism enough to promote
weight loss. Though capsaicin can boost metabolism slightly,
studies have shown that influence is not significant enough to
affect a persons weight.
Dont get too comfortable. Modern technology may be a rea-
son why waist sizes are getting bigger. Heating and cooling sys-
tems may be must-have items, but when the body is too comfort-
able, it burns less energy to stay warm in the winter or comfortably
cool in the summer. A study from the National Institute of Health
Clinical Center found that people who slept in a room kept at 66 F
burned 7 percent more calories than those who slept in a room at
75 F. Sleeping in a cooler room may just be the easiest way for
men and women to boost their metabolisms.
Boosting metabolism and shedding extra pounds is a goal for
many men and women. But while metabolism is a complex set of
processes, the various ways to effectively boost that metabolism
can be quite simple.
n n n
Residentia/ Care for Men LWomen
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www.thegaryhome.com
OPEN HOUSE
Thursday, January 16, 3pm-6pm
and
Friday, January 17, 10am-2pm
We Currently Have Suites Available
THANK YOU FOR SAYING
I SAW IT IN
page 16 The WORLD January 8, 2014
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low miles, warranty
$5,995
01 MERCURY MARQUIS
auto, loaded, Florida title, low miles: 50K
$4,995
02 CHEVY CAVALIER 4-DOOR
5-spd, mag wheels, low miles: 86K
$3,995
05 CHRYSLER T&C TOURING VAN
loaded, 7 passenger, warranty
$6,995
05 CHEVY CAVALIER
2-dr, LS sport, loaded, warranty
$5,995
03 BUICK LESABRE
auto., low miles, one owner, warranty,
$5,995
00 NISSAN SENTRA GXE
auto, Mass. title, low miles, warranty
$4,495
04 FORD F150 XL
auto, AC, low miles, 78K, 1 owner, warranty
$4,995
97 GMC EXTRA CAB SLT
3 dr., auto., leather, 4x4, low miles
$5,995
JUST GOOD AUTOS
Trades Welcome
Prices Negotiable
Just a Sample of Many
Just Good Autos!
EXTENDED WARRANTIES AVAILABLE
JUST GOOD
AUTOS
Rt. 14 N, 296 E. Montpelier Rd., Barre
802-479-0140
VERMONT TIRE & SERVICE
The local tire store where your dollar buys more Family owned and Serving Vermont for over 30 years
$290.95 IN VALUE EVERY TIME YOU BUY 4 ALL SEASON TIRES!!
FREE WHEEL ALIGNMENT FREE ROTATION EVERY 5000 MILES FREE FLAT REPAIR
ALL THIS PLUS...
FREE TIRE MOUNTING FREE TIRE BAGS FOR TAKE-OFF TIRES FREE LOCAL SHUTTLE !!
Happy New Years!
We still have winter tires in all brands!
WINTER IS HERE!
VERMONT
I S DUE
2
FREE PICKUP &
DELIVERY
HOURS:
Mon-Fri. 7:30-5
Sat. 8-4
Montpelier
90 River St.
229-4941
1800-639-1900
South Burlington
1877 Williston Rd.
658-1333
1800-639-1901
2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS SAME GREAT SER-
Not responsible for typographical errors
TRY OUR AWARD WINNING SERVICE!
2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS SAME GREAT SERVICE
2006 CHRYSLER 300-SE-
RIES TOURING 3.5L V6 Silver
4dr Auto Nicely equipt 76,484
Miles STK# K14077A $10,888
Capitol City Kia 866-872-4706
2006 VOLKSWAGEN PAS-
SAT Value Edition Black
84,000 Miles $8,495 Au-
toxtreme 866-859-8284
2008 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT
Charcoal 41,500 Miles $12,995
Autoxtreme 866-859-8284
2008 TOYOTA RAV4 Auto,
4cyl, 4wd, silver, clean. in-
spected, serviced. $11,900.
Juanita or Addie 802-793-8392.
2010 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Sport Utility Red 4WD Auto 2.5
STK#B07698 $19,995 Lam-
oille Valley Ford 866-308-5127
2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE
2LT 1.4L 4cyls Silver 23,248
Miles STK#13313A $14,888
Capital City KIA 866-872-4706
2011 Chevrolet Cruze 2LT
1.4L 4cyls Silver 23,248 Miles
STK# K13313A $14,888 Capi-
tol City Kia 866-872-4706
2012 FORD FOCUS SE Blue
2.0 Auto FWD Epa Est 34mpg
highway STK#218767
$17,999 Lamoille Valley Ford
866-308-5127
2012 HYUNDAI SONA-
TA Black Onyx Pearl Mica
44,630 Miles $18,995 Poulin
Auto Sales 888-502-0438
2012 KIA FORTE EX Titanium
34,416 Miles $12,995 Poulin
Auto Sales 888-502-0438
2013 DODGE AVENGER SE
Black 2.4L 4cyls FWD Auto
many features 19,785 Miles
STK# KP356 $13,888 Capi-
tol City Kia 866-872-4706
MOTORCYCLES/
ATVS
WANTED JAPANESE MOTOR-
CYCLE KAWASAKI 1967-1980
Z1-900, KZ900, KZ1000,ZIR,
KX1000MKII,A1-250, W1-
650, H1-500, H2-750,S1-250,
S2-350, S3-400 Suzuki
GS400, GT380, GT750,
Honda CB750(1969,1970)
CASH. FREE PICKUP. 1-800-
772-1142, 1-310-721-0726
usa@cl assi cr unner s. com
TRUCKS/VANS/
JEEPS/ACCESS.
1999 CHEVROLET SIL-
VERADO 1500 Tan Auto 4WD
5.3L V8 STK#KP383A $4,888
Capitol City Kia 866-872-4706
2001 CHEVROLET TA-
HOE 4WD DARK GREEN
126,000 Miles $6,995 Au-
toxtreme 866-859-8284
2002 TOYOTA TUNDRA Ex-
cess cab 4x4 S5 V6 Standard
105000 Miles. Just out of shop
new frame by Toyota New spark
plugs Battery Fuel lter Just
Inspected, Timing Belt Ideler
tentioner Water pump Recently
Done. Dents Front and Rear
Bumpers and Pickup Bed
$7,200.00 OBRO 802-433-1603
2003 MAZDA TRIBUTE ES V6
06010 157,048 Miles $2,995
Poulin Auto Sales 888-502-0438
2004 FORD EXPLORER XLS
4.0L 4WD Auto Gold 6-Cylin-
der V6, 4.0L (244 CID); FFV
STK#212393183 $3,995 East
Barre Auto Sales 866-928-9370
2004 FORD SUPER DUTY
F-350 DRW XLT Black Turbo
Diesel V8 6.0L 4WD Auto
STK#B19962 $18,995 Lam-
oille Valley Ford 866-308-5127
2008 FORD SUPER DUTY F-250
SRW 4WD Auto Dk.Blue 5.4 V8
STK# C96303 $20,995 Lam-
oille Valley Ford 866-308-5127
2009 TOYOTA TACOMA V6
Silver 78,775 Miles $23,995
Poulin Auto Sales 888-502-0438
2011 CHEVROLET SILVERA-
DO 1500 Work Truck Summit
White 66,805 Miles $20,995
Poulin Auto Sales 888-502-0438
2011 FORD F-150 XLT Silver 5.0
V8 Auto 4WD passthrough rear
seat STK# A16145 $27,995 Lam-
oille Valley Ford 866-308-5127
2012 RAM 1500 ST 5.7L
V8 2door Auto, 4WD 34,403
Miles STK# K14098A $20,888
Capitol City Kia 866-872-4706
4-SALE 1999 JEEP Grand
Cherokee fully loaded. needs
some TLC inspected until 4/14,
asking $990 802-476-0955
CARS &
ACCESSORIES
$ A1-CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
802-522-4279.
1992 VOLVO 900 GLS White
4-Cylinder L4 2.3L; Auto 8V
STK# 219078948 $1,595 East
Barre Auto Sales 866-928-9370
2000 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
GLS 2.0 Red 4cyl Auto L4 2.0L
(1984 cc) STK# 216322135
Call for price East Barre
Auto Sales 866-928-9370
2001 VOLKSWAGEN GOLF
GLS 2.0 4cyl L4, 2.0L; SOCH
8V STK#2206274140 East
Barre Auto Sales 866-928-9370
2004 AUDI A4 3.0 Quattro
Black 108,000 Miles $9,995
Autoxtreme 866-859-8284
2004 SUBARU FOREST-
ER 2.5 XS 4cyl B4, 2.5L
Auto Black STK#220518173
Call For Price East Barre
Auto Sales 866-928-9370
continued on next page
CARS &
ACCESSORIES
continued
TRUCKS/VANS/
JEEPS/ACCESS.
continued
FOR THE MOST CURRENT CLASSIFIED
ADS, VISIT OUR WEB PAGE:
www.vt-world.com
BERLIN
622-0250
Open 5am M-S,
6am Sun.
BARRE
479-0629
Open
24 hours
MONTPELIER
223-0928
Open 5am M-S,
6am Sun.
page 18 The WORLD January 8, 2014
FULL SERVICE BIKE/AUTO SHOP
Off Cox Brook Rd. Northeld
Pickup & Delivery Available
802485-3354
802498-8213
Owner:
Ed Barna
www.classiccyclesofvermont.com
Motorcycle Repair/Restoration/Racing
Major & Minor Repairs
State Inspections Parts & Accessories
Tires Batteries, Spark Plugs, Oil Filters,
Air Filters, Brake Pads & Shoes
Handlebars & Grips
Full Line of Spectro Lubricants
Still doing general repairs on cars & trucks!
D
U
M
P TRAILE
R
S

TRAILER
SALES
www.luckystrailers.com
Exit 3, I-89 So. Royalton, VT 05068
1-800-877-5854
Exit 17, I-89 Colchester, VT 05446
1-877-201-9993
Get Ready For Snow!
We carry a
full line of
Fisher and Blizzard
Plows and Sanders
FREE ESTIMATES Call For Pricing
AYER AUTO SALES
Auto Sales Excellence
(802) 622-0492
www.ayerautosales.com
572 No.Main St.
Barre, VT
OPEN:
Mon- Thursday
9:00-6:00
Friday 9-5
Saturday 9-3
Financing Available
To Qualied Buyers
Our Award Winning:
AYER AUTO BODY
Excellence in Collision Repair
10 West 2nd Street
Barre (802) 461-4503
2012 CHEV.
TRAVERSE LS
FWD, 26,475 miles
Balance of Factory Warranty
$
22,995
2008 TOYOTA
TACOMA
Double Cab, V6,
auto, 4WD
$
23,495
2009 TOYOTA
MATRIX S
AWD, 4 spd., auto.,
58,381 miles
$
13,495
2004 TOYOTA
RAV4
4WD,
57,255 miles
$
11,495
2009 TOYOTA
COROLLA S
4 spd auto.,
61,851 miles
$
12,895
2011 FORD F350 SUPER DUTY
Super Cab, with brand new V-plow. 38,764 miles
ONLY
$
33,495
2007 JEEP
COMPASS LTD 4WD
2004 NISSAN
TITAN LE
King Cab
4WD
$
13,495
2006 CHEV.
SILVERADO 1500 LTI
Ext. Cab. 4WD,
with Z71 Pkg.
$
14,995
CALL
FOR PRICE
WEEKLY PAYMENT SPECIAL
* 10% down plus tax, title and
fees to qualied buyers
$
36
50
*
A WEEK
THE WEBSITE AT THE TOP SHOULD BE WWW.AYERAUTOSALES.
COM <HTTP://WWW.AYERAUTOSALES.COM> -
DAVID ALSO WANTS ONE VEHICLE CHANGED-REPLACE THE
2010 HONDA CIVIC WITH A
2011 FORD F350 SUPER DUTY SUPER CAB, WITH BRAND
NEW V-PLOW. 38,764 MILES, ONLY $33,495. PHOTO IS
ATTACHED
2013 KIA OPTIMA LX 2.4L
4cyls Silver Auto FWD well
equipt 21,804 Miles STK#
KP331 $15,888 Capi-
tol City Kia 866-872-4706
4 FIRESTONE WINTERFORCE
TIRES 195/65/15 Less than
3,000 miles, $150. 802-476-6573
BLOWN HEADGASKET?
Any vehicle repair yourself.
State of the art 2-Component
chemical process. Specializing
Cadillac Northstar Overheat-
ing. 100% guaranteed. 1-866-
780-9038 www.RXHP.com
DONATE A CAR - HELP CHIL-
DREN FIGHTING DIABE-
TES. Fast, Free Towing. Call
7 days/week. Non-runners
OK. Tax Deductible. Call Ju-
venile Diabetes Research
Foundation, 1-800-578-0408.
Donate Your Car to Veterans
Today! Help those in need! Your
vehicle donation will help US
Troops and support our Veter-
ans! 100% tax deduction Fast
Free pickup! 1-800-263-4713
USED AUTO GLASS
802-522-9140
ERASE BAD CREDIT FOR-
EVER!
Credit repair companies make
false claims and promises to
erase a trail of unpaid bills or
late payments from your credit
report. However, only time can
erase negative, but accurate
credit information. In addition,
federal law forbids credit repair
companies from collecting mon-
ey before they provide their ser-
vice. TIP: If you have questions
about your credit history or you
want to know how to get a free
copy of your credit report call
the ATTORNEY GENERALS
CONSUMER ASSISTANCE
PROGRAM at 1-800-649-2424.
Dont send any money to a
credit repair company until you
check it out.
JUNK AUTO
PICK-UP
YOU CALL
ILL HAUL
802-279-2595
NEW & USED TIRES
ALL SIZES, Used Rims,
8 0 2 - 8 8 3 - 5 5 0 6 / 2 7 2 - 6 6 11
WILL HAUL away for free: Scrap
metal, old appliances, car parts,
etc. Furnaces, boilers and demo-
litions for a fee. No job too big or
too small. Chad, 802-793-0885.
CARS &
ACCESSORIES
continued
CARS &
ACCESSORIES
continued
Original
& Maple
280-310 calories
Nutritious &
Delicious!
$
1
59
At Our 3
Locations
BERLIN 622-0250 Open 5am M-S, 6am Sun.
BARRE 479-0629 Open 24 hrs
MONT. 223-0928 Open 5am M-S, 6am Sun.
OATMEAL
N
O
W
O
N
LY
!
THANK YOU FOR SAYING
I SAW IT IN
US Route 302 Barre-Montpelier Rd.
2009 Dodge Caliber SXT
Air Conditioning
Power Windows
Power Locks
Satellite Radio
Cruise Control
17 Aluminum Wheels
Tilt Steering Wheel
Chill Zone Cooler
& a Whole Lot More!!!
$
13,995
or
just
* includes $2000 in rebates
Special Deals available on select units
purchased from closing Dodge Dealers.
2009 Dodge Nitro 4X4
$
19,995
or
just
Air Conditioning
Power Windows
Power Locks
Satellite Radio
Cruise Control
16 Aluminum Wheels
Tilt Steering Wheel
Keyless Remote Entry
& a Whole Lot More!!!
Appreciation Event Ends June 17, 2009!!!
Stop in and register for a chance to win a New 2009 Dodge,
Chrysler or Jeep vehicle during our Appreciation Event.
Toll Free 866-410-3541 www.midstatedodge.com
OPEN
Sundays
Tax, title and Registration extra. All rebates to dealer. Please present ad to receive special pricing. Pictures may vary from actual vehicle
available. Cash Price/Finance Amnt. = advertised price @ 6.9%for 72 mos. Rebates include Customer cash, $1000 owner loyalty rebate and
$500 customer appreciation bonus. Customers who do not currently own a Dodge, Chrysler or Jeep will not qualify for $1000 loyalty rebate
and must add $1000 back to sales price. No purchase necessary to enter contest. Chance of winning depend on how many entries are
received from all Dodge Chrysler and Jeep dealers entrys. Only 1 winner from all entries. See contest for official rules.
* includes $3500 in rebates
www.midstatedodge.com
802-476-4724
www.midstatedodge.com
DIRECT SERVICE LINE:
Service & Parts Dept.
Toll Free 866-410-3541 Local 479-0586
NEW YEARS
SPECIALS
Midstate Chrysler Dodge Hyundai is an authorized Chrysler
Hyundai Dealer here to meet all your manufacturer service needs
whether it is a warranty or service issue. Also includes Jeep.
Please give us a call. Let us be your servicing dealer.
FLUSHES
& FILLS
$
20
YOUR CHOICE:
Power Steering Flush
Coolant Flush
Transmission Flush
Injector Service
MOST MAKES & MODELS
CALL SERVICE ADVISOR
FOR DETAILS. Not valid with
any other offers. With this
coupon through 1/31/14.
OFF
PARTS
ACCESSORIES
LOYALTY
DISCOUNT
5%
Present this coupon at our
parts dept. & save 5% on your
purchase. Discount is limited
to one purchase per customer
and does not apply to wholesale
customers. Not valid with any
other offers. With this coupon
through 1/31/14.
S
A
V
E
January 8, 2014 The WORLD page 19
POULIN AUTO SALES 888-502-0438
EAST BARRE AUTO 866-928-9370
2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE
$14,888
K13313A 866-872-4706
2006 CHRYSLER 300-SERIES
$10,888
K14077A 866-872-4706
2013 DODGE AVENGER
$13,888
KP356 866-872-4706
2013 DODGE AVENGER
$13,888
KP360 866-872-4706
2013 DODGE AVENGER
$14,888
KP359 866-872-4706
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
$13,888
KP372A 866-872-4706
2013 KIA OPTIMA
$15,888
KP320 866-872-4706
2013 KIA OPTIMA
$14,888
KP333 866-872-4706
2013 KIA OPTIMA
$15,888
KP331 866-872-4706
2012 KIA OPTIMA
$17,888
K14090A 866-872-4706
2013 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
$14,888
KP363 866-872-4706
2012 RAM 1500
$20,888
K14098A 866-872-4706
CAPITOL CITY KIA 866-872-4706
2000 CHEV SILVERADO 2500
$8,995
#141140471 866-928-9370
2006 FORD FOCUS
$7,995
#151318832 866-928-9370
2006 HONDA ELEMENT
Call
#207148878 866-928-9370
2004 CHEV MONTE CARLO
$7,995
#190632482 866-928-9370
2004 SUBARU OUTBACK
$6,995
#197629829 866-928-9370
2007 TOYOTA COROLLA
$7,995
#199517291 866-928-9370
2004 HYUNDAI SONATA
$5,995
#201349588 866-928-9370
2005 CHRYS TOWN & COUNTRY
Call
#203271726 866-928-9370
2007 SUBARU FORESTER
$11,500
#204537073 866-928-9370
2005 SUBARU OUTBACK
$6,995
#204536451 866-928-9370
2004 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
$5,995
#204786895 866-928-9370
2006 SUBARU OUTBACK
Call
#217695670 866-928-9370
2000 HONDA ACCORD
$6,500
#199523553 866-928-9370
2004 DODGE DURANGO
Call
#207132274 866-928-9370
2007 JEEP LIBERTY
Call
#211358154 866-928-9370
2005 CHEVROLET TAHOE
Call
#211358068 866-928-9370
2004 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
$6,995
#211358001 866-928-9370
2007 KIA SEDONA
Call
#212214071 866-928-9370
2007 HONDA CIVIC
Call
#213867441 866-928-9370
2008 SUBARU IMPREZA
Call
#217730706 866-928-9370
1999 JEEP CHEROKEE
$5,995
#219078861 866-928-9370
2010 CHEVROLET MALIBU
Call
#217730384 866-928-9370
2002 DODGE RAM 1500
Call
#211357946 866-928-9370
2002 JEEP LIBERTY
Call
#219079081 866-928-9370
2011 CHEV SILVERADO 1500
$20,995
#181693 888-502-0438
2007 DODGE RAM 1500
$15,995
#638528 888-502-0438
2007 CHEV SILVERADO 1500 CLASSIC
$18,995
#176552 888-502-0438
2009 TOYOTA TACOMA
$23,995
#608768 888-502-0438
2005 FORD FREESTYLE
$6,495
#A59588 888-502-0438
2012 FORD ESCAPE
$15,995
#B98380 888-502-0438
2007 JEEP WRANGLER
$16,995
#134169 888-502-0438
2008 KIA SPORTAGE
$12,995
#508406 888-502-0438
2004 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
$12,995
#036165 888-502-0438
2003 MAZDA TRIBUTE
$2,995
#M06010 888-502-0438
2009 KIA RIO
$6,995
#557622 888-502-0438
2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU
$16,155
#310835 888-502-0438
2011 MAZDA MAZDA3
$13,995
#356362 888-502-0438
2012 FORD FOCUS
$13,995
#403831 888-502-0438
2010 MAZDA MAZDA3
$15,995
#133996 888-502-0438
2012 NISSAN SENTRA
$12,995
#739968 888-502-0438
2007 NISSAN SENTRA
$8,995
#614992 888-502-0438
2009 FORD FOCUS
$8,995
#207843 888-502-0438
2008 PONTIAC G6
$8,995
#179788 888-502-0438
2008 CHEVROLET IMPALA
$12,995
#239964 888-502-0438
2012 TOYOTA COROLLA
$13,995
#808475 888-502-0438
2012 HYUNDAI SONATA
$18,995
#020963 888-502-0438
2010 MAZDA MAZDA3
$13,995
#A259695 888-502-0438
2012 KIA FORTE
$12,995
#512636 888-502-0438
An all new way
to search for local cars
BROUGHT TO YOU BY WORLD PUBLICATIONS, INC.
page 20 The WORLD January 8, 2014
NAME __________________________________________
ADDRESS _______________________________________
CITY _________________________________AGE _____
PHONE _________________________________________
SIGNATURE _____________________________________
SELECT YOUR WI NNERS
403 US Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641
3 BIG WINNERS
TO BE CHOSEN AT THE
END OF THE PLAYOFF SEASON
2013-14 RULES
1. One winning entry per eligible person per household.
2. Mail or bring your entry to The WORLD, 403 Rte. 302, Barre, VT 05641
by Friday, 5:00 p.m. before Sunday's game.
3. In case of a tie, the winner will be determined by a tie-breaker. Any further
tie-breaker will be determined by a drawing.
4. Each week's winner will be eligible for the End-of-the-Season Grand Prize to be
awarded to the 3 contestants with the most weekly wins.
5. Winner's names will be published in the following week's issue of The WORLD.
End of the season winners will be notified by the WORLD.
6. Must be 18 years and older to play.
7. Contest not open to WORLD employees or their immediate families.
8. Prize will be mailed to your address as filled out on entry form.
LAST
WEEK'S
WINNER:
Nancy Andreoletti, Barre
wk 1 Annette Kripinski, Newbury
wk 2 Joe Safranek, Newbury
wk 3 Leonard Rix, Williamstown
wk 4 Nancy Andreoletti, Barre
wk 5 Dan Williams, Barre
wk 6 John Stone, Barre
wk 7 Margery Hudson, Montpelier
wk 8 Annette Krupinski, Newbury
wk 9 Nancy Andreoletti, Barre
wk 10 John Stone
wk 11 Fred Jacek Montpelier
wk 13 Wayne Hunter, West Berlin
wk 14 Ron Larira, Barre
wk 15 Joe Safranek, Newbury
wk 16 Fred Jacek, Montpelier
wk 17 John Stone, Barre
wk 18 Michael Cody, Barre WEEK 17 SUN, DEC 29
Carolina @ Atlanta 1:00 PM
Baltimore @ Cincinnati 1:00 PM
Houston @ Tennessee 1:00 PM
Jacksonville @ Indianapolis 1:00 PM
NY Jets @ Miami 1:00 PM
Detroit @ Minnesota 1:00 PM
Washington @ NY Giants 1:00 PM
Cleveland @ Pittsburgh 1:00 PM
Green Bay @ Chicago 4:25 PM
Denver @ Oakland 4:25 PM
Buffalo @ New England 4:25 PM
Tampa Bay @ New Orleans 4:25 PM
San Francisco @ Arizona 4:25 PM
Kansas City @ San Diego 4:25 PM
St. Louis @ Seattle 4:25 PM
TIE BREAKER
Philadelphia @ Dallas 8:30 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________
Wild-Card Weekend
SAT, JAN 4
Kansas City at Indianapolis 4:35 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________

New Orleans at Philadelphia 8:10 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________
SUN, JAN 5
San Diego at Cincinnati 1:05 PM
SCORE _______________ SCORE _________________
San Francisco at Green Bay 4:40 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________

