Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 364

 

MASTER PLAN

Final Report
March 2011
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 – Introduction
1-1 Introduction 1-1
1-2 Overview 1-1

Chapter 2 – Existing Conditions


2-1 Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 2-1
2-2 Capacity Analysis 2-9
2-3 Facility Evaluations 2-25
Site Evaluation – George Mason and Mary Ellen Henderson 2-27
George Mason 2-35
Findings and Recommendations 2-47
Mary Ellen Henderson 2-51
Findings and Recommendations 2-58
Mt. Daniel 2-61
Findings and Recommendations 2-77
Thomas Jefferson 2-81
Findings and Recommendations 2-95
Gage House 2-99
Findings and Recommendations 2-103

Chapter 3 – Education Specifications


3-1 Purpose of a Division-Wide Educational Specification 3-1
3-2 The Division-Wide Educational Specification Development Process 3-1
3-3 Major Outcomes of Design Committee Process 3-7

Chapter 4 – Program of Space Needs


4-1 Overview of Space Programming 4-1
4-2 Space Requirements – Elementary 4-2
4-3 Space Requirements – Middle School 4-6
4-4 Space Requirements – High School 4-8
4-5 Other FCCPS Educational Programs/Centers 4-13
4-6 Conclusion – Programming That Meets Master Plan Goals 4-15
4-7 Summary of Long-Term Space Needs 4-16

Chapter 5 – Option Development


5-1 Option Development 5-1
5-2 Scheme A (Minimum) 5-2
5-3 Scheme B 5-4
5-4 Scheme C 5-6
5-5 Scheme D 5-8
5-6 Scheme E 5-10
Massing Diagrams Scheme A Minimal 5-13
Massing Diagrams Scheme B 5-15
Massing Diagrams Scheme C 5-17
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
1-1 – Introduction and Overview

Massing Diagrams Scheme D 5-19


Massing Diagrams Scheme E 5-21
Mt Daniel Possible Areas of Expansion 5-23
Thomas Jefferson Anticipated Renovation/ Partial Demolition 5-25
Thomas Jefferson Anticipated Areas of Expansion 5-27
George Mason Mary Ellen Henderson Anticipated Renovation/ Demolition 5-29
George Mason Mary Ellen Henderson Possible Areas of Expansion 5-31
Scheme A Mt Daniel 5-33
Scheme A Thomas Jefferson 5-35
Scheme A George Mason/ Mary Ellen Henderson 5-37
Scheme B Mt Daniel 5-39
Scheme B Thomas Jefferson 5-41
Scheme B George Mason/ Mary Ellen Henderson 5-43
Scheme C Mt Daniel 5-45
Scheme C Thomas Jefferson 5-47
Scheme C George Mason/ Mary Ellen Henderson 5-49
Scheme D Mt Daniel 5-51
Scheme D Thomas Jefferson 5-53
Scheme D George Mason/ Mary Ellen Henderson 5-55
Scheme E Mt Daniel 5-57
Scheme E Thomas Jefferson 5-59
Scheme E George Mason/ Mary Ellen Henderson 5-61

Chapter 6 – Preferred Option


6-1 Preferred Option 6-1
6-2 Phase I (2011-2016) 6-7
6-3 Phase II (2017-2021) 6-17
6-4 Phase III (2022-2026) 6-17
6-5 Phase II (2027-2031) 6-17
6-6 Summary 6-18
 

Chapter 1 
 

MASTER PLAN  
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
1‐1 ‐ Introduction, 1‐2 – Overview 

 
1‐1 ‐ Introduction 
 
In July 2008 the Falls Church City Public Schools contracted with PSA‐Dewberry to conduct a facility 
master plan.  The goals of this plan include the following: 
 
• Develop a 20‐year, phased strategy for maintaining and improving school facilities 
• Ensure that future school facilities will keep pace with anticipated growth, educational goals, 
and the priorities of the City of Falls Church. 
• Identify opportunities for improvements in infrastructure, in organization, and in teaching by 
examining the relationships between technology, academics, and school design. 
• Innovate where possible to create facilities that are environmentally sensitive, technologically 
capable, and that offer a cutting edge learning environment. 
• Facilitate cooperation between the Falls Church City Public Schools and other community 
groups, to provide infrastructure that can meet multiple needs, as appropriate. 
 
 
1‐2 ‐ Overview 
 
Steering Committee 
The master plan was directed by a steering committee made up of key staff from FCCPS, general 
government and community members.  The committee met regularly throughout the project to direct 
and guide the team in examining options.  (See Appendix A for listing) 
 
Design Committee 
The plan was also guided by a larger design committee comprised of principals, educators, and key 
members of the community at large.  This design committee met once a month for four months 
(October 2008, November 2008, December 2008, January 2009) to develop a vision for the future 
academic approach in Falls Church, a view for the role of technology, and a concept for the relationships 
between teachers and students, students and the community, and between all players and the school 
facilities themselves.  (See Appendix B for listing) 
 

 
1‐1 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
1‐2 – Overview 

Process 
The overall process consisted of the following steps: 
• Information Gathering 
o Design Committee 
o Facility Tours and Evaluations 
o Staff Interviews 
o Technology Audit 
o Enrollment Forecast 
• Summarizing Existing Conditions 
o Facility Evaluation Report 
o Catalog of Existing Space by Component 
o Existing Sites and Buildable Areas 
o Capacity Analysis 
• Identifying Goals and Priorities 
o Educational Goals 
o Technology Infrastructure 
o Class‐Grade Groupings 
o Campus Reduction/Co‐Location of Facilities 
• Developing Preliminary Options 
o Two extremes – minimal physical change, maximum physical change 
o Three midway options 
• Option Evaluation 
• Modifying and reducing the options to one 
• Completing detail work on selected option 
o Site work 
o Images 
o Phasing 
o Costing 
 
This report is a documentation of the process and conclusions drawn throughout this process. 
 
The executive summary which follows gives a brief overview of each phase of the process, and its 
outcomes. 
 
 

 
1‐2 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
1‐1 ‐ Introduction, 1‐2 – Overview 

Information Gathering 
The information gathered at the outset of the study set the foundation for the study, providing a base 
upon which all study initiatives were based.  This step included meetings with members of the school 
board, school administration, and principals from each school.  Reviews were made of previous 
enrollment forecasts, analysis of the City of Falls Church population and forecasted growth, and all of 
building floor plans for each school.  An inventory of spaces and technology was completed to give the 
team an idea of the physical resources currently available, and of the state of materials available at each 
grade level.   
 
Existing Conditions 
As part of the information gathering phase, an evaluation was made of the existing infrastructure 
comprising the Falls Church City Public Schools.  This infrastructure includes five buildings: 
 
• George Mason High School 
• Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 
• Mount Daniel Elementary School 
• Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 
• Gage House (alternative education, high school)  
 
Each facility was toured by professionals from various disciplines – mechanical, electrical, and plumbing 
engineers, architects, civil engineers, and Hazardous Materials assessment and abatement specialists.  
The goal of these evaluations was to determine in a broad sense the condition of each facility, its 
compliance with current code, and its prospect for continued long term use.  If any major issues were 
detected during these evaluations, they were documented for further consideration and evaluation as 
part of the master planning process. 
 
Chapter 2 of this report discusses each facility in turn, with sub‐sections for the various disciplines’ 
evaluations.   
 
 
Future Goals and Priorities 
The goals and priorities of the School Board and the key players in the school system were established 
during a series of evening working sessions conducted by Eperitus, a leader in educational planning.  
These sessions led to the development of the “Education Specifications” included in Chapter 3 of this 
report.  The education specifications and the desired educational delivery in Falls Church guided the 
entire master planning process from beginning to end.  
 
Discussion during the development and refinement of the options revolved around the following key 
questions: 
1. Is there a “right” size or a “maximum” size for schools in Falls Church?  How large is too large? 
2. How many campuses should there be?  Is there a cost to maintaining four separate school 
facilities? 
3. Should elementary grades be located in one school facility or two? 
4. Should eighth grade be part of high school or middle school? 
5. Should the master plan move toward one campus?  If so, would that campus be one of the 
existing locations, or a new site?  What new sites might be available for consideration? 
 
1‐3 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
1‐2 – Overview 

 
Preliminary Options 
Preliminary options explored during the study were framed by the “minimum” and “maximum” 
bookends.  These two extremes were defined by the option which included the least operational change 
and minimal changes to the current system, and by the option which required the maximum shift in 
thinking paired with dramatic change in the physical environment.   
 
Three interim options were developed, each of which included permutations of the “minimum” and 
“maximum.  These options explored various grade level breakdowns, different uses of the three sites 
currently occupied by the schools, and various orders in which the efforts could be implemented. 
 
 
Final Option (Recommended) 
The final recommended plan focuses on the elementary grades in Phase I. This option recommends an 
approximately 25,000 square foot addition at Thomas Jefferson Elementary School to allow fifth grade 
to be moved back into the elementary setting from Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School.  This option 
also includes improvements to some existing space within Thomas Jefferson Elementary School to 
increase core areas for anticipated long term (20‐year) growth, to improve internal building circulation, 
and to improve life‐safety systems.   Minor improvements are required at Mary Ellen Henderson to 
allow eighth grade to move back from George Mason High School, thereby freeing up space formerly 
utilized by eighth grade at the high school. 
 
With the elementary and middle school needs met through the planning period by the work completed 
in Phase I, Phase II will focus on George Mason High School.  This phase will include a major renovation 
and possible partial replacement of George Mason High School, with a focus on  
 
• improving internal building and external site circulation,  
• enhancing community access to and use of the facility during non‐school hours, and  
• replacement of outdated/failing mechanical systems with high‐efficiency systems utilizing solar 
or other renewable energy.   
 
As part of this renovation process, some of the multi‐level areas in George Mason will be modified to 
give the facility a more consistent feel and flow, to improve way‐finding, and to help co‐locate related 
functions in closer proximity to one another. 
 
Phase III will return to the elementary schools, and two possible options.  Phase II A could include a 
buildout of Thomas Jefferson Elementary School to allow one elementary to accommodate children 
from pre‐Kindergarten level through 5th grade.  Some details related to this project include the 
following: 
 
• This addition is anticipated to occur on the front of the existing building, and will require 
adjacent land acquisition.   
• Some reconfiguration of vehicular circulation along Oak Street is recommended as part of this 
project to provide a drop‐off/pick‐up zone away from the road. 
 
1‐4 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
1‐1 ‐ Introduction, 1‐2 – Overview 

• The classroom “community” for the younger children will be separate from the “community” of 
older children, to maintain the sense of scale Falls Church has had with two separate 
elementary schools. 
 
Phase III A will free the Mt. Daniel campus for sale or re‐use by the City. 
 
Alternatively, should two campuses for elementary schools continue to be the preferred option, Phase 
III B would focus on demolition of older, inefficient portions of Mt. Daniel and new construction of a 
three story addition to the existing building.  The current footprint would be maintenance to protect 
play area and trailers would be removed. 
 
If all other phases are executed successfully and growth continues as anticipated, Phase IV will see a 
break from capital construction.  During this phase CIP is expected to be required at Mary Ellen 
Henderson to update and replace any damaged or outdated components to what will be a 20+ year old 
facility.  An updated master plan is also recommended during this phase to adjust and re‐direct efforts in 
the subsequent years.  It is recommended that the master plan be completed prior to any re‐use or 
disposal decisions on Mt. Daniel Elementary School. 
 
Details of each phase of the recommended option are included in Chapter 6 of this report. 

 
1‐5 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
1‐2 – Overview 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This page intentionally left blank 

 
1‐6 
   

Chapter 2 

MASTER PLAN  
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

 
2‐Existing Conditions 
 
This chapter establishes the existing conditions in the Falls Church City Public Schools, so that there is a 
clear  understanding  of  the  strengths,  weaknesses,  and  the  priorities  of  the  educational  system  at  the 
time of this study looking forward.   
 
The first section discusses the historical demographics of the school division, historical enrollment, and 
enrollment projections through the 20‐year planning period.  The second section discusses capacity at 
the division’s four largest schools, and explores the enrollment to capacity ratio under three (3) different 
operational scenarios. 
 
The third section explores the physical infrastructure at the five schools within the division.  This section 
includes  a  great  deal  of  detail  regarding  the  mechanical  building  systems,  the  operations,  and  the 
challenges to continued use of each facility through the 20‐year planning period.  The fourth and final 
section is a review of the technological infrastructure in the school division. 
 
Each of these sections summarizes a piece of the picture of the existing school division, and brings out 
points  that  will  be  woven  together  in  the  master  plan  recommended  option,  as  the  strategies  for  the 
future  strive  to  remedy  shortfalls  and  concerns  with  the  current  system  while  capitalizing  on  the 
strengths inherent in the Falls Church City Public Schools. 
 
 
2‐ 1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 
 
Projection models are an attempt to mathematically explain the factors that influence the future of a 
real‐world situation.  No model can perfectly predict the future in a changing system with an infinite 
number of variables.  As a planning tool, however, projections can combine a number of key factors to 
estimate future space needs, to form a framework around which a capital plan can be developed. 
 
The Eperitus enrollment projection methodology as described below has been used in more than 35 
enrollment projection studies with an historical accuracy of within one‐half of one percent of actual 
September 30 membership annually.  Eperitus has also met with leading experts in the field, including 
the Virginia Commonwealth University Center for Public Policy and the University of Virginia Weldon 
Cooper Center for Public Service, to discuss projection methodology and verify that Eperitus’ 
methodology is consistent with “best practice” in the field.  Several other Virginia jurisdictions in which 
Eperitus recently worked have characteristics that are similar to those in Falls Church – namely Orange, 
Isle of Wight, Hanover, Powhatan, and Chesterfield.   
 
This enrollment forecasting methodology has been developed to focus on the key factors found to affect 
future school enrollment, with minimal emphasis placed on supposition or non‐measurable factors.  As 
such, this methodology may not capture every possible fluctuation, but it is not susceptible to changes 
that may not be permanent in the system in question. 
 
All spreadsheets, databases, formulas, and summary tables used in the final analysis were provided for 
future Falls Church City Public Schools use. 
 
2‐1 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

 
Greater Context  
 
The City of Falls Church is a landlocked area approximately occupying 2.2 square miles, nestled between 
Fairfax County, Virginia and Arlington County, Virginia.  Home to a large number of government 
employees, this relatively small jurisdiction has increased in sophistication commensurate with its 
location outside of the nation’s capital, all the while managing to maintain many of the small town 
values its citizens enjoy.  
 
The small size of this jurisdiction means that land resources are at a premium.  Recent development 
initiatives have promoted high‐rise projects including mixed‐use tenants, some of which combine 
residential and commercial on the same footprint.  The city’s Planning Division is working with 
developers to channel much of the higher structures into a new “City Centre” area, which will combine a 
festival stage and open pedestrian areas with new construction at the heart of the city.   
 
One of the effects of mixed use construction is the creation of new housing units – a factor long thought 
to be constrained in Falls Church by the limited land on which to build.  The number of single family 
homes in the city has been a constant for years, and is likely to remain fairly steady, due to limited land 
on which to build.  The creation of apartments and condominiums, however, has opened a new 
opportunity for increased residents, raising the ceiling for school enrollment to levels that were 
previously unanticipated.   
 
Eperitus  studied  multiple  sets  of  data  related  to  student  enrollment  and  demographic  trends  in  Falls 
Church.    Historical  enrollment  data  used  in  the  analysis  is  based  upon  the  annual  September  30 
Membership  report  to  the  Virginia  Department  of  Education.   All  projections  are  based  upon 
Kindergarten  through  12th  grade  data.   PreK  data  is  not  factored  into  the  projection,  however  it  is 
included in the analysis of space needs that follows.  Birth data was takenfrom the Virginia Department 
of Health data base as reported by hospitals in the locality.  This data is based upon the mother's place 
of  residence  and  is  address  specific.   Where  there  are  questions  about  residence  the  Department  of 
Health verifys with the locality.  
 
In addition to this data, residential development, both historical patterns and future potential, as well as 
other  housing  trends,  land  use  issues,  and  economic  development  factors  were  reviewed  with  Falls 
Church City planning officials.  To the extent possible, these complex and dynamic variables were taken 
into account in the final school enrollment projections.   

 
2‐2 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

Figure 2‐1a summarizes the projected enrollment for 2013 and 2018 as compared to actual enrollment 
in the fall of 2008.   

Figure 2-1a
Enrollment Projections 
Actual Projected
2008 2013 2018
Projected Total 1941 2047 2151
Projected Grades
K ‐ 1 258 273 312
2 ‐ 4 427 419 454
5 ‐ 7 455 477 485
8 ‐ 12 801 878 900  
 
Eperitus was also asked to provide an estimate for what the maximum enrollment might be in the Falls 
Church  City  Public  Schools  over  a  twenty‐year  planning  window  to  the  year  2028.    To  arrive  at  that 
estimate the assumption was made that the projected trends from 2008 to 2018 would continue for the 
subsequent  ten  years.    The  maximum  enrollment  was  then  established  using  those  trends  and  is 
summarized by level in Figure 2‐1b below. 
Figure 2-1b
20‐Year Planning Window 
Projected Maximum Enrollment 
            Year 2028      
Projected
2028
Projected Total 2600
Projected Grades
K ‐ 1 400
2 ‐ 4 600
5 ‐ 7 600
8 ‐ 12 1000  
 
 
 

 
2‐3 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

Enrollment Data 
 
The  following  tables  present  several  of  the  key  data  sets  Eperitus  developed  that  served  as  the 
foundation for the enrollment projections.  A variety of analyses are needed to formulate the overriding 
trend.  Figure 2‐2 shows a 16% increase in total enrollment for Falls Church over the past ten years.   

Figure 2-2
Enrollment History 
Year Enrollment
1999 1675
2000 1721
2001 1749
2002 1817
2003 1857
2004 1878
2005 1848
2006 1867
2007 1907
2008 1941  
 
Kindergarten enrollment, as displayed in Figure 2‐3, has shown a 14% increase in the last ten years. 
 
Figure 2-3
Kindergarten Enrollment 
Year Enrollment
1999 121
2000 106
2001 121
2002 114
2003 133
2004 110
2005 117
2006 123
2007 117
2008 138  
 
 

 
2‐4 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

Figure 2‐4 displays the current compliment of 1,940 students in broken into grade level subtotals. 

Figure 2-4
Enrollment by Grade Level 
Grade Enrollment
K 138
1 120
2 137
3 154
4 136
5 147
6 150
7 158
8 165
9 172
10 143
11 160
12 161
 
 
Figure 2‐5 summarizes the cohort growth from birth to kindergarten.   The annual cohort growth rate 
has fluctuated significantly since 2000, but has declined since 2006.  

Figure 2-5
Birth to Kindergarten 
Fall of Births Fall of K Enroll Ratio 
1995 96 2000 106 1.10
1996 78 2001 121 1.55
1997 110 2002 114 1.04
1998 86 2003 133 1.55
1999 109 2004 110 1.01
2000 126 2005 117 0.93
2001 88 2006 123 1.40
2002 92 2007 117 1.27
2003 124 2008 138 1.11
2004 102
2005 120
2006 105
2007 124  
 

 
2‐5 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

Figure 2‐6 summarizes the number of students who start in kindergarten and move onto the 4th grade.  
The trend in 2008 is the highest it has been in the past five years. 
 
Figure 2-6 
Kindergarten to 4th Grade 
 
Fall of K Enroll Fall of 4 Enroll Ratio
1999 121 2003 136 1.12
2000 106 2004 128 1.21
2001 121 2005 142 1.17
2002 114 2006 130 1.14
2003 133 2007 139 1.05
2004 110 2008 136 1.24
2005 117
2006 123
2007 117
2008 138  
 
As seen in Figure 2‐7 the survival ratio for those students moving from the 5th grade on to the 7th grade 
has been a more stable indicator, with the exception of 2006.   
 
Figure 2-7
5  Grade to 7th Grade 
th

 
Fall of 5 Enroll Fall of 7 Enroll Ratio
2001 126 2003 146 1.16
2002 128 2004 145 1.13
2003 128 2005 136 1.06
2004 157 2006 142 0.90
2005 136 2007 154 1.13
2006 141 2008 158 1.12
2007 143
2008 147  

 
2‐6 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

 
Figure 2‐8 shows the ratio of 8th grade students who move on to the 12th grade.  In 2008 the survival 
ratio was at 1.14.  Over the past six years the rate has stayed between 1.07‐1.18. 
 
Figure 2‐8 ‐ 8th Grade to 12th Grade Enrollments and Ratios 
 
Fall of 8 Enroll Fall of 12 Enroll Ratio
1999 130 2003 142 1.09
2000 136 2004 159 1.17
2001 133 2005 157 1.18
2002 155 2006 171 1.10
2003 168 2007 179 1.07
2004 141 2008 161 1.14
2005 145
2006 136
2007 158
2008 165  
 
Two  other  key  demographic  trends  summarized  from  the  Virginia  Department  of  Education  Data  and 
Reports website are changes over the past 10‐years in:  
 
• The percent of students qualifying for free/reduced price lunch and  
• The ethnic makeup of the student body in the Falls Church schools.   
 
Over the past 10‐years the percent of students qualifying for free/reduced price lunch has declined from 
10.5%  in  1997‐98  to  6.38%  in  2007‐08.    During  that  same  period  of  time  the  ethnic  makeup  of  the 
student  population  changed  as  the  percent  of  Caucasian  students  declined  by  6%,  the  percent  of 
Hispanic students declined by 2%, and the percent of African‐American students remained at 4% even 
though the actual number of students in each of these ethnic groups went up.   The biggest percentage 
change over this 10‐year period was in the Asian student population which increased from 6% to 13%.  
Figure 2‐9 summarizes the changes in the ethnic makeup of the student population.  
 
 
Figure 2‐9 
Fall Church City Public Schools Student Population 
Changes in Ethnic Makeup 
 
African 
Asian Hispanic Causasian
Amerian
% of  % of  % of  % of 
Year Actual Actual Actual Actual
Total Total Total Total
07‐08 13% 235 4% 86 8% 159 74% 1402

97‐98 6% 93 4% 58 10% 142 80% 1154


 
 
2‐7 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

 
Key Factors and Assumptions 
Despite the apparent complexities associated with school enrollment, the factors which can affect the 
number of school aged children in a landlocked and fairly built‐out jurisdiction like the City of Falls 
Church are somewhat limited.  A list of the two possible factors is given below: 
 
• In‐migration or out‐migration of families with school‐aged children.   
• Increasing or decreasing birth rates (if the birth rate increases, there will be more school aged 
children in the future).   
 
The planning team met with the Falls Church Planning Division to collect key data and to determine how 
these two factors may affect the enrollment forecast.   
 
In and Out‐Migration 
In‐migration has historically exceeded out‐migration in Falls Church, resulting in positive population and 
enrollment growth.  For the number of school aged children to continue increasing, the implication is 
that there will be a steady rate of conversion of non‐school aged family housing to school‐aged family 
housing, or that the families moving in have steadily increasing numbers of children per family unit.  The 
resulting planning/forecasting assumption is stated below: 
 
• In‐migration of families with school‐aged children can only be limited by a ceiling on the number 
of housing units.  With no ceiling on in‐migration apparent at this time, this forecast assumes 
that in‐migration can continue at historical rates into the foreseeable future.  
 
With no ceiling, the key issue in question is how high the in‐migration might go.  The unknown future 
rate of in‐migration resulted in several different projections, which are summarized below.   
 
- Steady In‐Migration ‐ The initial projection was based upon recent cohort growth trends in Falls 
Church, showed 1,986 students by the year 2018, and was not weighted for the most recent 
years of higher residential growth.   
- Faster In‐Migration ‐ The accelerated growth rate projection, which produced a projection of 
2,365 students, did assume that the pace of residential development would continue at pre‐
recession levels.   
- Slower In‐Migration ‐ Given the state of the economy at the time that these projections were 
developed (Fall 2008), and the housing market in particular, the final projection of 2,151 was 
based on the assumption that there would indeed continue to be new residential development 
in Falls Church but that it would not be at the same pace as that experienced pre‐recession.   
- Variance ‐ The difference of +165 students (2,151 in the slower in‐migration projection versus 
1,986 in the steady in‐migration growth projection) reflects the student yield that could be with 
the new residential units that might come on line during the planning period. 
 
Birth Rate 
The birth rate was found to be a factor with quantifiable and possibly significant impact on the 
enrollment in Falls Church schools; therefore a birth rate model was developed to forecast future 
enrollment.  That model is described in the following section. 

 
2‐8 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

 
Mathematical Approach to Birth‐Rate Based Enrollment Projection 
The steps in the enrollment projection study created by Eperitus for the Falls Church City Public Schools 
are as follows: 
 
1. Compile historical trend data  
Data was collected for live births in the city and for the division and individual schools by grade level. 
 
2. Project live birth data  
a. Projected birth is generated by  first calculating a five year average. 
b. This is derived from calculating the change is birth totals from one year to the next and then 
dividing the change by the previous years total. 
c. In the below example the change from the 2002 total of 92 to the 2003 total of 124 was an 
increase of 32 births,  the increase of 32 divided by the 2002 total of 92 shows and increase of 
35%. 
d. This process is repeated for the following years.  The five year average is derived, in this case 
equaling 8.06 %, as shown in the table below for the period 2002‐2007. 
 
Fall of 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
Births 92 124 102 120 105 124
Annual Change 32 -22 18 -15 19 Average
Percent Change 35% -18% 18% -13% 18% 8.06%  
 
e. The average is then used to project out the birth data by taking the last year of data multiplying 
by the average and then adding back to the last years total.   
 
Example ‐ In 2007 the live birth total was 124.   
 
124 * 8.06% (.0806) = 9.99 or 10 new births expected between 2007 and 2008. 
 
Previous year’s births (124 in 2007) plus projected new births (10) gives the 2008 total of 134 
total anticipated births.  The process is repeated rolling forward, using the new 2008 projection 
of 134 as the new base.   
  2003 124
2004 102
Actuals

134 * 8.06% (.0806) = 10.8 or 11 new births expected between 
2005 120
2008 and 2009.  
2006 105
 
2007 124
Previous year’s births (134 in 2008) plus projected new births  2008 134
Projected

(11) gives the 2009 total of 145 anticipated births, and so on, as  2009 145


illustrated in the table to the right.  2010 156
2011 169

 
2‐9 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

 
3. Calculate annual birth to kindergarten survival ratios. 
 
a. This process is done by taking the live birth total for a year and dividing it by the number 
of children who enter Kindergarten five years later. 
b. In the example below the number of live births in 1995 was 96, five years later in 2000 
106 children entered into Kindergarten.   
c. Taking the 96 live births and dividing it by the 106 kindergarteners results in a ratio of 
1.10. 
 
Fall of Births Fall of K Enroll Ratio
1995 96 2000 106 1.10  
 
4. Calculate three and five year averages, and establish minimum and maximum values.   
 
a. This process is done by taking (for a five year average) five years of ratios and averaging 
them. 
b. In the example below the five years of birth to Kindergarten ratios are 1.01 in 2004, 0.93 
in 2005, 1.40 in 2006, 1.27 in 2007, and 1.11 in 2008. 
c. The average of the five years is 1.14 with the minimum being 0.93 and the maximum 
equaling 1.40. 
 
Fall of 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Average
Ratio 1.01 0.93 1.40 1.27 1.11 1.14  
 
5. Apply five year average ratio to known births and to projected births to produce projected 
Kindergarten values by year 
 
a. The five year average ratio we calculated in the previous example (1.14) is used to 
project out the kindergarten enrollment. 
b. The birth year data is multiplied by the ratio to generate the Kindergarten enrollment. 
c. In the example below the 2004 total of 102 is multiplied by the 1.14 equaling 117 
(rounding up to the nearest whole number). 
d. This process is repeated to create the needed years of k enrollment for the enrollment 
analysis. 
 
Fall of Births Fall of K Enroll
2003 124 2008 138
2004 102 2009 117
2005 120 2010 137
2006 105 2011 120
2007 124 2012 142
2008 134 2013 153  
 
 
 

 
2‐10 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

6. Calculate five year survival constants by grade level for grades one through twelve.  
 
a. In the below example we calculate the survival constant by year for the first grade, 
taking the previous years kindergarten and subtracting that from the 1st grade 
enrollment. 
b. In 2003 there were 133 kindergarteners.  In 2004 there were 133 1st graders.  
Subtracting the 2003 class size of 133 kindergarteners from the 2004 class size of 133 
first graders gives zero change in the cohort size from 2003 (when those students were 
in kindergarten) to 2004 (when those students were in first grade).  This process is 
repeated for the following years to determine the cohort survival for each year. 
c. This process is repeated for all grades. 
 
School Grade Cohort
Year K 1 Survival
2003 133 128
2004 110 133 0
2005 117 109 -1
2006 123 129 12
2007 117 136 13
2008 138 120 3 
 
7. Calculate five year mean, median, minimum, and maximum yearly constants by grade level for 
grades one through twelve. 
 
a. Using the above table we can state that the Average or Mean  for the 1st grade is 5, the 
Median is 3, the minimum is 0 and the maximum is 12 
b. This process is repeated for all grades 
 
8. Calculate annual growth rates by grade level from 2004 through 2008. 
 
a. In the below example we calculate the percent change each year for kindergarten by 
taking the current year subtracting the previous and then taking the change and dividing 
it by the previous year 
b. Take the 2004 total of 110 and subtract the 2003 total of 133 equaling 23 divide that by 
the 2003 total of 133 and get the percent change of 17.3% 
c. This is done for each year and the values are averaged to get a 5 year mean of  1.5%  as 
seen in the following table 
 
Actual Grade Percent
Enrollment K Change
2003 133
2004 110 -17.3%
2005 117 6.4%
2006 123 5.1%
2007 117 -4.9%
2008 138 17.9%
5 yr Mean Growth R ate 1.5%  

 
2‐11 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

 
 
9. “Age” the various grade level cohorts through 2018 by applying mean, median, minimum, and 
maximum constants and average growth rate to produce multiple projection scenarios and frame 
the analysis with minimum and maximum growth predictions. 
 
a. Using the aging of kindergarten to 1st  grade as an example, we illustrate how for each 
scenario the value of the Mean, Median, Low and High Cohort survival constant is added 
to the previous years previous grade total to create the next years next grade total 
b. In the example below to generate the 2010 1st grade class Mean scenario we add 5 to 
the K 2009 total of 117 to generate a value of 122, for the Median scenario we would 
add 3 to the 2009 K total of 117 to generate the value of 120 for the 2010 1st grade 
cohort, for the Low scenario 0 is added to the 2009 K total of 117 to generate the value 
of 117 for the 2010 1st grade cohort, and lastly to generate the High 2010 1st grade we 
add 12 to the 2009 K total of 117 to reach a value of 129  
c. This process is repeated for all grade cohorts based on the cohort survival constants 
created for each grade 
 
Mean Median Low High
=5 =3 =0 = 12
Year K Year 1st 1st 1st 1st
2009 117 2010 122 120 117 129
2010 137 2011 143 140 137 149  
 
 
10. Make adjustments to individual cells by hand, factoring in results of discussions with city and 
school planning officials relative to residential development, population trends, economic 
conditions, and programs, as well as professional judgment to produce a most likely final projection 
through 2018, based on birth rate data. 
 
Note – no adjustments were necessary in the Falls Church enrollment forecast. 
 
11. Calculate a maximum enrollment by 2028 by applying a percentage growth factor to the 2018 
projection that accelerates enrollment growth over the decade of the 2020s at a rate that exceeds 
any previous growth.  Because birth data is not available beyond 2018, a percentage growth factor 
was applied to extend the 2018 forecast out ten years further, to form a basis for long‐term capital 
facility planning. 
 
The final resulting enrollment forecast is shown on the following page. 
 
 

 
2‐12 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

Falls Church Enrollment Projections


K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 T
1999 121 113 118 119 132 128 124 132 130 147 126 149 136 1,675
2000 106 131 122 125 127 140 137 128 136 151 151 133 134 1,721
2001 121 124 119 129 129 126 156 149 133 150 148 149 116 1,749
2002 114 135 128 130 127 128 141 165 155 144 155 151 144 1,817
2003 133 128 138 122 136 128 141 146 168 166 149 160 142 1,857
2004 110 133 128 138 128 157 133 145 141 178 168 160 159 1,878
2005 117 109 128 128 142 136 144 136 145 161 179 166 157 1,848
2006 123 129 124 132 130 141 138 142 136 162 158 181 171 1,867
2007 117 136 138 137 139 143 146 154 158 145 161 154 179 1,907
2008 138 120 137 154 136 147 150 158 165 172 143 159 161 1,940
2009 117 143 124 144 158 146 148 157 162 179 171 144 160 1,953
2010 137 122 147 131 147 167 147 155 161 176 178 172 145 1,987
2011 120 143 126 154 134 157 169 154 159 175 176 179 174 2,019
2012 142 126 147 133 158 144 158 175 158 173 174 177 181 2,045
2013 126 147 130 153 136 167 145 165 180 172 173 175 178 2,047
2014 126 131 151 136 157 146 169 152 169 194 171 174 177 2,052
2015 136 131 135 158 140 167 147 175 156 183 193 172 175 2,069
2016 147 142 135 142 161 150 168 154 180 170 183 194 174 2,099
2017 159 152 146 142 145 171 151 174 158 194 170 184 195 2,141
2018 148 164 156 152 146 155 172 157 179 172 193 171 185 2,151

 
Fundamental Conclusions Emerging from the Analysis 
 
In the course of reviewing the data, some trends emerged that are worthy of note, which describe 
unique characteristics in Falls Church.  These broad trends are likely to hold true, regardless of slight 
yearly nuances.  Planning implications of each trend are explained, to show how these numbers may 
affect capital planning. 
 
- Kindergarten enrollment will trend up over the next ten years but will continue the same 
sporadic pattern of the past decade, with enrollment higher in some years and lower in other 
years.   
- Overall school enrollment will continue to grow over the next ten years, but at a slightly more 
moderate rate than over the past decade. 
- In the maximum growth scenario, enrollment is forecasted to increase by more than 20% from 
2018 to 2028, describing a more accelerated rate than in either of the previous two decades.  
For planning purposes, this growth rate was considered to be the “worst case” scenario. 
- Several “bulges” are anticipated in the enrollment.  One is expected to occur with the 
graduating class of 2013 (now in 8th grade), and to a lesser degree with the years immediately 
preceding and succeeding it.  Another is expected to occur with the graduating class of 2017, 

 
2‐13 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

and it appears that a third is likely with the graduating class of 2020.  As these classes progress 
through the schools, there are likely to be temporary shortages of space that are not expected 
to continue, and which should be anticipated and dealt with using short‐term strategies. 
 
 
Transition from Enrollment Forecast to Planning Numbers 
 
While it is tempting to apply enrollment numbers directly to classroom size and move forward with a 
plan, doing so ignores the yearly roll‐over of students from one grade to the next.  The truth about most 
school districts, including Falls Church, is that some class sizes (i.e. the Class of 2007, for example) are 
larger or smaller than others.  In the forecasting numbers given on the preceding page, for example, the 
projected number of 12th graders varies from a low of 145 (2010) to a high of 195 (2017), with 
fluctuation between those numbers for all other years.  In long‐range planning, classroom size can’t be 
planned for any one class or year, but must be averaged to the approximate need over the entire 
planning period.  For this reason, the typical school planning process estimates a fixed number of 
students per year and creates the plan around that number.   
 
If the solution is targeted to the maximum need, the capital solutions will be costly and ample, 
nevertheless in some years there will likely be much more than the necessary infrastructure, or that 
infrastructure will be available but not necessarily where it is needed.  If, on the other hand, the solution 
targets the minimum need, and develops a contingency plan to deal with the years with enrollment 
spikes, the result may be trailers or years in which the student teacher ratio is very high for certain 
grades. This may be a satisfactory solution from the perspective of expenditures, but should be entered 
with full awareness of the possibility of rapidly outgrowing the facilities.   
 
The most common approach to long‐term capital planning is to plan for the mid‐ to high‐range need, 
with a phased strategy to increase infrastructure incrementally over a 20‐year period.  If growth occurs 
more rapidly than anticipated, the planning phases (typically five‐year periods) can be shortened and 
even collapsed on one another.  If growth occurs more slowly than anticipated, the planning phases can 
stretch out beyond the 20‐year planning period.  This is the approach recommended in this study.  
 
Mid‐ and Long‐Term Planning Numbers 
During the course of this study, a great deal of discussion was held around the proper number of 
students per classroom, and a final decision was made to plan classroom spaces around an average of 
175 students per grade level throughout the 20‐year planning period, with breakdowns given below for 
refinements by grade levels.  Core spaces (gymnasium, media center, and so forth) were planned 
around the maximum number of 200 students per grade level.  Using these average numbers as 
planning targets creates a smoothed approach designed to offer flexibility from year to year, and over 
time, to accommodate the occasional bulge in the system at one grade level or another. 
 
For long‐term facility planning (20 years +), all projects should be based on the assumption of 200 
students per grade level.   
 
 
 
 
 
2‐14 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐1 ‐ Demographic Analysis and Enrollment Projections 

Short‐Term Planning Numbers 
Based on the enrollment analysis, it is recommended that the following average grade level enrollments 
be used for determining the number of classrooms spaces needed per level on a short‐term basis, for 
minor interim project phases and CIP‐funded projects:   
 
Grades K‐2    160 students 
Grades 3‐5    170 students 
Grades 6‐8    185 students 
Grades 9‐12    185 students 
 
It is further recommended that beginning with the September 30, 2009 membership report the school 
division should annually update the enrollment data as presented in this report.  In particular the new 
data should be added to the cohort totals in the forecasting tables, new ratios computed, and the 
projections validated or revised based upon any changes in the trends.   
 
The planning numbers described in this section will become the foundation for the sketches, options, 
and site test fits, which will be explored later in this study. 
 
Regardless of the number of students per classroom or per grade level, all classrooms should be planned 
and designed to meet the Guidelines for School Facilities in Virginia’s Public Schools.  .

 
2‐15 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

Section 2‐2 ‐ Current Capacity Analysis 
 
An objective analysis of capacity for all school facilities is crucial to determining the ability of the current 
structures to handle the school population, and their potential for handling increased population in the 
future.    This  analysis  also  helps  planners  and  educators  to  understand  which  components  may  be 
limiting a school’s capacity from an operational perspective, so that the future plan can include what, 
where, when and type of needs for capital improvement planning.   
 
School capacity should be a component of annual data review.  Enrollment as a percent of capacity can 
provide a ‘trigger point’ for construction planning  purposes (i.e. when elementary enrollment exceeds 
85% program capacity, additional facility capacity should be initiated).   
 
This capacity analysis includes: 
 
• The definition of ‘capacity’ specific to Falls Church City Public Schools, and definitions for: 
o Design capacity 
o Functional capacity 
o Program capacity 
• A  capacity  analysis  of  Mt.  Daniel  and  Thomas  Jefferson  elementary  schools,  based  on 
enrollments, programs and utilization. 
• A capacity analysis of Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School based on enrollments, programs 
and utilization.  
• A  capacity  analysis  of  George  Mason  High  School  based  on  enrollments,  programs  and 
utilization and master schedule. 
 
This analysis, together with an analysis of the physical structures of each of the Falls Church City Public 
Schools,  provides  an  overall  view  of  the  infrastructure  capabilities  as  they  exist  today,  and  an  idea  of 
which appears to have the longevity to continue to serve the division into the future. 
 
Definition of ‘Capacity’ Specific to Falls Church City Public Schools 
 
Interviews and meetings with school staff at various levels revealed that in Falls Church, school capacity 
is usually determined in response to several of the following factors:  
 
• Educational  program  philosophy  (grade  level  house  vs.  departmentalized,  new  offerings, 
new requirements, specialty programs). 
• Change of class size/student to teacher ratios (reductions). 
• Expansion of educational services (increased special needs, ESL, etc.). 
• Scheduling.  
• Adequacy of space size for program delivery. 
 
When  a  change  occurs  in  one  of  these  factors,  the  capacity  of  a  school  needs  to  be  updated.  Special 
needs and implementation of programs for remedial efforts effect capacity more than any other factor 
(e.g. 21.5:1 vs. 8:1 in classrooms).   
 

 
2‐16 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

A critical component of analysis is how a space is actually used and managed.  An analysis of how space 
is managed in Falls Church was accomplished through analysis of the master schedule (at the high school 
and  middle  school)  and  floor  plans,  identification  of  current  space  use  and  pupil  teacher  ratios  by 
building principals and confirmation of any questions regarding use by building principals.   
 
Capacity can generally be defined in three basic ways: 
 
• Design  Capacity  is  the  desired  maximum  capacity  at  the  time  of  building  design,  and 
assumes  the  maximum  number  of  students  per  classroom.    This  formula  generally  follows 
either state ‘standards’ or a modification of this standard by the locality.   
 
• Functional  Capacity  is  the  capacity  of  a  school  as  it  functions  from  year  to  year  based  on 
enrollment and programs.  For example, in a high growth area, a school may actually have a 
functional  capacity  above  the  design  capacity,  or  if  a  school  has  a  stagnant  or  declining 
population  or  a  large  population  of  students  with  special  needs,  a  school  may  have  a 
functional capacity significantly below design capacity. 
 
• Program  Capacity  can  be  considered  as  a  hybrid  of  design  and  functional  capacity.      In 
calculating  program  capacity,  the  maximum  number  of  students  per  classroom  by  policy 
and/or by stated standards is used, but full‐sized classrooms that are used to deliver specific 
programs  consistently  from  year  to  year  are  also  considered  in  the  formula.    This 
methodology works well in school divisions such as Falls Church where there is little or no 
consistent  enrollment  change  from  year  to  year.    It  also  allows  for  a  more  consistently 
defined  capacity  number  from  year  to  year  unless  substantial  changes  are  made  to  a 
school’s  program  such  as  the  addition  of  curriculum,  pre‐school,  learning  labs,  community 
use  during  day  hours,  and  other  aspects  of  the  educational  programming  not  mentioned 
here. 
 

 
2‐17 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

There are additional spaces in the Falls Church City Public Schools which were not considered in making 
capacity calculations.  These include: 
 
• Modular classrooms. 
• Special Education resource rooms, and other smaller instructional resource spaces. 
• Pre‐K classrooms. 
• Rooms designated for community or business use only (i.e. the television station in the 
high school). 
 
 
 

 
2‐18 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

Elementary Schools Capacity Analysis  
 
The Program Capacity of Falls Church elementary schools, which includes PK‐1 and 2‐4 grade level 
configurations, was computed by using the desired pupil to teacher ratio in the school division (22:1 for 
grades K‐2 and 24:1 for grades 3 and 4) multiplied by the number of classrooms used for general 
education.  Full sized self‐contained special education rooms were considered as part of general 
education and calculated for capacity at a pupil to teacher ratio of 8:1.  Not included in capacity 
calculations were pre‐school classrooms, trailers, resource classrooms (art, music, PE, computer labs, 
reading resource, library) and special education resource rooms.  Capacity is indicated in a rounded 
number. 
 
Figure 2‐10 ‐ Mt. Daniel Elementary Capacity Worksheet 
 
Average
Number of Pupil/Teacher
Permanent Instruction Spaces Classrooms Ratio Capacity
Capacity Spaces
Academic Classrooms 1412 2322 322
264
Self Contained Exceptional Education (full-
sized classroom) 1 8 8
Non Capacity Spaces
Arts Education Classrooms
(visual arts, performing arts, drama) 1 shared
Music Classrooms 1 shared
Learning Labs
(computer lab, science, etc.) 1 computer TR
Exceptional Education Resource
(half-sized classroom)
Preschool 2
Early Childhood Special Education 1
Head Start
Gifted/Talented
Remedial Services 2
Title I
Other (specify)

Program Capacity 275


330
 
 
Source: Eperitus 

 
2‐19 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

Limiting Factors ‐ Mt. Daniel Elementary  
 
• Mt. Daniel currently operates on an average PTR at or above the desired 22:1 (and just at 
capacity), mainly because there is no space for additional classrooms. 
• The  recent  addition  to  Mt.  Daniel  is  very  well  designed  for  Kindergarten  needs,  with 
amenities including sound reinforcement, wireless technology, wet/dry areas, direct access 
to  the  outdoors,  ample  student  storage.    This  model  should  be  used  for  any  new 
construction. 
• This recent addition, however, left no room on the site for additional expansion. 
• Mt. Daniel cannot expand further on its current site to allow for any significant enrollment 
increases. 
• The  core  facilities  (gym/cafeteria,  library,  art,  music,  etc.)  cannot  handle  any  significant 
enrollment increase and would also need expansion.   
• The gymnasium and cafeteria are the same space, so gym cannot be taught and assemblies 
cannot be held during lunch hours. 
• The site and facility are not conducive to ADA accessibility.  The library has a story pit that 
cannot  be  accessed  by  handicapped  students  from  the  main  floor.    It  is  used  as  a  storage 
area more than intended use. 
• Currently students cannot access all resource subjects without going out‐of‐doors. 
• The  family  literacy  program  is  in  a  trailer  and  not  easily  accessible  to  parking  and  entry, 
particularly for night use. 
• The  before  and  after  school  component  is  critical  to  the  community,  but  has  no  available 
space for storage or program expansion.   
• In addition to full time staff there are also part time staff and itinerants. There is little space 
for  teacher  use  –  only  one  very  small  ‘lounge’  area  –  no  place  to  conference  or  discuss 
students and curriculum.   
• Office space is extremely limited. 
 

 
2‐20 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

Figure 2‐11 ‐ Thomas Jefferson Elementary Capacity Worksheet 
 
Average
Number of Pupil/Teacher
Permanent Instruction Spaces Classrooms Ratio Capacity
Capacity Spaces
Academic Classrooms grade 2 7 22 154
Academic Classrooms grades 3 & 4 14 24 336
Self Contained Exceptional Education (full-
sized classroom) 8 0
Non Capacity Spaces
Arts Education Classrooms
(visual arts, performing arts, drama)
Music Classrooms
Learning Labs
(computer lab, science, etc.)
Exceptional Education Resource
(half-sized classroom)
Preschool (not counted in capacity)
Head Start (not counted in capacity)
Gifted/Talented
Remedial Services
Title I
Other (specify)

Program Capacity 490


 
 
Source: Eperitus 
 
 
Please note that additional spaces indicated on this sheet do exist at Thomas Jefferson, but these spaces 
were not critical to the question of capacity.  Only capacity‐affecting spaces were included here, along 
with full‐sized specialty classrooms  used in a manner which does not increase capacity. 

 
2‐21 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

Limiting Factors ‐ Thomas Jefferson Elementary  
 
• Jefferson  Elementary  currently  operates  on  an  average  PTR  at  the  desired  22:1  ratio  in 
second grade and 24:1 in grades 3 and 4, and thus just below capacity.   
• The  facility  has  had  multiple  additions  over  the  years  and,  although  each  area  has  its 
positives, the flow in the facility is made difficult by multiple levels. 
• This facility receives very active community use, which is hard on the facility. 
• TJ  began  PYP  this  year  for  IB  –  program  requirements  may  determine  the  need  for  more 
flexible space. 
• A lot of programs and services are provided to students on this site (in trailers and in various 
places throughout the building). 
• Before and after care has been provided with good storage. 
• A science lab is a nice amenity for an elementary school. 
• There is little space for teacher use, and limited space to conference or discuss students and 
curriculum.   
• The main entry is not conducive to the parking area; the entry is not very friendly feeling. 
• The  lower  level  (first  floor)  is  a  maze  –  very  little  direct  line  of  sight  –  which  may  be 
considered a safety issue. 
• Office space is extremely limited, although the main office addition/renovation is nicely laid 
out. 
• The  site  has  wetlands  constraints  for  future  building,  but  is  in  a  good  location  for  the 
community. 
• The  trailer  complex  outside  has  been  there  for  over  a  decade  –  it  is  a  maze  with  security 
concerns. 
 
 

 
2‐22 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

Middle School Capacity Analysis  
 
Program  capacity  at  Mary  Ellen  Henderson  was  computed  using  desired  pupil  to  teacher  ratio  in  the 
school  division  of  24:1  for  each  core  academic  area  multiplied  by  the  number  of  classrooms  used  for 
each program.  In this scenario, elective areas were not considered capacity areas, as the facility is used 
as a true middle school (i.e. when a grade level is not in a core area it is vacated and the elective area 
used, therefore that ‘capacity’ is lost).  An “efficiency” percentage of 85% applied to this number reflects 
current  utilization  practice  (Figure  2‐12).    Full  sized  self‐contained  special  education  rooms  were 
considered  as  part  of  general  education.  Not  included  in  capacity  calculations  were  program  resource 
classrooms (reading and math resource, etc.) and special education resource rooms.   
 
Figure 2‐12 ‐ Mary Ellen Henderson Capacity Worksheet 
 
Average
Number of Pupil/Teacher
Permanent Instruction Spaces Classrooms Ratio Capacity
Capacity Spaces
Academic Classrooms
(English, Math, Soc Studies, Sci) 28 24 672
Self Contained Exceptional Education
(full-sized classroom) 5 8 40
Non Capacity Spaces
Elective Classrooms (specify)
Foreign Language 4
C&T Elective Classroom/Labs (specify)
Work & Family Studies, Tech Ed,
Broadcast 3
Arts Education Classrooms
(visual arts, performing arts, drama) 1
Music Classrooms 1
Main Gym (count as
two teaching stations) 2
Auxilliary Gym (Matt Room) 1
Fitness Room 1
Computer Labs 2
Health Classrooms 2
Exceptional Education Resource
(half-sized or 100% resource use) 3
Gifted/Talented
Remedial Services
Other (specify)

Program Capacity at 85% 600


 
 
Limiting Factors – Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 
 
 
2‐23 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

• Henderson Middle currently operates on an average PTR below the 24:1 target. 
• The  facility  currently  serves  grades  5  through  7,  operating  using  the  middle  school 
philosophy. 
• The  school  only  recently  opened  so  has  no  limiting  factors  for  program.    In  fact,  the 
community areas (gymnasium, locker rooms, fitness center, library, cafeteria, athletic fields 
and play areas) are well  designed for  full community use and  can serve the  middle school 
and other school populations well.  
• The only ‘limiting factor’ is the ability of the school to handle enrollment above the current 3 
grade levels, but not a full 4th grade level. 
• Heavy use by public may see early signs of wear‐and‐tear. 
 
 
 
High School Capacity Analysis  
 
 
Capacity of George Mason High School was computed using:  
• Desired pupil to teacher ratio in the division of 24:1 for each core instructional program area 
and  for  elective  programs  and  20:1  for  vocational/technical  programs  multiplied  by  the 
number of classrooms available for each program and  
• An  “efficiency”  percentage  to  account  for  specialized/low  enrollment  course  offerings  and 
the practice of  block scheduling, which often leaves a core area classroom empty for one 
period a day during which time the instructor is available for student remediation, make‐up 
work,  etc.    Full  sized  self‐contained  special  education  rooms  were  considered  as  part  of 
general education. Not included in capacity calculations were program resource classrooms 
(reading  and  math  resource,  etc.),  trailers  used  as  classrooms,  special  education  resource 
rooms, health classrooms, and ISS.   
 

 
2‐24 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

Figure 2‐13 ‐ George Mason High School Capacity Worksheet 

Average
Number of Pupil/Teacher
Permanent Instruction Spaces Classrooms Ratio Capacity
Capacity Spaces
Academic Classrooms
(English, Math, Social Studies, Language) 31 24 744
Science Classrooms
(classroom/lab only, not shared labs) 9 24 216
Self Contained Exceptional Education
(full-sized classroom) 6 8 48
Elective Classrooms (specify) 0 24 0
C&T Elective Classroom (specify -
do not count associated clsrm) Gourmet
Cooking, Robotics (Tech Ed), IB Design
Tech, Computer Graphics, Photo/Film
Study, Technical Drawing 5 20 100
Arts Education Classrooms
(visual arts, performing arts, drama) 5 20 100
Music Classrooms 1 20 20
Main Gym (count as
two teaching stations) 2 30 60
Auxilliary Gym
(count as one teaching station) 1 30 30
Non Capacity Spaces
Computer Labs
Exceptional Education Resource
(half-sized or 100% resource use)
Gifted/Talented
Remedial Services
Other (specify)

Program Capacity @ 80% 1055


 
 
Source‐ Eperitus 

 
2‐25 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

Limiting Factors ‐ George Mason High  
 
• George Mason High currently operates on average below the desired PTR of 24:1 in the core 
academic curriculum. 
• The  elective  and  CTE  courses  tend  to  run  well  below  the  20:1  PTR,  with  some  courses 
utilizing large areas of space for smaller groups of students not even 75% of the time. 
• The  facility’s  physical  layout,  with  several  level  changes,  makes  it  difficult  to  group 
classroom areas in various configurations – so interdisciplinary instruction would be difficult 
as best.   Therefore, trailers are being used for classroom instruction when there is available 
space within the building. 
• There are little or no resources areas for teachers to work together close to their classroom 
area. 
• There are little or no designated conference areas that could be used for a variety of staff 
and student development uses. 
• The administration office is remote from the staff and students. 
• There is no sense of arrival or clear entry to the facility. 
• Hallways are small, there are many dead‐end corridors, and the general layout is confusing.  
This could present a safety issue.  
• Huge demand for technology labs and technology in general that is not available. 
• If  all  courses  taught  off  campus  were  to  be  brought  back  ‘home’  there  would  need  to  be 
consideration for their space. 
• There is no space for the entire student body to gather at one time. 
• A community television station uses a large amount of building space and there are several 
district‐wide functions that have their home in the confines of the facility, so it is unavailable 
for instructional purposes. 
• General purpose areas (cafeteria, etc.) are well used for other than intended purpose. 
 
 
Figure 2‐14 demonstrates the potential differences between program and functional capacity.  The 
functional capacity shown was reported by FCCPS in January, 2009 and used in the development of the 
CIP budget.  The master planning process uses the program capacity throughout for consistency in 
analysis with the consultant process. 
 
Figure 2‐14 – Program vs Functional Capacity 
 
  Functional Capacity  Program Capacity 
Building  (FCCPS CIP Process 1/09)  (Master Plan) 
Mount Daniel  290  275 
Thomas Jefferson  476  490 
Mary Ellen Henderson  600  600 
George Mason  900  1055 
Source‐ Eperitus 
 
 

 
2‐26 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

The  resulting  table  indicates  the  program  capacity  as  each  school  is  currently  used;  that  is,  with  the 
grade configurations as they are currently divided and housed at each facility.  As shown in this table, by 
the year 2018 the two elementary schools are expected to exceed their capacities, while the middle and 
high schools will be at 68% and 85% of capacity, respectively. 
 
Figure 2‐15 ‐ Enrollment to Capacity Ratio Scenarios –Current Groupings 
 
Enrollment to Capacity - Current (2008) Configuration
Prog Cap 2008 % Cap 2013 % Cap 2018 % Cap
ELEMENTARY
Mt. Daniel PK-1 275 258 94% 273 99% 312 113%
T. Jefferson 2-4 490 427 87% 419 86% 454 93%
TOTAL ELEM 765 685 90% 692 90% 766 100%
MIDDLE 5-7
M.E. Henderson 600 455 477 485
TOTAL MIDDLE 600 455 76% 477 80% 485 81%
HIGH 8-12
George Mason 1055 801 878 900
TOTAL HIGH 1055 801 76% 878 83% 900 85%
 
Source‐ Eperitus 
 
If  different  configurations  are  implemented,  the  demands  for  space  are  different.    The  subsequent 
figures indicate the percentage ratio of anticipated enrollment per capacity for each school or schools 
and the grade level configurations indicated.  Program capacity was computed using the recommended 
average grade level enrollments on page 2‐8 of this report.  
 
Figure 2‐16 indicates a slight shift in school utilization which will ensure that none of the schools goes 
over 100% capacity by the year 2018.  This shift involves making George Mason a traditional 9‐12 high 
school  (instead  of  the  current  8‐12);  making  Mary  Ellen  Henderson  a  traditional  6‐8  Middle  School 
(instead of the current 5‐7), and shifting the 5th grade back to elementary school.   
 
Figure 2‐17 indicates the capacity analysis if the same grouping is completed using one large elementary 
school instead of two smaller schools.   

 
2‐27 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

 
Figure 2‐16 ‐ Enrollment to Capacity Ratio Scenarios – Efficiency Shift  
 
  - Separated Configuration Scenario
Enrollment to Capacity
Prog Cap 2008 % Cap
  2013 % Cap 2018 % Cap
ELEMENTARY
 
PK-2 600 395 66% 403 67% 468 78%
Grades 3-5 525 437 83% 456 87% 453 86%
TOTAL ELEM 1125 832 74% 859 76% 921 82%
MIDDLE
Grades 6-8 600 473 490 508
TOTAL MIDDLE 600 473 79% 490 82% 508 85%
HIGH
Grades 9-12 800 636 698 800
TOTAL HIGH 800 636 79% 698 87% 800 100%
Source‐ Eperitus 

Figure 2‐17‐ Enrollment to Capacity Ratio Scenarios –Traditional Groupings 
  Enrollment to Capacity - Grouped Configuration Scenario
  Prog Cap 2008 % Cap 2013 % Cap 2018 % Cap
 ELEMENTARY
 PK - 5 1200 832 859 921
  TOTAL ELEM 1125 832 74% 859 76% 921 82%
MIDDLE
 
Grades 6-8 600 473 490 508
  TOTAL MIDDLE 600 473 79% 490 82% 508 85%
 HIGH
 Grades 9-12 800 636 698 800
  TOTAL HIGH 800 636 79% 698 87% 800 100%
Source‐ Eperitus 
 
Figure 2‐18 shows the resulting analysis if the pre‐Kindergarten through 8th grades are grouped in one 
facility, with a traditional 9‐12 high school. 
 
 
Figure 2‐18 ‐ Enrollment to Capacity Ratio Scenarios –Two School Groupings 
Enrollment to Capacity - Very Grouped Configuration Scenario
Prog Cap 2008 % Cap 2013 % Cap 2018 % Cap
ELEMENTARY
PK - 8 1800 1305 1349 1429
TOTAL ELEM 1725 1305 76% 1349 78% 1429 83%
HIGH
Grades 9-12 800 636 698 800
TOTAL HIGH 800 636 79% 698 87% 800 100%

Source‐ Eperitus 
 
 

 
2‐28 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

The  results  of  this  analysis  show  that  a  part  of  the  future  capacity  of  facilities  in  the  Falls  Church  City 
Public School division is determined by grade groupings, and that by simply shifting population slightly, 
these buildings can be expected to accommodate enrollment through 2018. 
 
 
Planning for the Future – Trigger Points 
 
The overall goal of this master plan is to create a long‐range 20‐year plan for future school facility needs, 
based  on  student  population  growth  forecasts,  and  educational  program  needs.    This  plan  must 
determine  recommended  locations  for  future  schools,  the  sequence  and  phasing,  and  the  types  of 
schools  to  be  constructed.    Ideally,  this  master  plan  should  be  a  road  map  that  can  guide  schools 
projects for the next 20 years. 
 
 
To assist in keeping this master plan current, and to assist administrators in identifying crucial points at 
which action will be required, the team recommends the following: 
 
• Create  a  procedure  (or  policy)  regarding  the  use  of  trailers  to  accommodate  growth  on 
school  sites  –  if  they  will  be  used  and  for  how  long  –  to  ensure  that  these  temporary 
classroom structures do not become a long‐term solution.   
 