Division Playoffs
SAT, JAN 11
New Orleans at Seattle 4:35 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________
Indianapolis at New England 8:15 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________
SUN, JAN 12
San Francisco at Carolina 1:05 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________
San Diego at Denver 4:40 PM
SCORE _____________ SCORE _____________
GAME
GAME
o
f

t
h
e

W
e
e
k
LIVE HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS
All Games Available At
www.wsno1450.com
Play-by-play
coverage with
Joe Salerno &
Carl Parton
Play-
by-play
coverage
with
Jim
Severance
& Tanner
Acebo
GAME
GAME
o
f

t
h
e

W
e
e
k
LIVE HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS
All Games Available At
www.wsno1450.com
Play-by-play
coverage with
Joe Salerno &
Carl Parton
Play-
by-play
coverage
with
Jim
Severance
& Tanner
Acebo
Tuesday, March 5, 4:45pm
Girls Hockey
Metro Division Quarternal
Burr & Burton at Spaulding
Tuesday, March 5, 6:45pm
Boys Hockey
Lake Division Quarternal
Woodstock at U32
Thursday, March 7
Boys Basketball
Division Three Seminal
Rivendell vs Williamstown
1/3, Friday 7:00pm
Girls Basketball
Montpelier at U32
1/4, Saturday 2:00pm
Boys Basketball
Hartford at U32
1/8, Wednesday, 5:00pm
Girls Hockey Northeld at U32
1/9, Thursday, 6:30pm
Boys Basketball North Country at Spaulding
1/10, Friday, 7:00pm
Girls Basketball CVU at Spaulding
1/11, Saturday, 2:00pm
Boys Basketball Lamoille at Montpelier
1/8, Wednesday, 5:00pm
Girls Hockey Northeld at U32
1/9, Thursday, 6:30pm
Boys Basketball North Country at Spaulding
1/10, Friday, 7:00pm
Girls Basketball CVU at Spaulding
1/11, Saturday, 2:00pm
Boys Basketball Lamoille at Montpelier
McLEODS
SPRING & CHASSIS
Your Truck Chassis Specialists
32 BLACKWELL ST., BARRE, VT 05641 1-802-476-4971
Snowplows
SALES &
SERVICE
For Superior Snowplowing Performance
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ACT Stat Attack: All stats are from ACT US Late Model point
counting events only. 133 different drivers attended at least one
of the 14 events in 2013. 121 of those drivers qualified for at least
one event. 682 different drivers have now attempted to qualify
for at least one of the 247 events run since the inception of the
ACT Late Model Tour in 1992. 536 different drivers have now
started a feature event. 34 drivers started their first feature in
2013. Eric Chase (104) and Joey Polewarczyk, Jr. (100) made
their 100th career starts in 2013. 8 different drivers led the first
laps of their careers. (Brockton Davis, Todd Davis, Travis Fadden,
Dave Farrington, Jr., Ray Parent, Rowland Robinson, Jr., Travis
Stearns, Bobby Therrien) 156 different drivers have now led at
least one lap in ACT competition. Jimmy Hebert, Therrien, Alex
Labbe and Stearns all earned their first career ACT wins.
Therrien and Stearns join Jamie Fisher (1999) and Ryan Moore (2
2002) as the only drivers to score wins in their rookie seasons.
69 different drivers have now won an ACT feature. Polewarczyk
(11) became just the fourth driver to earn 10 ACT wins. (Brian
Hoar 39, Jean-Paul Cyr 19, Patrick Laperle 18) 10 different driv-
ers earned their first career top five finishes. 155 different drivers
have now earned at least one career top five. 14 different drivers
earned their first career top ten finishes. 244 different drivers
have now scored at least one career top ten. The top five money
earners (doesnt include point fund or special events) for the year
were: 1. Polewarczyk ($23,710), 2. Wayne Helliwell, Jr. ($21,
905), 3. Hebert ($17,630), 4. Hoar ($15,205), 5. Stearns ($14,055).
The 14 ACT events averaged 29.6 cars. The top five lap leaders
for 2013 were: 1. Helliwell (495), 2. Polewarczyk (230), 3. Dave
Pembroke (207), 4. Ray Parent (199), 5. Hebert (195) Therrien
led the most laps in a single event when he won the White
Mountain event and led 148 of the 150 laps. Polewarczyk earned
the most wins with 3. Polewarczyk and Helliwell earned the most
top fives with 10. Helliwell and Hebert earned the most top tens
with 13. Helliwell and Polewarczyk were the only drivers to
complete all 2,158 laps run in 2013. Ben Lynch was next with
2,153. They were also the only three drivers that started all 14
events and didnt have a DNF. Those 2,158 laps total up to 892.5
miles. ACT competitors racked up a total of 22,640 combined
miles in 2013. The longest distance race was the Sanair event at
129.775 miles. The shortest distance events were the April
Thunder Road race, Riverside NH, Star Speedway and White
Mountain events at 37.5 miles. There were a total of 84 lead
changes in 2013. That averages out to one every 25.7 laps. The
most lead changes in an event were 11 at both the Riverside NH
race and the Sanair race. There were a total of 108 cautions
(including 4 for rain) this season. That averages out to one every
19.98 laps. The White Mountain event in July had the fewest
cautions of the season with 1. The Riverside St-Croix event in
August set the record for the most cautions ever in a single event
with 19. The previous record was 18 also at Riverside St-Croix
back in 2002. The 14 events were completed in a combined 18
hours, 38 minutes and 8 seconds. The shortest race of the season
was the Airborne event in May that was 40 minutes and 19 sec-
onds. The longest race of the season was Riverside St-Croix
event which was 2 hours, 41 minutes and 11 seconds. It was less
than a minute shy of setting the record for the longest ACT race in
history. The record is 2:42:08 at Sanair in 2006. Brian Hoar had
the best average finish of the season with a 3.28 in his 7 starts.
Helliwell (4.5) edged Polewarczyk (4.8) for best average finish of
those with more than 7 starts. Helliwell gained the most positions
in a single event in 2013 by gaining 21 spots (24th to 3rd) in the
Sanair event.
Jimmie Johnson took a giant step toward joining NASCARs
pantheon of legends. And he did it in the NASCAR Sprint Cup
Series Gen-6 race car, which made its debut in record-setting
fashion. To say the least, 2013 was a very big year. Johnson,
whose run of five consecutive NASCAR Sprint Cup champion-
ships ended in 2011, regained his winning form. His six pack of
titles is one fewer than the seven championships won by NASCAR
Hall of Famers Richard Petty and Dale Earnhardt a record the
38-year-old El Cajon, Calif., competitor will stalk in 2014.
Johnson won his second Daytona 500 and became the first com-
petitor since 1982 to post a season sweep at Daytona International
Raceway. The Gen-6 car, a collaborative and far-reaching initia-
tive undertaken by NASCAR, Toyota, Chevrolet Division of
General Motors and Ford Motor Company to put the stock back
in stock car, provided close, competitive racing. The season saw
19 track qualifying records broken; a record number (127,306) of
Green Flag Passes; and the lowest Margin of Victory (1.267 sec-
onds) since 2005. Twenty races ended with a margin of victory of
less than one second, up from 17 in 2012. Seventeen different
drivers including five who had gone winless the previous season
went to Victory Lane, two fewer than the series modern era
record. With four victories, Johnson led the points standings after
all but three of the regular seasons 26 races. The Hendrick
Motorsports driver, however, started the Chase for the NASCAR
Sprint Cup as the No. 2 seed behind Matt Kenseth. Victories at
Dover International Speedway and Texas Motor Speedway enabled
Johnson to keep pace with and then pass his rival. The only driver
to qualify in all 10 years of the Chase era, Johnson posted an aver-
age finish of 5.0 in the 2013 Chase to edge Kenseth by 19 points.
Johnsons championships have come in three different generations
of NASCAR Sprint Cup cars.
NASCARs new aero changes, announced six days after a
30-car test at Charlotte Motor Speedway, are specifically designed
to improve competition and passing at the 1.5-mile tracks that
make up one-third of the Sprint Cup schedule. The changes are
as follows: Statically setting the race car ride height and elimi-
nating the pre- and post-race front height rules and inspections;
Adding a square leading edge on the splitter at the front of the car;
Making side skirt and rear fascia adjustments; Increasing the
height of the rear spoiler from seven and a quarter inches to eight
inches. The lower portion of the spoiler will be a composite mate-
rial, while the top two inches will be made of transparent Lexan
for better visibility; Increasing the size of the radiator pan under
the front of the car from 38 inches by 13 inches to a 43-by-13. The
rules package for the two restrictor-plate tracks, Daytona
International Speedway and Talladega Superspeedway, remains
unchanged. . The new NASCAR aero changes will increase front
and rear down force on the cars.
Next Lap
Preseason Thunder, the annual test session held at Daytona
International Speedway in preparation for the season-opening
races at the 2.5-mile superspeedway, will expand in 2014 to
include all three NASCAR national series the NASCAR Sprint
Cup, NASCAR Nationwide and NASCAR Camping World Truck
Series. Kicking off the Road to Daytona which culminates with
the 56th running of the Daytona 500 on Feb. 23, 2014, Preseason
Thunder testing begins Thursday and Friday, Jan. 9-10, with the
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series participating in two days and four
sessions of on-track activity. NASCAR Nationwide Series test-
ing will follow on Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 11-12, with the
NASCAR Camping World Truck Series testing on Monday and
Tuesday, Jan. 13-14. All test sessions are scheduled to run from 9
a.m.-Noon ET, and again from 1 p.m.-5 p.m. ET
Jimmy Hebert had two American Canadian Tour wins in 2013 while
placing 3rd in the points chase. Steve Poulin Photo
January 8, 2014 The WORLD page 21
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Vermont Turkey Hunters Had a Record Year
Enjoy Vermonts Historic Ski Culture at 6th Annual Ladies Nordic Ski Expo
Vermont Bear Hunters Had a Successful
and Safe Season in 2013
The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department
reports that bear hunters in Vermont had a safe
and successful hunting season in 2013. Hunters
took 557 black bears during the 85 days of the
two-part early season and late season, and
there were no shooting-related incidents for hunt-
ers while pursuing bear.
For the first time, the State implemented an
early bear hunting season (September 1-November
15) and a late season (November 16-24) in order
to improve the bear management program.
Hunters needed to purchase a special license
for the early bear season. Their regular hunting
license bear tag was valid for the late season. 2013
also marked a new four-day extension in November
designed to stabilize the growth in the population
The four-day extension was very helpful in
achieving our goal of harvesting more bears, said
bear biologist Forrest Hammond. The 2013 har-
vest is close to our average annual total of 547
bears over the past ten years. Participation in the
early bear season was higher than anticipated, an
indication that Vermonters are becoming increas-
ingly interested in hunting this big game ani-
mal.
Hammond said 306 bears were taken during the
early season and 251 in the late season that over-
lapped with the November deer season. Ten per-
cent of the harvest was taken by hunters during
the four-day extension of the late season. Two
towns had the highest number of bears taken,
Montgomery and Sutton, with 11 bears reported
in each town. Four bears weighing more than 400
pounds were taken in the state.
The annual bear harvest typically fluctuates
due to food availability and weather that influ-
ences how much the bears roam and how soon
they den up for the winter, said Hammond. The
2013 harvest was less than the previous year when
620 bears were taken.
Hammond attributes the higher total in 2012 to
a large bear population and a shortage of fall
foods in the woods that made bears more avail-
able to hunters.

Vermont wild turkey hunters had safe and successful spring and
fall hunting seasons in 2013, according to the Vermont Fish &
Wildlife Department.
A record 6,968 turkeys were taken by hunters during Vermonts
three hunting seasons the spring youth hunt, the regular May
spring season, and the fall turkey hunt.
Young turkey hunters mentored by experienced hunters took 782
bearded turkeys, which are almost always males, during the youth
turkey hunt on the weekend before the regular spring season.
Hunters took 5,580 bearded turkeys in the May 1-31 regular
spring turkey season.
Fall turkey hunting during October and November produced 606
turkeys of either sex, which was lower than 2012, but still enough
to make the 2013 three-season total the highest since Vermonts
wild turkey population was restored in the early 1970s.
Vermonts wild turkey numbers increased to an estimated 45,000
to 60,000 turkeys in the fall 2013 population, allowing the expan-
sion of turkey hunting opportunities which now offer hunters the
chance to take three turkeys each year statewide.
Vermont Fish & Wildlife also reports that no turkey hunting-
related shooting incidents were reported for the fourth consecutive
year.
Starting in January, 2014 Vermonts wild turkey program will be
led by state wildlife biologist Amy Alfieri working out of the Fish
& Wildlife Departments Dead Creek office.
I am pleased that we were able to hire Amy to take over manage-
ment of one of our premier big game animals is Vermont, said
Wildlife Director Mark Scott. She brings more than eight years of
experience working for the department on a variety of wildlife spe-
cies.
Scott further acknowledged the outstanding work that state wild-
life biologist Forrest Hammond has done on the turkey project in
recent years.
Hammonds been our lead biologist the past few years on tur-
keys and has done an excellent job building relationships with
Vermonts sporting groups and the states various National Wild
Turkey Chapters in promoting youth hunting and volunteers, said
Scott. The National Wild Turkey Federation is a key reason for our
success in establishing this big bird throughout the Green Mountain
State.
Hammond will be focusing more of his work on leading
Vermonts black bear project.
For more information regarding Vermonts wild turkeys visit
Vermont Fish &Wildlifes website, www.vtfishandwildlife.com.
Women in the United States are starting to make a name for
themselves in the Nordic skiing world. Last winter, two members
of the U.S. team took home the top honor at the Quebec World Cup
Relays. This summer, Olympian Liz Stephen set a new course
record at the Catamount Trail Associations North Face Race to the
Top of Vermont, as she began her path to the 2014 Sochi Winter
Olympics.
The Catamount Trail Association is welcoming all women to join
the Nordic ski world, whether to hone their skate technique, prac-
tice their tele turn, or simply learn to kick and glide, at the 6th
Annual Ladies Nordic Ski Expo, happening this year on January
11th at Trapp Family Lodge in Stowe. The spectacular location
draws participants to the event, and helps women of all ages find
their niche within the Nordic skiing culture.
The von Trapp family, who created Trapp Family Lodge over 60
years ago, are rooted to their skiing heritage, and to this day, the
women of the family are teaching and passing the tradition of win-
ter sports down from generation to generation. Kristina von Trapp
Frame, granddaughter of Maria von Trapp, noted that her mother
was instrumental in making sure that she and her brother Sam par-
ticipated in their familys culture of Nordic skiing. As children, they
grew up in a sugar-free household, unless they skied all the way to
the picnic knoll at Trapps, in which case they could earn bites of
chocolate for their efforts. (Incidentally, women participating in
CTAs Ladies Nordic Ski Expo on January 11th will also earn
their chocolate, a treat provided fireside at the end of the day from
Nutty Stephs, along with wine and cheese in the welcoming
Mozart room at Trapp Family Lodge.)
Kristina describes her grandmother Maria as a strong and
impulsive woman. Maria did not learn to ski until she was about
50 years old, but her passion, along with that of her son Johannes
(Kristinas father), has lead the Trapps Nordic skiing facilities to be
among the best in the East. Their elite equipment and instruction
mixed with rustic charm and Austrian flavors has made the Nordic
trails, the site for the Ladies Nordic Ski Expo, a favorite destination
for skiers throughout the world.
Being raised in the rugged, yet peaceful environment of Trapps,
Kristina became an avid skier, always searching for the fun adven-
ture that Nordic skiing provides. One of her most memorable
accomplishments on snow was completing the Elk Mountain
Traverse in Colorado. Starting in Crested Butte at midnight and
skiing over 40 miles to Aspen, Kristina and her partner relished
racing under a full moon in the silence of powder, deep in the
Colorado backcountry. Her team finished in third place after about
10 hours on skis, a testament to her enthusiasm for winter adven-
tures, which she now shares with her own young daughters, ages 8
and 10.
On Friday afternoons, Kristina helps coach her childrens after
school Nordic ski program at Trapps. Afterwards, her daughters
mimic their mother and Uncle Sam, working in the ski shop for a
few hours at the end of the day. Their reward for doing so takes
them into the woods of Trapps, skiing home with their mom; school
backpacks on, absorbing the silence and beauty of their own back-
yard. It is important to them too now, Kristina described, showing
how the von Trapp family tradition is continuing on to the youngest
generation. We take advantage of what we have in our back yard.
It is important to love what we have.
The Stowe Derby is one of the familys newest traditions, with
Kristina taking a year off from competition recently to become the
support crew for her oldest daughter who participated for the first
time in the derbys youth Nordic race.
Kristina von Trapp and her family are just one example of how
skiing can bring together friends and families, keeping them
healthy, happy and appreciative of Vermonts natural environment.
Whether skiing with a toddler for the first time, spending the after-
noon surrounded by fir trees and white snow along a backyard trail,
or spending a weekend with friends taking lessons, improving tech-
nique and enjoying local food at Trapp Family Lodge, Vermont is a
state that caters to women looking for ski camaraderie and adven-
ture.
Join the Catamount Trail Association at their Ladies Nordic Ski
Expo to meet other women from around the state and beyond who
are looking for beginner instruction all the way to advanced tech-
nique tips. Its also an opportunity to cultivate new winter friend-
ships and share stories about
how families are enjoying win-
ter together. With Trapp Family
Lodge providing a historic and
exquisite backdrop, this event
is one that no skiing woman
should miss. Check out the
Catamount Trail Associations
website at www.catamount-
trail.org for more details and to
register.

page 22 The WORLD January 8, 2014
All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.com or
mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S. Route 302, Barre,
Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00pm, Thursday preceding publica-
tion. The Ongoing section is for free/low cost community events,
which should be verified monthly. We are no longer able to include
ongoing classes.
Ongoing Events
BARRE- Central VT Adult Basic Education. Free classes. Pre-
GED and high school diploma prep classes at Barre Learning Center,
46 Washington St. Info./pre-register 476-4588.
Additional Recyclables Collection Center. Open for collection
Tuesdays & Thursdays 12:30-5:30pm, and 3rd Saturdays 9am-1pm.
540 No. Main St. Visit www.cvswmd.org for list of acceptable items.
Vermont Independent Writers. Place and time will vary according
to weather. Info. 476-7289 or chosenwords@yahoo.com
Navigating VT Health Connect. Get help from Certified Application
Counselor Marcia Drake. Aldrich Library, Tuesdays 5-8pm.
Medicare and You. New to Medicare? Have questions? We have
answers. Central Vermont Council on Aging, 59 N. Main St., Suite
200, 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month. Call 479-0531 to register.
Line Dancing. Old Labor Hall, 46 Granite St., by donation, Thursdays
6:30-8:30pm.
RCIA. For those who want to learn more about the Catholic faith. St.
Monica Church, Wednesdays starting 9/25, 7pm. Pre-reg. 479-3253.
Celebrate Recovery. Recovery for all your hurts/habits/hang-ups. Faith
Community Church, 30 Jones Bros. Way, Mondays, 6-8pm. 476-3221.
Wheelchair Basketball. Barre Evangelical Free Church, 17 So. Main
St., Tuesdays, 5:30-7pm. Info 498-3030 (David) or 249-7931 (Sandy).
Community Drum Circle. At the Parish house next to Universalist
Church, Fridays, 7-9pm. Info. 724-7301.
Story Hour. Aldrich Library childrens room, Mondays & Tuesdays,
10:30am.
Central Vermont Business Builders. Community National Bank, 1st
& 3rd Tuesdays, 8-9am. Info. 777-5419.
Weekly Storytime. Next Chapter Bookstore, 158 North Main St.,
Saturdays, 10:30am. Info. 476-3114.
Overeaters Anonymous. Church of the Good Shepherd, Tuesdays
6pm-7pm. Info. 249-0414.
Greater Barre Democrats. Town & City residents welcome. Aldrich
Public Library, last Wednesdays, 5:15-6:15pm. Info 476-4185.
Barre Tones Womens A Capella Chorus. 2nd flr Alumni Hall, next to
Barre Aud., Mondays, 6:30-9pm. www.barretonesvt.com or 223-2039.
Play Group. St. Monicas Church, lower level, Thursdays during
school year, 9:30-11am.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit 10. Meets at the post, first
Thursday of each month (not Jan. or July), 6:30pm.
Vermont Modelers Club. Building & flying model airplanes year-
round, visitors welcome. Info. 485-7144.
Community Breakfast. First Presbyterian Church, 78 Summer St.,
3rd Sunday of month, FREE, 7:30-9am. 476-3966.
Lupus Support Group. 9 Jorgensen Ln., teen meeting 3rd Wednesdays
at 6:30pm, adult meeting 4th Weds., 6:30pm. Info. 877-735-8787.
Grandparents Raising Their Childrens Children. Support group.
First Presbyterian Church, 1st & 3rd Weds., 10am-noon. 476-1480.
Friends of Aldrich Public Library. Aldrich Library, 2nd floor board-
room, 2nd Tuesday of month. Info. 476-7550.
Circle of Parents. Confidential support group for parents and caregiv-
ers. Meets Tuesday evenings. Info. 229-5724 or 1-800-CHILDREN.
Al-Anon Spiritual Mtgs. Hedding United Methodist, Weds. 7pm.
Central VT Amateur Radio Club. Steak House, Barre-Montpelier
Rd., 1st Wednesdays, 6:30pm. Info. 496-3566 or 496-2836.
Mothers of Preschoolers. Monthly get-togethers for crafts, refresh-
ments, etc. Christian Alliance Church, 476-3221.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings in Barre, daily; call 802-229-5100
for latest times & locations; www.aavt.org.
Alzheimers Support Group. Rowan Court Health & Rehab, 4th
Weds. of month, 3-5pm. Info/RSVP at 476-4166.
Hedding United Methodist Activities & Meetings. 40 Washington
Street, 476-8156. Choir, Thursdays 7pm; Free Community Supper,
Fridays 5:30-6:30pm; Community Service & Food Shelf Hours:
Weds & Thurs. 3-5pm. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly),
Wednesdays 5pm, call 371-8929.
Turning Point Recovery Center. 489 N. Main St. For individuals/
families in or seeking substance abuse recovery. Recovery coaching &
other support programs. Open Mon.-Fri. 10am-5pm, Sat. noon 5pm.
Alcoholics Anonymous Living Sober, Sundays, 8:30am; Making
Recovery Easier, Tuesdays, 6pm; Wits End family support group,
Wednesdays, 6pm; Narcotics Anonymous When Enough Is
Enough, Sundays, 5:30pm & Thursdays, 6:30pm; Life Skills Group,
Mondays, noon-1:30pm (lunch provided). Al-Anon- Courage to
Change, Saturdays 6-7pm, childcare provided. Info: 479-7373.
Knights of Columbus. Pine Hill Road, Barre Town, meetings second
Tuesday of every month, 7pm.
ReUse Stop. Barre Town recycling depot, Wilson Indust. Park; Tues/
Sat, 8-3:30, for unwanted reusable items; guidelines/prices, 775-7722.
Green Mountain Spirit Chapter. National women bikers club. 2nd
Wed. of month; info grnmtnspirit@hotmail.com.
BERLIN- Bereaved Parents Support Group: 2nd Wednesdays,
6-8pm, 793-2376; Bereavement/Grief Support Group. Meets every
other Wednesday 1/8-4/16, 10-11:30am; OR every other Monday,
1/13-4/21, 6-8pm. All at CVHHH, 600 Granger Rd. Info. 223-1878.
Survivors of Suicide Loss Support. For family and friends who lost
someone to suicide. CVMC, conf. room #1, 3rd Tuesdays, 6-7:30pm.
Info. 223-0924.
Lyme & Living. For adults & teens with lyme, family, friends.
Fragrance free. CVMC, conf rm #3, 3rd Saturdays, 2pm. 476-9965.
NAMI-VT Support Group. For families & friends of those living w/
mental illness. CVMC, Room 3, 4th Mondays, 7pm. 800-639-6480.
Cancer Support Group. With potluck. First Wednesday of each
month, 6pm. Info. 229-5931.
Living w/ Advanced or Metastatic Cancer: Lunch provided, 2nd
Tuesday of each month, noon-1pm. Writing to Enrich Your Life: For
anyone touched by cancer, 3rd Tuesday of each month, noon-1pm.
Both held at CVMC Cancer Center resource room. Info. 225-5449.
Central Vermont Rotary Club. Visitors & potential members wel-
come. Steakhouse Restaurant, Mondays, 6:15pm. 229-0235.
Parkinsons Support Group. CVMC, conf. rm. #3, third Thursdays,
6:30-8pm. Info. 439-5554.
continued on next page
Why So Cold This Winter?
The polar vortex has been displaced into the Hudson Bay of
Canada at times this winter with a free and clear shot of super
charged cold draining from near the North Pole. This cross polar
air makes it easily, into the parts of central North America and the
adjacent Northeastern U.S. The driving influence has been a little
talked about Pacific gatekeeper called the Eastern Pacific
Oscillation. In its negative phase, which has predominated it
allows the coldest arctic air to drain southeast into North America.
This has been shutting the door to colder air for Europe and even
at times across Asia. Thus North America is the coldest location
so far this winter while other areas have seen above normal tem-
peratures.
The higher pressure acts to shift the jet stream well north cap-
turing arctic air and then driving across the interior areas of North
America. Occasionally, this high pressure over the Aleutians
Island breaks down and this allows Pacific air to work eastward
creating warmer weather and the recent rains including the recent
ice storm just before Christmas. The weather pattern looks like it
will continue but at less intensity which means January will likely
also average colder than normal but not as extreme as what we
have seen in both November and December. If January averages
colder, then February may be much milder and vice a versa per
some of the analog climatology in past instances.
Last Weeks Vermont Weather
The large oscillation in temperatures continue to affect our
region with rain and ice and warmth followed by arctic air and
cycle then repeats. The highest temperatures hit late Sunday
night and early last Monday hit 55 degrees in numerous west-
ern Vermont valley locations. Minus 30 degrees was achieved
at Island Pond airport which is one of the top 5 coldest loca-
tions in the state of Vermont.
Snowfall has been rather healthy in parts of both southern
and northern Vermont but lesser so in the central part of the
state. Still Mount Mansfield carries the day with a total of 2
feet snow depth. This most recently was now below average.
The Cleat/Crampon winter conditions with so some much ice
due to so much rain may be taking a little breather. But as
Eastern Pacific Oscillation flips back and forth so will our
future weather.

Vermont Weather Extreme Stats from last week
Highest temperature: 55 degrees numerous locations ending
late Monday morning the 6th
Lowest temperature: Minus 30 degrees Saturday morning the
3rd
Heaviest melted precipitation: 0.64 Ludlow ending Friday
the 3rd
Biggest Snowfall: 9.5 Pomfret ending Friday the 3rd
Most Snow depth: 24 atop Mount Mansfield Sunday after-
noon the 5th
Global Temperature Facts For Last Week
Last weeks hottest temperature on planet earth was 115
degrees F Learmonth Airport (Australia)
Last weeks cold spot was minus 67 degrees at Tugoncani
(Russia)
Maximum 24 hour Global Precipitation
6.97 inches (flooding ) Allentown, Lehigh Valley International
Airport (United States)
Atmospheric CO2
The latest CO2 measurement ending December 29th with
Carbon Dioxide levels at 397.39 parts
per million. One year ago the reading
was 394.67 parts per million for a one
year change up a whopping 2.72 ppm
which is unsustainable for a stable cli-
mate. Stable climate conditions are at or
below 350 parts per million.
Climate Change Melt shifting loca-
tion of North Pole
The melting of ice caps and glaciers
due to climate change is causing a shift
in the Earths axis, according to new
research. Wobbles in the planets rota-
tion are due to various influences,
including the distribution of mass.
Observations conducted since 1899
have shown that the North Pole has
been drifting south toward eastern parts
of Canada at the rate of about 4 inches
per year. But that drift jogged abruptly
eastward in 2005 and has totaled about
4 feet in distance since then.
Jianli Chen of the University of Texas at Austin and col-
leagues collected data from NASAs GRACE satellite, which
measures changes in Earths gravity field over time in an
attempt to find out why the shift occurred. The measurements
allowed them to calculate how melting of the Greenland and
Arctic ice sheets and mountain glaciers, and the resulting rise
in sea level, caused a redistribution of mass on the Earths
surface. Computer analysis determined that it matched per-
fectly what it would take to cause the observed shift in the
North Poles position.
Ice melting and sea level change can explain 90 per cent of
the (eastward shift), Chen told the fall meeting of the
American Geophysical Union in San Francisco. The driving
force for the sudden change is climate change. His team
determined that the largest contributing factor of the shift is
the melting of the Greenland ice sheet, which is losing about
250 gigatons of ice each year.
Suns Magnetic Field flipped just before New Years Day
The suns magnetic field underwent a total reversal of
polarity during the closing days of 2013.
The flip marks the midpoint of Solar Cycle 24, which has
generated the weakest solar activity in a century.
Powerful eruptions of the sun often spew massive clouds of
superheated particles into space, sometimes directed toward
Earth. But such solar storms have rarely been seen during the
current solar cycle, even though the total number of generally
weaker storms hasnt declined much.
None of us alive has ever seen such a weak cycle. So we
will learn something, Leif Svalgaard of Stanford University
told reporters at last months meeting of the American
Geophysical Union in San Francisco. NASAs Tony Phillips
describes the reversal of the suns magnetic field as a literally
big event.
He said the suns magnetic influence extends outward for
billions of miles, well beyond the orbit of Pluto.
Weather Trends AheadPolar vortex Temporarily
Retreats Northward
Historically significant arctic chill that dropped tempera-
tures through the Midwest, Great Lakes and Ohio Valley
region before visiting the Northeast U.S., will pull away on
Wednesday with a moderation in progress. The early week
arctic air maxes out Tuesday and it should not be as fierce for
our region as it was being modified by the upstream Great
Lakes, which are in the low to middle 40s over a large area of
Lake Ontario, Lake Huron and Georgian Bay region.
A temporary pattern of Pacific air floods eastward with a
more zonal flow developing as we head into this coming
weekend bringing a modified warm up into the mid and upper
30s. This should bring temperatures to above seasonal levels
and compared to where we have journeyed it wont feel to bad
either.
The pick of this week will likely be Thursday with decent
enough sunshine, followed by an unsettled Friday with a few
light scattered snow showers but nearly warm enough to mix
with rain drop on valley floors. More marginal rain and snow
showers were likely Saturday with the moderating trend in full
force. Sunday appears a little colder but not
too much as skinny ridge of higher pressure
builds in Sunday looks like the next best day
after this Thursday.
Roger Hill of Weathering Heights
and Radio Vermont
January 20 Martin Luther King Day
Full Moon
Full moon date is expressed in Coordinated Universal Time
Wolf Moon 2014 Jan 16 04:52 Thu
Monthly Events
Family Fit Lifestyle Month
Financial Wellness Month
Get Organized Month
International Child - Centered Divorce Awareness Month
International Creativity Month
National Radon Action Month
National Clean Up Your Computer Month
National Glaucoma Awareness Month
National Hot Tea Month
National Mentoring Month
National Personal Self-Defense Awareness Month
National Poverty in America Awareness Month
National Skating Month
National Volunteer Blood Donor Month
Oatmeal Month
Shape Up US Month
Western Pacic Hurricane Season
January 2014
PERRY'S OIL SERVICE
Call 1-800-654-3344
For Price and Delivery Date
Minimum 100 gal. delivery




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Diabetes Support Program. CVMC, conf. rooms, first Thursday of
month, 7-8pm, free. Info. 371-4152.
Civil Air Patrol. At the airport (blue hangar), Tuesdays, 6-8:30pm.
Info at 229-5193.
Al-anon/Alateen. CVMC, rm. 3, Saturdays, 7pm . 866-972-5266.
Pregnancy & Newborn Loss Support Group. CVMC conference
room #3, 4th Monday of month, 6:30-8:30pm. 371-4304 or -4376.
Partners for Prevention-Alcohol & Drug Abuse Coalition. CVH,
2nd Weds. of month, 11:30am-1:30pm. Info 479-4250.
Savvy Speakers Toastmasters Club. BC/BS conf. room, Industrial
Ln., 1st & 3rd Tuesdays, 5:30-7pm. Info. 883-2313 or officers-1770@
toastmastersclubs.org
Birthing Center Open House. For parents, sibs, grandparents, etc.
CVMC, 1st Wed. of month, 5:30-7pm. RSVP/Info. 371-4613.
Knee/Hip Replacement Orientation Class. CVMC, conf. room #3,
free, 1st Thurs. of each month, 2-3pm. Info 371-4188.
Breastfeeding Support Group. CVMC Garden Path Birthing Center,
1st Monday of month, 5:30-7pm. Info. 371-4415.
Infant & Child Car Seat Inspections. Berlin Fire Station, free, first
Friday of month, 12-4pm. Appointments required, 371-4198.
BRADFORD- Rockinghorse Circle of Support. For young women
with or w/o kids, childcare & transportation available. Wednesdays,
1-2:30pm, Grace Methodist Church. Info 479-1086.
New Hope II Support Group. Grace United Methodist, every Mon.,
7-9p.m. Info. at 1-800-564-2106.
BROOKFIELD- MOPS - Mothers of Preschoolers. Moms of kids
birth through kindergarten welcome. Meal & childcare provided. New
Covenant Church, 2252 Ridge Rd., 3rd Fridays, 6pm. 276-3022.
Health-focused Group. Learn to cope w/ lifes passages. Weds,
7-8pm; Info 276-3142; Dr. Alice Kempe.
CABOT- Alcoholics Anonymous. Beginners meeting. Weds., 8pm.
Call 802-229-5100 for info, www.aavt.org.
Preschool Story Time. Cabot Public Library, Fridays, 10am.
CALAIS- Mens and Womens Bible Study Groups. County Road,
Wednesdays, 7pm. Info. 485-7577 or www.thefishermenministry.org.
CHELSEA- Chelsea Historical Society House/Museum. Open 1st
& 3rd Saturdays through September, FREE, 10am-noon. 685-4447.
Story Time. Songs, stories & crafts for children birth to 5 years.
Chelsea Public Library, Wednesdays, 1:15pm. 685-2188.
TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly. Nonprofit support grp. United Church
of Chelsea, North Common, Wednesdays, 5:45pm. 685-2271/685-4429.
EAST BARRE- Story Hour. Aldrich Library York Branch, Tuesdays,
9:45am and 10:45am. Info. 476-5118.
EAST MONTPELIER- Mens Fellowship Grp. Crossroads Christian
Church, 1st & 3rd Tues., 7pm. Breakfast, 2nd Sat., 8am. 476-9962.
continued on next page
8 State Street, Montpelier 229-6788
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page 24 The WORLD January 8, 2014
ONION RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA CHANNELS 15, 16, 17
Bethel Braintree Montpelier Randolph Rochester U-32 District Towns Waterbury Schedule is subject to change without notice.
ORCA Media Channel 15
Public Access Weekly Program Schedule
Wednesday, January 8
6:00a Rural VT Black Market Bounty
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Festival of Choirs
10:30a Off The Beetin Path
11:30a Farmers Talk
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p Critical Mass TV
2:00p Sudzin Country
3:00p Healthy Food For Local
Communities
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
6:00p France 24
7:00p Messing Around With Charlie
Messing
7:30p Spotlight On VT Issues
8:00p Randomizojustic-a-thon
10:00pThinking About Drinking
Thursday, January 9
6:00a NOFA Policy Update
7:00a Salaam Shalom
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a OnThe Drive
10:30a VT Senate Spotlight
11:00a Frostival Chat
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p Rural VT Black Market Bounty
2:30p Off The Beetin Path
3:30p VCDA Winter Meeting
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
6:00p France 24
7:00p Critical Mass TV
8:00pTalking About Movies
9:00p Songwriters Notebook
10:00p Vermont Musicians OnThe Air
11:00p Instant Coffeehouse
Friday, January 10
6:00a Randomizojustic-a-thon
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Slow Living Summit
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p Senior Moments
2:30p Songwriters Notebook
3:00p Brunch With Bernie LIVE
4:00pThe Wake We Leave Behind
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
6:00p France 24
7:00pThe Struggle
8:00p Vermont Countryside
9:00p For The Animals
10:00p OnThe Drive
Saturday, January 11
6:00a Jesus By John
7:00a Hour of Refreshing
7:30a Wings of Devotion
8:00a Senior Moments
10:00a Welcome To Reality: Phase B
11:00a The Wake We Leave Behind
11:30a Bill Doyle on VT Issues
12:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
12:30p OnThe Drive
4:30p Roman Catholic Mass
5:00p Washington Baptist Church
6:00p France 24
7:00p Farewell To Factory Towns
8:30p Salaam Shalom
9:30p Lost and Refound
11:00p Gay USA
Sunday, January 12
6:00a Wings of Devotion
6:30a Hour of Refreshing
7:00a Jesus By John
8:00a TBA
10:00a VT Senate Spotlight
10:30a Roman Catholic Mass
11:00a Vermont Musicians OnThe Air
12:00p Washington Baptist Church
1:00pThe Struggle
1:30p Randomizojustic-a-thon
4:00p Messing Around With Charlie
Messing
4:30p Vermont Countryside
5:30p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
6:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
7:00p Healthy Food For Local
Communities
8:30p Off The Beetin Path
9:30pTalking About Movies
10:00p Rural VT Black Market Bounty
Monday, January 13
6:00a Sudzin Country
7:00a Songwriters Notebook
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Vermont Musicians OnThe Air
10:00a Talking About Movies
11:00a Healthy Food For Local
Communities
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p For The Animals
2:00p Welcome To Reality: Phase B
3:00p Common Good VT
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
6:00p France 24
7:00p Senior Moments
8:30p Salaam Shalom
9:30p Farmers Talk
10:00p VCDA Winter Meeting
Tuesday, January 14
6:00a The Struggle
6:30a For The Animals
7:00a Vermont Countryside
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Salaam Shalom
10:00a VCDA Winter Meeting
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p Farmers Talk
1:30p Frostival Chat
2:30pThinking About Drinking
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show
6:00p Welcome To Reality: Phase B LIVE
7:00p VT Senate Spotlight
7:30p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
8:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
8:30pTalking About Movies
9:00p Frostival Chat
10:00p Sudzin Country
10:30p Common Good VT
11:30pTBA
ORCA Media Channel 16
Education Access Weekly Program Schedule
Additional Educational Programming
Between Scheduled Shows
Wednesday, January 8
12:00p KeepTalking: Depression and
the Holidays
1:00p Mindfulness & Leadership Program
3:00p Education JoinThe Conversation
4:00p An Evening At The Library
5:00p Anima Borealis
6:30p Lets Talk About Mental Health
7:00p Montpelier School Board LIVE
Thursday, January 9
12:00p Eating Far From Home
1:30p New England Culinary Institute
3:30p Brattleboro Literary Festival
4:30pTech Jam
7:00p CVTS Game of the Week
9:00p Vermont Floor Hockey
10:00p Lets Talk About Mental Health
10:30p First Wednesdays
Friday, January 10
12:00p Harwood Union School Board
4:30p U32 School Board
8:30p Montpelier School Board
Saturday, January 11
12:00p CVTS Game of the Week
3:00p E. Montpelier School Board
6:00p Holistically Speaking
6:30p Community Cinema
7:30p Mindfulness & Leadership Program
10:30p Speaking From Experience
Sunday, January 12
12:00p U32 School Board
4:00p Montpelier School Board
8:00p VT State Board of Education
Monday, January 13
12:00p Harwood Union School Board
4:00p Holistically Speaking
5:00pTech Jam
8:30p An Evening At The Library
9:00p EAI/PAI Debate
10:30p Sports Talk
11:00pThe Artful Word
Tuesday, January 14
12:00p First Wednesdays
1:30p Education JoinThe Conversation
2:30p CVTS Game of the Week
4:30p EAI/PAI Debate
6:00p Healthy Living
7:30p Massachusetts School of Law
8:30p New England Culinary Institute
10:30p Eating Far From Home
ORCA Media Channel 17
Government Access Weekly Program Schedule
Wed, Jan. 8
7:00a Government Accountability Committee
12:30p HowWashington Really Works
4:00p Legislative Preview
6:30p Montpelier City Council LIVE
Thu, Jan. 9
7:30a Bethel Selectboard
10:30a Montpelier Development Review
Board
3:30p Montpelier Planning Commission
6:00p Green Mountain Care Board
Fri, Jan. 10
7:30a Waterbury Selectboard
11:00a Berlin Selectboard
2:30p Waterbury Municipal Complex Building
Committee
6:00p Montpelier Design Review Committee
8:00p Montpelier City Council
Sat, Jan. 11
7:00a VTYankee Decommissioning Alliance
9:00a Randolph Selectboard
12:30p Waterbury Village Trustees
3:30p Berlin Selectboard
7:00p Bethel Selectboard
10:00p Central Vermont Regional Planning
Commission
Sun, Jan. 12
7:00a Building Communities Grants
Ceremony
11:00a City Room
12:00p Legislative Preview
3:00p Draft Property Tax Exemption Legisla-
tion Public Hearing
5:00p Waterbury Selectboard
9:00p Waterbury Municipal Complex Building
Committee
Mon, Jan. 13
7:00a Senator Bernie Sanders
9:00a Governors Press Conference
10:30a HowWashington Really Works
1:30p Waterbury Village Trustees
4:00p Draft Property Tax Exemption Legisla-
tion Public Hearing
5:00p Montpelier Planning Commission LIVE
Tue, Jan. 14
6:30a Green Mountain Care Board
10:00a VTYankee Decommissioning Alliance
12:00p City Room
1:00p Building Communities Grants
Ceremony
4:00p Governors Press Conference
5:30p Montpelier Design Review Committee
LIVE
7:00p Montpelier Development Review Board
Community Media(802) 224-9901 Check out our Web page at www.orcamedia.net
Making & Restoring Fine Violins
Violin Viola Cello Bass
VIOLIN RENTALS
Only
$
15 month
476-7798
10 Hutchins Circle
Barre
Cello Rentals
only
$28/month
www.vermontviolinmaker.com
Gregoires VIOLIN SHOP
Rentals
Service
Sales
Strings
Books
Accessories
Appraisals
Bow Rehairing
& Restoration
12-25
2 col x 6.35
ART EXHIBITS
BARRE- Whimsy and World View. Pet portraits and mixed
media by Christine Hartman. Barre Opera House, through
3/25/14.
BERLIN- Quiet Observations: Anthills, Insects & Water.
Drawings and paintings by Janet Fredericks. Central VT Medical
Center lobby gallery, through 1/10.
HARDWICK- Cats and Tigers and Turtles, Oh My! Work by
five women artists from the GRACE collection. Old Firehouse
Gallery, through 1/14.
MONTPELIER- Grief and Praise. A series of eight clay decora-
tive masks reflecting a 7-day walk-about fast by Janice Walrafen.
Contemporary Dance and Fitness Studio, Langdon St., through
1/21.
-- Landscape Photography by Lee Lilly. Montpelier Senior
Activity Center, 58 Barre St., through 1/30.
-- Shared Landscape. Multi-media and photography by Kim
Ward & Terri Kneen. Green Bean Art Gallery, Capitol Grounds,
through 1/31.
-- Places & Faces on a Journey. Paintings by Regis Cummings.
Photo ID required. Governors Gallery, Pavilion Bldg, through
3/28.
-- Sculpture Exhibit. Featuring works by Thea Alvin, Ria Blaas,
Rob Hitzig, Steve Proctor, Brian-Jon Swift & James Irving
Westermann.Vermont Arts Council Sculpture Garden, ongoing.
RANDOLPH- Ken Goss Photographs. Landscapes, still life and
portraits. Gifford Gallery, through 1/29.
ROCHESTER- Juice Bar Winter Show. Group show by gallery
members. BigTown Gallery, through 4/5.
CVTV Channel 23 BARRE, VT
ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE
Wednesday
6:30 AM Authors at the Aldrich
8 AM Vermont Architecture
9 AM ACLU - Surveillance
Conference
2:30 PM City Room
3:30 PM Joint Urban Ministry
4 PM City Room
4:30 PM Sports Talk
5 PM VT Genealogy Library
6 PM Seantor Anthony Pollina
7 PM Bill Doyle on VT Issues
7:30 PM Vermont Historical
Society
8:30 PM Sports Talk
9 PM VT_brigade_B1000
10 PM Treasuruer of Vermont
10:30 PM Brattleboro Literary
Festival
Thursday
2 AM Fright Night
6 AM Authors at the Aldrich
8 AM City Room
9 AM Arts Collage
10 AM VT Genealogy Library
12 PM Sports Talk
12:30 PM Vermont Architecture
2 PM City Room
2:30 PM VT Yankee Closing
impact
4 PM City Room
4:30 PM Brattleboro Literary
Festival
5:30 PM Celebrating the Arts
7:30 PM Thru-Hike Panel
9:30 PM Treasuruer of Vermont
11 PM Fright Nig
Friday
2 AM Fright Night
7 AM Vermont Architecture
9 AM Arts Collage
9:30 AM City Room
10 AM City Room
10:30 AM Treasuruer of Vermont
11 AM Celebrating the Arts
12:30 PM Workers Center
1 PM Brattleboro Literary
Festival
2 PM Sports Talk
2:30 PM Got Transparency?
4:30 PM VT Genealogy Library
7:30 PM City Room
8 PM Vermont Architecture
11 PM Fright Night
Saturday
1 AM Sports Talk
2 AM Fright Night
4 AM Vermont Historical Society
6 AM New England Cooks
7:30 AM Sports Talk
8 AM Captain Salty
9 AM School Breakfast=Success
9:30 AM Talking About Movies
10:30 AM Vermont Historical
Society
11:30 AM Celebrating the Arts
1 PM ACLU - Surveillance
Conference
7:30 PM Sports Talk
8 PM VT Genealogy Library
11 PM Fright Nigh
Sunday
2 AM Sports Talk
6:30 AM Sports Talk
7 AM Captain Salty
9:30 AM CVTSports_101813
10:30 AM Talking About Movies
11 AM Celebrating the Arts
12:30 PM VT Yankee Closing
impact
2 PM City Room
4:30 PM Workers Center
5:30 PM Treasuruer of Vermont
6 PM Sports Talk
6:30 PM Vermont Architecture
7:30 PM Sports Talk
8 PM School Breakfast=Success
8:30 PM Brattleboro Literary
Festival
10 PM Fright Night
Monday
2 AM Fright Night
6:30 AM Arts Collage
7 AM Birth to Three
8 AM Sports Talk
8:30 AM Authors at the Aldrich
9:30 AM Bill Doyle on VT Issues
10:30 AM City Room
11 AM Got Transparency?
1 PM Workers Center
1:30 PM School
Breakfast=Success
2 PM Celebrating the Arts
3:30 PM Sports Talk
4 PM City Room
4:30 PM True North
5 PM Thunder Road
6:30 PM Joint Urban Ministry
7 PM ACLU - Surveillance
Conference
Tuesday
7 AM VT_brigade_B1000
8 AM Sports Talk
8:30 AM CVTSports_101813
9:28 AM Seantor Anthony
Pollina
10 AM Barre Town School -
Concert
10:30 AM Vermont Architecture
11:30 AM City Room
12 PM Arts Collage
1 PM Celebrating the Arts
2:30 PM Bill Doyle on VT Issues
3 PM Authors at the Aldrich
4 PM Captain Salty
5 PM VT Genealogy Library
6:30 PM Thunder Road
8 PM City Room
8:30 PM Got Transparency?
11 PM Talking About Movies
GROTON- Stories and More (S.A.M.): ages 4 & up, 2nd Saturdays,
10:30am; YA Book Club: 3rd Mondays, 6:30pm; Book Discussion
Group: 4th Mondays, 7pm; Crafts & Conversation, Wednesdays,
1-3pm; Beginner Spanish: Thursdays, 6pm; Nifty Needles: 2nd
Tuesdays, 7-9pm. All at Groton Public Library, 584-3358.
HARDWICK- Caregiver Support Group. Agency on Aging, rear
entrance Merchants Bank, 2nd Thurs of month. 229-0308 x306.
Celebrate Recovery Groups. Touch of Grace A/G Church, Rts. 15 &
16. Women, Tues. 7pm. Men, Weds. 7pm. Men & Women, Fri. 6pm.
Info 472-8240/533-2245.
Peace and Justice Coalition. G.R.A.C.E. Arts bldg (old firehouse),
Tues., 7 pm. Info. Robin 533-2296.
Nurturing Fathers Program. Light supper included. Thurs.,
6-8:30pm. Registration/info 472-5229.
MARSHFIELD- Playgroup. Twinfield Preschool, Mondays, 11am-
12:30pm (except when school not in session).
Jaquith Public Library Activities. Old Schoolhouse Common, 426-
3581. Story & Play Group, Wednesdays, 10-11:30am. Book Group
for Adults, stop by for copy of the book, 4th Mondays, 7pm. Teen
Fridays, Fridays, 3-5pm. Imagination Station, Mondays, 3-4:30pm.
Open Gym/Activity Time for elementary age kids, Fridays, 3-4:30pm
Twin Valley Seniors. Mon, Wed, Fri., 11-2; meals $4 for ages 55 and
older and Meals on Wheels, 426-3447 (vol. drivers needed). Walking
Club, Weds. Old Schoolhouse Common. Info 426-3717.
MIDDLESEX- Food Shelf. United Methodist Church, Saturdays,
9-10:30am.
MONTPELIER- Central VT Adult Basic Education. Free classes.
Intermediate Level Reading for Adults: Thurs. 9-10am; Learning
English: Tues. or Weds. 9-10am; English Conversation: Tues. 4-5pm.
Montpelier Learning Center, 100 State St. Info/pre-register 223-3403.
Open Library. Open to all, books and DVDs for all ages. Resurrection
Baptist Church, open Sundays 12:30pm-2pm.
Central VT Roller Derbys Wrecking Doll Society. Intro to roller
derby, gear supplied, bring a mouth guard. First time is free. Montpelier
Rec. Center, Barre St., Saturdays 5-6:30pm. www.twincityriot.com
Celiac Support Group. Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., 2nd Wednesdays,
4-5pm. Info. 598-9206.
Cycling 101. Training rides on local paved roads. Tuesdays, leaves
Montpelier H.S. at 5:30pm. Info. 229-9409.
MSAC Public Activities: FEAST Together, $5 sugg. donation ages
60+/$6 others, Tuesdays & Fridays, noon-1pm. FEAST To Go, bene-
fits senior meals program, $5-8.50, Thursdays, 11am-1pm. Meal reser-
vations 262-6288. All at Montpelier Senior Activity Ctr, 58 Barre St.
A Course In Miracles study group. Everyone is welcome and there
is no charge. Christ Church, Tuesdays, 7pm. Info. 619-540-4876.
Parents Group and Meet-Up. Connect with local parents to share
advice & information, kids welcome. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Hayes
Rm, first Mondays, 10-11:30am. Info. mamasayszine@gmail.com
Joyful Noise Laughter Club. Playful exercises to get you moving,
breathing and laughing. Ages 8 & up. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 2nd
& 4th Mondays (no holidays), 6-7pm. Charlotte, 223-1607.
Families Anonymous. For families or friends of those who have
issues with addiction, alcohol and/or mental illness. Bethany Church,
2nd floor youth room, Mondays, 7-8pm. 229-6219.
Freeride Montpelier Open Shop Nights. Need help w/a bike repair?
Come to the volunteer-run community bike shop. 89 Barre St., Tuesdays
6-8pm, other days seasonal, donations. Info. freeridemontpelier.org
Womens Book Club. New members welcome. Kellogg-Hubbard
Library, East Montpelier rm, 2nd Thursdays, 6:30-7:30pm. 223-8067.
Free Community Meals. Mondays: Unitarian Church, 11am-1pm;
Tuesdays: Bethany Church, 11:30am-1pm; Wednesdays: Christ
Church, 11am-12:30pm; Thursdays: Trinity Church, 11:30am-1pm;
Fridays: St. Augustine Church, 11am-12:30pm. 2nd Saturdays: Trinity
Church, 11:30am-1pm; Last Sundays, Bethany Church, 4:30-6:30pm.
Trinity Teen Night. United Methodist Church, 2nd and 3rd Fridays,
5-9pm. Volunteers needed to share talents & hobbies. Info 279-3695.
Toastmasters. Montpelier Speakeasies held at National Life, 1st & 3rd
Wednesdays, noon-1pm. Learn the arts of speaking, listening & thinking.
No fee for guests. 229-7455 or tdensmore@sentinelinvestments.com
Grandparents Raising Their Childrens Children. Support group,
childcare provided. Resurrection Baptist Church, 144 Elm St., 2nd
Thursday of the month, 6-8pm. Info. 476-1480.
Calico County Quilters. All skill levels welcome. Bethany Church,
Red Room, 2nd Saturday of each month, 1-3pm (NOT Oct. or May).
Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA). Bethany Church basement,
Tuesdays, 6:30pm. Info. 229-9036.
Brain Injury Support Group. All brain injury survivors, caregivers &
adult family members welcome to attend. Disability Rights VT, 141
Main St., first Monday of month, 5:30-7:30pm. 1-800-834-7890 x106.
Kellogg-Hubbard Library Activities. 135 Main St., 223-3338.
Story Time, Tues/Fri, 10:30am. Write On!, for aspiring authors age
6-10, Fridays, 3:30-4pm. YA Nights: games, movies & more for teens
& tweens, 3rd Fridays, 6-9pm. Youth Chess Club, Weds, 5:30-7pm.
Read to Coco: Wednesdays, 3:30-4pm. Conversations with the
Word Weaver, with Lois Liggett: Tuesdays, 1:30pm.
CHADD ADHD Parent Support Group. Childcare not available,
please make plans for your child. Woodbury College, second Tuesday
of month, 5:30-7:30pm. Info. 498-5928.
Overeaters Anonymous. Bethany Church, Fridays at noon. 223-3079.
Good Beginnings of Central VT. 174 River St., 595-7953. Mamas
Circle, Thursdays, 10am-noon; Volunteer Meetings, 2nd Wednesdays,
10:30am; Babywearing Group, 2nd Thursdays, 10:30am-noon;
Bible Study. Christian Alliance Church, Weds., 7pm. 476-3221.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings in Montpelier, daily. Call 802-229-
5100 for latest times & locations, www.aavt.org.
Al-Anon. Trinity Methodist Church, Main St., Sun., 6:15-7:30pm.
Info. 1-866-972-5266.
Central Vermont Support Group. Meeting at Another Way, 125
Barre St., Tuesdays 6-7:30pm. Info. 479-5485.
Community Kitchen. Unitarian Universalist, 2nd & 4th Sun., 4:30-
6pm. Info. Richard Sheir, 223-4799.
SL AA. 12-step recovery group for sex/relationship problems. Bethany
Church, Wed., 5pm. Info. 802-249-6825.
Survivors of Incest Anonymous. Bethany Church parlor, 115 Main
St., Mondays, 5pm. Please call first: 229-9036 or 454-8402.
Brain Injury Support Group. Unitarian Church, first & third Thurs.
of month, 1:30-2:30pm. Info. call toll free 1-877-985-8440.
La Leche League. Breastfeeding info and support. Good Beginnings,
174 River St., 3rd Tuesdays, 10am. Info 244-1254.
Playgroups: Dads & Kids Playgroup, Thursdays, 6-7:30pm and
Playgroup, Saturdays, 9:30-11am, both at Family Center of
Washington County. All held during school year only.
Kindred Connections Peer to Peer Cancer Support for Patients and
Caregivers. Info 1-800-652-5064 email info@vcsn.net
Christian Meditation. Christ Church, Mondays, 12-1pm.
MORETOWN- Mad River Chorale. New singers welcome.
Rehearsals at Harwood Union High School chorus room, Mondays,
7-9pm. Info. 496-2048.
Playgroup. For kids birth to age 6 and their caregivers. Moretown
Elementary, Mondays, 9:30-11am (except when school not in session).
MORRISVILLE- Overeaters Anonymous. First Congregational
Church, 85 Upper Main St., Fridays at noon. Info. 888-2356.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Daily meetings, call 229-5100 for latest
times & locations; www.aavt.org.
NORTHFIELD- Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program. For ages 12-18.
Readiness & Regional Technology Center, Norwich campus, Tuesdays,
6-8:30pm. Info. capitalcomposite@yahoo.com
Clogging & Irish Step Lessons. W/Green Mountain Cloggers, ages
8-78, donations. Sundays 5-8pm. 522-2935.
Northfield Chess Club. Casual games & speed chess. Northfield
Senior Center, $1, Tuesdays, 7pm. Info. 764-5880.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings M-W-Th. Call 802-229-5100 for
details; www.aavt.org.
Playgroup. United Church of Northfield, Wednesdays, 9:30-11am.
Held only when school is in session. Info. 262-3292 x113.
PLAINFIELD- Cutler Memorial Library Activities: Classic Book
Club: 1st Mondays, 6pm; Plainfield Book Club: 3rd Mondays, 7pm.
Call 454-8504 to confirm.
Beaders Group. All levels welcome, bring your projects. The Bead
Hive, Saturdays, 11am-2pm. Info. 454-1615.
Diabetes Discussion & Support Group. Everyone welcome. The
Health Center conf. room, 3rd Thursdays, 1:30pm. Info. 322-6600.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Call 229-5100 for times/info, www.aavt,org.
RANDOLPH- Caregiver Support Group. Open to anyone caring
for a loved one. Gifford Medical Ctr, second Tuesdays, 11am-noon.
Line Dancing. Chandler Music Hall, 71-73 Main St., by donation,
Wednesdays 6:30-8:30pm.
Matters of the Heart. Experts discuss ways to improve heart health.
Gifford Conference Ctr, FREE, 3rd Wednesdays, 1-2pm. 728-2191.
Grief Support Group. The Family Center at Gifford, 44 South Main
St., 2nd & 4th Tuesdays, 4-5pm. Info. 728-7100 x7.
New Business Forum. Vermont Tech Enterprise Center, 1540 VT Rte
66, 2nd Wednesdays, 11:30am-1pm. 728-9101.
continued on next page
Skates
Sharpened
Professionally
Expect the Best
802-622-0580
sanisportservice.com
Mondays / Barre
Tuesdays / Northeld
Wednesdays / Montpelier
Thursdays-Fridays-Saturdays / Barre
1. The Hobbit: The Desolation
of Smaug (PG-13)
2. Anchorman 2: The Legend
Continues (PG-13) Will Ferrell
3. Frozen (PG) animated
4. American Hustle (R)
5. Saving Mr. Banks (PG-13)
6. The Hunger Games: Catching
Fire (PG-13) Jennifer Lawrence
7. Tyler Perrys A Madea
Christmas (PG-13) Tyler Perry,
Chad Michael Murray
8. Walking With Dinosaurs 3D
(PG) animated
9. Dhoom: 3 (NR) Aamir Khan
10. Thor: The Dark World (PG-
13) Chris Hemsworth
(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.
January 8, 2014 The WORLD page 25
Montpelier Antiques Market