• Determine a preferred grade level configuration and a target school program capacity model 
for  Falls  Church  at  each  grade  level.    As  part  of  the  master  plan  Falls  Church  City  Public 
Schools  will  assess  pros  and  cons  of  various  configurations,  as  they  will  affect  future 
infrastructure needs. 
 
• Create a procedure (or policy) that outlines the percentage of enrollment to capacity at each 
level  that  will  ‘trigger’  the  process  of  revising  attendance  boundaries  and/or  planning  and 
design  of  a  new  facility  or  additions  to  an  existing  facility,  based  on  the  target  capacity 
models set above, keeping in mind that the process of planning, design and construction can 
take 3‐4 years.  For example, if the trigger point is 85% of capacity: 
 
ƒ Elementary schools of 500 ‘trigger’ at 425 students 
ƒ Middle schools of 600 ‘trigger’ at 510 students 
ƒ High schools of 1000 ‘trigger’ at 850 students 
 
This  trigger  point  can  help  administrators  to  identify  if  the  growth  is  occurring  along  the 
projected  path,  faster  than,  or  slower  than  has  been  anticipated,  so  that  any  planned 
construction can be adjusted accordingly. 
• Plan  facilities  for  near‐term  anticipated  enrollment  with  expansion  capabilities  to 
accommodate long term needs.  This can be accomplished by considering program capacity 
with expandable design capacity as shown in Figure 2‐19. 
 

 
2‐29 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐2 ‐ Capacity Analysis 

 
Figure 2‐149 ‐ Enrollment to Capacity Ratio Scenario – Efficiency Shift 

 
  - Separated Configuration Scenario
Enrollment to Capacity
Prog Cap 2008 % Cap
  2013 % Cap 2018 % Cap
ELEMENTARY
 
PK-2 600 395 66% 403 67% 468 78%
Grades 3-5 525 437 83% 456 87% 453 86%
TOTAL ELEM 1125 832 74% 859 76% 921 82%
MIDDLE
Grades 6-8 600 473 490 508
TOTAL MIDDLE 600 473 79% 490 82% 508 85%
HIGH
Grades 9-12 800 636 698 800
TOTAL HIGH 800 636 79% 698 87% 800 100%
Source‐ Eperitus 

Impact of Expandable Design Capacity

 
  - Separated Configuration Scenario
Enrollment to Capacity
Design Cap 2008 % Cap 2013 % Cap 2018 % Cap
 
ELEMENTARY
 
PK-2 680 395 58% 403 59% 468 69%
Grades 3-5 650 437 67% 456 70% 453 70%
TOTAL ELEM 1330 832 63% 859 65% 921 69%
MIDDLE
Grades 6-8 800 473 490 508
TOTAL MIDDLE 800 473 59% 490 61% 508 64%
HIGH
Grades 9-12 1000 636 698 800
TOTAL HIGH 1000 636 64% 698 70% 800 80%
Source‐ Eperitus 

 
2‐30 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations ‐ Overview 

 
Section 2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations 
 
At the outset of this study, an evaluation was made of the  existing infrastructure  comprising the Falls 
Church City Public School Division.  This infrastructure includes four buildings: 
 
• George Mason High School 
• Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 
• Mount Daniel Elementary School 
• Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 
 
Each facility was toured by professionals from various disciplines – mechanical, electrical, and plumbing 
engineers,  architects,  civil  engineers,  and  Hazardous  Materials  assessment  and  abatement  specialists.  
The  goal  of  these  evaluations  was  to  determine  in  a  broad  sense  the  condition  of  each  facility,  its 
compliance with current code, and its prospect for continued long term use.  If any major issues were 
detected during these evaluations, they were documented for further consideration and evaluation as 
part of the master planning process. 
 
The  subsequent  sections  discuss  each  facility  in  turn,  with  sub‐sections  for  the  various  disciplines’ 
evaluations.   
 
Site Assessment – Notes on Approach 
 
Site  assessments  were  completed  for  the  three  sites  that  house  the  schools.    These  sites  are  the 
following: 
 
• George Mason High School and Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 
• Mount Daniel Elementary School 
• Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 
 
The  site  evaluation  includes  a  review  of  the  site,  a  discussion  of  zoning  requirements  for  the  site  in 
question, a discussion of the site’s role within the Fairfax County Comprehensive Plan, a discussion of 
site utilities, and a review of environmental features that affect the usable area of the site. 
 
Site maps and graphics are included in Appendix B. 
 

 
2‐31 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations ‐ Overview 

Hazardous Materials Assessment – Notes on Approach 
 
F&R  conducted  the  field  portion  of  the  hazardous  materials  survey  at  facilities  from  July  28  through 
August  8,  2008.  The  scope  of  work  included  inspection  and  sampling  for  ACM,  LBP  and  visual 
identification  of  suspect  PCB/mercury  containing  equipment.    The  inspection  was  completed  by  Alan 
Lederman  and  Stefan  Buck  of  F&R.    As  the  building  was  occupied  and  in  accordance  with  the  project 
scope  of  work,  the  survey  was  limited  to  utilizing  non‐destructive  sampling  techniques.    Enclosed 
columns and piping/ventilation chases within enclosures or behind walls were not surveyed or assessed. 
 
Two  abatement  cost  estimates  were  prepared,  one  for  “minor  renovations”  and  one  for  “major 
renovations”.  F&R defined minor renovations as renovations that impact only building finish materials 
and  do  not  impact  mechanical,  electrical  and  plumbing  systems.    Major  renovations  were  defined  as 
renovations that impact both building finish materials and mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems.  
An  assumption  was  made  that  all  identified  building  finish  materials  under  the  scope  of  the  survey 
would  be  removed  during  minor  renovation  activities  and  that  all  identified  hazardous  materials, 
including  finish  materials  and  mechanical,  electrical  and  plumbing  components  would  be  removed 
during major renovation activities.  Additionally, the cost estimates assume that the building will not be 
occupied during abatement activities and that all abatement activities will occur under one mobilization. 
 

 
2‐32 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Site Evaluation – George Mason High School and Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 

Site Evaluation ‐ George Mason High School and Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 
 

George Mason 
Mary Ellen Henderson  High School 
Middle School 

 
Description 
 
George Mason High School and Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School are located adjacent to each other 
in Fairfax County on Tax Map Parcels 40‐3 ((1)) 91, 93 and 94.  Lots 91 and 94 are zoned R‐1; Lot 93 is 
split‐zoned R‐1 and C‐8.  The total site acreage is 34.46 acres.  The schools are bounded by Leesburg Pike 
(Route 7) to the south, Custis Memorial Parkway (I‐66) to the west, the West Falls Church Metro Station 
to the north and Haycock Road (Route 703) to the east.  Site access is from Leesburg Pike and Haycock 
Road (Route 703). 
 
The site is approximately 34.46 acres in size. 
 
According to the County tax records, the total gross floor area of the two schools is 292,686 SF.  A total 
of  434  surface  parking  spaces  are  provided,  of  which  12  spaces  are  accessible  and  designated  for 
handicap  parking.    The  site  includes  a  60  foot  softball  diamond,  a  90  foot  baseball  diamond,  8  tennis 
courts, 2 outdoor basketball courts, and a football stadium with turf field. 
 
 
Zoning Requirements 
 
Maximum FAR 
According  to  the  Fairfax  County  Department  of  Tax  Administration  records,  Lot  91  contains  560,739 
square  feet  in  area,  Lot  94  contains  1,078,851  square  feet  in  area,  and  Lot  93  contains  71,566  square 
feet  in  area.    According  to  a  boundary  survey  completed  by  PHR&A  dated  January  10,  1999,  Lot  91 
contains 362,202 square feet in area, Lot 94 contains 1,069,514 square feet in area, and Lot 93 contains 
69,542 square feet in area.  Lots 91 and 94 are zoned R‐1 and may be developed with a public use to a 
 
2‐33 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

maximum floor area ratio (FAR) of 0.20.  Lot 93 is split zoned R‐1 and C‐8.  The portion of Lot 93 that is 
zoned R‐1 contains 56,510 square feet; the portion of Lot 93 that is zoned C‐8 is 12,932 square feet.  FAR 
is a bulk regulation and pursuant to Par. 1 of Section 2‐307 of the Zoning Ordinance, no structure or part 
thereof may be built or moved on a lot which does not meet all the maximum bulk regulations of the 
zoning district in which the structure is located.  Therefore, if a structure is located in the R‐1 portion of 
the lot then only that square footage zoned R‐1 may be used to calculate the maximum permitted GFA 
on the property. 
 
Based  on  the  boundary  survey,  the  entire  site  area  would  include  1,501,258  square  feet.    Of  this, 
approximately  1,488,326  is  zoned  R‐1,  and  approximately  297,665  square  feet  of  GFA  would  be 
permitted on this portion of the site.  Based upon the approved site plans for the site, 292,686 square 
feet of GFA exists on the site.  Therefore it appears that only additional 4,979 square feet of GFA could 
be constructed on the property under the existing zoning.  
 
The  FAR  limitation  may  trigger  the  need  to  rezone  the  property  to  permit  expansion  of  the  existing 
school facilities. It should  be noted  that Fairfax County rezoned other properties across the County to 
allow a more dense public use to meet an increasing school population.  While a rezoning would require 
a separate process, it is anticipated that pursuing a higher density with a rezoning on the property would 
be achievable.  The County’s Comprehensive Plan identifies that the school property and the properties 
immediately surrounding it, is favorable toward higher densities.  As a result, it is anticipated that the 
language of the Comprehensive Plan would be supportive of a rezoning of the school property. 
 
Yard Requirements/Setbacks 
In  the  R‐1  zoning  district  the  maximum  building  height  for  public  uses  is  60’.    The  minimum  yard 
requirements include: 
 
  Front yard:   Controlled by a 50° angle of bulk plane, but not less than 40’ 
  Side yard:   Controlled by a 45° angle of bulk plane, but not less than 20’ 
  Rear yard:   Controlled by a 45° angle of bulk plane, but not less than 25’ 
 
Landscaping/Screening Requirement 
Any development program on the subject property must comply with the applicable provisions set forth 
in Article 13 of the Fairfax County Zoning Ordinance.  The requirements include: 
 
  Interior Parking Lot Landscaping:    5% 
 
  Peripheral Parking Lot Landscaping:    Abuts Property – 4 feet 
                    Abuts Street – 10 feet 
 
  Tree Cover:          20% 
  Open Space:          30% 
 
  Transitional Screening/Barrier: 
     
    North Property Line      TSY 2 (35’), Barrier D, E, or F 
    East Property Line      No Requirement 
 
2‐34 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Site Evaluation – George Mason High School and Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 

    South Property Line      TSY 2 (35’), Barrier D, E, or F 
    West Property Line:      TSY 2 (35’), Barrier D, E, or F 
 
According  to  the  last  site  plan  permitted  for  the  property,  the  following  summarizes  the  landscape 
coverage required to address parking lot and peripheral landscaping requirements:   
 
Interior Parking Lot Landscaping Required (5%)    14,733 SF 
Interior Parking Lot Landscaping Provided    16,781 SF 
 
Tree Cover in the R‐1 District: 
    Required          124,923 SF 
    Provided          130,125 SF 
 
Tree Cover in the C‐8 District:       
Required          1,123 SF 
Provided          1,156 SF 
 
It is likely  that future additions to  the  existing schools would require additional landscaping, since the 
County  requirements  for  tree  cover  and  parking  lot  landscaping  are  currently  being  met  with  little 
additional coverage. 
 
Countywide Trail Requirement 
Any  improvements  on  the  property  that  require  a  site  permit  must  comply  with  the  Fairfax  County 
Countywide Trail Plan.  This Plan requires an 8’ asphalt or concrete trail along Leesburg Pike (Route 7) 
and Haycock Road (Route 703).  There is an existing 5’ sidewalk along portions of Leesburg Pike (Route 
7) and a 4’‐5’ sidewalk along Haycock Road (Route 703) that ties into an 8’ trail at the northeast property 
line.  The existing sidewalks will need to be reconstructed to meet the current trail requirement or a trail 
waiver will be required to reaffirm the existing configuration. 
 
Parking Requirements 
The  requirement  as  set  forth  in  Article  10  of  the  Zoning  Ordinance  reads  as  follows  for  “Other  Uses  ‐ 
High School”: As determined by the Director, based on a review of each proposal to include such factors 
as the occupancy load of all classroom facilities, auditoriums and stadiums, proposed special education 
programs, and student‐teacher ratios, and the availability of areas on site that can be used for auxiliary 
parking  in  times  of  peak  demand;  but  in  no  instance  less  than  three‐tenths  (0.3)  space  per  student, 
based  on  the  maximum  number  of  students  attending  classes  at  any  one  time.    Based  on  this 
requirement, the minimum number of parking spaces will be determined by the maximum number of 
students attending classes at any one time. 
 
The  parking  totals  reflected  on  the  most  recently  approved  site  plan  for  the  middle  and  high  school 
reflects the following: 
 
High School:          650 Students 
      Required Parking       0.3 Spaces / Student 
Required Parking      195 Spaces 
 
 
2‐35 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

Middle School:          80 staff/600 Students 
      Required Parking       1 Space/Staff+ 4 Spaces for Visitors 
      Required Parking      84 Spaces 
 
Total Required Parking        279 Spaces 
Total Provided Parking        434 Spaces 
   
Total H/C Parking Required      9 Spaces 
Total HC Parking Provided      12 Spaces 
 
Total H/C Van Parking Required     2 Spaces 
Total H/C Van Parking Provided      8 Spaces 
 
Total Loading Spaces Required      3 Spaces 
Total Loading Spaces Provided      5 Spaces 
 
Existing  parking  areas  are  asphalt  paved  and  constructed  in  accordance  with  VDOT/Fairfax  County 
specifications.  The following standard pavement section was utilized for recently paved asphalt parking 
areas: 
 
    Top Course:     2” Asphalt Surface Course SM‐9.5A 
    Intermediate:     3” Asphalt Base Course BM‐25.0 
    Base:       6” Aggregate Material Type 21B 
 
 
Fairfax County Comprehensive Plan 
 
George  Mason  High  School  and  Mary  Ellen  Henderson  Middle  School  are  located  with  the  Dranesville 
Planning  District  of  the  Fairfax  County  Comprehensive  Plan.    The  schools  are  within  a  specialized 
planning area around the West Falls Church Transit Station, particularly land unit “A”.  The intention of 
the  Transit  Area  designation  is  to  capitalize  on  the  opportunity  to  provide  transit  focused  housing 
employment locations, while still maintaining the existing, nearby land uses. 
 
A copy of the County’s Comprehensive Plan language for the area around the West Falls Church Transit 
Station is included in the appendix of this report. 
 
 
Site Utilities 
 
Water 
Service  is  provided  by  The  City  of  Falls  Church  Department  of  Public  Utilities.    An  existing  8”  and  20” 
water main is located across the site frontage within the west bound lane of Leesburg Pike (Route 7).  
Both mains turn northeast at the intersection of Haycock Road (Route 703) and Leesburg Pike (Route 7).  
At this point, the water mains enter the southeast corner of the site within the existing eastern parking 
lots  that  parallel  Haycock  Road  (Route  703)  and  continue  north.    A  8”X  20”  tap  of  the  20”  main  in 
Leesburg Pike (Route7) brings water into the site within an existing access road that runs north between 
 
2‐36 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Site Evaluation – George Mason High School and Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 

the  Mary  Ellen  Henderson  Middle  School  and  George  Mason  High  School  and  turns  east  along  the 
northern  access  road  to  connect  into  the  existing  20”  water  main  located  along  the  eastern  property 
line.  Two 6” lines tap off this 8” line to feed the Falls Church City Park to the northwest and an existing 
offsite building to the northwest.  Two fire hydrants are located on the 8” line; one on the east side and 
one on the north side of the high school.  An 8”X 8” tap and 8”X 20” tap of the 8” and 20” water mains 
located  in  Leesburg  Pike  (route  7)  feed  two  separate  onsite  fire  hydrants  located  to  the  south  of  the 
Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School and in the southern parking lot of the George Mason High School, 
respectively.    Additionally,  an  existing  fire  hydrant  is  located  along  Haycock  Road  (Route  7)  at  the 
southeast corner of the site. 
 
A 3” domestic connection and 4” fire line for the high school is located on the southeastern side of the 
existing building that taps off the 8” water main in Leesburg Pike (Route 7).  An additional 8” fire line 
tees  off  the  onsite  8”  line  that  connects  at  the  western  side  of  the  high  school.    It  is  anticipated  that 
these connections can be maintained with construction of any expansion of the existing facilities. 
 
A  4”  domestic  connection  and  6”  fire  line  for  the  middle  school  is  located  on  the  south  side  of  the 
existing  building  that  taps  off  the  8”  water  line  in  the  access  road.    It  is  anticipated  that  these 
connections can be maintained with construction of any expansion of the existing facilities. 
 
Sanitary Sewer 
Existing  service  is  provided  by  the  City  of  Falls  Church  Department  of  Environmental  Services.    An 
existing  sanitary  sewer  is  located  in  Leesburg  Pike  (Route  7)  at  the  south  west  corner  of  the  site  and 
continues west.  Dual 4” sanitary sewer laterals located on the south side of the middle school tie into a 
3”  force  main  that  is  located  along  the  site  frontage  of  Leesburg  Pike  (Route  7).    An  existing  sanitary 
sewer  lateral  for  the  high  school  ties  to  the  terminal  end  of  the  sanitary  sewer  main.    There  are  no 
known inadequacies of the existing sewer line.  It is anticipated that the existing sanitary sewer lateral 
can be maintained with construction of any expansion of the existing facilities. 
 
Storm Drainage 
Three  existing  storm  sewer  systems  provide  the  outfall  for  the  school  site.    Two  of  the  existing  storm 
sewer outfalls are located at the Route 7 right‐of‐way at the southwest corner of the site and at Haycock 
Road  (Route  703)  right‐of‐way  at  the  south  east  corner  of  the  site.    The  third  storm  sewer  system 
outfalls  at  the  northwest  corner  of  the  site  to  an  existing  concrete  ditch  that  runs  east  along  Custis 
Memorial  Parkway  (I‐  66).    Adequacy  of  these  storm  sewer  systems  will  need  to  be  verified  upon  any 
future  site  development.    Offsite  improvements  to  these  storm  sewer  systems  are  not  presently 
anticipated. 
 
The  existing  storm  drainage  system  on  the  northern  side  of  the  existing  building  will  need  to  be 
reworked  to  adequately  drain  the  site  if  the  building  is  expanded  to  the  north.    Where  possible,  the 
existing  stormwater  management  facilities  should  be  maintained  to  address  a  portion  of  the  overall 
storm water management requirements. 
 
Stormwater Management 
With relocation of the onsite athletic fields to ready the site for construction of the Middle School and 
construction of additional onsite parking, stormwater management facilities were constructed to meet 
the minimum County requirements for stormwater management.   Stormwater detention was provided 
 
2‐37 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

using  underground  detention  in  the  form  of  a  two  96”  diameter  corrugated  metal  pipes.    Best 
Management  Practices  (BMP’s)  were  addressed  with  the  use  of  a  DC  Sandfilter,  Stormfilters,  and 
Filterras (water quality inlets).  Both SWM detention and BMP’s were located in the transfer site.  The 
water quality requirement with the site improvements required a 19.1% phosphorous removal and the 
stormwater management facilities met this requirement with no surplus capacity for future expansion. 
 
Stormwater  detention for the site as summarized in the  most recent site plan for the site reflects  the 
following: 
 
Allowable Runoff: 
 
Q (2‐year) = 20.05 CFS 
Q (10‐year) = 26.08 CFS  
 
Calculated Peak Discharge: 
 
Q (2‐year) = 8.17 CFS 
Q (10‐year) = 19.61 CFS  
 
As  a  result,  it  appears  that  some  over‐detention  is  occurring  within  the  constructed  stormwater 
detention  facilities  which  may  allow  a  minor  amount  of  additional  impervious  area  to  be  constructed 
without upgrading the stormwater detention facilities.  
 
Any  future  site  development/expansion  would  be  subject  to  the  storm  water  management 
requirements as identified within the Fairfax County Public Facilities Manual (PFM).  These requirements 
include both storm water detention (peak flow reduction) and water quality enhancement. 
 
Where possible, the existing stormwater management facilities located beneath the existing parking lots 
on the north and east side of the school will be maintained to help address the stormwater detention 
requirement.    With  any  future  site  development,  the  2‐year  and  10‐year  peak  flow  from  the  site  will 
need  to  be  reduced  to  at  or  below  the  existing  peak  flow  for  these  recurrence  interval  storms.  
Additional onsite measures will be required to address peak flow detention, beyond that which can be 
accommodated in the stormwater management conduits that will be maintained.   
 
If  the  proposed  development  has  a  net  increase  of  impervious  area  less  than  20%  then  the 
redevelopment  formula  can  be  utilized  for  computing  the  BMP  requirement  of  any  future  site 
enhancements: 
 
[1 ‐ 0.9(Ipre/Ipost)] X 100% = % P Removal 
 
If  the  proposed  development  has  a  net  increase  of  impervious  area  less  than  20%  then  the  above 
formula can be utilized for computing the BMP requirement. 
 
In order to address the BMP requirement for the site, the following measures may be incorporated: 
 

 
2‐38 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Site Evaluation – George Mason High School and Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 

• Utilization  of  percolation  trenches  within  proposed  parking  areas  to  promote 
infiltration.  
• Utilization of a bioretention filter to promote infiltration. 
• Dedication of natural open space (Water Quality Management Area). 
• Consideration of green roof elements to promote infiltration. 
 
Verification of the infiltration capacity of the onsite soils is required to analyze the design requirements. 
 
 
Site Access 
There are two main access points to the site.  One is located on Leesburg Pike (Route 7) and the other is 
at  the  northeast  corner  along  Haycock  Road  (Route  703).    Additionally,  access  to  the  parking  lots  is 
provided off of Leesburg Pike (Route 7) and Haycock Road (Route 703).  It is anticipated that the four 
entrances will be maintained.  Sight distance for the existing entrances will be confirmed with the final 
site plan.   
 
The  following  standard  pavement  section  is  assumed  for  new  asphalt  access  roads  and  travel  aisles 
within the parking areas: 
 
    Top Course:     1.5” Asphalt Surface Course SM‐9.5A 
    Intermediate:     4” Asphalt Base Course BM‐25.0 
    Base:       8” Aggregate Material Type 21B 
 
 
Environmental 
 
Floodplains 
Based  on  the  Fairfax  County  Chesapeake  Bay  Preservation  Map  there  are  no  identified  100‐year 
floodplains in the vicinity of the lots that comprise the High School and Middle School Site. 
 
Resource Protection Areas 
Resource Protection Area (RPA) is the component of the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Area comprised 
of lands adjacent to water bodies with perennial flow that have an intrinsic water quality value due to 
the  ecological  and  biological  processes  they  perform  or  are  sensitive  to  impacts  which  may  result  in 
significant degradation of the quality of state waters.  In their natural condition, these lands provide for 
the  removal,  reduction,  or  assimilation  of  sediments,  nutrients,  and  potentially  harmful  or  toxic 
substances from runoff entering the Bay and its tributaries, and minimize the adverse effects of human 
activities  on  state  waters  and  aquatic  resources.    RPA’s  shall  include  any  land  characterized  by  the 
following features: 
 
• A tidal wetland. 
• A tidal shore. 
• A water body with perennial flow. 
• A  nontidal  wetland  connected  by  surface  flow  and  contiguous  to  a  tidal  wetland  or  a 
water body with perennial flow. 

 
2‐39 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

• A buffer area as follows: 
ƒ Any land with a major floodplain. 
ƒ Any land within 100 feet within an RPA feature. 
 
RPAs cannot be cleared without special permitting. 
 
Based on the Fairfax County Chesapeake Bay Preservation Map, there are no identified RPAs within the 
lots that comprise the High School and Middle School.  
 
Wetlands 
There were no identified wetland areas on the site plan for the Middle School.  The site should be field 
inspected to confirm that the area that will be impacted with construction of any proposed expansion is 
void of jurisdictional wetlands.  If wetlands are identified, they will be field confirmed by the USACE and 
the  Virginia  Department  of  Environmental  Quality  (DEQ),  surveyed  and  reflected  on  a  Jurisdictional 
Determination  (JD)  that  is  approved  by  the  USACE.    Disturbance  of  any  wetlands,  if  identified,  will  be 
avoided to the extent possible with site construction. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
2‐40 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluation – George Mason High School 

 
George Mason High School 
 
Architectural Assessment 
 
Construction  of  George  Mason  High  School 
was  completed  in  1954  with  several  minor 
additions  over  the  years  and  one  major 
addition in 1994. 
 
Upper Floor:  159,798 SF 
Lower Floor:    40,227 SF 
Total:      200,025 SF 
 
The current facility is a one‐story building with three sections that have a lower level as the site begins 
to slope away from the main level elevation. The current school plan layout is a series of additions to the 
original school facility, placed as site availability allowed. As a result, clear circulation for students and 
faculty is no longer convenient or comprehensible. 
 
Layout 
A total of 5 major ADA‐compliant entrances provide access to the school: two on the south side, two on 
the north side, one each on the east and west sides. Other entrances are less convenient for easy entry 
and exiting. The building is organized along two major corridors running north‐south and east‐west with 
several secondary corridors. Using this corridor framework, the school is divided into 6 major sections 
according to educational functions or class programs. The extensive length of the corridor system do to 
the fact that it is on one level creates long travel times for students and faculty alike to traverse from 
one  end  of  the  facility  to  the  other.  Minimal  signage  and  like  materials  also  add  to  the  confusion  of 
wayfinding  in  the  corridor  system.  Many  of  the  spaces  designated  as  available  for  public  use  are 
unfortunately positions with little adjacent parking or traffic access to be effectively utilized. An example 
of this is the current Auditorium. Public entries from the exterior are ineffective, and interior access for 
the public use is limited to one inaccessible vestibule.  Floor plates vary in elevation, requiring stairs and 
ramp systems to access. As a result, there are areas that are more difficult to utilize. 
 
The  corridors are long and relatively low, averaging  7’‐6” from floor to ceiling.  Classroom ceilings are 
can vary in height, with some current ceilings lower than the adjacent exterior glazing, requiring a step 
up bulkhead at areas to transition from the low ceiling to the higher window/ door assembly head.  The 
school  does  not  have  enough  storage  space.  Any  under‐utilized  room  may  become  a  storage  space, 
which leads to confusion and storage away from the location where items are likely to be utilized. 
 
Classrooms 
George Mason has more than 54 classrooms. Room sizes vary from 600 SF to 1,000 SF. There are also 6 
classroom trailers on the south side of the school, adjacent to Leesburg Pike (Route 7). 
 
 

 
2‐41 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

Materials 
The palette of finishes on the exterior consist of a brick veneer façade with plaster or metal soffit/ fascia 
elements  at  points  along  the  façade.  Aluminum  windows  are  comprised  of  bands  of  glass  from  a  sill/ 
counter height to ceiling height, with operable windows in certain locations in each classroom space. 
Entry Doors are typically aluminum with glass, or hollow metal doors in more utilitarian areas. 
Certain additions consist of a pre‐manufactured building system with white metal panel façade. 
 
Interior finishes include vinyl tiled floors installed over existing terrazzo flooring in many areas. Painted 
Concrete Masonry Units (CMU) and glazed CMU wall partitions line the corridors, and there are accents 
of  face  brick  and  some  poured  concrete  walls,  depending  on  the  location.  Extensive  2’  x  4’  acoustical 
ceilings  in  a  15/16  inch  grid  are  in  the  corridor  as  well.  These  ceiling  tiles  are  beginning  to  bow 
downward  after  years  of  installation  and  humidity  changes.  Ceiling  systems  should  at  some  point  be 
rehabilitated. 
 
Classroom  materials  vary  from  painted  Concrete  Masonry  Units  to  gypsum  board  wall  partitions. 
Generally the material is standing up to daily abuse, but the aesthetic appeal of some of these materials 
is less than desirable. 
 
Typical Door systems include a majority of wood veneer doors, some with view glass and some solid, in 
painted hollow metal frames, still in good condition for the most part. Hollow metal doors and frames 
are also there in special locations. 
 
Codes and Accessibility 
• Lighting 
The  existing  general  lighting  in  the  school  from  a  design  standpoint  is  not  a  preferable 
solution by today’s standards. The existing lighting acrylic lens fixtures are inefficient from a 
light quality standpoint, producing excessive glare for the users both at desktop heights and 
at computer screens. 
See Electrical Systems below for additional information. 
 
• Acoustics 
Overall,  the  building  acoustics  are  at  a  minimum.  Public  spaces  such  as  the  food  services 
areas  have  acoustical  materials  that  are  overtaxed  when  at  full  capacity.  Corridors  have 
acoustical ceiling material, but all other hard services serve to increase noise levels at peak 
usage.  A  reevaluation  of  the  theatrical  venues  should  be  undertaken  to  adopt  more 
contemporary acoustical practices. 
 
• General/Accessibility 
In general the building is compliant with the building codes, except a few instances of door 
opening  clearance  or  excessive  accessible  ramp  lengths.      The  auditorium  lobby  is  not 
directly  ADA‐accessible  due  to  the  steps  from  the  school  lobby.  A  person  in  a  wheel  chair 
needs  to  either  go  to  the  outside  and  come  back  in  thru  the  auditorium  exterior  doors  or 
move around the other side of the auditorium, passing by a more than 30 ft long ramp and 3 
more set of corridor doors.  The stage area is not directly accessible to the audience seating 
area. 
 
 
2‐42 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

 
Type of Construction 
Steel frame and face brick on concrete masonry unit back‐up. Window systems are typically… Except for 
a few small areas of flat roof with roofing membrane, the school’s roof is covered with low slope metal 
roofing panels. All exterior materials are in an acceptable condition. 
 
User Group and Construction Type 
The  building  is  mixed‐use  of  Groups  E  (Educational),  A‐3  (Gymnasium,  Library)  and  B  (Office).    The 
construction type is 2B. 
 