2nd & 4th Sundays October - March
Montpelier Elks Country Club
1 Country Club Rd., Montpelier, Vermont
7:30 AM - 1:30 PM
October 27 November 10 & 24 December 8 & 22
January 12 & 26 February 9 & 23 March 9 & 23
Early Buyers $5 (7:30AM) General Public $2 (9:00AM)
Visit us at: www.montpelierantiquesmarket.com
Dealer Information (802) 751-6138
Montpelier Antiques Market

2nd & 4th Sundays October - March
Montpelier Elks Country Club
1 Country Club Rd., Montpelier, Vermont
7:30 AM - 1:30 PM
October 27

November 10 & 24

December 8 & 22
January 12 & 26

February 9 & 23

March 9 & 23
Early Buyers $5 (7:30AM)

General Public $2 (9:00AM)


Visit us at: www.montpelierantiquesmarket.com
Dealer Information (802) 751-6138
Montpelier Antiques Market

2nd & 4th Sundays October - March
Montpelier Elks Country Club
1 Country Club Rd., Montpelier, Vermont
7:30 AM - 1:30 PM
October 27 November 10 & 24 December 8 & 22
January 12 & 26 February 9 & 23 March 9 & 23
Early Buyers $5 (7:30AM) General Public $2 (9:00AM)
Visit us at: www.montpelierantiquesmarket.com
Dealer Information (802) 751-6138
Our 8th
Season!
2013-2014
Montpelier Antiques Market

2nd & 4th Sundays October - March
Montpelier Elks Country Club
1 Country Club Rd., Montpelier, Vermont
7:30 AM - 1:30 PM
October 27 November 10 & 24 December 8 & 22
January 12 & 26 February 9 & 23 March 9 & 23
Early Buyers $5 (7:30AM) General Public $2 (9:00AM)
Visit us at: www.montpelierantiquesmarket.com
Dealer Information (802) 751-6138
Montpelier Antiques Market

2nd & 4th Sundays October - March
Montpelier Elks Country Club
1 Country Club Rd., Montpelier, Vermont
7:30 AM - 1:30 PM
October 27 November 10 & 24 December 8 & 22
January 12 & 26 February 9 & 23 March 9 & 23
Early Buyers $5 (7:30AM) General Public $2 (9:00AM)
Visit us at: www.montpelierantiquesmarket.com
Dealer Information (802) 751-6138
Spaghetti Dinner
NOTICE
The monthly spaghetti dinners at the Knights of
Columbus Hall in Barre Town will no longer be offered.
Our sincere thanks to everyone who supported this
charitable benet over the years and our best wishes to
everyone for the New Year.
Knights of Columbus 399
84 Pine Hill Road, Barre Town
Montpelier
Lodge of Elks
#924
203 Country Club Road
Montpelier 223-2600 Ext #27
JACKPOT $1,600.
55 numbers or less --
FLASH BALL $50.
MINI JACKPOT $1,100.
55 numbers or less --
Excellent Parking Available
MONTPELIER LODGE OF ELKS #924
BINGO
Tuesday Nights
Tuesday 1/7/14
New Years Resolution:
PLAY BINGO AT
MONTPELIER ELKS 924!!!
Safe & Happy New Year To All...
Doors open at 4:00 pm
Early Birds at 6:00pm
Regular Games at 7:00 pm
~Food Available~
Kitchen opens at 5:00pm
StepnTime Line Dancers of Central Vermont
Line Dancing - Spring Session
Starting Jan. 8 ~ Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30, at Chandler
Music Hall, 71-73 Main St., RANDOLPH
Starting Jan. 16 ~ Thursdays, 6:30-8:30, at Old Labor Hall,
46 Granite St., BARRE
An hour of beginner & intermediate lessons followed by open dancing
Admission by donation.
For more info: 802-728-5722 or
jamnsam@myfairpoint.net

CAT SHOW

Have
you
seen
these
CATS?

Photos by Chanan & O Silva
You just might see them or their relatives
January 11th and 12th 2014
at the
Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center
870 Williston Rd., Burlington, Vermont ( I-89 exit 14w)
Admission: Adults $7.00 Seniors 60+ and Childrens 6 to 12 $5.00
Open to the public from10.am to 4.pm both days
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Good for $1.00 Discount

on 1 Admission fee


CAT SHOW

Have
you
seen
these
CATS?

Photos by Chanan & O Silva
You just might see them or their relatives
January 11th and 12th 2014
at the
Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center
870 Williston Rd., Burlington, Vermont ( I-89 exit 14w)
Admission: Adults $7.00 Seniors 60+ and Childrens 6 to 12 $5.00
Open to the public from10.am to 4.pm both days
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Good for $1.00 Discount

on 1 Admission fee


C
A
T
S
H
O
W


H
ave
you

seen

th
ese
C
A
T
S
?


Photos by Chanan & O Silva
You just might see them or their relatives
Jan
u
ary 11th
an
d
12th
2014
at the
Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center
870 Williston Rd., Burlington, Vermont ( I-89 exit 14w)
Admission: Adults $7.00 Seniors 60+ and Childrens 6 to 12 $5.00
Open to the public from10.am to 4.pm both days

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Good for $1.00 Discount


on 1 Admission fee

CANADIAN CLUB
ROUTE 14 479-9090
Just outside of Barre
CANADIAN CLUB
BINGO
Flash Ball 1: $350.
Flash Ball 2: $300.
Mini Jackpot 54#'s: $2,925.
Jackpot 52#'s: $1,200.
Thursday Night
Doors Open at 4:00 PM
Premies at 6:00 PM
Regular Games at 7:00 PM
THIS W
EEK'S SPECIAL
C
H
IC
K
E
N
&
B
IS
C
U
IT
CALAIS- Lizzy Mandell. With Christine Malcolm & Mary Collins.
At Whammy Bar, Maple Corner Store, FREE, starts 7:30pm.
MONTPELIER- Vermont Economy. VT History Museum, 1-3pm.
See description 1/8.
Encounter with Japan: An Adventure in Love. Writer Susan Katz
Kaitoh shares the story of her mothers life-changing trip to Japan, won
through an essay contest in 1960. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 6:30pm.
Andy Pitt & Friends. Roots, blues, Americana. Bagitos Cafe, 28
Main St., 6-8pm. Info. 229-9212.
Winter Wildlife Tracking. Biologist John Jose helps you identify
tracks using sand-filled trays and plaster casts. Hunger Mtn Coop, $10
members/$12 non/$5 kids, 6-7:15pm. Pre-register 223-8000 x202.
Green Mountain Care Board Public Meeting. Dept. of Financial
Regulation, 89 Main St., 3rd floor, 1-4pm. Info. at http://gmcboard.
vermont.gov/
Simply Music Presentation. Find out about this new approach to
learning piano. Free presentation by Nicholas Mortimer. Christ Church,
64 State St., 5-6pm. Info. 595-1220 or www.LovePlayingPiano.org
Spice on Snow Folk Music Festival. Hosted by Summit School of
Traditional Music and Culture. Concerts, workshops and more. Full
schedule at www.summit-school.org
Boy Scout Tree Recycling. $10 donation. Call 223-2137.
Friday, January 10
CALAIS- Celtic sessions. At Whammy Bar, Maple Corner Store,
FREE, starts 7:30pm.
MONTPELIER- Laugh Local VT Open Mic Comedy Night.
Support local comedy by performing or watching those that do.
American Legion, 21 Main St., signup 7:30pm, show 8pm. 793-3884.
Jim Thompson. Piano and song. Bagitos Cafe, 28 Main St., 6-8pm.
Info. 229-9212.
Rewriting Your Truths. Workshop with Certified Holistic Health
Coach Sarah Richardson, M.Ed., M.S. Hunger Mtn Coop, $2 mem-
bers/$3 non, 6-7:30pm. Pre-register 223-8000 x202.
Simply Music Presentation. Learn about this new approach to learn-
ing piano. Free presentation by Nicholas Mortimer. Montpelier Senior
Ctr, Barre St., 3:30-4:30pm. 595-1220 or www.LovePlayingPiano.org
Boy Scout Tree Recycling. $10 donation. Call 223-2137.
Spice on Snow Folk Music Festival. See description 1/9.
Saturday, January 11
ADAMANT- Two Shoes Off. Folk trio featuring Susannah Blachly,
George White & Carter Stowell. Adamant Community Club, $10
advance at co-op/$15 at door, optional potluck 5:30pm, show 7pm.
BARRE- Preserving Large Paper Objects. Learn how to care for
historic maps, documents & more in this workshop. VT History Center,
$15/free for members, 10am-12:30pm. Call 479-8522 to register.
CALAIS- Audrey Bernstein and Joe Capps. Jazz. At Whammy Bar,
Maple Corner Store, FREE, starts 7:30pm.
MARSHFIELD- Movies for Everyone. In this film, Charlie
Chaplins tramp goes prospecting in Alaska, in winter. All ages wel-
come. Jaquith Public Library, FREE, 11am. Info. 426-3581.
MONTPELIER- Capital City Indoor Farmers Market. Locally
grown & prepared foods, more. Marie Frohlich cooking demo, 10am-
noon. Music by Patti Casey. VT College of Fine Arts gym, 10am-2pm.
Good Old Wagon, 11am-1pm; Irish Session, 2-5pm; Art Herttua &
Stephen Morabito Jazz, 6-8pm. All at Bagitos Cafe, 28 Main St.
Info. 229-9212.
Simply Music Presentation. Find out about this new approach to
learning piano. Free presentation by Nicholas Mortimer. Christ Church,
64 State St., 9:30-10:30am. 595-1220 or www.LovePlayingPiano.org
Memory Cafe Launch. First cafe will include introductions among
participants, refreshments, conversation, music by Eric Friedman.
Montpelier Senior Activity Ctr, 58 Barre St., 10am-noon. 223-2518.
Boy Scout Tree Recycling. $10 donation. Call 223-2137.
Renoir. Film about the painter, set in 1915. In French with subtitles.
Part of MSAC & Dharma Film Series, bring a cushion. Montpelier
Senior Activity Center, $3 sugg. donation, 6:30pm. Info. 224-1001.
Spice on Snow Folk Music Festival. See description 1/9.
STOWE- Cross-country Ski with Green Mtn Club. All abilities,
various distances at Trapp Family Lodge, trail fee. Call 505-0603 or
622-0585 for meeting time and place.
6th Annual Ladies Nordic Ski Expo. Beginner to advanced skiers
welcome. Trapp Family Lodge, $105, 8:30am-5:30pm. Details &
registration at www.catamounttrail.org
Sunday, January 12
EAST MONTPELIER- Snowshoe with GMC Young Adventurers
Club. Easy, 1-2 miles, for parents with young children. Call 229-9810
for meeting time and place.
Simply Music Presentation. Find out about this new approach to
learning piano. Free presentation by Nicholas Mortimer. Four Corners
Schoolhouse, 3-4pm. Info. 595-1220 or www.LovePlayingPiano.org
continued on next page
Yoga Classes. All ages & levels, donations benefit Safeline. VTC
Campus Center, last Sunday of month, 2-3:30pm.
Lift for Life Exercises, Tues-Fri, 8:30am; Cribbage 9:30am &
Mahjongg 10am on Tuesdays; Art History Video Series 12:45pm &
Bridge Club 2pm Wednesdays; Foot Clinics, 1st & 2nd Weds, 10am-
noon, call to sign up. All at Randolph Senior Ctr, Hale St. 728-9324.
Cancer Support Group. For survivors, sufferers & family. Gifford
Conference Ctr, 2nd Tuesdays, 9:30-11am. 728-2270.
Al-Anon/Alateen. Gifford Hospital, Weds, 7pm and Sundays, 11am.
Storytime. Kimball Library, Wed., 11am, ages 2-5; Toddlertime, Fri.,
10:30am; Gathering for hand work, 2nd & 4th Mon., 6pm.
ROXBURY- Alcoholics Anonymous. Call 802-229-5100 for times &
locations; www.aavt.org.
STOWE- Alcoholics Anonymous. Call 802-229-5100 for times &
locations; www.aavt.org.
Green Mtn Dog Club Mtg. All dog lovers welcome. Commodores
Inn, 4th Thursdays. 479-9843 or www.greenmountaindogclub.org
WAITSFIELD- Headache Relief Clinic. Free treatments using mas-
sage & craniosacral therapy. Mad River Valley Health Ctr, 2nd fl., last
Thursday of month, 4-7pm. RSVP 595-1919.
Community Acupuncture Night. Free assessment & treatment,
donations welcome. Three Moons Wellness, 859 Old County Rd., 2nd
fl., last Weds., of month, 4-7pm. RSVP 272-3690.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Call 229-5100 for times & locations, or
www.aavt.org.
WARREN- Knit and Play. Bring your kids and your projects. All
levels welcome. Warren Public Library, Thursdays, 9:30-11:30am.
WASHINGTON- Central VT ATV Club. Washington Fire Station,
3rd Tuesdays, 6:30pm. 224-6889.
Art and Adventure with April, 3rd Saturdays at 11am; Storytime,
Mondays at 11am; Tech Help Drop-In, Saturdays 10am-2pm. All at
Calef Memorial Library. Info. 883-2343.
WATERBURY- Story Times: Babies & Toddlers, Mondays 10am;
Preschoolers, Fridays 10am. Waterbury Public Library, 244-7036.
Noontime Knitters. Bring your latest project, crocheters also welcome.
Waterbury Public Library, Tuesdays, noon-1pm. Info. 244-7036.
Support Group for women who have experienced partner abuse.
Info at 1-877-543-3498.
Playgroups: Open Gym, Mon-Tues-Fri, 11:05-11:35am; Story Time,
Tues, 10-11am; Music & Movement Playgroup, Weds, 10-11:30am;
Art & Exploration Playgroup, Thurs., 9:30-11:30am. Thatcher
Brook Primary School Childrens Room, during school year only.
Al-Anon. Congregational Church, Mondays 7pm, Fridays 8pm; Info.
1-866-972-5266.
WATERBURY CENTER- Alcoholics Anonymous. Call 229-5100
for times & locations, www.aavt.org.
Bible Study Group. Bring your bible, coffee provided, all welcome.
Waterbury Center Grange, Sundays, 5-6pm. Info. 498-4565.
WEBSTERVILLE- Fire District #3, Prudential Committee.
Monthly meeting, 105 Main St., 2nd Tuesdays, 7pm.
WILLIAMSTOWN- Knitting Goup. All handwork welcome, come
for creativity & community. Ainsworth Library, Tuesdays, 7-8:30pm.
Bible Study. Christian Alliance Church, Sun., 6pm. Info. 476-3221.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Call 802-229-5100 for times & locations, or
www.aavt.org.
WOODBURY- Knitting Group. All hand work welcome. Library,
1st & 3rd Wed., 6:30-8pm.
WORCESTER- Knitting Night. The Wool Shed, Tuesdays, 6:30-
8:30
Playgroup. Craft, snack, outdoor time & more. Doty Elementary
pre-k room, Thursdays, 9:30-11am. For info. call Shaylyn, 223-1312.
Wednesday, January 8
BARRE- Financial Aid Forms Workshop. Free workshop hosted by
VSAC to help families fill out college financial aid forms (FAFSA).
Spaulding High School, 5:30-7:30pm. RSVP to 476-4811.
Open Mike. With host John Lackard. Green Mountain Tavern, 10
Keith Ave., no cover, 9pm. Info. 522-3482.
CALAIS- Open Mic. At Whammy Bar, Maple Corner Store, FREE,
starts 7:30pm.
MARSHFIELD- Classic Film Night. This chilling 1955 film stars
Robert Mitchum as a fake preacher who marries a gullible widow.
Discussion to follow. Jaquith Public Library, FREE, 8pm. 426-3581.
MONTPELIER- Vermont Economy. Part of History for
Homeschoolers series, for ages 6 to 12. VT History Museum, $5 per
child/$4 for VHS members or families w/ 3+ kids, 1-3pm. 828-1413.
What Women Want. Author Polly Young-Eisendrath argues that most
women dont know what they want because of societys programming.
A VHC First Wednesdays program. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 7pm.
New Years Resolution: Healthy Eating. Lisa Mase of Harmonized
Cookery shares menu plans, recipes and cooking strategies. Hunger
Mtn Coop, $5 members/$7 non, 5-6pm. Pre-register 223-8000 x202.
Boy Scout Tree Recycling. $10 donation. Call 223-2137.
PLAINFIELD- M.T. Anderson Reading, Reception & Book
Signing. Andersons satirical book Feed was a finalist for the National
Book Award. Goddard College, Haybarn Theatre, FREE, 7pm.
Thursday, January 9
BARRE- Trout Unlimited MadDog Chapter Meeting. Panel dis-
cussion on Future Protection of the Winooski Watershed. Public wel-
come. Steak House Restaurant, 7-8:30pm. Info. www.maddogtu.org
SAMBELS
CATERING
223-6776
Large & Small
Parties
Receptions
Anniversaries
Special Occasions
Barre Masonic Temple - Square & Compass Club
2 Academy Street, Barre 479-9179
Every Saturday Night - Children Welcomed
Doors Open 1:30PM Early Birds 5:45PM
Sales Start 4:00PM Reg. Games 7:00PM
Kitchen 5PM Tables/Tear-opens
Saturday
Night
FLASHBALLS
PROGRESSIVE JACKPOT
$1,700
#1
$
400
#2
$
350
55#'s or less
Winner Take All????
Special
Game 11:
Extra $100
53#'s or less