 
Mechanical, Plumbing, Electrical and Life Safety Assessment 
 
Mechanical (HVAC) 
The building HVAC system consists of 126 air‐cooled split systems with hot water heat and 46 thru‐the‐
wall incremental A/C units with hot water heat.  The system also includes 6 self‐contained roof‐top A/C 
units with gas heat and one (1) self‐contained VAV type A/C unit with hot water heat which serves the 
POD area.  Hot water for heating is provided from two (2) boiler plants.   
 
The  split  system  fan  coil  units  are  horizontal  type  ceiling  mounted  with  a  DX  cooling  coil,  a  hot  water 
heating coil and remote air cooled condensing unit (ACCU).  The ACCU’s are located on the roof and on 
grade outside the building.  Approximately 110 of the units serve classrooms, offices and corridors and 
range from ½ to 5 tons in capacity.  Twelve (12) of the split systems are 100% outside air units which 
provide ventilation air to the 110 smaller systems. The six roof top units serve the admin and auditorium 
ceilings.  The thru‐the‐wall units serve classrooms in wings A and B.   
 
All  of  the  split  systems,  thru‐the‐wall  A/C  units  and  roof  top  units  were  installed  as  part  of  the  1994 
renovations and additions project.  They appear to be well maintained and in good condition.  The only 
issue of concern is related to humidity control problems with the 100% outside air units. 
 
The HVAC systems were upgraded in the laboratory classroom wing A in 2005.  The thru‐the‐wall units 
were replaced with spit system fan coil units and remote condensing units.  The unit provided additional 
outside air for the new fume hoods.  The HVAC units in wing A (POD area) were replaced in 1998 with a 
new self‐contained VAV type A/C unit located on grade. 
 
 
Boiler Plants 
Boiler Plant 1 is located at the west end of the building and consists of two (2) 6275 CFH gas‐fired water 
tube  boilers.    Boiler  No.  1  was  installed  in  1952  and  boiler  1A  was  installed  in  1972.    One  boiler  is  a 
stand‐by.  The boilers were re‐tubed during the 1994 renovation project and all of the hot water piping 
was replaced.  The pumps are original and should be replaced.  The plant has two (2) 530 GPM capacity 
circulating pumps (one stand‐by). 
 
Boiler  Plant 2 is located at the east end of the building and consists of two (2) 3350 CFH gas‐fired York 
Shipley steam boilers with a shell and tube hot water heat exchanger. Boiler 2 was installed in mid 80’s 
and boiler 2A was installed in 1994.  One boiler is a stand‐by. 
 
2‐43 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

 
The plant has two (2) 270 GPM capacity end‐section centrifuged circulating pumps (one stand‐by). The 
boilers, pumps, exhaust fans and RTU’s are controlled by an Andover/ESI DDC control system.  Boiler 2A 
and the control system were part of the 1994 renovation; however, the rest of the equipment is part of 
the original construction.  The plant appears to be in good operating condition. 
 
Miscellaneous 
The kitchen hood exhaust air system has a gas‐fired make‐up air system, which were installed as part of 
the 1994 addition and alterations project. 
 
 
Plumbing Systems 
The building has a 3” domestic water service which enters the building at boiler plant No. 1.  There is no 
meter or backflow preventer inside the building. 
 
Domestic hot water is generated by two (2) gas‐fired water heaters.  Heater 1 is a 400 gallon, 1000 CFH 
gas‐fired  unit  located  in  boiler  plant  No.  1  and  serves  the  kitchen,  locker  room,  toilet  facilities  and 
classrooms on the west 2/3’s of the building.  Heater 2 is a 200 gallon, 600 CFH gas‐fired unit located in 
boiler plant No. 2 on the east end. 
 
The  water  piping  for  both  hot  and  cold  water  is  insulated  copper  with  soldered  joint.    The  hot  water 
piping  has  a  temperature  maintenance  system  utilizing  self‐regulating  electric  heat  tape.    All  of  the 
piping was replaced in 1994. 
 
The below grade sanitary and storm water piping is cast iron with hub and spigot joints and is original to 
the buildings and additions.  Most of the branch piping is new dating from the 1994 renovations.  The 
kitchen sanitary system has a grease trap located outside below grade. 
 
The building has two (2) low pressure natural gas services.  Service no. 1 is 15,619 CFH in capacity and 
enters boiler room 1 (west end). The service supplies boilers 1 and 1A, RTU 1 and 2, the domestic water 
heater  and  kitchen  equipment.    Gas  service  No.  2  is  8874  CFH  in  capacity  and  enters  the  building  at 
boiler room 2 (east end).  The service supplies boilers 2 and 2A, water heater 2 and RTU’s 3 thru 6. 
 
 
 
 
 
Fire Protection 
The building has a 6” fire service main which enters the building in a sprinkler room located adjacent to 
boiler  room  1.    The  fire  main  supplies  water  to  sprinkler  zone  control  valves  located  throughout  the 
building.  The building is fully sprinklered by a wet‐pipe system. 
 
The building does not have a fire pump. 
 
Electrical Systems 

 
2‐44 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

Electrical Service 
The  existing  power  company  is  Dominion  Virginia  Power.  The  main  building  of  this  school  has  two  (2) 
electrical services with a third service for the remote trailers. Service one is provided through a power 
company step down pad mounted transformer. This service enters the building at a dedicated electrical 
room adjacent to Gymnasium B101. This electrical service was upgraded in 1994. The power company 
electric meter is installed outside on the wall of the main electrical room. The existing power company 
pad  mounted  transformer  is  feeding  277/480  volt,  3000  amp.    The  existing  switchboard  is  Square‐D, 
model QED. There are three sections to this switchgear which include a CT and pull section, 3000A main 
service  disconnect  section  and  a  distribution  section.  The  switchboard  has  a  Square‐D  Powerlogic 
electronic meter which is not operable. This switchboard has little space left for expansion.  
 
Service  two  is  provided  through  a  power  company  step  down  pad  mounted  transformer.  This  service 
enters the building at a dedicated electrical room E203. This electrical service was added in 1994 as part 
of a renovation and addition project. The power company electric meter is installed inside on the wall of 
the  main  electrical  room.  The  existing  power  company  pad  mounted  transformer  is  feeding  277/480 
volt,  1600  amp.    The  existing  switchboard  is  Square‐D,  model  QED.  There  are  three  sections  to  this 
switchgear which include a CT and pull section, 1600A main service disconnect section and a distribution 
section.  The  switchboard  has  a  Square‐D  Powerlogic  electronic  meter  which  is  not  operable.  This 
switchboard  has  space  for  expansion,  however,  the  service  size  is  small  and  there  may  be  ampacity 
issues.  
 
The existing switchboards do not contain any ground fault protection as per current code requirements. 
The  existing  switchboards  do  not  contain  any  transient  voltage  surge  suppression.  The  two  (2)  main 
electrical services are located on remote sides of the building. There is no signage on the switchboards 
that indicate that multiple services enter the building or that there are multiple main disconnects as per 
code requirements. 
 
Power Distribution System 
The  existing  switchboards  serve  the  entire  building  through  a  number  of  branch  circuit  panelboards. 
Most of the panelboards have been replaced in the 1994 renovation project. There are a few remaining 
panelboards  from  the  1950/1960  era.  These  areas  include  in  part,  boiler  rooms  and  the  auditorium. 
These panels will be difficult to find parts for any future renovations. If any of the wiring for these panels 
is original wiring, then the circuits fed from these panels have reached the end of their useful life. The 
kitchen panelboard was never installed properly in the wall. Because of this a panel cover/door cannot 
be installed. A make‐shift wood frame with hinges was built over the panel to serve as the panel door. 
Typically all of the panels are filled to capacity. 
 
Electrical  closets  are  scattered  throughout  the  school.  All  of  the  existing  electrical  rooms  are  filled  to 
capacity. No additional equipment can be added and still meet the working clearance requirements. 
 
Emergency Power Distribution System 
The  building  has  a  Kohler  generator.  The  generator  is  rated  at  100kW/100kVA,  480/277  volt,  3‐Phase 
and has a 150A in‐line circuit breaker. The generator has a sub‐base mounted fuel tank and operates on 
diesel gas. The existing generator was installed during 1994 renovation. The existing generator is located 
outside  of  the  electrical  room  adjacent  to  the  Gymnasium.  The  emergency  system  is  operational; 
however, it is not adequate to handle additional loads with the current connected load. 
 
2‐45 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

 
The emergency generator feeds a Kohler automatic transfer switch "ATS" which further feeds to panel 
EP  which  contains  a  175A  main  circuit  breaker.  This  equipment  is  located  in  the  main  electrical  room 
adjacent  to  the  gymnasium.  The  existing  automatic  transfer  switch  and  emergency  panel  were  also 
installed in 1994, and are in fair condition. The emergency system serves emergency lights, exit lights, 
fire  alarm  system,  CATV  system,  sound  system  and  telephone/communication.  In  addition,  the 
generator feeds all the kitchen walk‐in refrigerator/freezers and coolers. 
 
Lighting System 
Most of the lighting fixtures were replaced in 1994. Existing lighting fixtures in classroom, media center, 
offices and corridors are 2’ X 4’ recessed fluorescent. The fluorescent lights utilize T12 technology which 
is old and not energy efficient. The corridors also contain downlights with twin tube fluorescent lamps. 
The  existing  lighting  fixtures  in  the  gymnasium  are  high  intensity  discharge  (HID)  fixtures.  The  lighting 
level  in  classrooms,  corridors,  and  gymnasium  is  poor.  The  light  fixtures  in  the  cafeteria  are  a 
combination  of  2’  X  4’  recessed  fluorescent  and  incandescent  downlights.  The  downlights  cannot  be 
converted  to  accept  fluorescent  lamps  due  to  having  an  odd  size  lamp  socket.  Exit  lights  utilize 
fluorescent lamps. Their appearance is old and discolored. 
 
Switching  control  is  through  single  toggle  switches  throughout  the  building  with  a  few  motion  sensor 
switches. This does not meet the current energy efficiency code requirements. 
 
The auditorium has a lighting control system them dates back to 1950/1960’s. This system utilizes old 
technology and does not have the flexibility of control as do current systems. 
 
On the exterior, there was an old tennis court that was transformed into a parking lot. The light fixtures 
for this area are the original 1950/1960’s fixtures that served the tennis court. The poles are rusted and 
the  light  fixtures  are  a  flood  light  style  that  create  a  substantial  amount  of  light  pollution  over  the 
property  line  and  do  not  provide  acceptable  lighting  levels  for  parking  lots.  There  are  some  exit 
discharge  locations  that  do  not  have  sufficient  emergency  egress  lighting.  The  building  lacks  proper 
security  lighting  around  the  perimeter  of  the  building.  Some  of  the  exterior  lights  have  clearly  been 
replaced as the existing fixtures that have not been replaced are old, discolored and some are damaged.  
 
 
Power Outlets 
The  power  outlets  located  in  the  classrooms  and  offices  were  provided  in  1994  addition/renovations. 
The  original  section  of  the  building  from  the  1950’s  had  few  recessed  receptacles.  Current  power 
requirements  require  more  receptacles  and  circuits.  Because  of  increased  requirements  surface 
mounted conduit and receptacles have been added in offices and classrooms. The auditorium and boiler 
rooms have a combination of original receptacles and wiring from the 1950’s and new receptacles that 
were added over the years. 
 
In  several  of  the  science  or  technology  type  classrooms,  there  are  extension  cords  draped  across 
ceilings. This should create the need for ceiling mount receptacles or power reels. 
 
 
 
 
2‐46 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

Fire Alarm System 
The existing fire alarm system is an Edwards EST system. The control panel is less than 10 years old. The 
devices were upgraded in 1994.  The existing fire alarm control panel is located in the main office. The 
building  is  sprinklered  and  flow  and  tamper  switches  are  tied  to  the  fire  alarm  system.  There  are  pull 
stations  at  all  of  the  exits.  The  entire  school  has  audio/visual  notification  devices  throughout. 
Notification is delivered through horns and strobes. There are fire alarm bells from pre‐1994 work that 
are connected to the fire alarm system. 
 
Sound System 
The existing sound system console manufactured by Dukane is located in the main office. Booster panels 
are installed throughout the facility. The existing sound system main equipment was installed in 1994. 
The  classrooms  have  surface  mounted  speakers  and  call  back  switches.  Corridors  and  cafeteria  have 
surface mount bull horns.  
 
There is an auxiliary sound reinforcement system in the gymnasium.  
 
Telephone/ CATV and Intercommunications Systems 
The  existing  main  CATV  HUB  is  located  in  the  existing  communication  room.  All  the  existing 
telephone/data outlets are surface mounted.  Most of the classrooms have one telephone and one data 
outlet, but some classrooms have one telephone and two data outlets. Data wiring is CAT 5 type. There 
are  computer  data  repeaters  installed  throughout  the  facility  in  corridors  surface  mounted  on  walls. 
These do not provide for a clean and neat installation and are prone to damage based on their location. 
 
There  are  telephone  data  closets  throughout  the  facility.  These  rooms  share  CATV,  telephone  punch 
blocks and backboard and data racks. The rooms are filled to capacity. 
 
Master Clock and Program Bell System 
The master clock system is integral with the Dukane sound system located in the main office.   
 
Building Security System 
The school is equipped with an access control and closed caption television (CCTV) security system. The 
system is web based with control panels in various locations. There are card readers at each entrance 
and security cameras located in corridors and at exterior exits. There is a video monitoring station in the 
school. 
 
Hazardous Materials Assessment 
 
F&R surveyed George Mason High School to identify ACM, LBP and suspect PCB and mercury containing 
equipment utilizing non‐destructive sampling.  The following paragraphs summarize the findings: 
 
• F&R identified asbestos‐containing mirror mastic in Rooms B104 and E149. 
• F&R identified asbestos‐containing 12”x12” black vinyl floor tile and associated mastic in the 
auditorium loft. 
• F&R identified asbestos‐containing saddle block insulation in Boiler Room E007. 
• F&R identified asbestos‐containing window caulk throughout the exterior of the school. 

 
2‐47 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

• F&R  observed  suspect  asbestos‐containing  mudded  pipe  fittings  in  the  hallway  outside 
Room F001. 
• F&R observed suspect asbestos‐containing metal fire doors throughout the building. 
• F&R  identified  boilers  with  presumed  asbestos‐containing  interior  components  in  the  B‐
Wing Boiler Room. 
• F&R  identified  three  elevators  throughout  the  school  presumed  to  contain  asbestos‐
containing interior and shaft components. 
• F&R  identified  water  fountains  throughout  the  building  that  are  presumed  to  contain 
asbestos‐containing pipe wrap. 
• F&R assumed the gymnasium floor felt paper and mastic to be asbestos‐containing. 
• F&R identified areas of lead based paint throughout the school. 
• F&R observed mercury‐containing thermostats in the B‐Wing Boiler Room and Maintenance 
Office. 
• F&R  visually  inspected  the  light  ballasts  throughout  the  school.    Based  on  our  inspection, 
there does not appear to be any regulated hazardous materials within these ballasts. 
 
Asbestos‐Containing Material 
During F&R’s non‐destructive survey for ACM the following materials were sampled: vinyl floor tiles and 
associated mastics, ceiling tile, vinyl covebase mastic, white duct seam sealant, grey duct seam sealant, 
wall  plaster,  slate  window  sills,  drywall  and  associated  joint  compound,  carpet  mastic,  saddle  block 
insulation,  window  caulk,  blackboard  mastic,  siding  material,  mirror  mastic,  ceiling  tile  mastic  and 
flooring  material.    The  following  materials  were  determined  to  be  asbestos‐containing:  12”x12”  black 
vinyl  floor  tile  and  associated  black  mastic,  saddle  block  insulation,  window  caulk  and  black  mirror 
mastic.  F&R presumed the following materials to be asbestos‐containing: mudded pipe fittings, metal 
fire  doors,  interior  boiler  components  (B‐Wing  Boiler  Room  only),  fume  hood  panels,  interior 
elevator/elevator  shaft  components,  water  fountain  pipe  wrap,  hardwood  floor  felt  paper  and  mastic 
and the main stage curtain. 
 
F&R identified approximately 400 square feet of asbestos‐containing mirror mastic in Rooms B104 and 
E149.    This  material  was  observed  in  good  condition  at  the  time  of  the  survey.    F&R  identified 
approximately  150  square  feet  of  12”x12”  black  vinyl  floor  tile  and  associated  black  mastic  in  the 
auditorium loft.  This material was observed in good condition at the time of the survey.  F&R identified 
approximately  10  square  feet  of  asbestos‐containing  saddle  block  insulation  on  the  hot  water  tank  in 
Boiler  Room  E007.    This  material  was  observed  in  poor  condition  at  the  time  of  the  survey.    F&R 
identified  approximately  500  linear  feet  of  remnant  window  caulking  throughout  the  exterior  of  the 
school.  This material was observed in fair condition at the time of the survey. 
 
F&R  observed  approximately  10  mudded  pipe  fittings  outside  Room  F001  that  are  presumed  to  be 
asbestos‐containing.  These fittings were observed in good condition at the time of the survey.  For the 
purposes  of  this  study,  F&R  assumes  that  there  are  approximately  500  mudded  pipe  fittings  located 
behind solid walls and ceilings and within pipe chases throughout the building.  F&R observed 22 metal 
fire doors throughout the school that are presumed to be asbestos‐containing. The doors were observed 
in  good  condition  at  the  time  of  the  survey.    F&R  observed  two  boilers  located  in  the  B‐Wing  Boiler 
Room  that  are  presumed  to  contain  asbestos‐containing  interior  components.    These  interior 
components were inaccessible at the time of the survey.  F&R observed approximately 200 square feet 

 
2‐48 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

of presumed asbestos‐containing fume hood panels in Rooms A121, A124, A126 and A127.  The fume 
hood panels were observed in good condition at the time of the survey.  F&R identified three elevators 
located  throughout  the  school  that  are  presumed  to  contain  asbestos‐containing  interior  and  shaft 
components.  These materials include elevator brakes, elevator cab insulation, elevator shaft walls and 
spray‐on fireproofing located in the elevator shaft.  The interior elevator components and elevator shaft 
were  inaccessible  at  the  time  of  our  inspection.    F&R  observed  approximately  20  water  fountains 
located  throughout  the  building.    These  water  fountains  are  assumed  to  contain  asbestos‐containing 
pipe wrap.  The water fountain pipe wrap was inaccessible at the time of our inspection.  F&R assumed 
the approximately 5,000 square foot gymnasium floor to have asbestos‐containing felt paper and mastic 
associated  with  it.    The  felt  paper  and  mastic  was  inaccessible  at  the  time  of  our  inspection.    F&R 
assumed  that  the  approximately  2,500  square  foot  stage  curtain  in  the  auditorium  is  asbestos‐
containing.  This material was observed in good condition at the time of the survey.   
 
As  part  of  this  study,  F&R  reviewed  an  Asbestos  Management  Plan  for  the  school,  prepared  by 
Professional  Service  Industries,  Inc.  (PSI)  and  dated  May  13,  2003.    The  PSI  report  identified  the 
following  asbestos‐containing  materials  within  the  school,  all  of  which  were  presumed  asbestos‐
containing: metal fire doors and mudded pipe fittings.  F&R observed these materials within the school 
during our survey. 
 
F&R  recommends  that  all  of  the  identified  ACM  be  removed  by  a  Commonwealth  of  Virginia  licensed 
asbestos abatement contractor prior to impact by renovation or demolition activities.  Furthermore, all 
suspect ACM that has not been previously sampled should be analyzed for asbestos prior to impact by 
renovation  or  demolition  activities.    Additionally,  F&R  recommends  that  the  2003  Asbestos 
Management Plan be updated as the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) requires that 
these plans be updated every three years. 
 
Lead Based Paint 
F&R  conducted  a  LBP  screening  of  the  painted  surfaces  located  throughout  the  interior  of  George 
Mason High School.  LBP was identified on the following building components: grey cinderblock walls in 
the  auditorium,  grey  wood  baseboards  in  the  auditorium,  white  metal  I‐beams  and  ducts  in  the 
gymnasium  and  white  metal  window  lintels  in  the  gymnasium.    Since  this  was  a  limited  LBP  survey 
additional LBP surfaces may be present that were not tested.  All painted surfaces should be assumed to 
contain LBP or lead‐containing paint. 
 
In  general,  if  structures  are  to  be  removed  or  demolished,  typical  demolition  techniques  can  be  used 
without LBP becoming an issue of concern.  However, if building components containing LBP are to be 
stripped and repainted, precautions would need to be taken.  Specifically, if these building components 
are  to  be  sanded,  abraded  or  heated  to  remove  the  LBP,  workers  trained  in  LBP  removal  should  be 
contracted  for  the  work.  At  this  time,  F&R  believes  that  the  presence  of  LBP  will  have  only  minimal 
impact to the project, primarily with contractor compliance with current OSHA regulations.  
 
Mercury‐Containing Equipment 
F&R  identified  7  thermostats  that  contained  mercury‐containing  switches.    These  thermostats  were 
observed in the B‐Wing Boiler Room and in the Maintenance Office.  Fluorescent light tubes were also 
inspected for the presence of mercury.  All of the fluorescent light tubes observed by F&R contained the 
low‐mercury  symbol.    Under  Virginia  regulations,  light  tubes  with  the  low  mercury  symbol  can  be 
disposed of as general waste provided that proper documentation can be provided by the manufacturer 
 
2‐49 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

that these tubes do not contain regulated levels of mercury.  Therefore, the fluorescent light tubes are 
not  likely  a  concern  at  this  property;  however  some  fluorescent  light  tubes  with  regulated  levels  of 
mercury may still remain within the school. 
 
PCB‐Containing Equipment 
F&R visually surveyed a representative number of light ballasts throughout George Mason High School.  
All of the light ballasts observed contained the “No PCB” label and therefore PCB‐containing ballasts are 
not likely a concern at this property; however some PCB‐containing ballasts may still remain within the 
school.  No other potential PCB‐containing equipment was observed by F&R. 
 
Cost Estimates 
F&R has developed conceptual cost estimates for the abatement of hazardous materials associated with 
major  and  minor  renovations  at  George  Mason  High  School.    F&R  is  assuming  that  no  work  is  to  be 
conducted on the roof. 
 
“Minor Renovation” Cost Estimate: 
• Mirror  Mastic  –  Approximately  400  square  feet  of  asbestos‐containing  mirror  mastic  was 
observed  in  Rooms  B104  and  E149.    F&R  assumes  a  cost  of  $3.00  per  square  foot  for 
abatement of the mirror mastic for a total cost of $1,200.  
• 12”x12”  Black  Vinyl  Floor  Tile  and  Associated  Mastic  –  Approximately  150  square  feet  of 
asbestos‐containing 12”x12” black vinyl floor tile and associated mastic was observed in the 
auditorium loft.  F&R assumes a total cost of $1,500.00 for abatement of the 12”x12” black 
vinyl floor tile and associated mastic. 
• Window  Caulk  –  Approximately  500  linear  feet  of  asbestos‐containing  window  caulk  was 
observed throughout the exterior of the school.  F&R assumes a cost of $10.00 a linear foot 
for abatement of the window caulk for a total cost of $5,000. 
• Metal  Fire  Doors  –  F&R  observed  22  metal  fire  doors  throughout  the  building  that  are 
assumed to be asbestos‐containing.  F&R assumes an abatement cost of $100.00 per door 
for a total abatement cost of $2,200.00. 
• Fume Hood Panels – F&R observed approximately 200 square feet of fume hood panels in 
Rooms A121, A124, A126 and A127 assumed to be asbestos‐containing.  F&R assumes a cost 
of $10.00 per square foot for abatement of the fume hood panels for a total cost of $2,000. 
• Gymnasium  Floor  Felt  Paper  and  Mastic  –  F&R  assumed  the  approximately  5,000  square 
foot gymnasium floor to contain asbestos containing felt paper and mastic.  F&R assumes a 
cost of $5.00 a square foot for abatement of this material for a total cost of $25,000. 
• Lead  Based  Paint  –  F&R  assumes  that  structures  containing  LBP  can  be  renovated  or 
demolished  utilizing  typical  demolition  techniques  without  LBP  becoming  an  issue  of 
concern.   
 
The  total  estimated  cost  for  the  removal  of  identified  and  suspected  hazardous  materials  associated 
with a minor renovation at George Mason High School is $34,900.  F&R typically adds an additional 25% 
contingency to estimates such as these.  Other costs typically associated with the abatement of these 
materials would include abatement design, project management, and oversight/monitoring of the work 
which  are  generally  estimated  to  be  15  to  25%  of  the  abatement  costs.    The  total  estimated  costs  to 
remove the identified and suspected hazardous materials associated with a minor renovation at George 
Mason  High  School,  including  the  25%  contingency  fee  and  design,  project  management  and 

 
2‐50 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

oversight/monitoring fees ranges up to $54,531.   
 
“Major  Renovation”  Cost  Estimate  (Estimate  also  includes  abatement  of  the  hazardous  materials 
referenced in the “minor renovation” cost estimate section): 
• Saddle Block Insulation – Approximately 10 square feet of asbestos‐containing saddle block 
insulation  was  observed  in  Boiler  Room  E007.    F&R  assumes  a  total  of  $1,500.00  for 
abatement of the saddle block insulation. 
• Mudded  Pipe  Fittings  –  F&R  observed  approximately  10  mudded  pipe  fittings  adjacent  to 
Room F001 that are assumed to be asbestos‐containing.  For the purposes of this study, F&R 
assumes  that  approximately  500  mudded  pipe  fittings  are  located  throughout  the  school 
behind  solid  ceilings  and  walls  and  within  pipe  chases.    An  abatement  cost  of  $50.00  per 
fitting is assumed for a total cost of $25,000 for abatement of the fittings. 
• Interior Boiler Components – F&R observed two boilers in the B‐Wing Boiler Room assumed 
to  contain  asbestos‐containing  interior  components.    F&R  assumes  a  cost  of  $2,500  per 
boiler for abatement of these components for a total cost of $5,000. 
• Interior  Elevator  and  Elevator  Shaft  Components  –  There  are  three  elevators  located 
throughout  the  school.    F&R  assumed  that  interior  components  within  the  elevators  and 
shafts  are  asbestos‐containing.    These  materials  include  elevator  brakes,  elevator  cab 
insulation, elevator shaft walls and spray‐on fireproofing located in the elevator shaft.  F&R 
assumes  a  cost  of  approximately  $10,000  per  elevator  for  abatement  for  a  total  cost  of 
$30,000. 
• Water  Fountain  Pipe  Wrap  –  F&R  observed  approximately  20  water  fountains  located 
throughout the building assumed to contain asbestos‐containing pipe wrap.  F&R assumes a 
cost of $250.00 per water fountain for abatement of this material for a total cost of $5,000. 
• Mercury‐Containing  Thermostats  –  F&R  observed  7  mercury‐containing  thermostats 
throughout the school.  F&R assumes that removal of the thermostats will be approximately 
$1,500.00. 
 
The  total  estimated  cost  for  the  removal  of  identified  and  suspected  hazardous  materials  associated 
with a major renovation at George Mason High School is $102,900.  F&R typically adds an additional 25% 
contingency to estimates such as these.  Other costs typically associated with the abatement of these 
materials would include abatement design, project management, and oversight/monitoring of the work 
which  are  generally  estimated  to  be  15  to  25%  of  the  abatement  costs.    The  total  estimated  costs  to 
remove the identified and suspected hazardous materials associated with a major renovation at George 
Mason  High  School,  including  the  25%  contingency  fee  and  design,  project  management  and 
oversight/monitoring fees ranges up to $160,781.   
 
 
Technology Assessment 
 
Eperitus  surveyed  George  Mason  High  School  to  determine  instructional  technology  capabilities  and 
network resources. The school is clearly taking advantage of using as many technology related resources 
as possible and is in a constant state  of upgrades. These upgrades include additional network cabling, 
LCD projectors, and speakers for computer presentations. Wireless and wired networking was evident 
throughout the building. While the network and other resources are available and being used, there are 
definite concerns for their future viability. The key concerns are as follows: 
 
2‐51 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

 
• Most  installations  appeared  to  have  been  done  in‐house  rather  than  through  outside 
vendors or contractors. This in itself is not an issue; however, the installation standards and 
potential code infractions are numerous. 
• Networking cabling types should not be mixed and present reliability problems for network 
communications.  There  is  a  mix  of  older  category  5  cabling  with  newer  category  5e  data 
cabling and components. Neither of these are considered state of the art for today’s school 
installations. This cable plant may have five more years at most of serviceable time and will 
prove to deliver inadequate and unreliable bandwidth for instructional needs. 
• There is absolutely no spare capacity in the building for additional cabling. As it is, when the 
time  comes  to  upgrade  the  cabling  in  the  school,  all  abandoned  cabling  will  need  to  be 
removed per code requirements. This has two major implications: 
• The upgrade will require that the existing network be completely removed prior to 
being able to install a new network with new cabling. In all likelihood, this means a 
major summer project. 
• There  will  be  significant  additional  expense  to  remove  all  of  the  old  cabling  and 
components. 
• Old  and  abandoned  cabling  and  raceways  exist  in  many  locations,  notably  science  labs. 
These need to be removed. 
• LCD projectors are being retrofitted into classrooms and the cabling for these units is simply 
being “fished” through holes in the ceiling tiles and left exposed down walls. Aside from the 
hazards  of  inadvertently  catching  these  cables  and  pulling  down  tiles  and  other  overhead 
devices and structures, the cabling is questionable as far as its plenum rating. 
• The 4:3 ratio format of the LCD projectors and screens being used to retrofit classrooms is 
being discontinued by manufacturers and broadcasters. The new 16:9 ratio is replacing that 
format. This can be seen by the screen on new laptops. At the least, future screens should 
be wider to accommodate these longer/wider images. 
• Wireless access points are placed in a number of locations and are deployed through various 
means. In some cases they have AC power adapters that are connected somewhere above 
ceiling,  potentially  with  extension  cords.  Other  installations  include  wireless  access  points 
with  power  injectors  being  used  in  the  data  closets.  Neither  situation  is  ideal  by  today’s 
standards, although the latter is not a violation of code requirements. 
• Management  and  reliability  of  these  older  wireless  access  points  appears  to  be  an  issue 
given the number of them that are missing or where locations have “extras” being plugged 
in  and  left  sitting  on  shelves  or  other  locations  rather  than  being  permanently  mounted. 
Current wireless deployments should include centrally managed “dumb” access points being 
connected to wireless switches with power over Ethernet (PoE) network ports. This would 
eliminate  the  less  than  desirable  installations  mentioned  in  #6  while  providing  a  very 
reliable wireless network. 
• The  continuous  addition  of  data  and  AV  wiring  has  created  hazards  for  people  and 
equipment  within  the  classrooms  and  labs  due  to  unprotected  cables  hanging  from  walls 
and  counters.  These  cables  are  also  on  floors  without  protection  such  as  “speed  bump” 
enclosures.  Numerous  other  cables  were  observed  spilling  over  into  lab  sinks.  While  the 
electrical current in these cables is considered relatively harmless to humans, the cable does 
present an electrical pathway that could harm the entire network if exposed to water and 
high voltages. 
 
2‐52 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

• The data and telecommunications closets and spaces were not designed with their current 
uses in mind. Temperature and dust/debris control is severely lacking, which is shortening 
the life span of the network and systems in these spaces. The spaces are getting excessively 
hot and the situation is being made worse by clogged vent openings on the equipment due 
to  dust  and  lint  that  are  preventing  ventilation  of  the  equipment  itself.  Some  closets  are 
retrofitted with disposable air filters on the doors, which is helping on the dust control but it 
is not adequately helping the temperature control required. 
• Documentation of the school’s network at a building level  is needed. There are numerous 
instances  of  cables  and  connections  throughout  the  building  that  would  be  extremely 
difficult to trace without a network map. When these connections stop functioning due to 
being  unplugged  or  equipment  failure,  they  can  bring  the  entire  school  network  down. 
These  points  of  potential  failure  need  to  be  documented  in  order  to  help  minimize 
instructional and network downtime. 
• Newer remodeled science labs have new lab tables/furniture that are situated with access 
pedestals  for  data,  electrical,  and  propane/natural  gas.  Surge  protector  strips  are  being 
plugged into these pedestals via hinged metal doors that are not designed to accommodate 
these cords. This is presenting a potentially hazardous situation with electrical cords getting 
“pinched”  and  exposing  the  electrical  wires  to  humans  or  metal,  which  could  produce  a 
lethal electrical shock. 
 
Findings and Recommendations – George Mason High School 
 
Site 
The combined high/middle school site has some buildable area, but is limited by Fairfax County FAR and 
current athletic uses. 
 
Capacity and Operational 
• Maximum  Capacity  –  1055  (as‐is).    Forecasted  8‐12  will  be  900  (2018)  to  1,000  (2028) 
students.  Classrooms and core areas more conducive to programmatic and community use 
functions are needed. 
• George  Mason  High  currently  operates  on  about  a  PTR  of  20:1  in  the  core  academic 
curriculum, with some classes more in line with the state average PTR of 24:1. 
• The  elective  and  CTE  courses  tend  to  run  well  below  the  20:1  PTR,  with  some  courses 
utilizing large areas of space for smaller groups of students not even 75% of the time. 
• The  facility’s  physical  layout,  with  several  level  changes,  makes  it  difficult  to  group 
classroom areas in various configurations – so interdisciplinary instruction would be difficult 
as best.   Therefore, trailers are being used for classroom instruction when there is available 
space within the building. 
• There are little or no resources areas for teachers to work together close to their classroom 
area.  There are little or no designated conference areas that could be used for a variety of 
staff and student uses.  The administration office is remote from staff and students. 
• There is no sense of arrival or clear entry to the facility.  Hallways are small, there are many 
dead‐end corridors, and the general layout is confusing.  This could present a safety issue.  
• Huge demand for technology labs and technology in general that is not available. 
• If  all  courses  taught  off  campus  were  to  be  brought  back  ‘home’  there  would  need  to  be 
consideration for their space. 
 
2‐53 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

• There is no space for the entire student body to gather at one time. General purpose areas 
(cafeteria, etc.) are well used for other‐than‐intended purpose. 
• A community television station uses a large amount of building space and there are several 
district‐wide functions that have their home in the confines of the facility, so it is unavailable 
for instructional purposes. 
 
Architectural 
• Constructed  in  several  phases,  the  facility  has  issues  with  adjacencies,  way‐finding, 
accessibility, and site circulation. 
• Single story footprint takes up valuable site area ‐ excessive travel distances and times 
• Current conglomeration of additions creates unappealing aesthetics.  Ceiling heights and 
configurations in corridors have odd proportions.  Modular structures are utilized away 
from the main facility. 
• Auditorium space inadequate for large student attendance. 
• Public  access  to  facility  is  unclear  at  some  points  and  inconvenient  at  other  points.  
Multiple entry access points create confusion and security issues. 
• Out of date sports spaces  
• Lighting quality needs upgrading‐ general and task oriented 
 
Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, and Life Safety 
• All of the split systems and roof top units utilize R22 refrigerant, which is being phased out.  
The use of this refrigerant will no longer be allowed by 2010 and will be difficult to obtain. 
• All of the split systems, incremental units and roof top units have reached their reasonable 
life expectancy of 15 to 20 years. 
• Boilers 1 and 1A, originally installed in 1952 and mid 70’s respectively, have been rebuilt and 
prepared, but have far surpassed their reasonable life expectancy of 25 to 30 years.  They 
should be replaced with more energy efficient units. 
• The pumps in boiler room 1 are original to the 1952 construction, are in poor condition and 
should be replaced. 
• The  equipment  in  boiler  room  2,  except  for  boiler  2A  installed  in  1994,  has  reached  or 
surpassed their reasonable life expectancy of 25 to 30 years. 
• The  twelve  (12)  100%  outdoor  air  units  providing  ventilation  air  to  the  classrooms  do  not 
provide  proper  de‐humidification  control.    These  units  should  be  replaced  with  energy 
recovery type units to provide ‘neutral’ air to the heat pump units in each classroom. 
• The  existing  switchboards  are  functioning.  Switchboard  1  does  not  have  space  for  future 
expansion and also does not have space for future expansion. Switchboard 2 does not have 
space for future expansion and is not sized to accommodate future expansions. In the event 
of a renovation it is recommended that one or both of the switchboards be replaced. 
• The  existing  distribution  system  is  functioning,  however  the  original  base  building  panel 
manufacturer  is  no  longer  in  business  and  replacement  parts  are  not  available.  The 
panelboards  also  do  not  have  many  spare  circuit  breakers.  In  the  event  of  a  complete 
renovation it is recommended that the power distribution equipment be replaced. 
• The building emergency generator is in working condition. The generator is not adequate to 
handle  additional  loads  with  the  current  connected  load.  In  the  event  of  a  complete 

 
2‐54 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

renovation,  it  is  recommended  that  a  new  properly  sized  generator  and  distribution 
equipment be installed for the entire building. 
• The existing lighting system is old and does not meet current code requirements and lighting 
guidelines.  It  is  recommended  to  provide  new  energy  efficient  fixtures  with  T8  lamps  and 
electronic ballasts. It is also recommended that exterior lighting be replaced to meet school 
security  lighting  requirements  and  exit  egress  requirements.  The  auditorium  lighting  and 
lighting control system need to be replaced. 
 
Hazardous Materials 
Although there were areas that were not able to be inspected for hazardous materials, the age and type 
of  structure  led  the  hazardous  materials  specialists  to  conclude  that  elevator  shafts,  water  fountains, 
and some pipe insulation is likely to contain asbestos.   
• HazMat – “Minor Renovation” Abatement Cost: $54,531. 
• “Major Renovation” Abatement Cost: $160,781. 
 
Technology 
The George Mason High School employs a significant amount of instructional technologies throughout 
the  building.  Many  of  the  resources  used  are  standalone  units,  such  as  LCD  projectors;  however,  the 
data  network  that  is  providing  connectivity  for  all  students  and  faculty  is  in  need  of  a  complete 
replacement soon. Due to code requirements, all old cabling would have to be removed as a part of the 
process. The initial cost estimate to provide a replacement cabling infrastructure would be in excess of 
$750,000,  potentially  reaching  a  million  dollars.  Instructional  technology  resources  are  not  consistent 
throughout  the  building.  Classrooms  have  varying  levels  of  resources  be  they  electronic  boards,  LCD 
projectors,  or  sound  systems.  It  does  appear  that  efforts  are  being  made  to  provide  parity  between 
classrooms and departments, but there is a long way to go. At the same time, advancing technologies 
and the declining service life of existing technology devices are outpacing the efforts to provide parity. 
Some  trip  and  snag  hazards  exist  that  need  to  be  rectified  to  prevent  human  or  equipment  damage 
through accidents. 
 
Summary 
This  facility  has  numerous  issues,  both  operational  and  in  the  infrastructure,  that  would  be  costly,  or 
logistically  impossible  to  repair.    While  satisfactory  for  current  operations,  this  facility  will  require 
considerable investment to infrastructure which will do nothing to expand capacity. 

 
2‐55 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – George Mason High School 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This page intentionally left blank. 
 
 

 
2‐56 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 

Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 
 
Architectural Assessment  
 
Mary  Ellen  Henderson  Middle  School 
was  built  in  2004/2005  and  opened 
for  the  2005/2006  school  year  to 
accommodate  middle  school 
students  relocating  from  spaces  in 
the  adjacent  George  Mason  High 
School.    The  building  consists  of  the 
following floor plates: 
 
Cellar floor:     27,612 SF 
1st  floor:     37,281 SF 
2nd floor:     31,726 SF 
3rd floor:     32,169 SF 
Total:      128,788 SF 
 
 
Layout 
Two major entrances are located on the north and south side of the building. They serve as main access 
to the school for students and teachers. These entrances are accessible. The main controlled entrance is 
on  the  south  side  and  serves  as  the  public  entrance  for  the  school,  and  for  athletic  events  in  the 
gymnasium on the cellar level below. A museum display area is incorporated into the lobby space. Mary 
Ellen Henderson is organized along a main north‐south corridor. Central stairs connect all three above‐
ground floors. Immediate access to outdoor play areas is convenient for students and staff.  Classrooms 
designated for each grade area are grouped around an administrative area and a central gathering space 
for group events.  Floor plates are flat and have no level changes that require transition ramps and stairs 
to access. 
 
 
Classrooms 
The school has 46 classrooms. Room sizes vary from 600 SF to 1,000 SF.   
 
Materials 
The  palette  of  exterior  finishes  includes  face  brick  of  varying  colors  and  split  face  concrete  masonry 
units. Clear aluminum colored metal accents accentuates the horizontality of the window configurations 
and roof lines. Individual window units consisting of aluminum frames and insulated glazing are situated 
in a regular rhythm in the façade. There is typically an operable window spaced out along the façade. 
Certain areas of the façade have painted metal panels as accents. 
 
Interior  finishes  include  resilient  flooring  and  base,  painted  concrete  masonry  unit  corridors  and  2’x4’ 
acoustical ceiling tiles in 15/16 metal grid. Half height metal lockers are positioned in the gathering areas 
for each grade. Administrative areas and some public areas such  as the Media Center include painted 

 
2‐57 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 

gypsum board wall partitions, all with 2’x4’ ceiling tile. These areas are carpeted and contribute to noise 
reduction. 
 
Classrooms 
Typical  class  spaces  incorporate  resilient  flooring  and  base,  painted  concrete  masonry  unit  partitions 
and  2’x4’  acoustical  ceiling  tile.  Each  class  space  has  access  to  exterior  windows  and  an  operable 
window. 
 
Typical Doors 
Exterior doors are either aluminum doors or frames with glass inserts or painted hollow metal doors and 
frames, some with glass inserts. Typical interior doors consist of wood veneer doors with glass inserts 
 
Lighting 
The typical lighting for the Middle School is acrylic lens fixtures, which produces excessive glare for tasks 
and computer use in many areas. The main north south corridor incorporates cove lighting and display 
accent lighting. See Electrical Systems below for additional information 
 
Acoustics 
Many of the surfaces in the facility are hard for durability over time. The remaining acoustical materials 
must compensate for the majority of hard surfaces reflecting sound when fully occupied. Carpet in some 
areas assists in noise reduction. 
 
Type of Construction 
Steel  frame  and  face  brick  or  split  face  brick  on  concrete  masonry  unit  back‐up.  Window  systems  are 
typically  aluminum  framing  and  insulated  glazing.  Roof  construction  consists  of  single  ply  roofing.    All 
exterior materials are still in good shape due to the newness of the facility. 
 
User Group and Construction Type 
The building is mixed‐use of Groups E (Educational), A‐3 (Gymnasium) and B (Office).  The construction 
type is 2A protected. 
 
 
Mechanical, Plumbing, Electrical and Life Safety Assessment 
 
Mechanical (HVAC) 
The  HVAC  system  consisting  of  twelve  (12)  self‐contained,  air  cooled  roof‐top  A/C  units  with  gas  heat 
and  one  (1)  modular  indoor  air  handling  unit  with  DC  cooling  and  remote  air  cooled  condenser.    The 
indoor air handling unit has a gas furnace for heating.   
 
Nine  (9)  of  the  roof‐top  units  are  variable  air  volume  (VAV)  type  units  which  serve  classrooms  and 
administration  space  on  floors  1,  2  and  3.    The  units  supply  air  to  powered  type  VAV  terminals  (with 
electric heat) which control the temperature in their respective room or zone.  The other four (4) roof‐
top  units  are  constant  volume  type  units  and  serve  the  gymnasium  and  cafeteria.    The  split  system 
serves all spaced on the cellar level. 
 
The controls are electronic / DDC type with a Tracer 1000 energy management system.   
 
2‐58 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 

 
 
Plumbing 
The building has a 3” domestic water service with meter and back flow preventer in cellar mechanical 
room. 
 
Domestic hot water is generated by two (2) 250 gallon 570 MBH gas fired PVI water heaters. 
 
The building has a sewage ejector to pump the effluent to the gravity sewer on site. 
 
 
Fire Protection 
The  building  has  a  6”  fire service  main  and  fire  pump  located  on  the  cellar  level.    The  building  is  fully 
sprinklered by a wet‐pipe system. 
 
 
Electrical Systems 
 
Electrical Service 
The  existing  power  company  is  Dominion  Virginia  Power.  The  electrical  service  is  provided  through  a 
power  company  step  down  pad  mounted  transformer.  This  service  enters  the  building  at  the  main 
electrical room. This electrical service was added in 2004. The power company electric meter is installed 
inside on the wall of the main electrical room. The existing power company pad mounted transformer is 
feeding 277/480 volt, 4000 amp. There are five (5) sections to this switchgear which include a CT and 
pull section, 1600A main service disconnect section, 2500A main service disconnect section and two (2) 
distribution  sections.  The  switchboard  has  an  electronic  meter  which  is  currently  reading  213kW 
demand load. This switchboard has space for expansion.  
 
Power Distribution System 
The existing switchboard serves the entire building through a number of branch circuit panelboards. The 
panelboards have approximately 25% spare capacity for future upgrades.  
 
Emergency Power Distribution System 
The  building  has  a  Cummins/ONAN  generator.  The  generator  is  rated  at  39kW,  480/277  volt,  3‐Phase 
and has a 50A in‐line circuit breaker. The generator operates on natural gas. The existing generator was 
installed during 2004. The existing generator is located outside of the electrical room. The emergency 
system  is  operational.  The  emergency  generator  feeds  a  Cummins  automatic  transfer  switch  "ATS" 
which  further  feeds  to  panel  EMH.  This  equipment  is  located  in  the  main  electric  room.  The  existing 
automatic transfer switch and emergency panel were also installed in 2004, and are in good condition. 
The  emergency  system  serves  emergency  lights,  exit  lights,  fire  alarm  system,  CATV  system,  sound 
system and telephone/communication. 
Lighting System 
All  of  the  lighting  fixtures  were  installed  in  2005.  Existing  lighting  fixtures  in  classroom,  media  center, 
offices  and  corridors  are  recessed  fluorescent.  The  fluorescent  lights  utilize  T8  technology  and  are 
energy efficient. The existing lighting fixtures in the gymnasium are (8) lamp 42W compact fluorescent 

 
2‐59 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 

fixtures. The lighting fixtures are clean and in good condition. The lighting levels throughout the school 
are good. Exit lights utilize LED lamps.  
 
Switching  control  is  through  motion  sensor  switches  and  meets  the  current  energy  efficiency  code 
requirements. 
 
The exterior lighting fixtures are in good condition and provide acceptable lighting levels.  
 
Fire Alarm System 
The  existing  fire  alarm  system  is  an  Edwards  system  installed  in  2005.  The  existing  fire  alarm  control 
panel is located in the security control room. The building is sprinklered and flow and tamper switches 
are  tied  to  the  fire  alarm  system.  There  are  pull  stations  at  all  of  the  exits.  The  entire  school  has 
audio/visual notification devices throughout. Notification is delivered through horns and strobes.  
 
Sound System 
The existing sound system console manufactured by Bogen is located in the main office. Booster panels 
are installed throughout the facility. The existing sound system main equipment was installed in 2004. 
The  classrooms  have  recessed  mounted  speakers  and  call  back  switches.  Corridors  and  cafeteria  have 
recessed speakers.  The system is in good condition. 
 
There is an auxiliary sound reinforcement system in the gymnasium.  
 
Telephone/ CATV and Intercommunications Systems 
The  existing  main  CATV  HUB  is  located  in  the  existing  communication  room.  Most  of  the  classrooms 
have one (1) telephone and two (2) data outlets. The system is in good condition. 
 
Master Clock and Program Bell System 
The master clock system is integral with the Bogen sound system located in the main office.   
 
Building Security System 
The school is equipped with an access control and closed caption television (CCTV) security system. The 
system is web based with control panels in various locations. There are card readers at each entrance 
and security cameras located in corridors and at exterior exits. There is a video monitoring station in the 
school. The system is in good condition. 
 
Summary 
• The HVAC system was installed in 2005 and is in excellent condition. 
• The plumbing systems were installed in 2005 and are in excellent condition. 
• The sprinkler system was installed in 2005 and is in excellent condition. 
• The  school  was  built  in  2005.  All  of  the  systems  have  spare  capacity  or  can  easily  be 
upgraded  to  accommodate  future  renovations  and  additions  barring  any  new  technology 
that would make any systems obsolete. Estimating, using Means Watts/square foot tables, 
the electrical service can handle an addition of up to 15,000 SF. 
 
 

 
2‐60 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 

Hazardous Materials Assessment  
 
F&R surveyed Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School to identify ACM, LBP and suspect PCB and mercury 
containing  equipment  utilizing  non‐destructive  sampling.    The  following  paragraphs  summarize  their 
findings: 
 
• F&R did not identify any ACM within the school. 
• F&R did not identify any LBP within the school. 
• F&R did not identify any suspect PCB or mercury‐containing equipment within the 
school. 
 
Asbestos‐Containing Material 
During F&R’s limited non‐destructive survey for ACM the following materials were sampled: ceiling tile, 
spray‐on  fireproofing,  white  duct  seam  sealant,  grey  duct  seam  sealant,  vinyl  covebase  mastic  and 
drywall  and  associated  joint  compound.    None  of  the  materials  sampled  were  determined  to  be 
asbestos‐containing. 
 
As  part  of  this  study,  F&R  reviewed  a  letter  from  the  architect  of  record,  Beery  Rio  Architecture  + 
Interiors.   The letter stated that to the best of Beery Rio’s knowledge, no asbestos‐containing materials 
or lead based paints were specified for use in the school and that none of these materials were used in 
the construction of the building.  Based upon F&R’s survey findings, the 2005 construction date of the 
building and the letter issued by Beery Rio; F&R does not consider ACM to be a concern at Mary Ellen 
Henderson Middle School. 
 
Lead Based Paint 
F&R  conducted  a  limited  LBP  screening  of  the  painted  surfaces  within  Mary  Ellen  Henderson  Middle 
School.    None  of  the  surfaces  analyzed  during  the  screening  were  identified  as  containing  LBP.    This 
analysis  confirms  the  use  of  non‐off‐gassing  paint  throughout  this  school,  as  documented  in  the 
previously referenced letter from Beery Rio.  F&R does not consider LBP to be a concern at Mary Ellen 
Henderson Middle School.   
 
Mercury‐Containing Equipment 
F&R  did  not  identify  any  equipment  likely  to  contain  regulated  amounts  of  mercury  at  Mary  Ellen 
Henderson Middle School.  All of the thermostats observed within the school were electronic, indicating 
that they do not contain regulated levels of mercury.  Fluorescent light tubes were also inspected for the 
presence  of  mercury.    All  of  the  fluorescent  light  tubes  observed  by  F&R  contained  the  low‐mercury 
symbol.    Under  Virginia  regulations,  light  tubes  with  the  low  mercury  symbol  can  be  disposed  of  as 
general  waste  provided  that  proper  documentation  can  be  provided  by  the  manufacturer  that  these 
tubes do not contain regulated levels of mercury.  Therefore, the fluorescent light tubes are not likely a 
concern at this property. 
 
PCB‐Containing Equipment 
F&R visually surveyed the fluorescent light ballasts within Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School for the 
presence of the “No PCB” label.  All of the ballasts observed by F&R contained the “No PCB” label and 
based on the 2005 construction date of the building, F&R does not believe PCB‐containing ballasts are a 
concern at this school.  No other potential PCB‐containing equipment was observed by F&R. 
 
2‐61 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 

 
Cost Estimates 
Based upon our survey findings, F&R does not consider the presence of ACM, LBP or PCB and mercury 
containing  equipment  to  have  a  cost  impact  of  renovation  activities  at  Mary  Ellen  Henderson  Middle 
School.   
 
 
Technology Assessment 
 
Eperitus  surveyed  Mary  Ellen  Henderson  Middle  School  to  determine  instructional  technology 
capabilities  and  network  resources.  The  school’s  relatively  new  construction  suggested  that  the 
infrastructure was in the best shape of the school division. This was found to be the case. The following 
observations were made: 
 
• The school makes use of video cameras and DVRs as part of its security system. The  main 
office has good visibility of the main entrance via large flat panel monitors. 
• Category 5e cabling was consistently used throughout the school. While this is not the state 
of  the  art  for  today’s  school  construction  projects,  this  is  an  appropriate  solution  for  a 
middle school of its age. The infrastructure should suffice for the anticipated cabling needs 
of  the  students,  faculty,  and  staff  over  the  next  ten  (10)  years,  after  which  wireless 
networking will most likely provide the bulk of everyone’s data communications needs. 
• The  originally  installed  data  and  technology  infrastructure  is  neatly  bundled,  secured,  and 
labeled. Infrastructure maintained in this way is more reliable, lasts longer, and is subject to 
less  damage.  The  network  electronics  installers/vendors  were  not  as  meticulous  in  their 
installation procedures. The provided cable management devices were not used and cabling 
is haphazardly strung between equipment and patch panels. 
• The  server  room  location  includes  data  cabling  terminations  that  are  missing  faceplates, 
which is further exposing the network to potential downtime due to broken connections. 
• Post construction data cabling installation is evident with wires being pulled through ceiling 
tiles  and  ceiling  grid  openings.  This  is  suggesting  that  the  network  documentation  for  the 
school  is  not  up‐to‐date,  which  is  going  to  lead  to  network  repair  and  maintenance 
problems in the future. 
• The school uses numerous wireless laptops distributed via rolling carts. These units depend 
upon the fixed wireless access points in the school, which highlights the need for a reliable 
wireless data network. 
• Wireless access points were clearly planned for in this school prior to construction and many 
are  evident.  In  many  cases  these  units  are  neatly  connected  and  mounted  to  walls; 
however, additional units have been connected. These add‐on units are not being secured in 
a similar fashion as the original. This provides additional problems for network uptime and 
performance for the users. This also indicates that decentralized wireless access points are 
being  used  rather  than  the  current  technology  that  uses  centrally  managed  access  points. 
Centrally  managed  access  points  perform  better  for  the  users  and  provide  significantly 
higher security. 
• The school has high‐end video and audio recording rooms and capability. 

 
2‐62 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 

• Currently  classrooms  are  outfitted  with  traditional  television  monitors  on  ceiling  mounted 
brackets.  The  televisions  are  fed  by  an  internal  coaxial  cable  system  that  is  supported  by 
individual classroom VCRs. Many of the television connections for coax and electrical were 
not  placed  appropriately  near  the  television  mounting  locations.  A  better  solution  is  a 
challenge at this point; however, there are numerous cables subject to damage between the 
wall and television, as well as cables hanging below the VDR shelves. 
• Audio  support  for  projectors  and  classrooms  (teacher  voices  and  presentations)  were  not 
planned for in the new construction. This may become an important issue as the classroom 
televisions begin to be replaced with either LCD projectors or flat panel displays. 
• The research lab classroom has a mobile Hitachi Starboard (interactive whiteboard) that has 
a  ceiling  mounted  projector  feeding  its  image.  There  was  a  coordination  issue  with  the 
projector  placement  relative  to  the  electrical  outlet.  The  electrical  cord  is  “fished  up” 
through a metal knockout in the mounting plate into the ceiling voice, and then poked out 
through the ceiling tile to be plugged into the outlet. (There are other locations in the school 
division with similar installations.) There are several potential hazards associated with this: 
a) the electrical cord is not rated for plenum spaces, b) the cord is not protected from wear 
on  the  metal  plate  and  is  subject  to  shorting  out  if  the  cable  jacket  is  compromised.  The 
solution  is  to  have  the  electrical  outlet  relocated  into  the  mounting  plate  as  originally 
intended.  
• Also in the research lab classroom, the AV connections originally installed for the teacher’s 
computer hookup are not being used.  Other non‐plenum AV cables are pulled up through 
the ceiling tile/grid to establish the needed connections. 
• Mixed brands of network switch gear are being used in this new school. This prevents the 
network from being as fully managed as it could be. 
• The main electrical room on the basement level contains the primary data entrance facilities 
for the school network. It is never advisable to locate these services in an electrical room as 
the electrical noise interferes with data communications. 
• Surge  protectors  for  the  data  network  in  the  main  electrical  room  have  been  wire  tied  to 
bundles  of  the  telephone  cables.  This  may  be  done  to  keep  them  off  the  floor  in  case  of 
flooding  or  other  cleaning,  but  this  practice  poses  damage  potential  for  the  telephone 
cabling  in  a  short  period  of  time  –  the  weight  will  break  the  copper  cabling  inside  of  the 
cable jacket. 
• The learning space adjacent to the media center offices includes a ceiling mounted projector 
and  motorized  screen.  The  projector  appears  to  have  been  installed  after  the  main 
construction of the building due to the looped electrical cord (pokes up through the ceiling 
tile and back out at another ceiling tile location where an outlet is installed). The projector 
has a noticeable vibration when the mechanical system is running. This would indicate a lack 
of  vibration  isolators  at  either  or  both  of  the  projector  mount  and  air  handler  locations. 
Given  the  number  of  retro  installations  of  projectors  throughout  the  school  division,  it  is 
expected that this issues occurs in more than one location. 
 
Findings and Recommendations 
 
Site 

 
2‐63 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 

This facility is located on the same parcel as George Mason High School.  The actual site of the middle 
school is land‐locked – it is bounded by Leesburg Pike (Route 7) and the high school.  There is no plan to 
connect this structure to the existing high school, nor is there an expansion plan. 
 
Capacity and Operational 
• Ideal  Capacity  –  600  (as‐is).    Forecasted  5‐7  will  be  485  (2018)  to  600  (2028)  students.  
Forecasted 6‐8 will be 508 (2018) to 600 (2028) students.  While no shortfall is foreseen, this 
will bring the facility up to full capacity.   
• Mary Ellen Henderson Middle currently operates on an average PTR very close to (or even 
below) 20:1. 
• The  facility  was  designed  to  serve  grades  6  through  8,  but  currently  operates  using  the 
middle school philosophy with grades 5 through 7. 
• The  school  only  recently  opened  so  has  no  limiting  factors  for  program.    In  fact,  the 
community areas (gymnasium, locker rooms, fitness center, library, cafeteria, athletic fields 
and  play  areas)  are  well  designed  for  community  use  and  can  serve  the  middle  and  high 
school populations well.  
• The only ‘limiting factor’ is the ability of the school to handle enrollment above the current 3 
grade levels, but not a full 4th grade level. 
• Heavy use by public may see early signs of wear‐and‐tear. 
 
Architectural 
• Relatively new construction and design –in good shape and appears to operate well. 
• Two main entries do not present clear public vs. student entries. 
• Interior finishes do not provide adequate acoustical attenuation. 
• Multipurpose space not optimal for performance or other stage oriented events. 
 
Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, and Life Safety 
• The HVAC system, plumbing systems, and sprinkler system were installed in 2005 and are in 
excellent condition. 
• The school was built in 2004/2005. All of the systems have spare capacity or can easily be 
upgraded  to  accommodate  future  renovations  and  additions  barring  any  new  technology 
that would make any systems obsolete. Estimating, using Means Watts/square foot tables, 
the electrical service can handle an addition of up to 15,000 SF. 
 
Hazardous Materials 
No significant costs. 
 
Technology 
The  Mary  Ellen  Henderson  Middle  School  provides  consistent  instructional  technology  resources 
throughout the school. The original installation of devices could have been done with a higher degree of 
coordination so that appropriate outlets/connections are installed, as well as placing them in the correct 
locations.  The  additions  of  new  technologies  and  their  required  connections  to  the  network  are  not 
being installed in a manner that is consistent with the original installation – this situation needs to be 
rectified before the infrastructure becomes piecemeal and undocumented. Some trip and snag hazards 
exist that need to be rectified to prevent human or equipment damage through accidents. 