24-Hr Movie Line 229-0343 BUY TICKETS ONLINE AT: www.fgbtheaters.com
~MATINEES SATURDAY & SUNDAY ONLY~
CAPITOL MONTPELIER
229-0343
www.fgbtheaters.com
FRI.-THURS., JAN. 10-16
Audio Descriptive Available on certain movies....
LONE SURVIVOR --R--
SAVING MR. BANKS --PG-13--
THE WOLF OF WALL STREET --R--
THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY
--PG--
ANCHORMAN 2 --PG-13--
AMERICAN HUSTLE --R--
PARAMOUNT
BARRE
For Showtimes Please Call
479-9621
www.fgbtheaters.com
FRI.-THURS., JAN. 10-16
THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF
SMAUG --PG-13-- (3D & 2D)
FROZEN --PG-- (3D & 2D)
THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING
FIRE --PG-13--
LONE SURVIVOR --R--
SAVING MR. BANKS --PG-13--
THE WOLF OF WALL STREET --R--
THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY --PG--
ANCHORMAN 2 --PG-13--
AMERICAN HUSTLE --R--
page 26 The WORLD January 8, 2014
CVTV CHANNEL 7
CHARTER
COMMUNICATIONS
OF BARRE
ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE
WITHOUT NOTICE
Wednesday 1/8
Barre City Council 9a,12p,3p
Williamstown Select 7p,10p

Thursday 1/9
Williamstown Select 6a, 9a, 12p
Barre Town School 3p,7p,10p

Friday 1/10
Barre Town School 6a,9a,12p
Barre Town Select 3p,7p,10p

Saturday 1/11
Barre Town Select 6a, 9a, 12p
4 PM Washington Baptist Church
5 PM Faith Community Church
6 PM Barre Congregational Church
8 PM St. Monicas Mass
9 PM Gospel Music
10 PM Calvary Life

Sunday 1/12
1 AM Faith Community Church
2 AM Barre Congregational Church
4 AM St. Monicas Mass
5 AM Washington Baptist Church
6:30 AM Calvary Life
8 AM Gospel Music
9 AM Washington Baptist Church
10 AM Faith Community Church
11 AM Barre Congregational Church
1 PM St. Monicas Mass
3:30 PM Calvary Life
5 PM Gospel Music
6 PM Washington Baptist Church
7 PM Faith Community Church
8 PM Barre Congregational Church
10 PM St. Monicas Mass
11 PM Calvary Life

Monday 1/13
Twinfield School 6a,9a,12p
Spaulding High School 3, 7, 10p

Tuesday 1/7
Spaulding High School 6a,9a,12p
Statehouse Programming
Barre City Council Live 7pm
Wednesday
5:30 AM Dartmouth Medical
7 AM The Painted Word
10 AM Vermont Youth Orchestra
12 PM Poetry Slam
12:30 PM Granite History
2:30 PM Burlington Authors
4 PM Instant Coffee House
4:30 PM The Painted Word
6 PM CVTSport_010313
7:30 PM For the Animals
8 PM Vermont Workers Center
9 PM Ask the Experts
11:30 PM Montpelier Now

Thursday
2 AM Fright Night
6 AM CVTSport_010313
8 AM For the Animals
8:30 AM Road to Recovery
9:30 AM Dartmouth Medical
11 AM For the Animals
11:30 AM Messing Around
12 PM Granite History
1:30 PM CVSWMD
2 PM Road to Recovery
2:30 PM Vermont Movie Update
3 PM Burlington Authors
4 PM Dartmouth Medical
5:30 PM The Painted Word
6:30 PM Montpelier Now
7 PM Vermont Workers Center
8 PM Wind Power Discussion
9:30 PM New England Cooks
1/17 April Verch Band, Chandler Center for the Arts - Randolph, VT
1/17 An Acoustic Evening with Lyle Lovett & John Hiatt, Flynn Theater
2/7 Eric Bibb & Ruthie Foster, Chandler Center for the Arts - Randolph, VT
2/8 Instant Misunderstanding, Twilight Theater - Lyndonville, VT
2/15 Vermont Vaudeville, Tupelo Music Hall - White River Jct, VT
2/18 Hamlet, Fuller Hall - St. Johnsbury, VT
2/21 Fatoumata Diawara, Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
2/7 thru 2/22 Freuds Last Session, Shaker Bridge Theater - Enfield, NH
3/3 DeJohnette, Lovano, Spalding, Genovese, Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
3/4 Josh Ritter, Lebanon Opera House - Lebanon, NH
3/6 North Mississippi Allstars, Jay Peak Resort - Jay, VT
3/14 Jefferson Starship: 40th Anniversary, Tupelo Music Hall - White River Jct, VT
3/15 Dan, Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
3/19 Keb Mo, Lebanon Opera House - Lebanon, NH
3/21 Lucky Plush, Twilight Theater - Lyndonville, VT
3/22 Cantrip, Chandler Center for the Arts - Randolph, VT
3/22 Robert Randolph & The Family Band, Jay Peak Resort - Jay, VT
3/29 Lucy Kaplansky, Tupelo Music Hall - White River Jct, VT
4/1 Tao Drummers, Lyndon Institute - Lyndonville, VT
4/4 John Gorka, Chandler Center for the Arts - Randolph, VT
4/4 Shawn Mullins, Tupelo Music Hall - White River Jct, VT
4/11 David Bromberg Quartet, Tupelo Music Hall - White River Jct, VT
3/28 thru 4/13 The Other Place, Shaker Bridge Theater - Enfield, NH
4/17 Cinderella - Moscow Festival Ballet, Lyndon Institute - Lyndonville, VT
5/11 The Wailin Jennys, Chandler Center for the Arts - Randolph, VT
5/2 thru 5/18 Joe Egg, Shaker Bridge Theater - Enfield, NH
oncert
Connections
2x4.75
1-8
For venue phone numbers, call
The Point at 223-2396 9:00 to 5:00
Mon.-Fri., or visit our web site at www.pointfm.com
11/29 Seamus The Great (Toys for Tots
benefit), Nectars - Burlington, VT
11/30 Hot Tuna, Jay Peak Resort - Jay,
VT
11/30 Lunasa & Karan Casey, Barre
Opera House - Barre, VT
12/4 Natalie MacMaster, Barre Opera
House - Barre, VT
12/6 Bow Thayer & Perfect Trainwreck,
Tupelo Music Hall - White River Jct, VT
12/5 thru 12/7 Claras Dream: A
Nutcracker Story, Lebanon Opera
House - Lebanon, NH
12/7 A Fools Feast, St. Johnsbury
School - St. Johnsbury, VT
12/12 Choir of Clare College, North
Congregational Church - St. Johnsbury,
VT
12/13 Ben Taylor, Higher Ground -
South Burlington, VT
12/14 Sophistafunk, Tupelo Music Hall -
White River Jct, VT
12/13 and 12/14 RAQ, Nectars -
Burlington, VT
12/12 thru 12/15 The Christmas Revels,
Hopkins Center - Hanover, NH
12/6 thru 12/22 Miracle on South
Top 10 DVD, Blu-ray Rentals
1. Man of Steel (PG-13) Henry
Cavill
2. The Heat (R) Sandra
Bullock
3. Red 2 (PG-13) Bruce Willis
4. The Internship (PG-13) Vince
Vaughn
5. White House Down (PG-13)
Channing Tatum
6. R.I.P.D (PG-13) Jeff Bridges
7. The Smurfs 2 (PG) animated
8. The Mortal Instruments: City
of Bones (PG-13) Lily Collins
9. Grown Ups 2 (PG-13) Adam
Sandler
10. Turbo (PG) animated
Top 10 DVD, Blu-ray Sales
1. Despicable Me 2 (PG)
Universal
2. Fast & Furious 6 (PG-13)
Universal
3. The Wolverine (PG-13)
FOX
4. Turbo (PG) FOX
5. Monsters University (G)
Disney
6. The Smurfs 2 (PG) Sony
7. Man of Steel (PG-13) Warner
Bros.
8. The Hobbit: An Unexpected
Journey (PG-13) Warner Bros.
9. Disneys Planes (PG)
Disney
10. Red 2 (PG-13) Summit
Source: Rentrak Corp.
(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.
PICKS OF THE WEEK
The Butler (PG-13) -- This historical
drama draws on the true story of the
butler who served under eight American
presidents and witnessed enormous social changes from the
windows of the White House. Forest Whitaker plays the fic-
tionalized butler who exchanges measured dialog with presi-
dents from Dwight D. Eisenhower (Robin Williams) to Ronald
Reagan (Alan Rickman). Oprah Winfrey plays the butlers
wife, his connection to the frustration of the people outside the
White House.
Director Lee Daniels puts a soft-toned style on the whole
story, making some of the conflicts feel softened. Although the
casting decisions for the various presidents can get distracting
at times, its still an entertaining and thoughtful look at the
human beings behind history.
Enough Said -- Eva (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) is a masseuse and
a single mom stressing about her daughters imminent depar-
ture for college. At the same garden party, she befriends ele-
gant poet Marianne (Catherine Keener), and Albert (James
Gandolfini), who also is anxious over his outbound daughter.
As she falls for adorable Albert, Eva becomes confidantes with
Marianne -- who gripes about her ex-husband incessantly. Eva
doesnt realize the annoying Neanderthal described by
Marianne is actually the charming goof shes in love with.
The leads have an easy chemistry, which makes you root for
them even more as the cracks and dysfunctions start to form in
their relationship. The movie cuts a fine balance between
romantic comedy and introspective drama.
20 Feet from Stardom (PG-13) -- Through all of Motown,
Rock n Roll and R&B, the powerful back-up singers pro-
vided the extra lift that makes hits into memorable classics.
This documentary focuses on the backup singers who have
worked with the top names in music, across decades and
across genres. Its an important perspective for any music fan
to consider. A series of superstars tell their stories about mak-
ing hit records with these talented women who received little
or no credit. Bruce Springsteen takes a sympathetic tone in his
interview. As he puts it, its a long walk from one part of the
stage to the other.
Fruitvale Station (R) -- In the 24 hours before his death,
Oscar Grant III tried to get a head start on his new years reso-
lutions. He tries to do right by his mother, his girlfriend and his
daughter. Michael B. Jordan plays the 22-year-old Oakland
native who was shot by police on New Years Day, 2009. The
movie opens with cellphone camera video of the incident in
the Bay areas Fruitvale Station, where Grant was thrown on
the ground and shot in the back after being accused of starting
a fight in a metro train. The film has been drawing awards like
a magnet with its praise for powerful performances.
(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.
Preparing for and Coping with Postpartum. Part of workshop
series for new and expectant parents. Good Beginnings, 174 River St.,
FREE, 6-8pm. Info./registration 595-7953 or gbcv91@gmail.com
40th Army Band. Performing as part of Farmers Night series, the band
will be joined by The Liberty Belles woodwind quintet, Ruck and Load
big band and Power of 10 rock band. State House, FREE, 7:30pm.
Boy Scout Tree Recycling. $10 donation. Call 223-2137.
WAITSFIELD- Off Piste in the Alps. EmberPhoto slide show fea-
turing bicycle-powered skiing adventures in the Swiss and Italian
Alps. Joslin Memorial Library, FREE, 7pm.
WILLIAMSTOWN- Financial Aid Forms Workshop. Free work-
shop hosted by VSAC to help families fill out financial aid forms
(FAFSA). Williamstown High School, 5:30-7:30pm. RSVP 433-5350.
Thursday, January 16
CALAIS- Poetry Slam. Hosted by Geof Hewitt. At Whammy Bar,
Maple Corner Store, FREE, starts 7:30pm.
MARSHFIELD- Writing and Reading Film Series. In this 2006 film,
an East German Stasi agent sets up surveillance of a writer, then starts
reading his books. Jaquith Public Library, FREE, 7pm. Info. 426-3581.
MONTPELIER- Computer & Technology Assistance. Middle school
students can help with e-mail, Facebook & more. Montpelier Senior
Activity Center, 58 Barre St., 10am-noon. Call 223-2518 to confirm.
Green Mountain Care Board Public Meeting. Dept. of Financial
Regulation, 89 Main St., 3rd floor, 1-4pm. Info. at http://gmcboard.
vermont.gov/
The Hungry Heart. Screening of the documentary about prescription
opiate abuse in Vermont. Discussion follows. Appropriate for ages 12
& up. Main Street Middle School, FREE, 6:30-8:30pm. 225-8192.
Boy Scout Tree Recycling. $10 donation. Call 223-2137.
Third Thursday Lunch Series: Civilian Conservation Corps.
Learn about the CCC public work relief program. Bring a bag lunch.
Vermont History Museum, FREE, noon. Info. 828-2180.
ROCHESTER- Off Piste in the Northeast. EmberPhoto slide show,
benefits Rochester Area Sports Trails Alliance. Pierce Hall Community
Center, $5, 7pm.
Friday, January 17
CALAIS- Granite Junction. At Whammy Bar, Maple Corner Store,
FREE, starts 7:30pm.
MONTPELIER- Full Moon Snowshoe Hike. Explore Montpeliers
hillsides with NBNC staff. Snowshoes and hot chocolate provided.
North Branch Nature Ctr, $5 members/$10 non, 7-8:30pm. 229-6206.
Jeff Lathrop. Indie, folk/rock. Bagitos Cafe, 28 Main St., 6-8pm.
Info. 229-9212.
Central VT Council on Aging Assistance. Sarah Willhoit of CVCOA
can help with your Medicare Part D Plan. Montpelier Senior Activity
Center, 58 Barre St., starting 9am. Call 479-4400 for appointment.
WATERBURY CTR- Walking the Camino: No Experience
Required. Kathy & Jerry Kilcourse share their experience walking the
475-mi. Camino de Santiago de Compostela. GMC Visitor Ctr, 7pm.
Saturday, January 18
BARRE- Additional Recyclables Collection Center Open House.
Tour, demos, refreshments, ribbon cutting at 11am. Visit the new site
at old Times Argus building. 540 North Main St., 9am-1pm.
CALAIS- The Aristocratic Peasants. With Michael Jermyn. At
Whammy Bar, Maple Corner Store, FREE, starts 7:30pm.
MONTPELIER- Lake Champlain Birding. Well explore the wet-
lands, fields & waterbodies of the Champlain Valley. W/North Branch
Nature Ctr staff, $20 members/$25 non, 8am-4:30pm. 229-6206.
Peter Farber, 11am-1pm; Irish session, 2-5pm; The Wall Stiles,
6-8pm. All at Bagitos Cafe, 28 Main St. Info. 229-9212.
Boys and Books. Discussion about motivating boys to read, with
Duncan McDougall of Childrens Literacy Foundation and U-32
librarian Dan Greene. Bear Pond Books, FREE, 11am.
Sunday, January 19
GROTON- Cleaning Without Chemicals: Reducing Your Everyday
Toxic Exposure. Presentation by Michelle Robbins, Environmental
Wellness Consultant from Williston. Groton Public Library, 3:30pm.
MARSHFIELD- Seed Saving Workshop. Anne Miller shares what
you need to know before ordering your vegetable gardening seeds.
Jaquith Public Library, FREE, 1:30pm. Info. 426-3581.
MONTPELIER- Eric Friedman. Folk ballads for Sunday brunch.
Bagitos Cafe, 28 Main St., 11am-1pm. Info. 229-9212.
TUNBRIDGE- Guy Davis. The bluesman returns to Tunbridge for
the MountainFolk concert series. Tunbridge Town Hall, 7:30pm. Tix at
SoRo Market, Tunbridge Store or http://mtnfolk.org
MONTPELIER- Capital City Concerts: Rural Refrains. Featuring
soprano Hyunah Yu in a distinctly Vermonty program. Unitarian
Church, $10-$25, 7:30pm. www.capitalcityconcerts.com
Montpelier Antiques Market. Furniture, ephemera, jewelry, post-
cards, more. Elks Club, Country Club Rd., $2, 9am-1:30pm. $5 early
buyers at 7:30. www.montpelierantiquesmarket.com
Dave Moore. Irish and American folk songs for Sunday brunch.
Bagitos Cafe, 28 Main St., 11am-1pm. Info. 229-9212.
Spice on Snow Folk Music Festival. See description 1/9.
Boy Scout Tree Recycling. $10 donation. Call 223-2137.
WATERBURY- Northeast Fiddlers Association Monthly Jam &
Meet. Fiddlers and public welcome. American Legion, 16 Stowe St.,
donations accepted, noon-5pm. Info. 728-5188.
Monday, January 13
MONTPELIER- Natural Medicine for Children: Colds, Coughs &
Ear Infections. Workshop w/herbalist Shona MacDougall. Hunger Mtn
Coop, $5 members/$7 non, 5:30-7:30pm. Pre-reg. 223-8000 x202.
Boy Scout Tree Recycling. $10 donation. Call 223-2137.
SO. ROYALTON- Financial Aid Forms Workshop. Free workshop
hosted by VSAC to help families fill out financial aid forms (FAFSA).
So. Royalton High School, 6:30-8:30pm. RSVP to 763-7740.
WATERBURY- Music with Lesley Grant. Sing along with local
musician and educator, Lesley Grant. For kids age 18 months to 4
years. Waterbury Public Library, FREE, 10am. Info. 244-7036.
Tuesday, January 14
EAST MONTPELIER- Cross-country Ski with Green Mtn Club.
All abilities, various distances. Morse Farm Ski Touring Center, trail
fee. Call 223-3550 for meeting time.
MARSHFIELD- Workshop on Water Quality and Agriculture.
Hosted by Winooski Natural Resources Conservation District. Lunch
provided. Town Hall, FREE, 10am-1pm. RSVP to 288-8155 x104.
MONTPELIER- Open Mic. Strut your stuff in a supportive, fun
atmosphere. Bagitos Cafe, 28 Main St., 6-8pm. Info. 229-9212.
Sustainable Happiness. Workshop with Ginny Sassaman, M.S., cre-
ator of the Happiness Paradigm in Maple Corner. Hunger Mtn Coop,
$8 members/$10 non, 5:30-7:30pm. Pre-register 223-8000 x202.
Financial Aid Forms Workshop. Free workshop hosted by VSAC to
help families fill out college financial aid forms (FAFSA). Montpelier
High School, 5:30-7:30pm. RSVP to 225-8000.
Library Book Delivery Service. Rachael Grossman from Kellogg-
Hubbard Library will talk about KHLs book delivery service.
Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre St., 1pm. 223-2518.
Boy Scout Tree Recycling. $10 donation. Call 223-2137.
Wednesday, January 15
BARRE- Open Mike. With host John Lackard. Green Mountain
Tavern, 10 Keith Ave., no cover, 9pm. Info. 522-3482.
Keeping the Books & Tax Planning for Small Businesses. Workshop
led by Denice Brown, Abacus Bookkeeping. Central VT Community
Action Council, 20 Gable Place, 6-8:30pm. Pre-register 477-5214.
CALAIS- Open Mic. At Whammy Bar, Maple Corner Store, FREE,
starts 7:30pm.
MARSHFIELD- Song Circle Community Sing Along. Led by Rich
and Laura Atkinson, song books provided. Jaquith Public Library,
FREE, 6:45pm. Info. 426-3581.
MONTPELIER- Papa GreyBeard Blues. Bagitos Cafe, 28 Main
St., 6-8pm. Info. 229-9212.
Community Cinema: Las Marthas. The film follows two Mexican-
American girls preparing for the traditional debutante ball in Laredo,
Tex. Panel discussion to follow. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 7pm.
Saving Mr. Banks

I
f I got to write the epi-
taph on Walt Disneys
tombstone, it would
read:
This Man Commod-
itized Childhood.
Ive got to hand it to him. Walt Disney had a magical, white-
washed vision of America and he gured out how to sell it to
us. And not just once. Again and again, decade after decade.
Every generation grew up with its own beloved Disney en-
tertainment. People in the 1940s had Dumbo. Baby Boom-
ers had The Mickey Mouse Club. My generation had The
Lion King. Millennials had Hannah Montana.
To fans, Disney entertainment is consistently wholesome
and family friendly. It promises cute animals, catchy songs,
and happy endings and it always delivers.
To cynical detractors (like me), Disney entertainment is
bland, manipulative uff. To be fair, I never saw The Lion
King like the rest of my classmates. By that age I was already
more interested in Woody Allen and Stanley Kubrick.
That probably made me a weird kid. I also think it made me
a less nostalgic adult, with more sophisticated taste in art and
lm and comedy.
It probably made me more morbid. But thats the price I
have to pay, I guess. I saw The Little Mermaid and I saw Dr.
Strangelove. Even at age 12, I knew that Dr. Strangelove
was a much better movie.
As you can tell, I dont care for Walt Disney, and not just
because he may have been a Nazi sympathizer.
Saving Mr. Banks has a very different perspective on
Walt Disney. The lm defends both the man and the cultural
value of his movies.
The story takes place in 1961. An energetic middle aged
Walt Disney (Tom Hanks) has invited cantankerous British
author P. L. Travers (Emma Thompson) to Los Angeles. Dis-
neys goal is to convince her to sell him the lm rights to her
beloved childrens book Mary Poppins.
Saving Mr. Banks is a classic A Christmas Carol-style
drama, where an angry old curmudgeon slowly goes from be-
ing a Grinch to being a Disney fan. At rst Travers says no
to every idea that Walt throws at her. No animation. No Dick
Van Dyke. No songs!
But, eventually, inevitably, Traverss icy heart melts and she
agrees to give Disney the lm rights. Saving Mr. Banks is
basically a good movie; its always nice to watch a mean, bit-
ter character have a change of heart.
The ending is predictable and cheesy. But Travers makes
some terric arguments about why Disney movies are poison-
ous to the minds of children along the way.
Wheres the gravitas? Wheres the reality? Wheres the
heart?! Travers passionately asks Disney. Exactly, Ms.
Travers! I dont agree with the notion that sheltering kids from
darkness and truth and death will make them happier or more
well-adjusted adults.
I like a happy ending as much as the next guy. But I also
want some violence, profanity, nudity, and intellectual stimu-
lation along the way.
Long story short: Disney movies are garbage. Saving Mr.
Banks is pretty good, though.
FOR THE MOST CURRENT
LISTINGS & EVENTS
VISIT OUR WEB PAGE:
www.vt-world.com
January 8, 2014 The WORLD page 27
Best described as a number crossword, the task in
Kakuro is to fill all of the empty square, using num-
bers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal lock equals
the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical
block equals the number on its top. No number may
be used in the same block more than once.
The idea of Go Figure is to arrive at the figure given at
the bottom and right-hand columns of the diagram by
following the arithmetic signs in the order they are given
(that is, from left to right and top to bottom). Use only the
numbers below the diagram to complete its blank
squares and use each of the nine numbers only once.
GO FIGURE
page 28 The WORLD January 8, 2014
WORLD CLASSIFIED
DEADLINE MONDAY 10AM (Display Ads Thursday at 5PM)
802-479-2582 1-800-639-9753 sales@vt-world.com www.vt-world.com
JOB
OPPORTUNITIES
ACTORS/MOVIE Extras Need-
ed immediately for upcoming
roles $150-$300 per day de-
pending on job requirements.
No experience, All looks need-
ed. 1-800-561-1762 Ext A-104,
for casting times/locations.
MONTESSORI SCHOOL of
Central Vermont Inc. is seeking
the services of an AMI or AMS
Primary Guide to teach in a 3-6
classroom, starting March 2014
for a maternity leave. There
is a potential for this position
to turn into a permanent posi-
tion with the expansion of our
programs. We are looking for
an energetic, fexible individual
to join our small, but growing,
school. Please consider joining
us amidst natural beauty and
cultural advantages of Vermont.
Benefts include health plan, re-
tirement plan, tuition discounts,
sick leave, and professional
development support. Please
send cover letter, resume, and
references to info@mscvt.org
TEDS KAR KARE
NOW HIRING
Experienced
Automotive
Mechanic
Looking for an experienced, reliable,
mechanic. Must have own tools.
Must have worked in a shop before.
Reference needed.
802-244-1224
E.O.E.

PCA at Central Vermont Home
Health & Hospice (VT 05641)
P/T 20-30 hrs/wkly. Be a care-
giver to adults in their home.
Travel within Washington Coun-
ty is necessary for this position.
Valid drivers license required.
Apply: cvhhh.org/careers.
SEEKING WELL Established
Hair Stylists with clientele for
booth rental at the Family Hair-
loom. If you are looking for a
relaxed atmosphere with lots
of free parking, this is DEFI-
NITELY the place for you. We
offer tanning, and spray tan-
ning for those clients that may
appreciate those extra service.
Please call for an interview with
Liz Provencher at 802-498-4816
TWINCITY FAMILY Fun Center
is Now accepting applications
for highly motivated workers
with excellent customer service
Skills to work in the new La-
ser Tag Arena and renovated
Arcade room. Must be able to
work with children and avail-
able nights and weekends. Full
and Part-Time Position. Apply in
Person During normal business
hours.704 US RT 302-Berlin VT.
WORK AT HOME AND EARN
BIG BUCKS!
Earn up to $1,000 a week at
your leisure in your own home?
The probability of gaining big
profts from this and many simi-
lar at home jobs is slim. Promot-
ers of these jobs usually require
a fee to teach you useless, and
unproftable trades, or to provide
you with futile information. TIP:
If a work-at-home program is
legitimate, your sponsor should
tell you, for free and in writing,
what is involved. If you question
a programs legitimacy, call the
ATTORNEY GENERALS CON-
SUMER ASSISTANCE PRO-
GRAM at 1-800-649-2424.
CHILDCARE
BARRE CITY daycare Infant/Tod-
dler and School age Openings.
Call Doug or Jen. 802-476-3565.
REGISTERED HOME Day-
care with openings available.
Meals and snacks provided.
Open 7:00-5:00 with some
fexible. Please call 476-5970
to schedule an appointment.
SOUTH BARRE. Full- or part-
time, all meals included, Barre
Town Bus route, nice play yard,
low rates. Ages 2+. 802-479-8904
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
LOOKING TO EARN A MIL-
LION$? Watch out for business
opportunities that make outra-
geous claims about potential
earnings. Dont get fooled into
get rich quick scams. There are
legitimate business opportuni-
ties, but be cautious of any busi-
ness that cant refect in writing
the typical earnings of previous
employees. TIP: Investigate
earning potential claims of busi-
nesses by requesting written in-
formation from them before you
send any money, or by calling
the ATTORNEYS GENERAL
CONSUMER ASSISTANCE
PROGRAM, at 1-800-649-2424.
CLASSES &
WORKSHOPS
AIRLINE CAREERS begin here
- Get trained as FAA certifed
Aviation Technician. Housing
and Financial aid for qualifed
students. Job placement assis-
tance. Call AIM (866)453-6204.
continued on next page
BARRE CITY
ELEMENTARY
AND
MIDDLE SCHOOL
Seeks
PARA-EDUCATOR
BCEMS seeks a full-time
1:1 para-educator for
the 2013-14 school year.
Qualifed candidates must
have an Associates Degree
or 48 credits.
If interested, please send
cover letter, resume, copy of
transcripts and three letters
of reference to:
Stacy Ferland
Barre City Elementary and
Middle School
50 Parkside Terrace
Barre, VT 05641
EOE
INTERESTED
IN CDL?
Classes
ongoing in Barre
Information:
476-4679
249-2886
Visit Our Website:
www.cdlschoolinvt.com
Global Values Inc. is a reputable name when it comes to high quality
color granite monuments. Our mission is to improve the quality standards
of memorialization in North America. To that extent we always seek to
employ high quality people to keep up with our mission. We have the
following positions open. If you are interested in any of the following
positions you can e-mail your resume to jobs@gvalues.com. Please
specify the job title in the subject and make it clear which position you are
applying when you apply.
Sales Executives:
It aint braggin if you can back it up! If this is your motto and you have
sold business to business products or services, preferably to small family
owned businesses and/or medium size organizations and are stuck with
no upward mobility, then we want to talk to you! The most successful
candidate has experience selling to small business owners and middle
managers responsible for purchase decisions with 4 5 competitors. You
build relationships quickly and want a company that is quality conscious
with high integrity. You know how to lead from the front and by example.
You have 5+ years of sales experience and are looking for an opportunity
to grow in your career. You are a natural motivator and people are attracted
to your charisma, style and leadership. You enjoy the challenge of sales
and can transfer your successes to the team! You earn respect instead
of expecting it. You understand the importance of sales fundamentals,
are not afraid to get your foot in the door and go head-to-head with the
competition. You understand the importance of nding new business
and then servicing the accounts you build. You have to sell products and
services to monument retailers, cemeteries and funeral homes. Your
previous monumental sales experience is very desirable. Our product line
is recession-proof and we are seeing it growing every day! You must have
earned 45k in the past and need to make 60K+. You dene your earning
potential.
Operations Manager:
Please see our Ad for the Sales Executive role above. If you have
been a successful salesperson in a granite monument company with
characteristics explained above, and if you know and understand several
aspects of monument business, including but not limited to expedition,
estimation, customer service, insight into drafting and etching artwork
development, if you are ready to take on a bigger role than just sales
we are interested to talk to you. Previous granite monument industry
experience is a must in this role.
Customer Service Representative:
We seek a friendly, energetic Customer Service Representative to perform
a variety of customer care and order entry functions including answering
phone professionally and ensuring a positive customer service experience
to our clients. We will require the Specialist to accurately complete order
entry for Granite Monuments and other granite products and provide
ofce support, faxing and mailing responsibilities. Qualications for this
position includes but not limited to, Experience in bookkeeping, simple
customer service and telephone customer service, Working knowledge of
Microsoft Word and Excel; database experience, Strong communication
skills, Marketing or sales experience a plus, Previous granite industry or
monument industry experience a plus
Benets:
We offer an excellent career path and attractive salary based on the
experience. We understand our employees want to succeed both
personally and professionally. This is why we are excited to offer many
professional growth opportunities to advance your career. We also offer
unprecedented benets to our employees. We offer one of the best
available benet programs for small businesses, including healthcare
plan, 401(k), disability, holidays and life insurance.
Development Coordinator
Grant management, fundraising, and publicity for
Good Samaritan Haven homeless shelter in Barre.
Full time; flexible hours, leave benefits, shared office.
EOE. Minimum requirements: bachelors degree or
equivalent; two years experience grant writing.
Send resume, cover letter, and references to
Bernard Chenette P.O Box 1104 Barre, VT 05641

For questions, contact Brooke Salls 479-2294
Full description www.goodsamaritanhaven.org/careers
PRODUCTION & WAREHOUSE
Immediate openings in Williston, VT, area.
Friday-Saturday-Sunday schedule.
12-hour shifts. A full week's pay in 3 days!
Pay up to $12.75/hour. Benefits available!
Apply online at
www.spherion.com/jobs
Enter ID #1001842368
or call for details
1-800-639-6560
Shared Home Provider
Setting without children, needed for a man
who has a minor chronic medical condition
yet still wants to be out in his community. He
has a dog and enjoys TV, video games, fairs
and racing. Responsibilities include providing
constant and reliable supervision, assistance
with problem solving and communicating with
others, transportation, scheduling routine med-
ical appointments, implementing doctor's
orders and participate in consumer specific
training. Compensation includes $40,000 a
year tax-free stipend, and room and board.
Call or write Mr. Irwin
Upper Valley Services, Inc.
(802) 222-9235
or lirwin@uvs-vt.org
CLIENT SERVICES
Make a difference by helping Vermont individuals & families
with their housing needs. Join the Vermont State Housing
Authority team, a statewide affordable housing provider.
Position open for an organized, reliable individual to perform
a variety of technical, clerical, hands-on work related to
housing programs. Will conduct routine certifcations
of tenants to determine appropriate rental subsidy, &
communicate verbally & in writing with tenants & landlords
regarding housing subsidies. Position includes telephone
& public contact work & is based in Montpelier. Must be
able to multi-task & work in a fast-paced environment,
independently or as part of a team. For position details,
requirements & qualifcations, visit www.vsha.org.
Cover letter & resume to: HR, VSHA, 1 Prospect St.,
Montpelier, VT 05602-3556.
VSHA is an Equal Opportunity Employer

SBIRT Drug & Alcohol


Clinician

www.cvmc.org/jobs
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January 8, 2014 The WORLD page 29
BEGINNING FURNITURE Mak-
ing starting Thursday January
23rd, 12 Thursday evenings
5:30-8:30. $300 includes
materials.
Wednesday Wood Working for
intermediate wood workers, 10
Wednesday 4:30-7pm starting
Wednesday January 22nd. $200
plus materials.
Both Classes @ U32, Contact
info:
dbazis@u32.org, 802-595-3295
Sponsored by Community Con-
nection.
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
FROM HOME. 6-8 weeks AC-
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Get a job. 1-800-264-8330
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PERSONALS
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CLASSES &
WORKSHOPS
continued
continued on next page
ACTIVITY AIDE OPENINGS
Two part time positions available.
Work 12:30 pm to 7 pm on weekdays
and 9 am to 5 pm every other weekend.
These positions are for forty hours per
biweekly pay period.
LNA licensure preferred.
If you enjoy engaging and encouraging residents
to participate in daily activities,
Contact: Kim Marcotte
Activity Manager
71 Richardson Street
Northfeld, VT 05663
802-485-3161 Fax 802-485-6307
kmarcotte@mayohc.org www.mayohc.org
EOE
NOW HIRING
FULL TIME
ON
EVENING SHIFT
RN SUPERVISOR
- AND -
ONE LNA
Contact: Barbara Connor, RN
Director of Nursing Services
bconnor@mayohc.org
802-485-3161
Fax 802-485-6307
71 Richardson Street
Northeld, VT 05663
www.mayohc.org
EOE
CUSTODIAN I (Temporary)
Department of Buildings and
General Services
We are seeking qualified applicants to provide custodial and
housekeeping services for state offices and facilities in
Montpelier. We have three temporary position expected to
last January through May. Hours are Monday Friday,
2nd shift: 12:00pm 8:30pm.
For additional information, or to obtain an application, please
contact Sherry at 828-3312 or Jean at 828-3245.
The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer
Only qualified applicants will receive a response. Valid drivers license, excellent driving record and access to a safe, reliable,
insured vehicle is required. Send letter of interest and resume to: WCMHS, Personnel, PO Box 647, Montpelier, VT 05601.
Contact: 802-229-1399 Fax 802-223-6423 personnel@wcmhs.org www.wcmhs.org E.O.E.
Case Manager for our Community Support Programs: full-time w/ benefits. Want to work with great people doing important work? Are
you compassionate, enthusiastic, and optimistic? Do you like to be consistently challenged at your job? Is integrity important to you? Were
looking for someone who can answer yes to these questions. If you have a Masters Degree in a mental health related field, experience
working with adults with severe and persistent mental illness, and have a focus on recovery, then consider applying for this Case
Management position in WCMHS Community Support Program. Supervision hours towards licensure available.
Residential Support Specialist Hill Street: Full-time w/ benefits. Seeking individual to provide support to residents with developmental
and medical concerns at a group home in Barre. Support includes personal care of individuals, community inclusion, communication
enhancement, household maintenance, and other team approach activities that contribute to the overall wellness of the residents. Shift is
currently daytime hours with one weekend day. (Hours may change based on program needs). LNA preferred; but will hire as long as
agreement to get LNA within the first six months. High school diploma or equivalent (GED) required.
Behavior Interventionists/Educational Support Specialists for the following programs: Full time w/ benefits.
SBBI (School Based Behavior Interventionist): Multiple positions. Full time w/ benefits. Provide direct supervision to enrolled
child or youth within a school setting. Implement behavioral programming and provide counseling in social, recreational and daily
living skills in school and community settings. Bachelor's Degree in human services, education or psychology preferred. If degree
requirements are not complete, working toward BA/BS or related field is required. Experience providing direct instruction and
therapeutic services to children with challenging behaviors preferred.
ChOICE Behavior Intervention/Education Support Specialist: Provide direct supervision to youth (ages 12-18+) within an
integrated mental health treatment facility / educational center. Implement behavioral programming and milieu counseling in social,
emotional and recreation/leisure skills and activities of daily living in classroom, day treatment and community settings. Provide
individual and group supervision as needed.
ODIN Home/School Behavior Interventionist: Full time w/ benefits. Seeking individual to provide individualized support
services to assigned youth who have significant social, behavioral and emotional needs. Responsibilities will require the ability to
implement individualized behavior/reinforcement plans, provide direct supervision and support in areas of social skills and daily
living skills development. Willingness to work flexible hours required.
Evergreen: Provide individualized support services to assigned youth who have significant social, behavioral and emotional needs.
Responsibilities will require the ability to implement individualized behavior/reinforcement plans, provide direct supervision and
support in areas of social skills and daily living skill development. Willingness to work flexible hours required.
Crescent House Home/School Behavior Interventionist: Full time w/ benefits. Provide individualized support services to
assigned youth who have significant social, behavioral and emotional needs. Responsibilities will require the ability to implement
individualized behavior/reinforcement plans, provide direct supervision and support in areas of social skills and daily living skill
development. Willingness to work flexible hours required.
All Behavior Interventionist positions require: Bachelor's Degree in human services, education or psychology preferred. If
degree requirements are not complete, working toward BA/BS or related field is required. Experience providing direct
instruction and therapeutic services to children with challenging behaviors preferred. Ability to lift and carry 50 pounds
and execute physical restraints required.
Elder Care Clinician (one day per week) needed to provide assessment, psychotherapy and social support services to elder clients utilizing
an outreach based approach primarily in our clients homes. This position will provide service in the Orange County area. Specific training
in geriatrics or gerontology needed. Familiarity with evaluations and guardianship protocol a valuable tool. Applicant must be comfortable
working independently, with the knowledge that supervision and a supportive team approach is available as needed. A Masters degree,
license eligible, with a minimum of one year experience providing psychotherapy required for this one day (eight hours) per week
position.
Segue Residential Counselor: Full time w/ benefits. Seeking an individual to provide for the emotional and physical safety of residents in
a group care setting experiencing mental health challenges. A residential counselor will act as a role model and teach independent living
skills, to include cooking, housekeeping and personal hygiene, assisting with medication administration, and crisis intervention as needed.
Must be willing to work a flexible schedule that will include some overnights. BA in Human Services or related field required.
Evergreen House Supervised/Assisted Living Provider & Behavior Interventionist: Full time w/ benefits. This position will provide a
level of supervision for severe emotional/behavioral challenged youth. To provide supervision in the assigned home during selected day
shifts as well as selected over night shifts. To be available during nighttime hours for supportive counseling and for implementation of
crisis plan as needed. To participate in the treatment process, and utilize that knowledge to intervene during potentially high-risk situations.
Extensive transportation to fulfill transition / treatment plan goals. Experience providing direct instruction and therapeutic services to
children with challenging behaviors preferred. Willingness to work flexible hours required. Bachelor's Degree in human services, education
or psychology preferred. If degree requirements are not complete, working toward BA/BS or related field is required. Experience providing
direct instruction and therapeutic services to children with challenging behaviors preferred. Ability to lift and carry 50 pounds and execute
physical restraints required.
Positive Behavior Support Behavior Analyst Twinfield Elementary School: Full time w/ benefits. Seeking individual to provide
consultation to assigned school and program clients in the application of Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports (PBiS) methods based
upon the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis. Training in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis and experience working with children
and youth who present serious emotional and behavioral challenges and/or autism is required. Experience working in school settings is
desirable. Completion (or (ongoing progress toward the completion) of the coursework required to sit for the BCBA examination is
required. Possession of a Masters degree or enrollment and participation in a Masters degree program is required. Minimum 1 year
experience as a Behavior Interventionist (or equivalent) preferred; OR Board Certified Associate Behavior Analyst in good standing. Ability
to lift and carry 50 pounds and execute physical restraints.
Home Intervention Counselor: Full time w/ benefits. Position # 884. This is a floater position and candidate will provide fill-in for staff
vacancies or leaves. In the absence of vacancy/leaves will negotiate a mutually agreeable schedule. Provides direct care to consumers in
crisis who would generally receive services in a hospital environment. Responsible for doing related tasks which provide for a safe
environment. Program uses a recovery model to provide supportive counseling and constructive interactions to promote emotional stability.
Will participate in treatment planning and documentation, coordination and referral processes and consult with community teams.
Bachelor's degree preferred.
Home Intervention Counselor: Full time w/ benefits. Position #806 is a Saturday Tuesday, awake overnights. Provides direct care to
consumers in crisis who would generally receive services in a hospital environment. Responsible for doing related tasks which provide for
a safe environment. Program uses a recovery model to provide supportive counseling and constructive interactions to promote emotional
stability. Will participate in treatment planning and documentation, coordination and referral processes and consult with community teams.
Bachelor's degree preferred.
Outpatient/Reach-Up Community Based Case Manager: Full time w/ benefits. Seeking a collaborative, energetic, team-oriented,
creative individual to provide a complement of services to meet the support needs of adults, children, and families as part of the Outpatient
and Reach Up collaborative team. Bachelors Degree in social work, human services, or related field is required. Masters degree and
community based experience preferred. One year of services delivery with adults. Sensitivity to the unique needs of clients with a history
of trauma.
Registered Nurse - Weekends: Looking for a Registered Nurse to provide weekend professional nursing supervision and care to consumers
in crisis at the Home Intervention program. This Nurse will provide both psychiatric and physical assessments, communicate with on call
psychiatric providers, facilitate admissions, and delegate medication administration duties to direct care staff, as well as provide clinical
supervision to direct care staff. This position requires strong team work as well as the capacity to function independently. The successful
candidate will have strong interpersonal skills, along with strong psychiatric and medical assessment skills. Must be an RN with a current
Vermont License.
Community Support Specialist: 25 hours per week supporting a 21 y.o. man in the Barre area. The successful candidate will provide
structure and support and facilitate participation in recreational/vocational based activities; be able to manage problematic behaviors and
follow a structured behavioral support plan; Actively act as a role model for socially acceptable behavior. Must be able to work independently
as well as part of a team. Must possess strong communication skills, both verbally and in writing. Experience providing direct instruction
and therapeutic services to young adults with challenging behaviors preferred. HS Diploma or GED required. Bachelors degree in human
services related field preferred.
Chrysalis House Residential Counselor: Full time w/ benefits. Chrysalis House is a program supporting psychiatrically challenged
individuals in a residential setting. Major focus will be on goal oriented behavioral program accentuating living skills and community
integration. This is a 40 hour a week position which will include overnight hours from Monday evening through Friday morning. This
location is based in Waterbury. The successful candidate will possess the ability to work independently and collaboratively with other team
members. Have the ability to communicate effectively in writing and verbally to other members of the team. The preferred individual will
have a BA or comparable experience working within the human service field. Experience working with psychiatrically disabled adults
preferred
Beckley Day Program Elementary Educational Instructor Substitute Coverage (Anticipated mid-January, 2014 thru mid-April,
2014): $16.84 - $18.95 per hour. Seeking individual to provide academic and skill instruction (substitute coverage) to elementary aged
children in an integrated mental health treatment facility/education tutorial center. Bachelors or Masters degree, with a teaching license
in the area of elementary education grades K 6. A Bachelors degree with extensive knowledge and experience in instructional
specialization with teaching experience will be considered. Teachers meeting Vermonts Highly Qualified standard preferred. Teaching
experience with children with severe emotional and behavioral challenges or other mental health issues preferred.
Our Walking Routes make a Great
Exercise Plan, and the Bonus is...
YOU GET
PAID
TO DO IT!
Deliver on
a Walking Route!
Once-A-Week No Collecting
Barre
Montpelier
Northfield
Waterbury
479-2582
Classied
Deadline
Is Monday
Before
10:00AM
page 30 The WORLD January 8, 2014
403 U.S. RT. 302 - BERLIN BARRE, VT 05641-2274
479-2582 1-800-639-9753 FAX 479-7916
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and call 479-2582 or
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CLIP AND MAIL THIS HANDY FORM TODAY
CHECK HEADING:
Animals-Farm ......................500
Animals-Pet .........................430
Antiques/Restorations .........144
Baby/Children Items ............140
Bicycles ...............................220
Boating/Fishing ...................210
Building Materials ................300
Business Items ....................080
Business Opportunities .......060
Camping ..............................205
Childcare Service ................030
Christmas Trees ..................370
Class & Workshops .............103
Clothing & Accessories .......130
Computers/Electronics ........100
Farm/Garden/Lawn .............410
Free Ads ..............................108
Furniture ..............................180
Garage Sales/Flea Mkt. ......145
Health ..................................113
Home Appliances ................160
Hunting/Guns/Archery .........305
Insurance/Investments ........090
Job Opportunities ................020
Lost and Found ...................110
Miscellaneous .....................150
Musical ................................200
Personals ............................105
Professional Services .........540
Rideshare ............................125
Snow Removal Equip. .........355
Snowmobiles/Access. .........360
Sporting Equipment ............250
Storage................................235
Support Groups ..................107
Tools ....................................330
Wanted ................................120
Wood/Heating Equip. ...........350
Work Wanted .......................040
AUTOMOTIVE
Campers/Motor Homes .......845
Cars & Accessories ............875
Motorcycles/ATVs ...............850
Trucks/Vans/Jeeps Access. .870
Vintage/Classic Vehicles .....873
Work Vehicles/Heavy Equip. ....855
REAL ESTATE
Apts./House for Rent ...........630
Camps for Sale ...................650
Comm. Rentals/Sales .........605
Condominiums ....................680
Apt. Blds. for Sale ................685
Homes .................................690
Land for Sale .......................670
Mobile Homes .....................600
Vacation Rentals/Sales .......645
Wanted to Rent/Buy ............610
PHONE NUMBER ___________________________________________________________________________
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ADDRESS _________________________________________________________________________________
CITY _______________________________________________ STATE ____________ ZIP _______________
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403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641
479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 Fax (802) 479-7916
www.vt-world.com sales@vt-world.com
Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm
THANK YOU ST. JUDE For
Petitions Answered. Sacred
Heart Of Jesus Pray For Us.
St. Jude Pray For Us! MES
FREE ITEMS
$100-$300 PAID for Your Com-
plete Junk Cars and Trucks,
FREE metal pickup Plaineld.
839-6812 (Cell); 454-0165.
HEALTH CARE
LOOKING FOR A MIRACLE/
Lose 20 pounds in one week?
This is almost impossible!
Weight loss ads must reect
the typical experiences of the
diet users. Beware of pro-
grams that claim you can lose
weight effortlessly. TIP: Clues
to fraudulent ads include words
like: breakthrough, effortless,
and new discovery. When you
see words like these be skepti-
cal. Before you invest your time
and money call the ATTORNEY
GENERALS CONSUMER
ASSISTANCE PROGRAM, at
1-800-649-2424.
WANT A CURE-ALL?
Health fraud is a business that
sells false hope. Beware of un-
substantiated claims for health
products and services. There
are no Quick Cures - no mat-
ter what the ad is claiming. TIP:
DO NOT rely on promises of a
money back guarantee! Watch
out for key words such as exclu-
sive secret, amazing results,
or scientic breakthrough. For
more information on health re-
lated products or services, call
the ATTORNEY GENERALS
CONSUMER ASSISTANCE
PROGRAM at 1-800-649-2424,
or consult a health care pro-
vider.
WANTED
$ A1-CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
802-522-4279.
COIN COLLECTOR will
Pay Cash for Pre-1965
Coins and Coin Collec-
tions. Call Joe 802-498-3692
WANTED: PISTOLS, Ri-
es, Shotguns. Top Pric-
es paid. 802-492-3339
days. 802-492-3032 nights.
WANTS TO purchase miner-
als and other oil and gas in-
terests. Send details to: PO
Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201
WILL HAUL away for free: Scrap
metal, old appliances, car parts,
etc. Furnaces, boilers and demo-
litions for a fee. No job too big or
too small. Chad, 802-793-0885.
CLOTHING &
ACCESSORIES
T-SHIRTS Custom Printed.
$5.50 heavyweight. Gildan,
Min. order of 36 pcs. Hats
- Embroidered $6.00. Free
Catalog. 1-800-242-2374.
Berg Sportswear. 40. BNE - N
ANTIQUES/
COLLECTIBLES/
RESTORATION
6 DIFFERENT Dining Room Ta-
bles Instock. Last Time Around
Antiques.com
114 No. Main St Barre 802-476-
8830
GRAKLES CRAFTS/AN-
TIQUES
166 No. Man St, Barre.
Hours: Tuesday-Friday 10-5;
Saturday 9-3, Closed;Sunday,
Monday
ELEVENTH ANNIVERSARY
SALE. 10% OFF Everything in
the Store on Wednesday, Janu-
ary 15th only. Lots of interesting
stuff.
JOHNSON ANTIQUES 4 Sum-
mer St East Barre, behind VT
Flannel 802-249-2525 Best
Kept Secret in East Barre. If you
havent found us yet, you dont
know what youre missing. An-
tique furniture-Oak, Maple, Pine,
Mahogany, Walnut. Closed Sun-
day & Tuesday, 8:30-3:30 every-
day but Saturday Open til noon.
TWO THRIFTY SISTERS An-
tiques our merchandise is ever
changing Home of quality,
friendly services. TWO Thrifty
Sisters Antiques 124 No. Main
St Barre, VT 802-622-8000
MISCELLANEOUS
GREEN MOUNTAIN
BARGAIN SHOP
802-461-7828
We Buy-Sell-Barter
Lets Make a Deal
Williamstown VT
$ A1-CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
802-522-4279.
$ CASH $
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
Paying up to $300 for junk cars
and trucks, FREE Scrap Metal
Pick-up. Call Barre, 802-917-
2495, 802-476-4815, Bob.
AVIATION MAINTENANCE
TRAINING Financial Aid if quali-
ed. Job Placement Assistance.
Call National Aviation Acad-
emy Today!. FAA Approved.
CLASSES STARTING SOON!
1-800-292-3228 or NAA.edu.
DIRECTV $0 Start Costs!
150+ Channels $7.50/week!
Free HBO/Cinemax/Showtime/
Starz+HD/DVR +NFL Sunday
Ticket! Call 1-800-983-2690
PERSONALS
continued
continued on next page
ANTIQUES/
COLLECTIBLES/
RESTORATION
continued
DONT PUT OFF TIL
TOMORROW WHAT
YOU CAN SELL
TODAY!
479-2582
Or Toll Free
1-800-639-9753
Central Vermonts Newspaper
CLASSIFIEDS
403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin Barre, VT 05641
Let Us Know...
if you are not getting
your w orld each week!
If you are in the greater
Barre-Montpelier Area
Call 479-2582
Other Areas Can Call Toll Free
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Advertising
That Works
Call 479-2582 or
1-800-639-9753
January 8, 2014 The WORLD page 31
POTATO BARN ANTIQUES
WINTER HOURS: Fri.-Sat.-Sun. 10-4
~Weather Permitting~
(603) 636-2611
Just 40 minutes East of St. J. Rte 3 Northumberland, NH
(4 mi. North of Lancaster, NH, Fairground)
Always Buying Vintage Clothing &
Accessories, Lamps & Lighting
7500 sq.ft. of Antiques & Collectables including:
Vintage Clothing Costume
Jewelry Lamps, Lighting,
Rewires & Repairs Official
Aladdin Lamp Dealer Glass
China Ephemera & more
Please Visit Our eBay & Etsy Stores,
Ladys Slipper Vintage NO
SALES
TAX!
SALES SERVICE REPAIR
TOOLS SUPPLIES
120 River St., Montpelier
(802) 229-4800
M-F 8-5:30, Sa 9-2
spoonerspec.com
WOODWORKING
TOOLS + SUPPLIES
SPECIALS THROUGHOUT THE STORE
GREAT DEALS STACKED HIGH
ON THE BARGAIN TABLE
W
IN
T
E
R
W
H
I
T
E
S
A
L
E
50%
OFF
UP
TO
JA
N
U
A
R
Y 13-18
1950s Lunchbox
Q: When I was in grade school
during the 1950s, I carried my
lunch in an Annie Oakley and
Tag lunchbox. I still have it
and the original thermos. I
read in your column recently
that older lunchboxes have
become quite valuable. Is
mine? -- Ken, Ramona, Calif.
A: According to the 19th edi-
tion of Toys & Prices by
Mark Bellomo and published
by Krause Books, your lunch-
box and thermos were issued
in 1955 by Aladdin. The box
is valued at $695, the bottle
$150.
***
Q: My dad and I have always
been interested in both the
summer and winter Olympic
Games. We have managed to
build quite a collection of
pins, posters, badges, decals
and stickers. Is there someone
to contact about the items we
have? -- Rob, Titusville, Fla.
A: Craig R. Perlow is the
owner of Olympian Artifacts,
a business that specializes in
autographs, badges, posters,
medals and programs relating
to the Olympics. His address-
es are P.O. Box 92331,
Norcross, GA 30010-3311;
and www.olympianartifacts.
com. Incidentally, Perlow
recently was named by the
International Olympic
Memorabilia Federation as an
expert in this field of collect-
ing.
***
Q: My mom recently gave me
a bowl in the Cat-Tail pat-
tern, which she thinks she got
as a wedding present in 1948.
What can you tell me about it?
-- Susan, Rio Rancho, N.M.
A: Cat-Tail dinnerware was
introduced during the 1930s
and sold extremely well for
the next two decades. Even
though it was manufactured
by several companies, most of
the pieces Ive seen were
issued by Universal Potteries
of Cambridge, Ohio. The pat-
tern is distinctive, often fea-
turing a cluster of red cat-tails
with black stems. Most pieces
seem to sell in the $15-$25
range.
***
Q: I have a number of tobac-
co-related collectibles, includ-
ing old tins, premiums and
even an assortment of older
cigarette packs. Whom can I
contact to find out if my col-
lection is worth saving? --
Bill, Tyler, Texas
A: Smoke out Dale Fenton,
owner of Antique Tobacco, a
company that buys, sells and
appraises tobacco-related
items. Contact him at dale@
antiquetobacco.com; and 404-
606-2648. He also has an
excellent website at antiqueto-
bacco.com.
Write to Larry Cox in care of
King Features Weekly Service,
P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475, or send
e-mail to questionsforcox@
aol.com. Due to the large vol-
ume of mail he receives, Mr.
Cox is unable to personally
answer all reader questions.
Do not send any materials
requiring return mail.
(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.
DIRECTV, Internet, & Phone
From $69.99/mo+ Free 3
Months: HBO Starz SHOW-
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EMAX + FREE GENIE 4Room
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TICKET! 1-855-302-3347
DISH TV Retailer, SAVE!
Starting $19.99/month (for 12
months). Free premium movie
channels. Free equipment,
installation and activation. Call,
Compare Local Deals!
1-800-309-1452
DUNCAN PHYFE dining room
table with six matching chairs
$300; several four and ve draw-
er steel ling cabinets in good
to very good condition $40-$60
each; computer desk $25; sev-
en conference room chairs $10
each. Located in Montpelier. Call
Ellen or John at 802-223-3479.
Hi-light and bold
JUNK AUTO
PICK-UP
YOU CALL
ILL HAUL
802-279-2595
MEET singles now! No paid
operators, just people like you.
Browse greetings, exchange
messages, connect live, FREE
trial. Call 1-877-737-9447
NAPA AUTO Parts your real
locally owned and operated
auto parts store. 44 South
Main Barre. 802-476-9408.
ORDER DISH Network Satel-
lite TV and Internet Starting at
$19.99! Free Installation, Hopper
DVR and 5 Free Premium Mov-
ie Channels! Call 800-597-2464
ROTARY INTERNATIONAL-
Start with Rotary and good
things happen. Rotary, human-
ity in motion. Find informa-
tion or locate your local club
at: www.rotary.org. Brought
to you by your free commu-
nity paper and PaperChain.
TOP CASH PAID FOR OLD
GUITARS! 1920s thru 1980s.
Gibson, Martin, Fender,
Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild,
Mosrite, Rickenbacker, Prai-
rie State, DAngelico, Strom-
berg, and Gibson Mandolins/
Banjos. 1-800-401-0440.
WE CAN remove bankruptcies,
judgments, liens, and bad loans
from your credit le forever! The
Federal Trade Commission says
companies that promise to scrub
your credit report of accurate
negative information for a fee
are lying. Under FEDERAL law,
accurate negative information
can be reported for up to seven
years, and some bankrupt-
cies for up to 10 years. Learn
about managing credit and debt
at ftc.gov/credit. A message
from The World and the FTC.
FURNITURE
RECLINER ELECTRIC
Small, good condition, works
great, Asking $225.00. 802-
560-4113 Please Leave
a message if not home.
MUSICAL
LEARN TO PLAY PIANO
NATURALLY using the Simply
Music method. Comprehen-
sive song-based approach.
Fun and rewarding for all
ages. Nicholas Mortimer, Cer-
tied Teacher. Free presenta-
tions in January. For locations/
time call 802-595-1220 or visit
www. LovePl ayi ngPi ano. org
MUSIC INSTRUCTION: Pro-
fessional instructor/musi-
cian. Musicspeak Education
Program (www.musicspeak.
org) 802-793-8387Servic-
es in Central VT & Beyond
NORTH BRANCH Instruments,
LLC. Fretted Instrument Repair.
Buy and Sell used Fretted Instru-
ments. Michael Ricciarelli 802-
229-0952, 802-272-1875 www.
northbranchinstruments.com
STORAGE
8X20 STORAGE UNITS for rent.
Airport Rd, Berlin. 802-223-6252
8x20, 8x40 OCEAN
FREIGHT containers (new/
used) for sale. 802-223-6252.
Abbys Self Storage
Rt. 2, Montpelier
BOXES &
PACKING
SUPPLIES
229-2645
NOW
SELLING