 
2‐64 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 

 
Summary 
This school is relatively new and was constructed in a thoughtful and contemporary manner.  The facility 
serves  the  current  purpose  well  and  can  be  expected  to  continue  to  do  so  throughout  the  20‐year 
planning period.  At the same time, the facility is subject to heavy wear and tear and should be carefully 
maintained  to  prevent  premature  aging.    Construction  and  size  make  this  facility  a  possibility  for  an 
altered mission, either temporarily or permanently, as the master plan options are developed.   

 
2‐65 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This page intentionally left blank. 
 
 

 
2‐66 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

Mount Daniel Elementary School 
 
Site Description 
 
Mount  Daniel  Elementary  School  is 
located  adjacent  in  Fairfax  County  on 
County  Tax  Map  Parcel  40‐4  ((1))  22, 
Parcel  40‐4  ((15))  A,  and  Parcel  40‐4 
((19)) 41.  All three lots are zoned R‐4.  
The  total  site  acreage  is  7.31  acres.  
The  school  is  bounded  by  Woodland 
Drive  (Route  2768)  to  the  northwest, 
Custis Memorial Parkway (I‐66) to the 
northeast and Oak Street (Route 1746) 
to  the  south.    Access  to  the  existing 
school  is  from  Oak  Street  (Route 
1746). 
 
This site is approximately 5.88 acres in size. 

 
2‐67 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

According to the County tax records, the total gross floor area of the schools is 44,068 square feet.  A 
total  of  63  surface  parking  spaces  are  provided,  of  which  3  spaces  are  accessible  and  designated  for 
handicap parking.  Two (2) loading spaces are provided. 
 
Zoning Requirements 
 
Maximum FAR 
The R‐4 zoned property and may be developed with a public use to a maximum floor area ratio (FAR) of 
0.35.  The Gross Floor Area of existing school is 44,068 square feet which equates to a FAR of 0.138. 
 
Yard Requirements/Setbacks 
In  the  R‐4  zoning  district  the  maximum  building  height  for  public  uses  is  60’.    The  minimum  yard 
requirements include: 
 
  Front yard:   Controlled by a 35° angle of bulk plane, but not less than 25’ 
  Side yard:   Controlled by a 30° angle of bulk plane, but not less than 10’ 
  Rear yard:   Controlled by a 30° angle of bulk plane, but not less than 25’ 
 
Landscaping/Screening Requirement 
Any development program on the subject property must comply with the applicable provisions set forth 
in Article 13 of the Fairfax County Zoning Ordinance.  The requirements include: 
 
    Interior Parking Lot Landscaping:    5% 
 
    Peripheral Parking Lot Landscaping:    Abuts Property – 4 feet 
                      Abuts Street – 10 feet 
 
    Tree Cover:          20% 
    Open Space:          NA 
 
    Transitional Screening/Barrier: 
     
      North Property Line      TSY 2 (35’), Barrier D, E, or F 
      East Property Line      TSY 2 (35’), Barrier D, E, or F 
      South Property Line      TSY 2 (35’), Barrier D, E, or F 
      West Property Line      TSY 2 (35’), Barrier D, E, or F 
 
According  to  the  last  site  plan  permitted  for  the  property,  the  following  summarizes  the  landscape 
coverages required to address parking lot and peripheral landscaping requirements:   
 
Interior Parking Lot Landscaping Required (5%)    1,035 SF 
Interior Parking Lot Landscaping Provided    1,200 SF 
 
Tree Cover in the R‐4 District: 
      Required          55,789 SF 
      Provided          122,870 SF 
 
 
2‐68 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

Parking 
The  requirement  as  set  forth  in  Article  10  of  the  Zoning  Ordinance  reads  as  follows  for  “Other  Uses  ‐ 
Elementary School”: As determined by the Director, based on a review of each proposal to include such 
factors  as  the  occupancy  load  of  all  classroom  facilities,  auditoriums  and  stadiums,  proposed  special 
education programs, and student‐teacher ratios, and the availability of areas on site that can be used for 
auxiliary  parking  in  times  of  peak  demand;  but  in  no  instance  less  than  one  (1)  space  per  faculty  and 
staff  and  other  full  time  employee  plus  four  (4)  spaces  for  visitors.    Based  on  this  requirement,  the 
minimum number of parking spaces will be determined by the maximum number of students attending 
classes at any one time. 
 
The required number of loading spaces is based on the amount of GFA.  An increase of GFA may require 
an additional loading space. 
 
The parking totals reflected on the most recently approved site plan for elementary school reflects the 
following: 
 
    Elementary School    50 Staff 
    Required Parking     1 Space/Staff+ 4 Spaces for Visitors 
    Required Parking    54 Spaces 
 
Total Required Parking    54 Spaces 
Total Provided Parking    63 Spaces 
   
Total H/C Parking Required    3 Spaces 
Total H/C Parking Provided    3 Spaces 
 
Total H/C Van Parking Required   1 Space 
Total H/C Van Parking Provided    2 Spaces 
 
Total Loading Spaces Required    2 Spaces 
Total Loading Spaces Provided    2 Spaces 
 
Existing  parking  areas  are  asphalt  paved  and  constructed  in  accordance  with  VDOT/Fairfax  County 
specifications.  The following standard pavement section was utilized for recently paved asphalt parking 
areas: 
 
    Top Course:     2” Asphalt Surface Course SM‐9.5A 
    Intermediate:     3” Asphalt Base Course BM‐25.0 
    Base:       6” Aggregate Material Type 21B 
 
 

 
2‐69 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

Fairfax County Comprehensive Plan 
 
Mount Daniel Elementary School is located within the Dranesville Planning District of the Fairfax County 
Comprehensive  Plan.    It  is  within  a  specialized  planning  area  around  the  West  Falls  Church  Transit 
Station, particularly land unit “E”.  The intention of the Transit Area designation is to capitalize on the 
opportunity  to  provide  transit  focused  housing  employment  locations,  while  still  maintaining  the 
existing, nearby land uses. 
 
Land  Unit  “E”  is  characterized  as  a  stable,  residential  community  that  is  planned  at  a  density  of  R‐4, 
which is the existing zoning of the parcel.   Since less than half of the allowable FAR of 0.35 is utilized 
(the existing FAR is 0.18), expansion of the existing facilities in the future is not likely restricted due to 
FAR  limitations.    The  Comprehensive  Plan  does  encourage  special  efforts  to  provide  pedestrian 
amenities which would allow access to Metro. 
 
A copy of the County’s Comprehensive Plan language for the area around the West Falls Church Transit 
Station is included as an attachment to this report. 
 
 
Site Utilities 
 
Water 
Service is provided by the City of Falls Church Department of Public Utilities.  An existing 6” water main 
enters  the  site  at  the  southwest  corner  from  Oak  Street  (Route  1746)  and  wraps  around  the  western 
portion  of  the  existing  building  and  exits  the  site  at  the  northwest  corner.    An  existing  fire  hydrant 
offsite along Oak Street (Route 1746) provides fire coverage for the existing building.  An additional fire 
hydrant located to the northeast of the site taps off the 6” water main in Woodland Drive (Route 2768). 
 
A 4” domestic connection is located on the side south of the existing building and taps off the existing 6” 
water main that enters the site at the southwest corner.  The 4” line continues east and reduces to a 2” 
line that connects  to the  southwest side of the building.  A 4” fire line tees off the onsite  6” line that 
wraps  around  the  west  side  of  the  existing  building.    It  is  anticipated  that  these  connections  can  be 
maintained with construction of any expansion of the current facilities. 
 
Sanitary Sewer 
Existing  service  is  provided  by  the  City  of  Falls  Church  Department  of  Environmental  Services.    An 
existing 8” terracotta sanitary sewer located in Oak Street (Route 1746) enters the south west corner of 
the site and connects to the south of the building.  Additionally, a 4” sanitary sewer lateral connection 
on the southwest side of the building ties into the 8” terracotta sewer line.  An existing 8” DIP sanitary 
sewer  enters  the  site  from  Oak  Street  (Route  1746).    This  line  provides  service  for  two  4”  DIP 
connections  at  the  southeast  side  of  the  existing  building.    There  are  no  known  inadequacies  of  the 
existing sewer line.  It is anticipated that the existing sanitary sewer lateral can be maintained with any 
expansion of the current facilities. 
 
 

 
2‐70 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

Storm Drainage 
Two  existing  storm  sewer  systems  provide  outfall  for  the  project  site.    An  existing  18”  storm  sewer 
outfall is located in Woodland Drive (Route 2768) right‐of‐way at the northeast corner of the site.  An 
existing 15” storm sewer outfall is located at the Highland Avenue right‐of‐way to the west of the site.  
Adequacy  of  these  storm  sewer  systems  will  be  verified  upon  any  expansion  of  the  current  facilities.  
Offsite improvements to these storm sewer systems are not presently anticipated. 
 
The  existing  storm  drainage  system  on  the  northwest  side  of  the  existing  building  will  need  to  be 
reworked  if  the  northwest  corner  of  the  building  is  to  be  expanded.    Where  possible,  the  existing 
stormwater  management  box  culverts  shall  be  maintained  to  address  a  portion  of  the  overall  storm 
water management requirements. 
 
Storm Water Management 
The  site  improvements  (addition  to  the  existing  school  building  and  parking  expansion)  addressed  the 
minimum  stormwater  management  requirements  as  mandated  by  the  Fairfax  County  Public  Facilities 
Manual.  Stormwater management peak flow reduction requirements (detention) mandate that the 2‐
year  and  10‐year  peak  flow  from  the  site  be  reduced  at  or  below  the  existing  peak  flow  for  these 
recurrence interval storms.  Water quality requirements or Best Management Practices (BMP’s) require 
a  40%  phosphorous  removal  rate  (unless  the  site  development  qualifies  for  re‐development  with  an 
increase of impervious area less than 20% of the existing impervious area of the site). 
 
The site currently addresses Best Management Practices (BMP’s) by reducing the phosphorus loads by 
two different methods: 
 
• Dedication of natural open space (Water Quality Management Area). 
• Utilization of two Filterra units. 
 
The  Filterra  units  and  dedicated  open  space  meet  the  40%  requirement  with  no  excess  capacity.  
Stormwater detention requirements were met with the use of two underground, privately maintained 
detention structures.  These structures consist of standard box culverts, a minimum of six feet in height 
with a weirwall at the lower end to regulate the release of storm flows. 
 
Any proposed addition to the site that requires a site permit and generates additional impervious area 
on  site  will  be  subject  to  the  storm  water  management  requirements  as  identified  within  the  Fairfax 
County  Public  Facilities  Manual  (PFM).    Where  possible,  the  existing  stormwater  management  box 
culverts  located  to  the  northwest  and  east  of  the  school  should  be  maintained  to  address  the 
stormwater detention requirement.  Additional onsite measures will be required to address peak flow 
detention, beyond that which can be accommodated in the stormwater management box culverts. 
Any  addition  to  the  site  that  requires  a  site  permit  with  a  net  increase  of  impervious  area  will  also 
require  BMP’s.    If  the  net  increase  of  impervious  area  less  is  less  than  20%,  then  the  redevelopment 
formula  can  be  utilized  for  computing  the  BMP  requirement  which  may  afford  a  reduction  of 
phosphorous load of less than 40%: 
 
[1 ‐ 0.9(Ipre/Ipost)] X 100%  =  % P Removal 
 
In order to address the BMP requirement for the site, the following measures may be incorporated: 
 
2‐71 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

 
• Utilization of percolation trenches within proposed parking areas to promote 
infiltration. 
• Utilization of a bioretention filter to promote infiltration. 
• Dedication of natural open space (Water Quality Management Area). 
• Consideration of green roof elements to promote infiltration. 
 
Verification of the infiltration capacity of the onsite soils is required to analyze the design requirements.  
The  Water  Quality  Management  Area  (Conservation  Areas)  recorded  with  the  most  recent  site 
improvements  must  be  preserved  with  future  development  of  the  site,  unless  the  express  written 
permission  of  the  Director  of  the  Fairfax  County  Department  of  Public  Works  and  Environmental 
Services is obtained. 
 
Environmental Assessment 
 
Floodplains 
Based  on  the  Fairfax  County  Chesapeake  Bay  Preservation  Map  there  are  no  identified  100‐year 
floodplains in the vicinity of the lots that comprise the Mount Daniel Elementary site. 
 
Resource Protection Areas 
Resource Protection Area (RPA) is the component of the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Area comprised 
of lands adjacent to water bodies with perennial flow that have an intrinsic water quality value due to 
the  ecological  and  biological  processes  they  perform  or  are  sensitive  to  impacts  which  may  result  in 
significant degradation of the quality of state waters.  In their natural condition, these lands provide for 
the  removal,  reduction,  or  assimilation  of  sediments,  nutrients,  and  potentially  harmful  or  toxic 
substances from runoff entering the Bay and its tributaries, and minimize the adverse effects of human 
activities  on  state  waters  and  aquatic  resources.    RPA’s  shall  include  any  land  characterized  by  the 
following features: 
 
• A tidal wetland. 
• A tidal shore. 
• A water body with perennial flow. 
• A  nontidal  wetland  connected  by  surface  flow  and  contiguous  to  a  tidal  wetland  or  a 
water body with perennial flow. 
• A buffer area as follows: 
ƒ Any land with a major floodplain. 
ƒ Any land within 100 feet within an RPA feature 
 
RPAs cannot be cleared without special permitting. 
 
Based on the Fairfax County Chesapeake Bay Preservation Map, there are no identified RPAs within the 
lots that comprise the Mount Daniel Elementary School.  
 
Wetlands 

 
2‐72 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

There were no identified wetland areas on the site plan for the Mount Daniel Elementary School.  The 
site  should  be  field  inspected  to  confirm  that  the  area  that  will  be  impacted  with  construction  of  any 
proposed  expansion  is  void  of  jurisdictional  wetlands.    If  wetlands  are  identified,  they  will  be  field 
confirmed  by  the  USACE  and  the  Virginia  Department  of  Environmental  Quality  (DEQ),  surveyed  and 
reflected  on  a  Jurisdictional  Determination  (JD)  that  is  approved  by  the  USACE.    Disturbance  of  any 
wetlands, if identified, will be avoided to the extent possible with site construction. 

 
Architectural Assessment  
 
Mount Daniel Elementary School was built in the time period of 1955 with an addition started in 2006 
and completed in 2007.  The building consists of the following: 
 
Upper Floor:  39,701 SF 
Lower Floor:    2,960 SF 
               Total:       42,661 SF 
 
Layout 
The main entrance to the school is on the south side of the site, at an elevation of 10’ above sidewalk 
grade  and  is  not  accessible  by  wheel  chair.  A  disabled  person  must  enter  the  school  at  grade  level  at 
another entrance next to the multi‐purpose room and can only gain access to the classrooms by using a 
corridor ramp of more than 50’ long without intermediate landings.  
 
The  school  is  arranged  along  a  central  main  corridor  that  transitions  in  elevation  between  levels.  The 
newer  addition  circulation  ties  into  this  main  corridor.  The  main  corridor  ramp  length  was  configured 
before  current  standards  were  developed,  and  is  longer  than  the  30’  limit  set  by  ADA  standards.  The 
steepness  of  the  ramp  is  also  in  question.  The  handrails  of  the  east  side  entrance  stair  leading  to  the 
playground  are  also  not  compatible  with  ADA  code  for  continuity.    Doors  to  the  existing  classrooms 
don’t  have  enough  clearance  width  and  landing  space  for  the  disabled.  A  few  drinking  fountains  are 
currently at a mounting height for adults, not for kindergarten children.  
 
Classrooms 
There are 15 classrooms. Room sizes average 860 SF.  Also there are two (2) classroom trailers on the 
north side or back of the school. 
 

 
2‐73 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

Materials 
The  palette  of  exterior  finishes  includes  face  brick  and  painted  plaster  soffits  and  accents.  Dark 
aluminum  frames  and  glazing  in  banded  configurations  appear  throughout  the  façade.  Darker  metal 
trims are also apparent at roof transitions and façade treatments.  
 
Interior finishes 
Typical corridor finishes include carpeted flooring and resilient base, a combination of painted concrete 
masonry  units  and  glazed  masonry  units,  and  a  2’x4’  acoustical  panel  ceiling  in  a  15/16  inch  grid. 
Modifications  and  renovations  throughout  the  years  have  created  a  “patchwork”  visual  of  the  various 
wall  materials  throughout  the  building.  The  multipurpose  room  utilizes  a  2’x2’  ceiling  and  resilient 
flooring. 
 
Classrooms 
Classroom finishes continue the carpeted flooring and 2’x4’ acoustical panel ceilings. Various walls have 
various  finishes  do  the  renovations  that  have  occurred  over  time.  The  new  addition  classrooms  have 
partial  carpet  flooring  and  resilient  flooring  for  craft  project  development.  Child  sized  cabinetry  is 
incorporated into these class spaces. These classrooms also incorporate accessible toilet facilities. 
 
Typical Doors 
All exterior doors on the front of the building were replaced as part of the 2006 addition.  Entry doors to 
the building are typically aluminum with glass inserts. Additionally some exterior doors are hollow metal 
with glass inserts. The interior doors vary from contemporary wood veneer doors hollow metal frames 
and  hardware  to  some  of  the  original  doors  and  frames  from  the  original  building  still  in  use.  This 
creates a visual disparity between areas of the facility. The wall openings that house the original doors 
and frames do not allow enough clearance for accessibility clearances. 
 
Lighting 
The typical lighting throughout the facility is acrylic lens fixtures, that tend to produces excess glare for 
tasks and computer use. 
See Electrical Systems below for additional information. 
 
Acoustics 
The  carpet  flooring  in  combination  with  the  acoustical  panel  ceiling  system  provides  good  acoustical 
attenuation, offsetting the hard wall surfaces in the facility. 
 
Type of Construction 
This building consists of steel frame and face brick on concrete masonry unit back‐up. The exterior walls 
are currently in fair shape. Window systems consist of aluminum framing systems and glazing.  The roof 
consists of membrane roofing over rigid insulation on low slope roofs. 
 
User Group and Construction Type 
The  building  is  mixed‐use  of  Groups  E  (Educational),  A‐3  (Gymnasium)  and  B  (Office). 
The construction type is 2B. 
 
 

 
2‐74 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

Mechanical, Plumbing, Electrical and Life Safety Assessment 
 
Mechanical (HVAC) 
The  original  building  HVAC  system  consists  of  approximately  17  vertical  type,  floor  mounted  water 
source heat pump units and 4 roof mounted outdoor roof top type water source heat pump units.  The 
units serve the classrooms, offices and corridors and range from ½ to 5 tons in capacity.  The roof top 
heat pump unit serving the multipurpose room, gymnasium/auditorium space is a 20 ton capacity unit.  
All of the equipment was installed as part of a 1988 addition and alterations project. 
 
The  heat  pump  units  are  served  by  a  closed  loop,  un‐insulated  piping  system  with  a  water  to  water, 
plate and frame type heat exchanger and a 255 GPM capacity, end‐suction circulating pump located in 
the Central Plant on the lower level of the East Wing.  Hot water for heating the closed loop is provided 
by a 240 KW electric boiler totaling 810 MBH in capacity.  The boiler appears to be in poor condition. 
 
Heat rejection for the closed loop system is provided by a 95 ton capacity forced draft, BAC Model VXT 
95 cooling tower located on grade. The original tower was replaced in 2007. Condenser water within the 
open loop piping system connecting the cooling tower to the heat exchanger is circulated by a 255 GPM 
capacity, end‐suction, circulating pump.  The plant has a third circulating pump which serves as a stand‐
by for both the closed loop system and the condenser water system. 
 
The  heat  pump  units  are  controlled  by  a  space  thermostat  and  started  and  stopped  form  a  Central 
Timed Control Center.  The boilers, cooling tower and pumps are controlled by a Central Temperature 
Control and Alarm Panel in the Central Plant. 
 
The  vertical  heat  pump  units  serving  the  class  room  are  located  in  the  mechanical  rooms,  which  are 
located on the perimeter of the building or water closets.  Ventilation air is provided thru louvered wall 
opening with motorized damper and is non‐ducted. The room/closet is treated as a return air plenum. 
 
The heat pump units and all equipment in the central plant appear to be well maintained and in good 
shape.    The  control  system  is  adequate;  however,  there  is  no  remote  monitoring  to  alert  staff  of 
equipment failure or monitor temperature conditions in various areas of the building. 
 
Addition 
The new 2005 building addition HVAC system consists of self‐contained roof top A/C units with gas heat. 
The  addition  has  electric  unit  heaters  for  supplemental  heating.    All  of  the  equipment  is  in  excellent 
condition. 
 
 
Plumbing Systems 
The original building has a 3” domestic water service which enters the building in a dry storage room off 
the kitchen.  The main shut off valve is in a storage room on the first floor.  There is no meter or back‐
flow prevention device inside the building.   
 
Domestic hot water is generated by two (2) 85 gallon, 12 KW electric storage type water heaters located 
in the Kitchen.  The water heaters were installed in 1988 as part of a kitchen renovation.  
 
 
2‐75 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

The  water  piping  for  both  hot  and  cold  water  is  copper  with  soldered  joints  and  is  insulated.    The 
sanitary sewer and storm water piping is cast iron with bell and spigot hubs on original systems and no‐
hub type fitting on renovated areas and the 2005 addition.  The toilet fixtures and associated faucets, 
flush valves, etc. appear to be original.  Minimal ADA upgrades have been made but tempered water is 
not currently provided for all lavatories and hand sinks. 
 
Roof drainage is provided via roof drains with internal storm water piping and by exterior gutters with 
down  spouts.    The  down  spouts  are  connected  to  cast  iron  boots  which  are  piped  to  the  site  storm 
water system. 
 
The kitchen sanitary system has a grease trap located outside below grade.  
 
Addition 
The 2006/2007 addition has a separate 2” domestic water service to handle the new plumbing fixtures 
and  toilets  in  the  addition.    Sanitary  and  vent  piping  and  cast  iron  no‐hub  and  PVC  were  allowed  by 
code.    Roof  drainage  is  by  exposed  gutters  with  downspouts  connected  to  underground  storm  water 
system.  Systems are new and in excellent condition. 
 
Natural gas is provided to the 2006/2007 addition at 0.5 psi pressure and serves the roof top units. The 
gas service is located outside. The original building is currently ‘total electric’ after the gas service was 
removed during the 1988 renovation.  
 
 
Fire Protection Systems 
The  original  building  does  not  have  a  sprinkler  system.    A  “limited‐area”  type  sprinkler  system  is 
provided for storage rooms on the first floor and storage in the kitchen area.  The “limited‐area” system 
is connected to the domestic water system and is monitored. 
 
The  2006/2007  addition  has  a  wet‐pipe  sprinkler  system  and  is  served  by  a  4”  fire  service.    The  fire 
service is equipped with an in‐line fire pump. 
 
Electrical Systems 
 
Electrical Service 
The  existing  power  company  is  Dominion  Virginia  Power.  The  electric  service  is  provided  through  a 
power  company  step  down  pad  mounted  transformer.  This  service  enters  the  building  at  a  dedicated 
electrical room. This electrical service was last upgraded in 1989. The power company electric meter is 
installed  inside  on  the  wall  of  the  main  electrical  room.  The  existing  power  company  pad  mounted 
transformer is feeding 120/208 volt, 1600 amp. The existing switchboard is a General Electric (GE). The 
switchboard utilizes fused switches instead of circuit breakers. There are five sections to this switchgear 
which  include  a  CT/pull  section,  1600A  main  service  disconnect  and  a  three  distribution  sections.  This 
switchboard has no space left for expansion. The service size of 1600A, 120/208 volt is too small for a 
school needing to meet current electrical demands. 
 
The  existing  switchboard  does  not  contain  any  ground  fault  protection  as  per  current  code 
requirements. The existing switchboard does not contain any transient voltage surge suppression. The 
 
2‐76 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

facilities supervisor noted that any brownout or power outage will require facilities personnel to reset 
the mains. This is typically not an acceptable situation for a school. 
 
There is a separate electrical service for remote trailers. 
 
A fire pump was added in 2006/2007 and a separate electrical service was installed for this equipment. 
This meets national electrical code requirements. 
 
Power Distribution System 
The base building was renovated in 1989 and a new addition was added in 2006/2007. The base building 
has GE panels that are filled to capacity. The electric closets are scattered throughout the base school. 
All of the existing electrical rooms are filled to capacity. No additional equipment can be added and still 
meet the working clearance requirements. 
 
The new addition has two (2) new panelboards that are fed from the GE main switchboard. These are 
surface mounted panels and were placed in staff room #44.  
 
Emergency Power Distribution System 
This school does not have an emergency generator. Emergency lighting is by battery packs in individual 
fixtures. 
 
Lighting System 
All of the lighting fixtures in the new addition are recessed fluorescent. The fluorescent lights utilize T8 
technology and are energy efficient. The lighting fixtures are clean and in good condition. The lighting 
levels throughout the school are good. Exit lights utilize LED lamps. 
 
In  the  base  building  most  of  the  lighting  fixtures  were  replaced  in  1989.  Existing  lighting  fixtures  in 
classroom,  classrooms,  offices  and  corridors  are  2’  X  4’  recessed  fluorescent.  The  fluorescent  lights 
utilize T12 technology which is old and not energy efficient. The lighting level in classrooms is poor. The 
corridor has recently been upgraded with the addition of surface wall mount light fixtures in addition to 
the  recessed  fixtures  noted  above.  Exit  lights  utilize  fluorescent  lamps.  There  appearance  is  old  and 
discolored. 
 
In the new addition, switching control is through motion sensor switches and meets the current energy 
efficiency  code  requirements.  In  the  base  building  switching  control  is  through  single  toggle  switches 
throughout  the  building  with  a  few  motion  sensor  switches.  This  does  not  meet  the  current  energy 
efficiency code requirements. 
 
The exterior lighting at the new addition is adequate. At the base building, there are some exit discharge 
locations that do not have sufficient emergency egress lighting. Some of the exterior lights have clearly 
been  replaced  as  the  existing  fixtures  that  have  not  been  replaced  are  old,  discolored  and  some  are 
damaged.  
 
Power Outlets 

 
2‐77 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

In  the  base  building,  current  power  requirements  require  more  receptacles  and  circuits.  Because  of 
increased  requirements  surface  mounted  conduit  and  receptacles  have  been  added  in  offices  and 
classrooms.  
 
Fire Alarm System 
The  base  building  has  a  fire  alarm  system  which  was  installed  in  1989.  It  is  an  Edwards  system.  The 
existing fire alarm control panel is located in the main office. Notification is delivered through bells and 
flashing  lights.  These  devices  are  not  ADA  compliant,  nor  do  devices  meet  spacing  requirements  per 
current code requirements. This is a non‐addressable system which means it works on a different and 
older technology than the new panel. 
 
Addition 
The new addition has a new fire alarm system which is an Edwards EST‐2 system. The control panel is 
located in staff room #44. The fire alarm devices in the new addition are new. There is a new graphic 
annunciator  in  the  new  addition  which  is  a  graphic  depiction  of  the  new  addition  only.  It  does  not 
include the base building. Notification is delivered through horns and strobes. 
 
Sound System 
The existing sound system console manufactured by Dukane is located in the main office. Booster panels 
are installed throughout the facility. The existing sound system main equipment was installed in 1989. 
The  classrooms  have  recessed  mounted  speakers  and  call  back  switches.  Corridors  and  cafeteria  have 
recessed mounted speakers.  
 
Some of the individual classrooms have sound reinforcing systems. 
 
Telephone/ CATV and Intercommunications Systems 
The  existing  main  CATV  HUB  is  located  in  the  existing  communication  room.  The  existing 
telecommunication main HUB is located in the existing communications room. There are no dedicated 
rooms for telephone and data equipment. This equipment is installed in various workrooms throughout 
the  school.  There  is  no  capacity  for  expansion  unless  more  work  space  is  taken.  All  the  existing 
telephone/data  outlets  are  surface  mounted  in  the  base  building.  Most  of  the  classrooms  have  one 
telephone and one data outlet, but some classrooms have one telephone and two data  outlets in the 
base building. There are computer data repeaters installed  throughout the facility in  corridors surface 
mounted  on  walls.  These  do  not  provide  for  a  clean  and  neat  installation  and  are  prone  to  damage 
based on their location. 
 
Master Clock and Program Bell System 
The master clock system is integral with the Dukane sound system located in the main office.   
 
Building Security System 
The  school  is  equipped  with  a  partial  access  control  and  closed  caption  television  (CCTV)  security 
system.  The  system  is  web  based  with  control  panels  in  various  locations.  There  are  card  readers  at 
some  entrances  and  security  cameras  located  in  corridors  and  at  exterior  exits.  There  is  a  video 
monitoring station in the school. 
 