Royalton, VT
1-877-204-3054 (802) 763-7876
FOR LEASE OR SALE...
8I080|
00NI|N|88
DELIVERED TO YOUR SITE
PLENTY OF STORAGE TRAILERS
& CONTAINERS AVAILABLE
Call For Prices
l82043054
Exit 3
off I-89

storage
units
5x5 10x15
Pay for 6 Months,
Get 1 Month FREE!
Dons Affordable
Self Storage
East Montpelier
223-7171
YOU Store It!
Lock It!
And YOU
Keep The Key!
CaII 229-2222
Barre Montpelier Area
Mini Storage Warehouse
HUNTING/GUNS/
ARCHERY
NEW AND used guns, muzzle
loaders, accessories. Snowsville
Store E. Braintree, 802-728-5252
TOOLS/MACHINERY
GENERATOR 6500 SERIES,
Very good condition, asking
$1300. Call Roger 802-505-3026
TooI Warehouse OutIet, Inc.
Rt. 302 Barre-MontpeIier
CentraI Vermont's Best
SeIection Of QuaIity TooIs
Discount Prices!
802-479-3363 800-462-7656
TOOLS REPAIRED
Air, electric, hydraulic. Tool
Warehouse Outlet, Barre-Mont-
pelier Rd.
802-479-3363, 1-800-462-
7656.
WOOD/HEATING
EQUIP.
ANTHRACITE COAL
5 Sizes in stock
Bulk & 50lb bags
BLACK ROCK COAL
www.blackrockcoal.com
1-800-639-3197
802-223-4385
FIREWOOD DRY 2012 $325.
Green $230.00/cord, 16
inches. 479-0372/839-0429
FIREWOOD FOR SALE, 4/
cords 16 cut & split, $180per
cord, Call Roger 802-505-3026
FIREWOOD, GREEN and
SEASONED call 802-454-1062
For Prices, Leave message.
FIREWOOD. CUT, split & de-
livered. $195/cord. Maple/
Ash/Cherry. 802-476-9117.
FIREWOOD: Green $230/
cord, 802-461-6748
HARDWOOD KINDLING,
Meshbags $6.00/ea. Free de-
livery to Seniors. 802-279-2595
METALBESTOS INSULATED
Chimney pipes. Everyday low
price. Plaineld Hardware &
General Store, Rt2 East Mont-
pelier Rd, Plaineld. 802-454-
1000 Open 7 Days a Week
MIDDLESEX, Log Length Fire-
wood, 6/Cord $800 delivered in
Middlesex, Calais, E.Montpelier &
Worcester Areas. 802-229-4859
MISCELLANEOUS
continued
Classied
Deadline
Is Monday
Before
10:00AM
MISCELLANEOUS
continued
THANK YOU FOR SAYING I SAW IT IN
Icy Tips for a
Frozen Land
Q: Im new to the
Northeast, and a neigh-
bor told me that ice is a
bigger problem in our
area than snow. What is
the best way to deal with icy walkways? Salt,
kitty litter or something else?
-- Shivering Southerner
A: Dealing with slippery sidewalks and icy
buildup varies depending on a number of factors,
such as the outside air temperature, the thickness
of the ice, the chance of additional ice buildup
and more.
Salt is used to melt icy patches, but using it
alone isnt the most effective method. Plus, it
only works within a temperature range of 15 to
32 degrees F; below that, the ice doesnt melt
much. Youll see it more often used as part of a
salt-sand mixture when temperatures are within
its effective range. The sand provides traction on
the icy patch and, when the ice refreezes at night
when temperatures drop, the sand often freezes
into the patch, providing continued traction.
Another negative point for salt is its impact on
the environment. Salt can burn vegetation along-
side your walkways, so use it sparingly.
For temperatures below 15 F youll need to
use ice melt, available at local hardware and
home-improvement stores. Again, use only the
amount needed to clear ice from your walkway,
as the ingredients in the most effective ice melts
can be dangerous to pets and small animals if
ingested.
Ice buildup is another issue for homeowners in
the Northeast, particularly along gutters. Check
your homes gutters frequently (at least once a
week if its particularly stormy) and look for ici-
cles dangling from the gutters or ice dams build-
ing up. This frequently happens at the top of
gutterspouts when leaves and other debris keep
By Samantha
Mazzotta
water from draining efficiently. Clear away an
ice dam as soon as possible, preferably on an
above-freezing day so the dam melts and loos-
ens somewhat, and repair the gutter section that
is causing the jam-up if you can.
HOME TIP: If constant ice buildup on outdoor
steps is a problem, work with it by laying a strip
of burlap across each stair tread and wetting
each strip slightly. The burlap will freeze to the
step, creating temporary traction.
Send your questions or home tips to ask@thisi-
sahammer.com. My e-book, 101 Best Home
Tips, is available to download on Kindle! Pick
it up it today for just 99 cents.
(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.
continued on next page
page 32 The WORLD January 8, 2014
Dog Takes a Break From Housetraining
DEAR PAWS CORNER:
We adopted a beautiful
dog about a month ago.
Chase is a great young
dog, about a year old by
the shelters estimate.
But over the past week
he seems to be forgetting
his house training. He
urinates in different cor-
ners of the house at least
three times a day, even
though we take him out
morning and evening at the same time. He seems kind of
mopey, too. How can we correct this? -- Chandra in Baltimore
DEAR CHANDRA: You should contact Chases veterinarian
right away. A sudden change in behavior or elimination pat-
terns often signals that a dog is ill, rather than forgetting his
training.
While puppies need to urinate more often due to their
smaller bladders, Chase is nearing full growth and should not
need to go out so often. Since he is peeing in the house, he may
not be able to control his bladder, indicating something is
wrong.
Chase could be suffering from a urinary tract infection, or
something else, but only the vet can determine exactly what the
problem is and prescribe the right medicine. Take him in soon
to get checked so he can start feeling better, and your carpet
can get a break.
What if an infection isnt the cause? The vet will check for
other possible issues. If Chase is physically healthy, then begin
looking for other reasons why he may be eliminating in the
house. Does he suffer from anxiety? (Many shelter dogs do.) Is
he alone in the house for long periods of time? Has anything
changed in the household, like a new family member ... or
someone leaving? Pets react to the rhythms of your home,
sometimes much more strongly than we do.
Send your questions or comments to ask@pawscorner.com.
(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.
"Tiki"
~4 Year Old Spayed Female Short Hair
Tikis Feline-Ality is: Sidekick! (orange) Like all
sidekicks, I'm just plain good company. I like
attention, and I also like my solitude. I don't go
looking for trouble, but I'm no scaredy-cat, either.
If you are looking for a steady companion to
travel with you on the road of life, look no further.
Tiki has lived with other felines and a small
dog. She enjoys her kitty naps after her daily
adventures within her home.
1589 VT Rte 14S East Montpelier
802-476-3811 www.cvhumane.com
Tues.-Fri. 1PM-5PM, Sat. 10AM-4PM
BUDDY
~2 Year Old Neutered Male Short Hair
My Feline-Ality is: The Executive
Im a unique, grey and white male kitty with a
gigantic, heartfelt rumble! Im always looking for
an affectionate head bump or a big behind-
the-ear scratch. If you are looking for a steady
companion to travel with you on the road of life,
look no further!
$ $ cash for guns $ $ cash f
o
r

g
u
n
s

$

$

c
a
s
h

f
o
r

g u n s $ $ c a s h f o r g u n s $ $ c a s h f o
r

g
u
n
s

$

$

c
a
s
h

f
o
r

guns
carraras gun shop
WE BUY GUNS! New, Used, Old or Broken
802-492-3339 Days
802-779-7217 Cell
if you have firearms for sale, we are serious buyers!
We are strong buyers for nice
Winchesters, Savages, Brownings, Colts & ne shotguns
~We Have Buyers In Your Area~
We Buy
Guns
We Buy
Guns
POWER EQUIPMENT
476-7712
81 S. Main St., Barre
M-F 8-5, Sat. 8:30-Noon
Toro Power Max

Snow Throwers

$
799
95
Starting
at
www.toro.com
with QuickStick
TM

Control
Birds
for
Sale
2 Buff Colored
Cockatiels
8 Parakeets,
various colors
2 Finches, 1 albino
4 Cages
Bird food/seed
ALL FOR
$250.
Call 802-223-5252
Ext. 107
Ask for Mr. B
SNOW REMOVAL/
EQUIPMENT
1979 F150 FORD
TRUCK W/Plow $1500.00
frm 802-728-5516
FOR SALE: 20 inch Crafts-
man snowblower 5hp
Good running condition
$150.00 Call 802-229-1052
SNOWMOBILES &
ACCESSORIES
2005 POLARIS 550 CLASSIC
TWO 2004 ARCTIC CAT
Z440LX Snowmobiles with All
Extras, excellent shape. 802-
456-7049
2006 SKI-DOO GSX-600
SDI Blue 5,500 Miles $3,495
Autoxtreme 866-859-8284
SKI-DOO 2001 MXZ-X 600cc
new track mirrors Good condition
with Reverse $1600. 2001 Po-
laris Classic 550 Reverse Elec-
tric Start Good condition 1200
miles $1500. 802-661-8002
SNOWMOBILE TRAILER,
SNO PRO Xtreme. Alumi-
num 10 w/Black Cap, 2002
good Condition with Acces-
sories $1400 802-371-7848
FARM/GARDEN/
LAWN
CEDAR BROOK FARM; Ce-
dar Fence Posts, Brush Hog-
ging, Pasture Renovation,
Rototilling, Planting, Wildlife
Food Plots. 802-274-2955
email-ajpalmiero@gmail.com
FOOD GRADE BARRELS
Charlie the Barrel Man has re-
tired; Good Luck Charlie! Gary
Bicknells Bicknell Barrels has
acquired the barrel man busi-
ness. From 2 1/2 to 275 gallon
Barrels & Totes available. Plas-
tic and steel; all food grade. Call
802-439-5149 or 802-439-5519
ANIMALS/PETS
AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD
Puppies Beautiful friendly and
very social ready to go now. First
shots, wormed, tails docked.
Born October 13, parents live
here to meet. Located in East
Hardwick $500 802-274-2633
Just in time for a Christmas Pup-
py. Tammiescritters.webs.com
BARRE TOWN, Peking-
ese Puppies, shots, de-
wormed, multi-colored, ready
now. $400. 802-793-6791.
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE
Country
Pampered
Paws
Pet Grooming & Boarding
East Montpelier
802-229-0114
Radiant Heated Floors For Winter,
Air Conditioning In Summer

DONT WANT TO
KENNEL YOUR DOG(S)?
Have your child friendly com-
panion animal stay with us in
the comfort of our home. Call
Your Pet Nannies, Sophie 802-
229-0378 or Shona 802-229-
4176, references available.
ANIMALS/FARM
GRASS FED BEEF Heif-
ers & Bulls For Meat or
Breading. 802-456-1028
Kidders Smokehouse. Custom
smoke & cure. We do corn-
beef. Orange. 802-498-4550.
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
$ A1-CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
802-522-4279.
$ CASH $
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
Paying up to $300 for junk cars
and trucks, FREE Scrap Metal
Pick-up. Call Barre, 802-917-
2495, 802-476-4815, Bob.
CARPENTRY; ADDITIONS/
Renovations, kitchens, cabi-
nets, and siding, tile work.
Clay wall plastering. Rob
after 6p.m., 456-1340.
CARPET AND
UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING
Residential & Commercial
223-6490
Our Reputation Is Clean!
CLEANING Profession-
ally for Commercial & Resi-
dential. Call 371-8083
CLEANING SERVICES: Home
or Offce, One time or sched-
uled, Carpets, Clean-out, Site
Clean-ups, Real Estate Clean-
ing, Windows. 802-279-0150
DmFURNACE
MAN
Oil Furnace Tune-Ups
Cleanings Repairs
Installations
Fully Licensed & Insured
Reasonable Rates
Call Daryl
802-249-2814
GOOBERS SMALL EN-
GINES; Repairing & Servicing
All Brands of Outdoor Power
Equipment, $30 an hour, Fast
Reliable Service, Pick-up & De-
livery Available. 802-730-3839
HANDYMAN SERVICES:
Repai rs.Carpentry.Fl oori ng.
Painting. Electrical/Plumb-
ing, Pressure Washing. De-
bris Removal 802-279-0150
HANDYMAN will Clean-Up
your Walks, driveway, Roofs,
or anything outside& inside
the house or garage, Rea-
sonable and Good work, Call
802-479-0610 Scott Plante
PAINTING/PAPERING also
all prep work, very rea-
sonable 802-249-4817
QUALITY PAINTING, Stu-
art Morton, Interior/Exterior,
Repairs, Many Excellent Lo-
cal References. 802-229-
0681 corsica@sover.net
ROOF SHOVELING, Careful,
reasonable. Andy 802-223-5409
ROOF SNOW Removal +
Quality Full Tree Services.
Fully Insured. Call Randy @
802-479-3403 or 249-7164.
TRASH
DROP OFF
AT
Touch-Free
Pelletier Car Wash
$
4.00
Starting 10/21 - Recycling
Wednesdays & Saturdays
7:30AM-2:30PM 7:30AM-1PM
Route 302 East Barre
479-1308 or 249-7857
30-gallon
bag

UPHOLSTERY Quality Mate-
rials and workmanship from
a fully equiped shop in
Northfeld. Craftman Gene
Petrochko 802-485-4327
WILL HAUL away for free: Scrap
metal, old appliances, car parts,
etc. Furnaces, boilers and demo-
litions for a fee. No job too big or
too small. Chad, 802-793-0885.
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
continued
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
continued
Before you use your grater to grate
cheese, give it a quick shot of nonstick
spray. It will keep the cheese from gunking
up in the grate. If you need softened butter
for a recipe, you can grate it frozen, and it
will soften up very quickly, but not melt like in a microwave.
Eliminate the odor of peanut butter after you wash the jar by
rinsing it with white vinegar. I use peanut butter jars for storing
things in my shop because they are a good size and the twist-off
top is very secure. One time, the jar smelled like peanut butter, and
I guess a mouse decided hed like to get a taste. I found the
gnawed-on jar on my outside workbench. Luckily, there wasnt
anything in it. -- T.E. in Georgia
I have found a new way to grocery shop and stay on budget. I
use my calculator as I am going through, and add up as I go. Once
I hit my budget, I cant get anything else, so I have learned to get
the things I really need first (most of them on the perimeter of the
store), then shop the aisles for other things. I have stayed on bud-
get for two months, when before I had been going over budget a
lot! -- E.O. in Oregon
Clean your cellphone screen often. This is especially important
if you have a smartphone. We use our fingers nonstop to touch the
phone, then put it directly up to our face. Its a germs paradise.
Just remember: A quick swipe with an alcohol cloth might save
you from getting the flu this season. Stay healthy!
When heater season is in full effect -- like now -- I keep a spray
bottle of water, to which I add 2 tablespoons of liquid fabric soft-
ener. I spritz the house from time to time, and it will add humidity
as well as a pleasant scent, but it also keeps my carpets from mak-
ing my kids little zappers (from static buildup when dragging their
feet!). -- M.A. in Ohio
Send your tips to Now Heres a Tip, c/o King Features Weekly
Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475 or e-mail
JoAnn at heresatip@yahoo.com.
(c) 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.
NOW HERES A TIP
By JoAnn Derson
E-mail
us!
Classified
& Display
ADS
Now Placing Your
Classified Or
Display Ad Is Even
Easier!