Summary 
 
2‐78 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

• The electric boiler has surpassed its reasonable life expectancy of 10 to 15 years.  Also the 
cost of electricity as a fuel source for heating is much more than gas. 
• The heat pump units have reached or surpassed life expectancy of 15 to 20 years. 
• The ventilation for the classroom heat pump units should be “ducted” to assure adequate 
ventilation to the classrooms. 
• Remote monitoring of setup and alarm functions on the central control systems should be 
provided. 
• The electric domestic water heaters have surpassed their normal life expectancy of 10 to 15 
years.  Recommend they be replaced with more energy efficient gas fired type units. 
• Tempering valves should be installed on all handicapped accessible lavatories and hand 
sinks to provide “temperature” water per ADA recommendations.  
• Recommend providing a sprinkler system to the original building to improve level of ‘life 
safety’. 
• The existing switchboard is functioning; however, the switchboard does not have space for 
future expansion. The switchboard also is not sized to accommodate future expansions. In 
the event of a renovation it is recommended that the switchboard be replaced. 
• The  existing  distribution  system  is  functioning.  The  panelboards  do  not  have  many  spare 
circuit breakers. The electrical rooms have no space for the addition of new equipment. In 
the  event  of  a  complete  renovation  it  is  recommended  that  the  power  distribution 
equipment be replaced. 
• In  the  event  of  a  complete  renovation,  it  is  recommended  that  a  new  generator  and 
distribution equipment be installed for the entire building. 
• The  existing  lighting  system  in  the  original  base  building  is  old  and  does  not  meet  current 
code  requirements  and  lighting  guidelines.  It  is  recommended  to  provide  new  energy 
efficient fixtures with T8 lamps and electronic ballasts. It is also recommended that exterior 
lighting be replaced to meet school security lighting requirements and egress requirements. 
• We recommend that classrooms in the base building have receptacles added. The existing 
walls are masonry block so new conduit and devices would have to be surface mount. In the 
event  of  a  complete  renovation  the  classrooms  would  need  to  have  all  electrical  systems 
removed and replaced with new. 
• The  fire  alarm  system  in  the  base  building  needs  to  be  replaced  with  a  new  system  that 
meets current code requirements. 
• The  sound  system  in  the  base  building  has  reached  the  end  of  its  useful  life.  The  sound 
system needs to be replaced with a new system. 
• In  the  event  of  a  complete  renovation  it  is  recommended  that  the  telephone/CATV 
equipment be replaced. Dedicated communications rooms will need to be placed at several 
locations. 
 
 

 
2‐79 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

Hazardous Materials Assessment  
 
F&R  surveyed  Mt.  Daniel  Elementary  School  to  identify  ACM,  LBP  and  suspect  PCB  and  mercury 
containing  equipment  utilizing  non‐destructive  sampling.    The  following  paragraphs  summarize  their 
findings: 
 
• F&R identified asbestos‐containing pipe insulation in Classrooms 2 and 7 and the adjoining 
hallway. 
• F&R identified asbestos‐containing cementatious panels on portions of the roof soffit. 
• F&R observed suspect asbestos‐containing metal fire doors located throughout the school. 
• F&R observed water fountains with suspect asbestos‐containing pipe wrap throughout the 
school.  
• F&R identified lead based paint on exterior building components. 
• F&R observed mercury‐containing thermostats throughout the school. 
• F&R  visually  inspected  fluorescent  light  fixtures  throughout  the  school.    Based  on  our 
inspection, there does not appear to be any regulated hazardous materials within these light 
fixtures. 
 
Asbestos‐Containing Material 
During  F&R’s  non‐destructive  survey  for  ACM  the  following  materials  were  sampled:  pipe  insulation, 
vinyl  floor  tile  and  associated  mastic,  vinyl  covebase  mastic,  carpet  mastic,  blackboard  mastic, 
cementatious  panels,  expansion  joint  caulk,  ceiling  tile,  drywall  and  associated  joint  compound,  wall 
plaster  and  duct  seam  sealant.    The  following  materials  were  determined  to  be  asbestos‐containing: 
pipe  insulation  and  cementatious  panels.    The  following  materials  were  assumed  to  be  asbestos‐
containing: metal fire doors, and water fountain pipe wrap.   
 
F&R identified approximately 75 linear feet of asbestos‐containing pipe insulation above the drop ceiling 
in Classrooms 2 and 7 and the adjoining hallway.  This material was observed in a fair condition at the 
time of the survey.  For the purposes of this study, F&R assumes that approximately 500 linear feet of 
asbestos‐containing  pipe  insulation  is  located  above  solid  walls  and  ceilings  and  within  pipe  chases 
throughout  the  school.    Approximately  1,000  square  feet  of  asbestos‐containing  cementatious  panels 
were observed on the school’s roof soffit.  The material was observed in a fair condition at the time of 
the  survey.    38  metal  fire  doors,  presumed  to  be  asbestos‐containing  were  observed  throughout  the 
school  during  F&R’s  survey.    The  metal  fire  doors  were  observed  in  good  condition.    Approximately  6 
water  fountains  were  identified  by  F&R  that  are  presumed  to  contain  asbestos‐containing  pipe  wrap.  
The water fountain pipe wrap was inaccessible at the time of the survey. 
 
As  part  of  this  study,  F&R  reviewed  an  Asbestos  Management  Plan  for  the  school,  prepared  by 
Professional Service Industries, Inc. (PSI) and dated May 30, 1992.  The PSI report did not identify any 
ACM within the school. 
 
F&R  recommends  that  all  of  the  identified  ACM  be  removed  by  a  Commonwealth  of  Virginia  licensed 
asbestos abatement contractor prior to impact by renovation or demolition activities.  Furthermore, all 
suspect ACM that has not been previously sampled should be analyzed for asbestos prior to impact by 
renovation or demolition activities. Additionally, F&R recommends that the 1992 Asbestos Management 

 
2‐80 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

Plan be updated as the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) requires that these plans be 
updated every three years. 
 
Lead Based Paint 
F&R conducted a LBP screening of the painted surfaces located throughout the interior and exterior of 
Mount  Daniel  Elementary  School.    LBP  was  identified  on  the  following  exterior  building  components: 
white cementatious panels (also identified as ACM) on the roof soffit and brown wood window panels 
located  in  the  rear  exterior  of  the  building.    No  lead  based  paint  was  identified  on  the  interior  of  the 
building.    Since  this  was  a  limited  LBP  survey,  additional  LBP  surfaces  may  be  present  that  were  not 
tested.  All painted surfaces should be assumed to contain LBP or lead‐containing paint. 
 
In  general,  if  structures  are  to  be  removed  or  demolished,  typical  demolition  techniques  can  be  used 
without  lead  based  paint  becoming  an  issue  of  concern.    However,  if  building  components  containing 
lead based paint are to be stripped and repainted, precautions would need to be taken.  Specifically, if 
these  building  components  are  to  be  sanded,  abraded  or  heated  to  remove  the  lead  based  paint, 
workers trained in lead based paint removal should be contracted for the work. 
 
The  “Lead:  Renovation,  Repair  and  Painting  Program”  rule,  which  will  take  effect  in  April  2010  will 
require  that  contractors  involved  in  renovation,  repair  or  painting  activities  in  buildings  constructed 
prior to 1978 in which children under the age of 6 are present take special precautions to avoid creating 
a lead hazard.  These precautions include posting warning signs; restricting occupants from work areas; 
containing work areas to prevent dust and debris from spreading; conducting a thorough cleanup and 
verification  that  cleanup  was  effective.    Should  renovations  that  disturb  LBP  take  place  once  this 
regulation takes effect, there will be a cost associated with renovating these building components.  At 
this time F&R believes that the presence of LBP will have only minimal impact to the project, primarily 
with contractor compliance with current OSHA regulations. 
 
Mercury‐Containing Equipment 
F&R  identified  20  thermostats  that  contained  mercury‐containing  switches.    These  thermostats  were 
observed  throughout  the  building.    Fluorescent  light  tubes  were  also  inspected  for  the  presence  of 
mercury.  All of the fluorescent light tubes observed by F&R contained the low‐mercury symbol.  Under 
Virginia  regulations,  light  tubes  with  the  low  mercury  symbol  can  be  disposed  of  as  general  waste 
provided  that  proper  documentation  can  be  provided  by  the  manufacturer  that  these  tubes  do  not 
contain regulated levels of mercury.  Therefore, the fluorescent light tubes are not likely a concern at 
this property; however some fluorescent light  tubes with regulated levels of  mercury may still remain 
within the school. 
 
 
PCB‐Containing Equipment 
F&R  visually  surveyed  a  representative  number  of  light  ballasts  throughout  Mount  Daniel  Elementary 
School.    All  of  the  light  ballasts  observed  contained  the  “No  PCB”  label  and  therefore  PCB‐containing 
ballasts are not likely a concern at this property; however, some PCB‐containing ballasts may still remain 
within the school.  No other potential PCB‐containing equipment was observed by F&R. 
 
Cost Estimates 
F&R has developed conceptual cost estimates for the abatement of hazardous materials associated with 
 
2‐81 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

major and minor renovations at Mount Daniel Elementary School.  F&R is assuming that no work is to be 
conducted on the roof. 
 
“Minor Renovation” Cost Estimate: 
 
• Cementatious  Panels  –  Approximately  1,000  square  feet  of  asbestos‐containing 
cementatious  panels  were  observed  on  the  roof  soffit.    F&R  assumes  a  cost  of 
approximately $3.00 per square foot for abatement of the cementatious panels for a total 
cost of $3,000. 
• Metal  Fire  Doors  –  38  presumed  asbestos‐containing  metal  fire  doors  were  observed 
throughout  the  school.    F&R  assumes  a  cost  of  approximately  $100.00  per  door  for 
abatement of the metal fire doors for a total cost of $3,800. 
• Lead  Based  Paint  –  F&R  assumes  that  structures  containing  LBP  can  be  renovated  or 
demolished  utilizing  typical  demolition  techniques  without  LBP  becoming  an  issue  of 
concern  if  renovation  work  impacting  LBP  occurs  before  April  2010,  when  the  “Lead: 
Renovation,  Repair  and  Painting  Program”  takes  effect.    For  renovation  work  that  impacts 
LBP  which  occurs  after  this  date,  F&R  assumes  a  cost  of  approximately  $5,000  for  special 
precautions that will need to be taken. 
 
The  total  estimated  cost  for  the  removal  of  identified  and  suspected  hazardous  materials  associated 
with a minor renovation at Mount Daniel Elementary School is $11,800.  F&R typically adds an additional 
25% contingency fee to estimates such as these.  Other costs typically associated with the abatement of 
these materials would include abatement design, project management, and oversight/monitoring of the 
work which are generally estimated to be 15 to 25% of the abatement costs.  The total estimated costs 
to  remove  the  identified  and  suspected  hazardous  materials  associated  with  a  minor  renovation  at 
Mount Daniel Elementary  School, including  the 25% contingency  fee and  design, project  management 
and oversight/monitoring fees ranges up to $18,438. 
 
“Major  Renovation”  Cost  Estimate  (Estimate  also  includes  abatement  of  the  hazardous  materials 
referenced in the “minor renovation” cost estimate section): 
 
• Pipe  Insulation  –  F&R  assumes  that  approximately  500  linear  feet  of  pipe  insulation  exists 
within pipe chases and behind solid walls and ceilings.  F&R assumes a cost of approximately 
$25.00 per linear foot for abatement of the pipe insulation for a total cost of $12,500. 
• Water  Fountain  Pipe  Wrap  –  Approximately  6  water  fountains  presumed  to  contain 
asbestos‐containing  pipe  wrap  were  observed  throughout  the  school.    F&R  assumes  an 
abatement cost of $250.00 per water fountain for a total cost of $1,500. 
• Mercury‐Containing  Thermostats  –  F&R  observed  20  mercury‐containing  thermostats 
throughout  the  school.    F&R  assumes  that  removal  of  the  thermostats  will  cost 
approximately $3,000. 
 
The  total  estimated  cost  for  the  removal  of  identified  and  suspected  hazardous  materials  associated 
with a major renovation at Mount Daniel Elementary School is $28,800.  F&R typically adds an additional 
25% contingency fee to estimates such as these.  Other costs typically associated with the abatement of 
these materials would include abatement design, project management, and oversight/monitoring of the 
work which are generally estimated to be 15 to 25% of the abatement costs.  The total estimated costs 
 
2‐82 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

to  remove  the  identified  and  suspected  hazardous  materials  associated  with  a  major  renovation  at 
Mount Daniel Elementary  School, including  the 25% contingency  fee and  design, project  management 
and oversight/monitoring fees ranges up to $45,000. 
 
 
Technology Assessment 
 
Eperitus  surveyed  Mount  Daniel  Elementary  School  to  determine  instructional  technology  capabilities 
and network resources. The following observations were made: 
 
• The main entrance to the school made use of an IP video camera and intercom as part of its 
security system. 
• The school uses a networked copier/printer in the main office. This is a good practice and 
would be advisable at other school locations within the division for servicing, energy savings, 
and control of consumables reasons. 
• Classrooms have been outfitted with voice enhancement systems (manufacturer: FrontRow 
Digital).  These  are  highly  recommended  systems  for  classroom.  These  systems  are  also 
capable  of  providing  the  sound  from  the  teacher’s  computer  when  it  is  being  used  for 
electronic  presentations  such  as  MS  PowerPoint  and  streaming  video.  The  teacher 
computers  are  not  hooked  up  to  these  systems  at  this  time,  but  instead  are  using  small 
desktop speakers that are inadequate for all students in a classroom. 
• The  data  network  is  in  serviceable  shape.  It  uses  category  5e  cabling  and  Cisco  switches. 
Most  closets  and  data  cabinets  use  good  cable  management  practices;  however,  there  is 
evidence of additional devices and cables being added that are not receiving the same care 
of  organizing  and  security.  As  with  other  school  division  locations,  one  of  the  persistent 
issues is that the patch cables being used in the racks are significantly longer than needed. 
Many cables only need to be 1’ or 3’, yet 10’ cables are being used. 
• Wireless access points have been professionally installed throughout the school. These units 
are using high gain antennas. 
• In  general,  installations  of  newer  or  additional  technologies  in  this  school  are  more 
organized  than  in  other  schools.  This  suggests  that  outside  contractors  or  vendors  have 
been  used  in  many  of  these  instances  since  the  cabling  is  generally  better  organized  and 
protected. 
 
 
Findings and Recommendations 
 
Site 
The  site  is  in  Fairfax  County,  and  this  school  has  issues  with  surrounding  neighborhood.    The  site  is 
limited and would be difficult to expand. As situated on the parcel, Mount Daniel is particularly close to 
its  neighbors  to  the  west  and  cannot  expand  further  on  its  current  site  to  allow  for  any  significant 
enrollment increases.   
 
Capacity and Operational 

 
2‐83 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

• Maximum Capacity – 275 (as‐is).  Forecasted K‐1 will be 312 (2019) to 400 (2028) students.  
Shortfall  =  125  or  approximately  6  classrooms  (22:1),  plus  the  associated  supporting  core 
areas 
• Mt. Daniel currently operates on an average PTR at or above the desired 22:1 (and just at  
capacity), mainly because there is no space for additional classrooms. 
• The  recent  addition  to  Mt.  Daniel  is  very  well  designed  for  Kindergarten  needs,  with 
amenities including sound reinforcement, wireless technology, wet/dry areas, direct access 
to the outdoors, ample student storage.  This recent addition, however, left no room on the 
site for additional expansion. 
• The  core  facilities  (gym/cafeteria,  library,  art,  music,  etc.)  cannot  handle  any  significant 
enrollment increase and would also need expansion.   
• The gymnasium and cafeteria are the same space, so gym cannot be taught and assemblies 
cannot be held during lunch hours. 
• The site and facility are not conducive to ADA accessibility.  The library has a story pit that 
cannot  be  accessed  by  handicapped  students  from  the  main  floor.    It  is  used  as  a  storage 
area more than intended use. 
• Currently students cannot access all resource subjects without going out‐of‐doors. 
• The  family  literacy  program  is  in  a  trailer  and  not  easily  accessible  to  parking  and  entry, 
particularly for night use. 
• The  before  and  after  school  component  is  critical  to  the  community,  but  has  no  available 
space for storage or program expansion.   
• In addition to full time staff there are also part time staff and itinerants. There is little space 
for teacher use – only one very small ‘lounge’ and no place to conference.   
• Office space is extremely limited. 
 
Architectural 
• Access issues ‐ Main Public Entry not Accessible; Central circulation corridor has ramp that 
has slope distance and adjacent room connectivity issues. 
• Modular structures are being utilized away from the main structure. 
• Interior  issues  ‐  Main  office  could  have  more  transparency;    Interior    finishes  need 
upgrading. 
• Lighting quality needs upgrading‐ general and task oriented. 
 
Mechanical, Plumbing, Electrical and Life Safety Assessment 
• The electric boiler has surpassed its reasonable life expectancy of 10 to 15 years.  Also the 
cost of electricity as a fuel source for heating is much more than gas. 
• The  heat  pump  units  have  reached  or  surpassed  life  expectancy  of  15  to  20  years.    The 
ventilation  for  the  classroom  heat  pump  units  should  be  “ducted”  to  assure  adequate 
ventilation. 
• Remote monitoring of setup and alarm functions on the central control systems should be 
provided. 
• The electric domestic water heaters have surpassed their normal life expectancy of 10 to 15 
years.  Recommend they be replaced with more energy efficient gas fired type units. 

 
2‐84 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

• Tempering valves should be installed on all handicapped accessible lavatories and hand 
sinks.  
• Add a sprinkler system to the original building to improve level of ‘life safety’. 
• The existing switchboard is functioning; however, the switchboard does not have space for 
future expansion. The switchboard also is not sized to accommodate future expansions. In 
the event of a renovation it is recommended that the switchboard be replaced. 
• The  existing  distribution  system  is  functioning.  The  panel  boards  do  not  have  many  spare 
circuit breakers. The electrical rooms have no space for the addition of new equipment. In 
the  event  of  a  complete  renovation  it  is  recommended  that  the  power  distribution 
equipment be replaced. 
• In  the  event  of  a  complete  renovation,  it  is  recommended  that  a  new  generator  and 
distribution equipment be installed for the entire building. 
• The  existing  lighting  system  in  the  original  base  building  is  old  and  does  not  meet  current 
code  requirements  and  lighting  guidelines.  It  is  recommended  to  provide  new  energy 
efficient fixtures with T8 lamps and electronic ballasts. It is also recommended that exterior 
lighting be replaced to meet school security lighting requirements and egress requirements. 
• Classrooms  in  the  base  building  should  have  receptacles  added.  The  existing  walls  are 
masonry block so new conduit and devices would have to be surface mount. In the event of 
a  complete  renovation  the  classrooms  would  need  to  have  all  electrical  systems  removed 
and replaced. 
• The  fire  alarm  system  in  the  base  building  needs  to  be  replaced  with  a  new  system  that 
meets current code requirements. 
• The  sound  system  in  the  base  building  has  reached  the  end  of  its  useful  life.  The  sound 
system needs to be replaced with a new system. 
• In  the  event  of  a  complete  renovation  it  is  recommended  that  the  telephone/CATV 
equipment be replaced. Dedicated communications rooms will need to be placed at several 
locations. 
 
Hazardous Materials 
The majority of the construction at Mount Daniel appears to be hazardous‐materials free.  There are a 
few minimal features – some exterior block work, thermostats, and water fountain pipe‐wrap – which 
should be removed if renovations are to occur.   
 
• “Minor Renovation” Abatement Cost: $18,438 
• “Major Renovation” Abatement Cost: $45,000
 
Technology 
The Mount Daniel Elementary School provides consistent instructional technology resources at different 
grade  levels.  Providing  the  same  resources  for  all  grades  would  be  of  benefit  to  the  students  as  they 
progress through school. (The same could be said for K‐12 continuum in the division.). Despite the age of 
the facilities and the obvious upgrades it has received, the additional installations of cabling and systems 
was  the  best  of  the  four  schools.  More  use  of  raceways  and  organization  of  installation  was  evident 
throughout the school, which provides protection to the infrastructure and the people in the building.  
 
Summary 

 
2‐85 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Mount Daniel Elementary School 

This school is in good condition and is well‐designed for its intended purpose.  It is, however, currently 
over utilized, resulting in taxed building systems and increased wear and tear.  Use could be continued 
through the 20‐year planning period if capacity were limited to a more appropriate level and if a high 
degree of maintenance were continued. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
2‐86 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 
 
Site Description 
 
The  Thomas  Jefferson  Elementary 
School is located in the City of Falls 
Church on City Tax Map Parcels 50‐
2.    The  parcel  is  zoned  R‐1A  low 
density  residential.    The  total  site 
acreage is 5.83 acres.  The school is 
bounded  by  Seaton  Lane  to  the 
south  and  South  Oak  Street  to  the 
northwest.    Site  access  is  from 
Seaton Lane. 
 
Based  on  an  approximate 
measurement,  the  building  area  occupied  by  the  existing  school  is  37,000  SF.    A  total  of  38  surface 
parking spaces are provided, of which 2 spaces are accessible and designated for handicap parking.   
 
 
Zoning Requirements 
 
Maximum Building Coverage 
The R‐1A zoned property may be developed with a public use to a maximum building coverage of 30%.  
Therefore, the maximum allowable building footprint area is 76,199 square feet.   
 
Yard Requirements/Setbacks 
In  the  R‐1A  zoning  district  the  maximum  building  height  for  public  uses  is  45’  with  no  more  than  3 
stories.  The minimum yard requirements include: 
 
  Front yard:     Not less than 30’ 
  Side yard:     Not less than 25’ 
  Rear yard:     Not less than 40’ 
 
Landscaping/Screening Requirement 
The  proposed  expansion  of  the  development  program  on  the  subject  property  must  comply  with  the 
applicable  provisions  set  forth  in  Article  IV  of  the  City  of  Falls  Church  Zoning  Ordinance.    The 
requirements include: 
 
  Interior Parking Lot Landscaping :      No Requirement 
  Peripheral Parking Lot Landscaping:           No Requirement 
  Tree Cover:            20% 
  Open Space:            No Requirement 
 
  Transitional Screening/Barrier: 

 
2‐87 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

    North Property Line        No Requirement 
    East Property Line        No Requirement 
    South Property Line        No Requirement 
    West Property Line        No Requirement 
 
Parking Requirements 
The requirement as set forth in Article IV of the City of Falls Church Zoning Ordinance reads as follows 
for “Public Elementary School”: One parking space for each teacher, employee or administrator whether 
full  or  part‐time,  plus  one  for  every  ten  students  of  maximum  enrollment  or  capacity.    Based  on  this 
requirement, the minimum number of parking spaces will be determined by the number of employees 
and the maximum number of students attending classes at any one time. 
 
The parking totals reflected on the most recently approved site plan for the elementary school reflects 
the following: 
 
Elementary School:          25 Staff/400Students 
    Required Parking         1 Space/Staff + 1 Space/10 Students 
    Required Parking        65 Spaces 
 
Total Required Parking          65 Spaces 
Total Provided Parking          38 Spaces 
   
Total H/C Parking Required        2 Spaces 
Total H/C Parking Provided        2 Spaces 
 
Total H/C Van Parking Required       2 Spaces 
Total H/C Van Parking Provided        2 Spaces 
 
 
Existing  parking  areas  are  asphalt  paved  and  constructed  in  accordance  with  VDOT/Fairfax  County 
specifications.  The following standard pavement section was utilized for recently paved asphalt parking 
areas: 
 
  Top Course:       2” Asphalt Surface Course SM‐9.5A 
  Intermediate:       3” Asphalt Base Course BM‐25.0 
  Base:         6” Aggregate Material Type 21B 
 
 

 
2‐88 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

Site Utilities 
 
Water 
Service is provided by the City of Falls Church Department of Public Utilities.  An existing 6” water main 
is located in Seaton Lane, south of the project site.  An existing 16” water main runs along South Oak 
Street and enters the parcel on the north side of the site.  The 16” line continues along South Oak Street 
and exits the site at the northeast corner.  Two (2) fire hydrants are located on the 16” line; one on the 
north side of South Oak Street at the northwest corner of the site and the other at the northeast corner 
of the site.  An additional fire hydrant may need to be installed if the two existing fire hydrant locations 
do not provide adequate fire coverage for the expanded facility. 
 
Sanitary Sewer 
Sanitary  sewer  is  provided  by  the  City  of  Falls  Church  Department  of  Public  Utilities.    There  are  no 
known capacity issues. 
 
Site Access 
 
The main access to the site is located at the intersection of Seaton Lane and West Greenway Boulevard.  
Additionally,  access  to  the  parking  lot  south  of  the  building  is  provided  off  of  Seaton  Lane.    It  is 
anticipated  that  the  entrances  will  be  maintained.    Sight  distance  for  the  existing  entrances  will  be 
confirmed with the final site plan.   
 
The  following  standard  pavement  section  is  assumed  for  new  asphalt  access  roads  and  travel  aisles 
within the parking areas: 
 
  Top Course:       1.5” Asphalt Surface Course SM‐9.5A 
  Intermediate:       4” Asphalt Base Course BM‐25.0 
  Base:         8” Aggregate Material Type 21B 
 
Environmental 
 
Floodplains 
Based  on  the  City  of  Falls  Church  Mapping  System,  the  project  site  encompasses  an  existing  stream, 
Tripps Run, which flows north to south on the eastern portion of the site.  The 100‐year floodplain for 
Tripps Run take up nearly half of the parcel area and the limits are located approximately 15’ away from 
the existing buildings.  

 
2‐89 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

 
Resource Protection Areas 
Resource Protection Area (RPA) is the component of the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Area comprised 
of lands adjacent to water bodies with perennial flow that have an intrinsic water quality value due to 
the  ecological  and  biological  processes  they  perform  or  are  sensitive  to  impacts  which  may  result  in 
significant degradation of the quality of state waters.  In their natural condition, these lands provide for 
the  removal,  reduction,  or  assimilation  of  sediments,  nutrients,  and  potentially  harmful  or  toxic 
substances from runoff entering the Bay and its tributaries, and minimize the adverse effects of human 
activities  on  state  waters  and  aquatic  resources.    RPA’s  shall  include  any  land  characterized  by  the 
following features: 
 
• A tidal wetland. 
• A tidal shore. 
• A water body with perennial flow. 
• A  nontidal  wetland  connected  by  surface  flow  and  contiguous  to  a  tidal  wetland  or  a 
water body with perennial flow. 
• A buffer area as follows: 
ƒ Any land with a major floodplain 
ƒ Any land within 100 feet within an RPA feature 
 
RPAs cannot be cleared without special permitting. 
 
Based  on  the  City  of  Falls  Church  Mapping  System,  the  project  site  encompasses  an  existing  stream, 
Tripp Run, which flows north to south on the eastern portion of the site.  Limits of the RPA for Tripps 
Run are located approximately 100’ from the stream and are within the 100‐year floodplain limits.   
 
Wetlands 
There were no identified wetland areas on the site plan for the elementary school.  The site should be 
field  inspected  to  confirm  that  the  area  that  will  be  impacted  with  construction  of  any  proposed 
expansion is void of jurisdictional wetlands.  If wetlands are identified, they will be field confirmed by 
the  USACE  and  the  Virginia  Department  of  Environmental  Quality  (DEQ),  surveyed  and  reflected  on  a 
Jurisdictional  Determination  (JD)  that  is  approved  by  the  USACE.    Disturbance  of  any  wetlands,  if 
identified, will be avoided to the extent possible with site construction. 
 
 
Architectural Assessment  
 
Thomas Jefferson Elementary School was built in the 1940’s with a major addition completed in 1990.  
The school has 3 levels of varying footprint configurations, totaling 60,919 SF.   
 
Layout 
The public entry into the facility is achieved by steps leading to the main entrance on the second level, 
located  on  the  west  side  (or  front)  of  the  school,  and  are  not  ADA‐compliant.  A  disabled  person  or  a 
person in a wheel chair must enter the school on the first floor at the drop‐off area on the east side (or 
back) of the building and use the elevator to the upper floors. The main office and classrooms are on the 
second floor. 8 additional classrooms are on the third floor. All special classes and services are located 
 
2‐90 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

on the first floor (or lower level). The addition is located on the south edge of the property and has an 
on‐grade entrance facing west.  A makeshift wood ramp allows wheeled access to this area. 
 
In  general  the  building  is  compliant  with  building  codes,  except  a  few  instances  where  changes  are 
needed to meet accessibility requirements.  These changes include a ramp to the main entrance, stair 
handrails, and other modifications to bring building accessibility into current standards. 
 
Classrooms 
There are 21 classrooms in the facility and 7 trailers grouped together adjacent the main entry sidewalk. 
Current enrollment is 420 students. 
 
Materials 
The  palette  of  exterior  finishes  include  face  brick  and  metal  panel  fascia  accent  elements.  Dark 
aluminum frames with glazing are inserted along the façade as individual window units.   
 
Interior finishes in a majority of the building is a combination of glazed masonry units configured as a 
high wainscot and door surrounds, and painted plaster walls above.  A portion of east west classroom 
corridor also contains a movable wall system implemented during one of the building renovations. 
 
Classrooms 
Classrooms have a combination of solid partitions and movable partition systems installed as part of an 
earlier renovation. Carpeting over original flooring is the typical floor covering. 
 
Typical Doors 
Exterior doors are a combination of aluminum doors and glazed inserts, and hollow metal doors, both 
with glazed inserts and solid faces. 
Interior  doors  include  new  wood  veneer  doors  with  glass  inserts  in  painted  steel  frames,  and  original 
painted doors from the original construction. 
 
Codes and Accessibility 
• Lighting 
Typical lighting consists of 2’x’4 acrylic lens fluorescent fixtures, which produce excess glare 
for tasks and computer use. The addition also has accent lighting along the sky lit spine. 
 
• Acoustics 
The use of acoustical panel ceilings and the addition of carpet floor covering contributes to 
the attenuation of noise throughout the building. 
 
 

 
2‐91 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

Type of Construction 
Construction  consists  of  steel  frame  and  face  brick  on  concrete  with  masonry  unit  back‐up.  Window 
systems  consist  of  dark  aluminum  frames  and  glazing.  The  roof  system  is  comprised  of  single  ply  flat 
roofs  with  some  sloped  skylight  accents  in  gathering  spaces.    All  the  exterior  materials  are  in  good 
shape. 
 
User Group and Construction Type 
The building is mixed‐use of Groups E (Educational), A‐3 (Gymnasium) and B (Office).  The construction 
type is 2B Protected. 
 