Our E-mail address is


sales@vt-world.com
Please include contact
person & payment info
( Only)
479-2582 or
1-800-639-9753
FAX US!
Now Placing Your
Classified Or Display Ad Is
Even Easier!
Our Fax Number Is
(802)479-7916
Please Include Contact
Person & Payment Info
VISA, MasterCard & Discover
Keep Pets Safe In Cold Weather
Many pet owners enjoy taking their four-legged friends with them
when running errands. But when the weather is especially cold and
harsh, pet owners may want to leave their pets behind in the
warmth and comfort of indoors. There are other tactics to keeping
pets safe when the winter arrives in earnest.
Keep pets away from antifreeze
Antifreeze emits a sweet smell, which is often inviting to dogs and
cats. But antifreeze is lethal in small doses, so its best to keep pets
out of your garage and away from your driveway, where antifreeze
may leak. Antifreeze can prove especially harmful to pets if it
contains ethylene glycol as the main ingredient. There are safer
alternatives, but even the safest antifreezes can be lethal when
consumed in high quantities.
Protect their paws
Rock salt on sidewalks can effectively melt ice and snow. But rock
salt also can be very irritating to pets paws. Remember to wipe
your pets feet when coming indoors after walking on surfaces
treated with salt or another melting agent. This will help to remove
excess particles and prevent your pet from getting ill when the
animal licks its paws clean.
Keep pets indoors on cold days
Dont allow pets outside when the temperature falls below 20 F, as
pets are at risk of frostbite or hypothermia when exposed to such
temperatures. Puppies, kittens and short-haired pets may be more
susceptible to the cold and should be kept in when temperatures
dip below 40 F.
Look out for animals seeking shelter
Outdoor cats and other animals may choose your car engine as a
cozy place to spend the night. A warm engine provides enough
heat to ward off the chill. You may have a cat under your hood and
not know it. Beep the horn before starting the car to scare the
animal away. Otherwise the cat could be severely injured when the
car is started.
Do not leave a pet alone in a car
It is unwise to leave a pet unattended in a parked car. It may seem
that the interior is warmer than outside, but the temperature in the
car can drop quickly. Never leave a pet locked in a car, especially
in harsh weather conditions.
THANK YOU FOR SAYING I SAW IT IN
January 8, 2014 The WORLD page 33
SNOW PLOWING
& SNOW REMOVAL
Abare Lawn Care and Property Services
Residential &
Commercial
Sanding &
Salting
Eric Abare 476-6941 Cell 793-7472
BUILDING GARAGES
FROM FLOOR TO ROOF
Starting At
$
8,900
24 x 24 garage, 6 concrete floors with steel
rebar, (2) 7 x 9 garage doors, one entry door.
Garages to your specifications, any size.
House Framing & Addition Work
Call 802-296-1522 Ask for Ray
Fireplace, Stove & Chimney Maintenance
David Loughran
Barre, VT
Chimney Building Repairs Liners Caps
Cleaning Metalbestos
Also Foundation &
Brick Wall Repair (802) 479-3559
GREGS
PAINTING & STAINING
Metal Roof Painting
Call 802-479-2733
gpdpainting@aol.com EPA, RRP, EMP Certified
Handpaint or Spray
Metal Roof Painting
Interior/Exterior
Guarantee
Free Estimates
Reasonable Low Rates
Neat, Quality Work
References Insured
DEMERS
AUTO
DEMERS
AUTO
COLLISION REPAIR
All Vehicles - All Makes & Models
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT
3.5 miles from Montpelier roundabout toward East Montpelier (RT 2)
229-6262
Got the good old appliances still around?
Need repair?
Call the old guy to x em!
Servicing Central Vermont for 40+ Years
Even got old prices!
Call Dennis 229-0096
Randy Eastman
CARPENTRY
"25 Years Experience"
522-5889
You Save Money Because There Is No Overhead
Free Estimates References
Remodeling
New Construction
Kitchens and Bathrooms,
Additions,
Doors and Windows,
Ceramic Tile,
Hardwood and Laminate
Floors,
Stairways and Railings,
Painting
and much more.
Les Church Chris Lackey
802-249-1030
dlesc51854@aol.com
W/ 21-ro corr|lrerl & cred|l qua||l|cal|or
Still Have
Dial UpI
Get High-Speed Today!
Offer expires l/l6/l4. Pestrictions apply. Call for details.
Promotional prices start at
lor 12 rorl|s
ll :.a, :. a .a: ..
Mark Alberghini
Green Mountain Satellite
Waterbury, VT
802-244-5400
www.greenmountainsatellite.getdish.com gmsat@myfairpoint.net
Garage Doors and Openers
Sales & Service
Offering prompt, professional service and
repair on all residential makes and models
Kevin Rice, Owner Cell: (802) 839-6318
Kevins Doors
OPENERS
Come Home To A
Clean House!
Wouldnt it be wonderful to come home to
a clean house, without lifting a fnger?
Now, you can!
Break free from the doldrums of housework
with a professional cleaning service.
Ill leave your home looking, smelling
and feeling freshly cleaned
for a very affordable price.
Dont hesitate~call Beth today
802-272-5550
Montpelier & East Montpelier Area
Reliable Dependable Reasonable Rates
ROOF SNOW REMOVAL
Call Us Before Its Too Late!
ROOF REPAIRS & SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL & FLAT ROOF EXPERTS
H We install new roofs year-round H
SHINGLES RUBBER SLATE METAL
Emergency Repairs 24/7 (Expert Leak Finders)
Al Smith, LLC
FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED
Call 233-1116 alsmithroofng.com

FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Conditions
Apply

Tom Moore
T&T Repeats
116 Main St., Montpelier
802-224-1360
Light Moving
House Clean-Out
Landfill Runs
Garage Clean-Out
Reasonable Rates
Local Business
Long Distance Runs
Deliveries for
Local Businesses
TRUCK FOR HIRE!
Mobile Home
Sales, Parts & Services
GoVillageHomes.com
HSingle Wide & Double Wide
HNew & Used (Trades Welcome)
HEnergy Star Packages
HFinancing & Site Work
HHome Parts & Fixtures
802-229-1592 1083 US Route 2, Berlin, VT
HDoors & Knobs / Storm Doors
HInsulated Windows / Skylights
HTubs, Faucets & Plumbing
HSkirting & Exterior Steps
HTie Down Anchoring Products
W.C. Heating
227 Felicity 2nd Ave.
Williamstown, VT 05679
Cell (802) 793-5794
$
90 Cleaning
$
65
00
/hour on Repairs
$
97
50
/hour on After Hours Calls
Fully Insured and Licensed
Free Quotes Available for Installs & Repairs
Oil/Propane Certied
Service provided on
the following:
Water Heaters
Furnaces Boilers
Space Heaters
Oil Tanks
Toyotomi Oil and
Rinnai Gas On-Demand
Water Heaters sold
Both Mobile Home
Approved
ERVICE DIRECTOR
S Y
Central Vermont's Best Weekly Guide
To Professional Services
Home repairs are inevitable. For the homeowner
who also happens to be handy with a hammer,
the occasional home repair is nothing to fear
and something that many even enjoy. But there
many homeowners who arent so adept at home
repairs, and such men and women typically rely
on trained professionals when something goes
awry around the house. For those homeowners
who either dont have the time or the ability to fx
issues that arise around the house, the following
is a breakdown of three of the more commonly
called on home service providers.
* Electrician: An electrician specializes in ad-
dressing a buildings or homes electrical wiring
issues, stationary machines and the equipment
related to those machines. Electricians can fx
existing issues, but many also can design and in-
stall new electrical components and systems. The
dangers of working with electrical systems are
many, so electricians typically must be certifed
and licensed before they can practice their trade.
Such danger is one reason why even those who
are adept at fxing problems around the house
might want to hire an electrician should an elec-
trical issue arise.
* Plumber: A plumber is a professional whose
area of expertise is in installing and maintaining
systems for drinking water, drainage and sewage.
Though not all jurisdictions require a plumber be
licensed before he or she can practice, many do,
and it can take years of training and experience
to master the skill of plumbing. Many people
call a plumber when a toilet or sink backs up,
but plumbers must have far more extensive skills
as well. Plumbers must be skilled in a number
of areas, including having an ability to read and
understand a homes blueprints, detect faults in a
plumbing system if the homeowner cannot install
and repair fxtures and systems, and be aware of
any legal requirements to ensure a home is safe.
* Landscaper: Homeowners have increasingly
looked to professional landscapers to maintain
their homes exterior and subsequently ensure
their property value remains high. A typical land-
scaper offers his client an array of services, from
cutting the grass to raking leaves to more compli-
cated tasks that gravitate toward landscape archi-
tecture. A homes curb appeal has been shown to
vastly improve a prospective buyers impression
of the house, and as a result many homeowners
rely on a landscaper to take care of their property.
Many landscapers an extensive knowledge of the
science involved in tending to a lawn and how
to help it weather the seasons without losing its
appeal.
These Professionals Can Help
page 34 The WORLD January 8, 2014
Lovely 4 bedroom / 3 bathroom cape sitting on 2
acres of meticulously maintained landscaping. This
beautiful home has attached, oversized, 2-car heated
garage with paved driveway. This home was built in
late 1999 and has a drilled well and city sewer. Main
level has large mud room with dual closets, dining
room, kitchen with custom cabinets and granite
counter tops, bright living room, bedroom or ofce,
and full bath. Main level has all hardwood and tile
oors. Upper level has 2 bedrooms plus master suite.
Master suite has a large walk-in closet! Bedrooms
are all carpeted. Basement has lots of storage and is
nished as a cozy den. Large laundry room and cute
bathroom! Enjoy Beautiful sunsets over Vermonts
Camels Hump and Worcester Mountain Range from
your large deck. Located only 5 minutes from I-89.
$359,000. Call 802-839-0100
Barre Town
P: 802-479-1154
C: 802-224-6151
Wanda French
Mortgage Loan Officer
NMLS ID: VT101185
wanda.french@academymortgage.com
www.AcademyMortgage.com/wandafrench
164 So. Main St., Barre, VT 05641
VT License VT101185
Corp. License #6289 and 1068MB
NMLS ID 3113
Licensing Information: http://www.academymortgage.com/licensing
Offering: Conventional,
Renance, VA, FHA & USDA loans
LAST DOWN
LENDER UPDATE RATE APR TERM PTS PAYMENT
Granite Hills 1/3/14 4.750% 4.913% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Credit Union 522-5000 3.750% 4.027% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
Merchants Bank 1/3/14 5.400% 5.421% 30 yr fixed 0 20%
1-800-322-5222 3.750% 3.784% 15 yr fixed 0 20%
New England Federal 1/3/14 4.625% 4.661% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Credit Union 866-805-6267 3.500% 3.524% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
Northfield Savings 1/3/14 4.625% 4.666% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Bank (NSB) 3.500% 3.570% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
802-485-5871
VT State Employees 1/3/14 4.625% 4.655% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Credit Union (VSECU) 3.500% 3.551% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
1-800-371-5162 X5345
Rates can change without notice.
***APRs are based on 20% down payment. Some products are available with as little as
5% down, with purchase of Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). The cost of PMI is not
included in the APR calculations.
Updated Weekly
Home Mortgage Rates

Rate APR Term Points Downpayment

Granite Hills CU 4.750% 4.913% 30 yr fixed
0 5%
3.750% 4.027% 15 yr fixed 0
5%

Merchants 5.400% 5.421% 30 yr fixed
0 20%
3.750% 3.784% 15 yr fixed 0
20%

NE Fed CU 4.625% 4.661% 30 yr fixed
0 5%
3.500% 3.524% 15 yr fixed 0
5%

Northfield Savings 4.625%4.666% 30 yr fixed 0
5%
3.500%3.570% 15 yr fixed 0
5%

VSECU 4.625%4.655% 30 yr fixed 0
5%
3.500%3.551% 15 yr fixed 0
5%
COMMERCIAL SPACE
FOR LEASE
Ofce, Warehouse, Retail,
Shop Space
Numerous Prime Locations
Throughout Central Vermont
For Inquiries, Call
Malone Properties
802-793-0179
patrick@together.net
Westons Mobile Home Park
ONLY 33 31 LOTS LEFT FOR RENT!
Lot rent of $320.00 month includes water, septic, and
trash removal. Close to the Interstate and Montpelier.
Ellery & Jennifer Packard
Westons Mobile
Home Park
229-5741ext. 103

Lots Available Year Round


Does Your Home Need Repair? We Can Help!
Repairs include:
Energy efficient improvements
Heating systems, including
Alternative fuel heating sources

Make Your Home Safe and Accessible
Access Modifications include:

Grab bars
Barrier-free showers

If eligible* we can assist with an affordable loan or grant to address
health & safety concerns, correct code violations or make access modifications
for an elderly or disabled household.
-
*Homeowners in Washington, Orange and Lamoille counties who meet income eligibility
requirements may qualify, please call for these guidelines. For example, a four person
household in Washington County must have an annual income of $54k or less.

Call today: 802-476-4493 ext:211 or visit our website: www.cvclt.org
or stop by our office
Central Vermont Community Land Trust NeighborWorks Homeownership Center
107 N. Main Street, Barre, Vermont 05641
Supported by a $375,000 VCDP grant from the
Agency of Commerce &
Community Development
Wells and Septic systems
Plumbing and Wiring
Roof and Foundation repairs
Permanent or temporary wheelchair ramps
Flooring repair/replacement
Does Your Home Need Repair? We Can Help!
Repairs include:
Energy efficient improvements
Heating systems, including
Alternative fuel heating sources

Make Your Home Safe and Accessible
Access Modifications include:

Grab bars
Barrier-free showers

If eligible* we can assist with an affordable loan or grant to address
health & safety concerns, correct code violations or make access modifications
for an elderly or disabled household.
-
*Homeowners in Washington, Orange and Lamoille counties who meet income eligibility
requirements may qualify, please call for these guidelines. For example, a four person
household in Washington County must have an annual income of $54k or less.

Call today: 802-476-4493 ext:211 or visit our website: www.cvclt.org
or stop by our office
Central Vermont Community Land Trust NeighborWorks Homeownership Center
107 N. Main Street, Barre, Vermont 05641
Supported by a $375,000 VCDP grant from the
Agency of Commerce &
Community Development
Wells and Septic systems
Plumbing and Wiring
Roof and Foundation repairs
Permanent or temporary wheelchair ramps
Flooring repair/replacement
REAL ESTATE
1-800-639-9753 sales@vt-world.com
MOBILE HOMES/
RENT/SALE
FOR SALE; In Zephyrhills,
Florida, Doublewide Mobile
Home, 2Bedrooms, 1 bath.
Large Porch, Washer, Shed
and many extras. Price has
been Reduced. Have Pictures
to show. Call 802-225-6542
For Details and Make an Offer.
MUST SEE! Needs To Be
MOVED, 26x52 3 Bedroom 2
bath, $30,000.00 obro, 802-456-
1060 Ask for Shannon or Ryan.
COMMERCIAL
RENTALS/SALES
We have commercial space
available for lease and sale
and businesses for sale
throughout the
Central Vermont area.
For more information, please
call John at BCK Real Estate.
John Biondolillo
BCK Real Estate
(802) 479-3366, ext. 301
John@BCKrealestate.com
COMMERCIAL SPACE FOR
LEASE; Ofce, Warehouse,
Retail, Shop Space. Numer-
ous prime locations through-
out Central Vermont. Call
802-793-0179 or patrick@
together.net for inquiries.
WANTED TO RENT/
SHARE/BUY
ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share home on Rt. 100, So.
Duxbury. $450/mo + $450
Security. 802-244-8666.
APARTMENTS
ROOMS/HOUSES
FOR RENT
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT
- East Barre. Great for single
person. Washer/Dryer in-
cluded. No pets, no utilities.
$500/month plus deposit.
8 0 2 - 2 7 9 - 7 7 2 8 / 8 8 1 - 4 7 9 7
2-BEDROOM HOUSE So.
Woodbury $600.00 plus
Utilities. 802-456-1028
BARRE CITY: Nicely reno-
vated, 1bdrm, Includes
heat, hot water, rubbish re-
moval. $700. 802-476-0533.
CALAIS/MAPLE Corner Area
Cozy 4-room cottage. New gas
furnace, wood stove backup.
Sunny and comfortable for one
or two people. No pets. $900./
mo. Lease. 802-223-5510
MOBILE HOME For Rent in Brain-
tree, 3 miles from Randolph. Pri-
vate lot, 3bedroom/2bath, $850/
mo+deposit+utilities. No Pets/
Non-smoking, 802-728-3602
RANDOLPH AREA APART-
MENT for Rent, small one bed-
room, heat furnished, $600/
mo Plus deposit. 802-728-3602
RETIREMENT APART-
MENTS, ALL INCLUSIVE.
Meals, transportation, activities
daily. Short Leases. Monthly
specials! Call 877-210-4130
RULE OF THUMB......
Describe your property,
not the appropriate buyer or
renter, not the landlord,
not the neighbors.
Just describe the property and
youll almost always obey the
law.
WILLIAMSTOWN 2 BEDROOM
APT, Heat and Rubbish includ-
ed. No Pets, No Smoking. $950/
References. 802-433-6149
VACATION RENTALS/
SALES
HOME FOR SALE IN FLORIDA,
The Villages, 2bedroom/1bath,
dishwasher/washer/dryer, Sun-
ny Pleasant home, $86,000.00.
For Information 802-392-8031
PAWLEYs ISLAND, South Car-
olina 2 Bedroom, 2 bath Condo
100 yards from beach. Quiet
and comfortable. Sleeps 6.
Weekly, monthly and seasonal
rentals. Call Ed 802-485-8396
for info, availability, and rates.
WARM WEATHER is Year
Round in Aruba. The water is
safe, and the dining is fantastic.
Walk out to the beach. 3-Bed-
room weeks available. Sleeps
8. $3500. email: carolaction@
aol.com for more information.
FOR THE
MOST CURRENT
CLASSIFIED ADS,
VISIT OUR WEB PAGE:
www.vt-world.com
www.C21Jack.com
802-223-6302
147 State Street
Montpelier
REALTOR
Each Office is Independently Owned & Operated
Lori Holt
Ext. 326
MAPLE CORNER, CALAIS
Outstanding 4-BR, 2-bath
amenity-lled residence
(3,200+/- sq. ft). Cherry
kitchen with Caesarstone
counters and stainless
appliances. Gas replace.
Den. Master BR with
gigantic closet! Separate,
very comfortable 3-season
cottage with private dock
A NORTHFIELD LANDMARK rich in history, this circa 1850s 5 BR,3-
bath elegant Colonial residence is locally known as the Margaret
Holland Inn. Centrally located between Depot Square (a Village Green)
and the Norwich University Campus. Hardwood oors, several multi-
purpose rooms and a lovely sunroom. Enjoy the well-established
perennial beds from the wraparound porch. Attached 2-story carriage
house offers PLENTY of storage. Parking for 8. $275,000.
on Curtis Pond. Plus, theres a heated in-ground pool with cabana.
On 3.3+/- acre of primarily level, beautifully-landscaped grounds with
perennial gardens, blueberries and raspberry patch. Oversized 2-car
direct-entry garage. Call for additional details and photos! $549,900.
continued on next page
THANK YOU FOR SAYING
I SAW IT IN
January 8, 2014 The WORLD page 35
Please contact CVCLT for more information.
10 North Main Street, Barre, VT 05641
802-476-4493 ext 211
Email: cpollard@CVCLT.org
Sale Price
$,000
*after $,000
down payment
assistance Grant
$1,000
Completely Renovated! 2 bathroom .
acres
Offering a two car
garag and a decent size deck this home cannot get any better for the price.
ale by CVCLT with $,000 in down-payment assistance from VHFAs HARP
program.
Lague Lane, Barre Town
Set the heat on 63 and it is comfort-
able. Multiple zone baseboard hot
water heat. Appliances new in 2011.
Spacious breakfast bar. Two bed-
rooms on main level, third nished
room on basement level used as a
third bedroom/ofce/guest. Taste-
fully nished entertainment room
20x21. Surveyed one acre. Secu-
rity system. Drilled well, munici-
pal sewage disposal . NO renova-
tions needed here. Many nancing
options available now.
Barre Town ....................$219,000.
Call for appointment
8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
available daily.
Betty Lawton
MarketPlace Real Estate
Office 802-456-1200
BUILT FOR COMFORT
Log Home
Preferred
Barre Town or
Berlin
for qualied buyer.
Call Betty Lawton
802-456-1200
Market Place Real Estate
PUBLISHERS
NOTICE
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising in this news-
paper is subject to the fair housing act
which makes it illegal to advertise any
preference, limitation or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or national ori-
gin, or an intention, to make any such
preference, limitation or discrimination.
Additionally, Vermonts Fair Housing
and Public Accomodations Act prohibits
advertising that indicates any prefer-
ence, limitation or discrimination based
on age, marital status, sexual orienta-
tion or receipt of public assistance.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our read-
ers are hereby informed that all dwell-
ings advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity
basis.
To file a complaint of discrimination, call
the Vermont Human Rights Commisson
toll-free at 1-800-416-2010 (voice
& TTY) or call HUD toll free at
1-800-669-9777 (voice) or
1-800-927-9275 (TTY).
LAND FOR SALE
BCK offers expert advice on
maximizing your land investment.
Farms, estates, Maple Sugar
Orchards, and woodlands.
Call to arrange a consultation
whether you`re Buying or Selling.
Dave Jamieson - BCK Real Estate
(802) 479-3366, ext. 305
Cell: (802) 522-6702
DavidJ@BCKrealestate.com
www.VermontLandCompany.com
HOMES
75% COMPLETE HOUSE and
Three Acres Overlooking Joes
Pond on US RT2 $62,500.00
802-565-2296 941-704-9729
GREENSBORO BEND, OLDER
2 STORY HOUSE, 3 bedrooms
upstairs, kitchen living room,
dining room and bedroom on
frst foor, full bath, some ap-
pliances, 2 acres +/-, asking
$105,900. 802-328-2008/802-
535-7867 leave message.
SIDE-BY-SIDE DUPLEX located
in Barre City For Sale by Owner.
1st unit is a 3 bedroom 1 bath.
2nd unit is a 2 bedroom 1&1/2
bath. Please call 802-793-8332.
WORRIED ABOUT FORECLO-
SURE?
Having trouble paying your mort-
gage? The Federal Trade Com-
mission says dont pay any fees
in advance to people who prom-
ise to protect your home from
foreclosure. Report them to the
FTC, the nations consumer pro-
tection agency. For more infor-
mation, call 1-877-FTC-HELP or
click on ftc.gov. A message from
The World and the FTC.
Susan Charron
Arguin
Steve Arguin
204 Washington St., Barre
802-476-4121 fax 802-476-4831
Arguin
Real Estate
This is a split entry home that has been completely updated
inside with a new kitchen, new full bathroom with granite
counter tops, new ooring and huge master bedroom. This
home is situated in a desired neighborhood in Barre Town on a
large, at lot. It offers a 2 plus attached garage, new standing
seam roof, new Buderus Boiler, 2 replaces and beautiful
family room with plenty of storage. Asking $249,900.
NEW!
BARRE TOWN LISTING!
This home is beautiful situated in a quiet neighborhood
offering gorgeous views of the mountains. There is a little
over an acre of well landscaped land. The house offers 3-4
bedrooms, large family room with wood stove, eat in kitchen
with plenty of cabinets, 3 car attached garage, brand new
updated full bath and hardwood ooring. There is tons of
storage too! Amust see! Asking $244,900.
BARRE TOWN HOME ON
OVER AN ACRE
FAX
US!
Now Placing Your
Classified Or Display
Ad Is Even Easier!
Our Fax Number Is
802479-7916
Please Include Contact Person
& Payment Info
VISA, MasterCard & Discover
ANN
CUMMINGS
272-0944
CAROLELLISON
249-7435
CHARLIE CLARK
229-0345
MICHELLE
MORAN GOSSELIN
249-9002
MAURICE (MOE)
FORTIER
249-7628
STEPHEN
BOUSQUET
793-9951
TIM HENEY
229-0345
FRED
VAN BUSKIRK
505-8035
BRENDAN
COYNE
245-4369
HREALTORS
eney
HeneyRealtors.com
81 Main Street
Montpelier
229-0345
135 Washington St.
Barre
476-6500
Own For Less Than Renting
Easy Living!
Relax and enjoy life at this three bedroom, two bath
Berlin condominium. The main level offers a cathedral
ceiling in the living room, sunny three season porch, a
well-designed kitchen and dining area. A wonderful
design that accommodates one level living, plus two
bedrooms and a bath upstairs and a full walkout basement
with an extra nished room. An ideal location central to
This three bedroom, one and a half bath Barre home
offers a large eat-in kitchen with updated appliances.
The living room centers around a great working replace
and a recently touched up brick hearth. New laminate
ooring throughout the downstairs. The exible layout
provides a rst oor laundry, a bright, newly added
family room and three bedrooms upstairs. Lots of closet
space, a new roof
and new windows
and a private back
deck. $99,950. Call
Brendan to see how
homeowner shi p
can work for you.
Montpelier, Barre
and easy access to
I-89. $239,000.
Contact Tim Heney
to schedule your
appointment.
www.C21Jack.com
(802)244-4500 Ext. 704
98 So. Main St., Waterbury
REALTOR

Each Office is Independently Owned & Operated


Open living concept in this traditional cape frame with
exposed beams and cathedral ceilings. 3 bedrooms and 2
baths with master suite. Traditional living area and den in the
basement. Deck and balconies.
East Montpelier, $219,000
Tina Golon
802-522-9216
Easy to maintain ranch with 2 car garage underneath.
2 bedrooms, 1 bath ready for a handyman or woman to
cosmetically upgrade. 3 season front porch and
hardwood oors. Working elevator to basement/garage.
Barre City, $93,500
New Affordable Homes

Barre 802-479-3366 Montpelier 802-229-4242 Rochester 802-767-9900 Essex Jct. 802-878-5500
Northfield 802-485-7400 Stowe 802-253-8484 Morrisville 802-888-0088 St. Johnsbury 802-748-9543
www.BCKrealestate.com www.BCKrealestate.com www.BCKrealestate.com
BUY OF THE WEEK
Search Every Listing
in Vermont at:
www.BCKrealestate.com
Barre - $525,000 East Montpelier - $230,000 Plaineld - $239,000
Williamstown - $209,000
REALTOR

Williamstown - $150,000
Colonial, built in 1780 boasts 8 bedrooms and 5 re
places. Recent upgrades include new roofs, windows
and a new kitchen. This home would make the ideal Bed
& Breakfast. Also included is a second home, a single-
family cottage with 3 bedrooms and 1 bathroom.

www.BCKrealestate.com/4247601
Enjoy your own piece of Vermont! This 3 bedroom, 2
bathroom home has been renovated with hardwood
and tile ooring with natural woodwork. Enjoy
entertaining friends and family on the 3 season porch.
Located near hiking and VAST Trails.

www.BCKrealestate.com/4223215
Expansive country home situated on +/- 6.45 acres
located in a private wooded section. Large windows
throughout provide for great natural light. This home
offers 4 bedrooms, 1 full and 1 half bathroom, 2
workshops and storage galore. This is a must see
property.

www. BCKrealestate.com/4224530
Classic A-frame style vacation home or mountain retreat.
Close to I-89 and minutes from Norwich University and
popular skiing destinations. The home features an open
living space with one bedroom downstairs and sleeping
loft upstairs. Dont miss out on this classic VT home.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4224950
Located a few miles from I-89, this beautiful 3 bedroom,
1 bathroom home is peaceful and charming. Enjoy
the living room with solarium, hard wood oors, rst
oor laundry, rst oor bedroom and a cozy downstairs
family room with lots of natural light.

www.BCKrealestate.com/4229691
This spacious 4 bedroom home built in 1844 with
character features storage, wide wooden oor boards,
8x17 pantry, a large room for a workshop, walking
distance to Norwich University, downtown, and local
schools. Close to I-89.
www.BCKrealestate.com/4149738
Northeld - $200,000
Barre - $265,000
Expansive 4 bedroom, 3 bath, Colonial on nearly
an acre situated quietly near the end of the street.
Beautiful architectural features include high ceilings,
chair rails, hardwood oors, a sunroom with parquet
ceiling & rounded archways. Broker Owner.

www.BCKrealestate.com/4314744
Barre - $122,000
Close to I-89 and the bus stop at
the end of the road, this 4 bedroom,
strategically located home has a
newer furnace, newer roof, newer oil
tank, and a new water main to the
home. Updated kitchen and bath. A
great family home with lots of room
and close to it all!

www.BCKrealestate.com/4218831
Its a great time to consider a career in real estate.
If you are looking for a exible career and unlimited income potential,
call me today at 479-3366 Ext. 301!
We have openings in several ofces throughout Vermont.
BCK Agents Get More. The End Result: You Get More!
Call John at 479-3366 or e-mail John@BCKrealestate.com
John Biondolillo
President
page 36 The WORLD January 8, 2014