 
Mechanical, Plumbing, Electrical and Life Safety Assessment 
 
Mechanical (HVAC) 
The  building  HVAC  systems  consist  of  approximately  53  horizontal  type  ceiling‐mounted  water  source 
heat  pump  units  and  six  (6)  floor  mounted  console  type  water  source  heat  pump  units.    These  units 
serve the classrooms, offices and corridors and range from ½ to 5 tons in capacity.  Thirteen (13) of the 
units  were  installed  as  part  of  the  1990  addition  and  the  rest  were  installed  as  part  of  a  1995  HVAC 
replacement project. 
 
In addition the Administration Area, Library and Gymnasium are served by self‐contained roof top A/C 
units with gas heat, which were installed in 1995.  The kitchen has a heating and ventilating unit with 
electric heat, installed as part of a 1979 renovation project. 
 
The  heat  pump  units  are  served  by  a  closed  loop,  un‐insulated  piping  system  with  a  water  to  water, 
plate and frame type heat exchanger and 475 GPM capacity, end‐suction circulating pump located in the 
Central Plant on the first floor.  Hot water for heating the closed loop is provided by four (4) gas‐fired 
high‐efficiency condensing type boilers totaling 2100 MBH in capacity.  Two (2) 300 MBH boilers were 
installed  in  1990  and  two  (2)  750  MBH  boilers  were  installed  in  1995  when  the  plant  was  completely 
replaced.  There are two (2) 156 GPM capacity circulating pumps (one stand‐by) with hot water piping 
connections to the closed loop. 
 
Heat rejection for the closed loop system is provided by a 160 ton capacity forced draft, low profile BAC 
cooling tower located on grade.  Condenser water within the open loop piping system connecting the 
cooling tower to the heat exchanger is circulated by a 475 GPM capacity, end‐suction, circulating pump.  
The plant has a third circulating pump which serves as a stand‐by for both the closed loop system and 
the condenser water system. 
 
The  heat  pump  units  are  controlled  by  a  space  thermostat  and  started  and  stopped  form  a  Central 
Timed Control Center.  The boilers, cooling tower and pumps are controlled by a Central Temperature 
Control and Alarm Panel in the Central Plant. 
 
Ventilation air for the ceiling mounted heat pump units is ducted from wall louvers and/or roof mounted 
intake  air  units.    The  ventilation  air  is  untempered  and  the  heat  pump  units  must  heat  and  cool  the 
ventilation air.  The console type heat pump units have a wall louver used to obtain ventilation air. 
 
 
2‐92 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

The heat pump units, roof top units and all equipment in the control plant appear to be well maintained 
and  in  good  shape.    The  control  system  is  adequate;  however,  there  is  no  remote  monitoring  to  alert 
staff of equipment failure or monitor temperature conditions in various areas of the building. 
 
Plumbing Systems 
The building has a 2½” domestic water service which enters the building on the right side of the main 
entrance.  The main shut off valve is in a storage room on the first floor.  There is no meter or back‐flow 
prevention device inside the building.  Our investigation could not locate a utility vault outside. 
 
Domestic hot water is generated by a 500 gallon, 63 KW electric storage type water heater located in 
the Maintenance Office adjacent to the Main Electric Room and Kitchen.  The water heater was installed 
in  1979  as  part  of  a  Kitchen  Renovation  when  the  building  was  an  all  electric  facility  and  is  in  poor 
condition. 
 
The  water  piping  for  both  hot  and  cold  water  is  copper  with  soldered  joints  and  is  insulated.    The 
sanitary sewer and storm water piping is cast iron with bell and spigot hubs on original systems and no‐
hub  type  fitting  on  renovated  areas  and  the  1990  addition.    The  kitchen  sanitary  system  has  a  grease 
trap located outside below grade.   
 
The toilet fixtures and associated faucets, flush valves, etc. appear to be original.  Minimal ADA upgrades 
have been made but tempered water is not currently provided for all lavatories and hand sinks. 
 
Roof drainage is provided via roof drains with internal storm water piping and by exterior gutters with 
down  spouts.    The  down  spouts  are  connected  to  cast  iron  boots  which  are  piped  to  the  site  storm 
water system. 
 
Natural gas is provided to the building at 2 psi pressure and serves the boilers, roof top units and the 
kitchen cooking equipment.  The gas service enters the Central Plant with meter and regulator located 
outside. 
 
 
Fire Protection Systems 
The  building  does  not  have  a  sprinkler  system.    A  “limited‐area”  type  sprinkler  system  is  provided  for 
storage rooms on the first floor and storage in the kitchen area.  The “limited‐area” system is connected 
to the domestic water system and is monitored. 
 
Electrical Systems 
 
Electrical Service 
The  existing  power  company  is  Dominion  Virginia  Power.  The  electric  service  is  provided  through  a 
power  company  step  down  pad  mounted  transformer.  This  service  enters  the  building  at  a  dedicated 
electrical room. This electrical service was last upgraded in 1979. The power company electric meter is 
installed  inside  on  the  wall  of  the  main  electrical  room.  The  existing  power  company  pad  mounted 
transformer is feeding 277/480 volt, 1600 amp.  The existing switchboard is Federal Pacific Electric Co. 
(FPE).  FPE  has  been  out  of  business  for  over  25  years  and  parts  will  be  difficult  to  find  for  any  future 
renovations. There are two sections to this switchgear which include a 1600A main service disconnect  
 
2‐93 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

and  a  combination  distribution  section  with  a  separate  distribution  section.  This  switchboard  has  no 
space  left  for  expansion.  The  service  size  of  1600A,  480/277  volt  is  too  small  for  a  school  needing  to 
meet current electrical demands. 
 
The  existing  switchboard  does  not  contain  any  ground  fault  protection  as  per  current  code 
requirements. The existing switchboard does not contain any transient voltage surge suppression.  
 
There is a separate electrical service for remote trailers. 
 
Power Distribution System 
The  existing  switchboard  serves  the  entire  building  through  a  number  of  branch  circuit  panelboards. 
Approximately  half  of  the  panels  are  FPE.  These  panels  will  be  difficult  to  find  parts  for  any  future 
renovations.  The  other  half  of  the  panels  are  a  combination  of  GE  and  Square‐D.  These  panels  were 
added  for  later  renovations  and  do  have  a  few  spare  breakers  that  could  be  utilized  for  small  future 
changes.  
 
Electric  closets  are  scattered  throughout  the  school.  All  of  the  existing  electrical  rooms  are  filled  to 
capacity. No additional equipment can be added and still meet the working clearance requirements. 
 
Emergency Power Distribution System 
The building has an ONAN generator. The generator is rated at 60kW, 480/277 volt, 3‐Phase and has a 
90A  in‐line  circuit  breaker.  The  generator  has  a  remote  double  fuel  tank  located  adjacent  to  the 
generator  location  and  sits  on  a  concrete  pad.  The  generator  operates  on  diesel  gas.  The  existing 
generator  was  installed  during  1979  renovation.  The  existing  generator  is  located  outside  of  the 
electrical room. The emergency system is operational but reaching the end of its useful life. 
 
The emergency generator feeds an ONAN automatic transfer switch "ATS" which further feeds to panel 
EE which contains a 100A main circuit breaker. This equipment is located in the main electric room. The 
existing  automatic  transfer  switch  and  emergency  panel  were  also  installed  in  1979.  The  panel  is  FPE 
and  the  transfer  switch  is  approaching  the  end  of  its  useful  life.  The  emergency  system  serves 
emergency  lights,  exit  lights,  fire  alarm  system,  CATV  system,  sound  system  and 
telephone/communication. In addition, the generator feeds the elevator sump. 
 
Lighting System 
Most of the lighting fixtures were replaced in 1979 with some upgrades over the years. Existing lighting 
fixtures in classroom, classrooms, offices and corridors are 2’ X 4’ recessed fluorescent. The fluorescent 
lights  utilize  T12  technology  which  is  old  and  not  energy  efficient.  The  existing  lighting  fixtures  in  the 
bathrooms  are  incandescent.  The  lighting  level  in  classrooms,  corridors,  and  gymnasium  is  poor.  The 
light fixtures in the cafeteria are surface mounted. Storage room lights are surface mounted and several 
are damaged. 
 
Switching  control  is  through  single  toggle  switches  throughout  the  building  with  a  few  motion  sensor 
switches. This does not meet the current energy efficiency code requirements. 
 
There  are  some  exit  discharge  locations  that  do  not  have  sufficient  emergency  egress  lighting.  The 
building lacks proper security lighting around the perimeter of the building. Some of the exterior lights 
 
2‐94 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

have clearly been replaced as the existing fixtures that have not been replaced are old, discolored and 
some are damaged. Some exterior flood lights were added on the roof to shine down on walkways for 
security lighting. 
 
Power Outlets 
The  power  outlets  located  in  the  classrooms  and  offices  were  provided  in  1979.  Current  power 
requirements  require  more  receptacles  and  circuits.  Because  of  increased  requirements  surface 
mounted conduit and receptacles have been added in offices and classrooms. 
 
Fire Alarm System 
The existing fire alarm system is a Simplex 4010 system. The control panel and devices were installed in 
2001.  The  existing  fire  alarm  control  panel  is  located  in  the  main  office.  The  building  is  not  fully 
sprinklered. There are a few limited area sprinkler systems with flow switches that tie back to the fire 
alarm system. There are pull stations at all of the exits. The entire school has audio/visual notification 
devices  throughout.  Notification  is  delivered  through  horns  and  strobes.  The  annunciator  at  the  main 
entrance is a LCD type annunciator. 
 
Sound System 
The existing sound system console is manufactured by Rauland and is located in the main office. Booster 
panels are installed throughout the facility. The existing sound system main equipment was installed in 
1979. The classrooms and offices have combination of surface and recessed mounted speakers and call 
back switches. Corridors have recessed speakers. The system is operable but near the end of its useful 
life. 
 
Telephone/ CATV and Intercommunications Systems 
The  existing  main  telephone  and  CATV  HUB  is  located  in  the  main  electrical  room.  The  existing 
telecommunication  main  HUB  is  located  in  the  existing  communications  room.  All  the  existing 
telephone/data outlets are surface mounted.  Most of the classrooms have one telephone and one data 
outlet,  but  some  classrooms  have  one  telephone  and  two  data  outlets.  There  are  computer  data 
repeaters  installed  throughout  the  facility  in  corridors  surface  mounted  on  walls.  At  some  of  these 
locations there are surface mounted data and power outlets and there is an excess of wiring dangling 
from this equipment. This is a messy installation and is prone to damage based on their location. 
 
There  are  telephone  data  closets  throughout  the  facility.  These  rooms  share  CATV,  telephone 
punchblocks and backboard and data racks. The rooms are filled to capacity. 
 
 
 
Master Clock and Program Bell System 
There is no master clock system in this facility.   
 

 
2‐95 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

Building Security System 
The school is equipped with an access control and closed caption television (CCTV) security system. The 
system is web based with control panels in various locations. There are card readers at each entrance 
and security cameras located in corridors and at exterior exits. There is a video monitoring station in the 
school. 
 
Summary 
• All of the major HVAC equipment was replaced in 1992 and 1995.   
• The boilers, pumps and central plant equipment have a normal life expectancy of 20 to 25 
years.   
• The water‐cooled heat pumps, roof top A/C units and the cooling tower have a normal life 
expectancy of 15 to 20 years and are at the end of their normal life expectancy.  
• All of the heat pumps and RTU’s utilize R‐22 refrigerant which has been phased out.  The use 
of  this  refrigerant  will  no  longer  be  allowed  by  2010  and  will  be  difficult  to  obtain  for 
maintenance purposes. 
• The  make‐up  air  unit  for  the  kitchen  has  electric  heat  which  is  very  expensive  to  operate.  
The  unit  is  30  years  old  and  has  outlived  its  normal  life  expectancy.    The  unit  should  be 
replaced and either gas or hot water heat should be used to reduce operation cost. 
• The  central  temperature  control  and  alarm  panel  should  be  modified  to  provide  remote 
status and alarm capability at the main facility office. 
• The existing domestic water heater has surpassed its reasonable life expectancy of 10 to 15 
years and should be replaced with a more energy efficient gas fired type unit. 
• Tempering  valves  should  be  installed  on  all  handicapped  accessible  lavatories  and  hand 
sinks to provide ‘tempered’ water per ADA requirements. 
• Recommend  providing  a  wet  type  sprinkler  system  to  the  building  to  improve  the  level  of 
‘life safety’. 
• The existing switchboard is functioning, however the manufacturer is no longer in business 
and  replacement  parts  are  not  available.  The  switchboard  also  does  not  have  space  for 
future  expansion.  In  the  event  of  a  complete  renovation  it  is  recommended  that  the 
switchboard and electrical service equipment be replaced. 
• The  existing  distribution  system  is  functioning,  however  the  original  base  building  panel 
manufacturer is no longer in business and replacement parts are not available. Through the 
years, other manufacturer’s circuit breakers have been fitted into existing panels. The panel 
boards also do not have many spare circuit breakers. In the event of a complete renovation 
it is recommended that the power distribution equipment be replaced. 
• The  building  emergency  generator  is  in  working  condition  but  is  reaching  the  end  of  its 
useful  life.  The  automatic  transfer  switch  is  also  reaching  the  end  of  its  useful  life.  The 
emergency  panel  is  manufactured  by  Federal  Pacific  which  is  no  longer  in  business,  so 
replacement  parts  are  not  available.    In  the  event  of  a  complete  renovation,  it  is 
recommended that a new properly sized generator and distribution equipment be installed 
for the entire building. 
• The existing lighting system is old and does not meet current code requirements and lighting 
guidelines.  It  is  recommended  to  provide  new  energy  efficient  fixtures  with  T8  lamps  and 
electronic ballasts. It is also recommended that exterior lighting be replaced to meet school 
security lighting requirements. 
 
2‐96 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

 
 
Hazardous Materials Assessment  
 
F&R surveyed Thomas Jefferson Elementary School to identify ACM, LBP and suspect PCB and mercury 
containing  equipment  utilizing  non‐destructive  sampling.    The  following  paragraphs  summarize  the 
findings: 
 
• F&R observed suspect asbestos‐containing metal fire doors located throughout the school. 
• F&R  observed  one  elevator  suspected  to  contain  asbestos‐containing  interior  and  shaft 
components. 
• F&R  observed  water  fountains  throughout  the  school  assumed  to  contain  asbestos‐
containing pipe wrap. 
• F&R assumes that asbestos‐containing pipe insulation exists behind solid walls and ceilings 
and within pipe chases throughout the school. 
• F&R identified lead based paint throughout the interior and exterior. 
• F&R observed mercury‐containing thermostats throughout the school. 
• F&R  visually  inspected  fluorescent  light  fixtures  throughout  the  school.    Based  on  our 
inspection, there does not appear to be any regulated hazardous materials within these light 
fixtures. 
 
Asbestos‐Containing Material 
During  F&R’s  non‐destructive  survey  for  ACM  the  following  materials  were  sampled:  spray‐on 
fireproofing,  ceiling  tile,  carpet  mastic,  vinyl  covebase  mastic,  drywall  and  associated  joint  compound, 
floor tile and associated mastic, carpet mastic, wall plaster, window caulk, duct seam sealant, ceiling tile 
mastic and white pipe seam sealant.  All of the materials sampled by F&R were determined to be non 
asbestos‐containing.  However, F&R assumed the following materials to be asbestos‐containing: metal 
fire doors, interior elevator/elevator shaft components, water fountain pipe wrap, and pipe insulation 
behind solid walls and ceilings and behind pipe chases.  
 
F&R observed 23 metal fire doors throughout the school that are presumed to be asbestos‐containing.  
The doors were observed in good condition at the time of the survey.  Additionally, F&R assumed that 
the  one  elevator  located  within  the  school  contains  interior  and  shaft  components  that  are  asbestos‐
containing.    These  materials  include  elevator  brakes,  elevator  cab  insulation,  elevator  shaft  walls,  and 
spray‐on  fireproofing  located  in  the  elevator  shaft.    The  interior  elevator  and  shaft  components  were 
inaccessible at the time of the survey.  F&R observed approximately 10 water fountains throughout the 
school that are assumed to contain asbestos‐containing pipe wrap.  The pipe wrap was inaccessible at 
the  time  of  our  inspection.    For  the  purposes  of  this  study,  F&R  assumes  that  there  is  approximately 
1,000  linear  feet  of  asbestos‐containing  pipe  insulation  within  pipe  chases  and  behind  solid  walls  and 
ceilings, although no asbestos‐containing pipe insulation was observed by F&R during our investigation. 
 
As  part  of  this  study,  F&R  reviewed  an  Asbestos  Management  Plan  for  the  school,  prepared  by 
Professional Service Industries, Inc. (PSI) and dated May 30, 1992.  The PSI report did not identify any 
ACM within the school. 
 

 
2‐97 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

F&R  recommends  that  all  of  the  identified  ACM  be  removed  by  a  Commonwealth  of  Virginia  licensed 
asbestos abatement contractor prior to impact by renovation or demolition activities; furthermore, all 
suspect ACM that has not been previously sampled should be analyzed for asbestos prior to impact by 
renovation  or  demolition  activities.    Additionally,  F&R  recommends  that  the  1992  Asbestos 
Management Plan be updated as the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) requires that 
these plans be updated every three years. 
 
Lead Based Paint 
F&R conducted a LBP screening of the painted surfaces located throughout the interior and exterior of 
Thomas Jefferson Elementary School.  LBP was identified on the following interior building components: 
white  metal  pillars  located  in  the  kitchen  and  blue  metal  door  frames  located  throughout  the  school.  
The following exterior building components were identified as containing lead based paint: brown metal 
pillars throughout the exterior and a black metal overhang located at a rear building entrance adjacent 
to the playground.  Since this was a limited LBP survey additional LBP surfaces may be present that were 
not tested.  All painted surfaces should be assumed to contain LBP or lead‐containing paint. 
 
In  general,  if  structures  are  to  be  removed  or  demolished,  typical  demolition  techniques  can  be  used 
without LBP becoming an issue of concern.  However, if building components containing LBP are to be 
stripped and repainted, precautions would need to be taken.  Specifically, if these building components 
are  to  be  sanded,  abraded  or  heated  to  remove  the  LBP,  workers  trained  in  LBP  removal  should  be 
contracted for the work. 
 
The  “Lead:  Renovation,  Repair  and  Painting  Program”  rule,  which  will  take  effect  in  April  2010  will 
require  that  contractors  involved  in  renovation,  repair  or  painting  activities  in  buildings  constructed 
prior to 1978 in which children under the age of 6 are present take special precautions to avoid creating 
a lead hazard.  These precautions include posting warning signs; restricting occupants from work areas; 
containing work areas to prevent dust and debris from spreading; conducting a thorough cleanup and 
verification  that  cleanup  was  effective.    Should  renovations  that  disturb  LBP  take  place  once  this 
regulation takes effect, there will be a cost associated with renovating these building components.  At 
this time F&R believes that the presence of LBP will have only minimal impact to the project, primarily 
with contractor compliance with current OSHA regulations. 
 
Mercury‐Containing Equipment 
F&R  identified  46  thermostats  that  contained  mercury‐containing  switches.    These  thermostats  were 
observed  throughout  the  building.    Fluorescent  light  tubes  were  also  inspected  for  the  presence  of 
mercury.  All of the fluorescent light tubes observed by F&R contained the low‐mercury symbol.  Under 
Virginia  regulations,  light  tubes  with  the  low  mercury  symbol  can  be  disposed  of  as  general  waste 
provided  that  proper  documentation  can  be  provided  by  the  manufacturer  that  these  tubes  do  not 
contain regulated levels of mercury.  Therefore, the fluorescent light tubes are not likely a concern at 
this property; however some fluorescent light  tubes with regulated levels of  mercury may still remain 
within the school. 
 
PCB‐Containing Equipment 
F&R  visually  surveyed  a  representative  number  of  light  ballasts  throughout  Thomas  Jefferson 
Elementary School.  All of the light ballasts observed contained the “No PCB” label and therefore PCB‐
containing ballasts are likely not a concern at this property, however some PCB‐containing ballasts may 
 
2‐98 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

still remain within the school.  No other potential PCB‐containing equipment was observed by F&R. 
 
Cost Estimates 
F&R has developed conceptual cost estimates for the abatement of hazardous materials associated with 
major and minor renovations at Thomas Jefferson Elementary School.  F&R is assuming that no work is 
to be conducted on the roof. 
 
“Minor Renovation” Cost Estimate: 
 
• Metal  Fire  Doors  –  F&R  observed  23  metal  fire  doors  throughout  the  school  that  are 
assumed  to  be  asbestos‐containing.    F&R  assumes  an  abatement  cost  of  approximately 
$100.00 per door for a total abatement cost of $2,300. 
• Lead  Based  Paint  –  F&R  assumes  that  structures  containing  LBP  can  be  renovated  or 
demolished  utilizing  typical  demolition  techniques  without  LBP  becoming  an  issue  of 
concern  if  renovation  work  impacting  LBP  occurs  before  April  2010,  when  the  “Lead: 
Renovation,  Repair  and  Painting  Program”  takes  effect.    For  renovation  work  that  impacts 
LBP which occurs after this date, F&R assumes a cost of approximately $10,000 for special 
precautions that will need to be taken. 
 
The total estimated cost for the removal of the identified and suspected hazardous materials associated 
with  a  minor  renovation  at  Thomas  Jefferson  Elementary  School  is  $12,300.    F&R  typically  adds  an 
additional  25%  contingency  fee  for  estimates  such  as  these.    Other  costs  typically  associated  with  the 
abatement  of  these  materials  would  include  abatement  design,  project  management,  and 
oversight/monitoring  of  the  work  which  are  generally  estimated  to  be  15  to  25%  of  the  abatement 
costs.  The total estimated costs to remove the identified and suspected hazardous materials associated 
with a minor renovation at Thomas Jefferson Elementary School, including the 25% contingency fee and 
design, project management and oversight/monitoring fees ranges up to $19,219.  
 
“Major  Renovation”  Cost  Estimate  (Estimate  also  includes  abatement  of  the  hazardous  materials 
referenced in the “minor renovation” cost estimate section): 
 
• Interior Elevator and Elevator Shaft Components – There is one elevator located within the 
school.  F&R assumed that interior components within the elevator and shaft are asbestos‐
containing.  These materials include elevator brakes, elevator cab insulation, elevator shaft 
walls,  and  spray‐on  fireproofing  located  in  the  elevator  shaft.    F&R  assumes  a  cost  of 
approximately $10,000 for abatement of these materials. 
• Water  Fountain  Pipe  Wrap  –  F&R  observed  approximately  10  water  fountains  located 
throughout the school assumed to contain asbestos‐containing pipe wrap.  F&R assumes an 
abatement cost of approximately $250.00 per water fountain for a total abatement cost of 
$2,500. 
• Pipe Insulation – F&R assumes that approximately 1,000 linear feet of pipe insulation exists 
within pipe chases and behind solid walls and ceilings.  F&R assumes an abatement cost of 
approximately $25.00 per linear foot for a total abatement cost of $25,000. 
• Mercury‐Containing  Thermostats  –  F&R  observed  46  mercury‐containing  thermostats 
throughout  the  school.    F&R  assumes  that  removal  of  the  thermostats  will  cost  $100.00 
each for a total removal cost of $4,600. 
 
2‐99 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

 
The total estimated cost for the removal of the identified and suspected hazardous materials associated 
with  a  major  renovation  at  Thomas  Jefferson  Elementary  School  is  $54,400.    F&R  typically  adds  an 
additional  25%  contingency  fee  for  estimates  such  as  these.    Other  costs  typically  associated  with  the 
abatement  of  these  materials  would  include  abatement  design,  project  management,  and 
oversight/monitoring  of  the  work  which  are  generally  estimated  to  be  15  to  25%  of  the  abatement 
costs.  The total estimated costs to remove the identified and suspected hazardous materials associated 
with a major renovation at Thomas Jefferson Elementary School, including the 25% contingency fee and 
design, project management and oversight/monitoring fees ranges up to $85,000.  
 
 
Technology Assessment 
 
Eperitus  surveyed  Thomas  Jefferson  Elementary  School  to  determine  instructional  technology 
capabilities and network resources. The following observations were made: 
 
• The school has developed a broadcast studio at the TLC. 
• The technology support office/area is located in a mobile classroom unit. 
• Classrooms use voice enhancement systems (manufacturer:  FrontRow Digital), as does the 
other  elementary  school.  Similar  to  that  school,  the  sound  systems  are  not  connected  to 
teacher computers. 
• Some classrooms do not have the FrontRow sound systems. In those areas, self‐contained 
powered single‐speaker units are used. 
• This  appears  to  be  the  only  school  using  Macintosh  computers  in  addition  to  PC‐based 
machines.  (All  of  the  other  schools  use  PC  computers  running  Microsoft  Windows.)  These 
Macintosh computers are being phased out, but are being used to the end of their service 
life. 
• Laptops and carts are being used in this school.  
• Apple brand wireless access points continue to be used in this school to support the student 
laptops. These access points are not capable of being centrally managed as are current state 
of the technology installations used in other school divisions. The service life of these units is 
coming to an end due to their age and that new laptops are capable of communicating at 
much higher speeds and bandwidths than these devices can support. 
• There is a mix of access point types and brands being used in the school. Some Cisco access 
points were observed in addition to the Apple “mushrooms”. The Cisco access points are not 
being  fed  electricity  via  the  network  (PoE  –  power  over  Ethernet),  which  means 
transformers  are  being  connected  to  electrical  outlets  above  ceiling  tiles.  This  is  not  an 
acceptable  practice.  Also,  these  units  are  intended  to  mount  against  a  wall  so  that  the 
antennae are positioned properly to reach the users in the room. 
• The mix of wireless access point types and inconsistent mounting practices do not produce a 
solid  or  manageable  wireless  network  environment.  As  has  been  mentioned,  a  centrally 
managed  wireless  network  environment  is  considered  a  standard  for  current  school 
construction projects. 
• Some  of  the  servers  are  Apple  machines  running  a  non‐Microsoft  Windows  operating 
system. 

 
2‐100 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

• The network cabling is a mixture of category 5 and 5e and it has been augmented over an 
undetermined period of time. Overall, this school has network cabling infrastructure that is 
very much at risk due to disorganization and non‐standard installation practices. 
• An  LCD  projector  retrofit  program  was  underway  for  the  classrooms.  Generally,  better 
practices installation practices, mounting hardware, and connections are being used in these 
installations  compared  to  elsewhere  in  the  school  division.  There  is  still  a  risk  of  vibrating 
projectors and images given these retro installations. 
• In general, two computers are available for student use in each classroom. 
• As  with  a  number  of  other  data  locations  in  the  school  division,  there  are  issues  with 
data/network  spaces  relative  to  temperature  and  dust/lint  control.  In  some  situations  box 
fans were seen in these areas. These might help the comfort of the technician, but they only 
make the dust situation worse and do not provide any cooling or heat exhaust unless there 
is an opening for the air to circulate through. 
 
 
Findings and Recommendations 
 
Site 
Much of the unbuilt site is in a flood plain and is not usable, but the parcel is in a good location within 
the City.  This is the only school located within the City boundaries, and as such its location is valuable to 
the residents of Falls Church. 
 
Capacity and Operational 
• Maximum Capacity – 490 (as‐is).  Forecasted 2‐4 will be 454 (2018) to 600 (2028) students.  
Shortfall  =  110  or  approximately  6    classrooms  (24:1),  plus  the  associated  supporting  core 
areas. 
• Jefferson  Elementary  currently  operates  on  an  average  PTR  at  the  desired  22:1  ratio  if 
second grade and 24:1 in grades 3 and 4, and thus just below capacity.   
• The  facility  has  had  multiple  additions  over  the  years  and,  although  each  area  has  its 
positives, the flow in the facility is made difficult by multiple levels.  Lower level (first floor) 
is a maze – very little direct line of site – may be considered a safety issue.  Main entry not 
conducive to parking area; entry not very friendly feeling. 
• Very active community use, hard on the facility. 
• Began  PYP  this  year  for  IB  –  program  requirements  may  determine  the  need  for  more 
flexible space. 
• A lot of programs and services are provided to students on this site (in trailers and in various 
places throughout the building).  Extras ‐ Before and after care has been provided with good 
storage.  A science lab is a nice amenity for an elementary school. 
• There is little space for teacher use, and limited space to conference or discuss students and 
curriculum.    Office  space  is  extremely  limited,  although  main  office  addition/renovation  is 
nicely laid out. 
• The  trailer  complex  outside  has  been  there  for  over  a  decade  –  it  is  a  maze  with  security 
concerns. 
 
Architectural  
 
2‐101 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

• Accessibility issues ‐ main public entry not accessible, interior accessibility not convenient 
• Existing Building is a conglomeration of various aesthetic elements do to assorted additions 
• Too many modular structures are being utilized on site 
• Existing facility has many differing levels to access efficiently 
• No onsite parking for visitors visiting the public entry 
• Lighting quality needs upgrading‐ general and task oriented 
 
Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, and Life Safety 
• All of the major HVAC equipment was replaced in 1992 and 1995.  The boilers, pumps and 
central plant equipment have a normal life expectancy of 20 to 25 years.   
• The water‐cooled heat pumps, roof top A/C units and the cooling tower have a normal life 
expectancy of 15 to 20 years and are at the end of their normal life expectancy.  
• All of the heat pumps and RTU’s utilize R‐22 refrigerant which has been phased out.  The use 
of  this  refrigerant  will  no  longer  be  allowed  by  2010  and  will  be  difficult  to  obtain  for 
maintenance purposes. 
• The  make‐up  air  unit  for  the  kitchen  has  electric  heat  which  is  very  expensive  to  operate.  
The  unit  is  30  years  old  and  has  outlived  its  normal  life  expectancy.    The  unit  should  be 
replaced and either gas or hot water heat should be used to reduce operation cost. 
• The  central  temperature  control  and  alarm  panel  should  be  modified  to  provide  remote 
status and alarm capability at the main facility office. 
• The existing domestic water heater has surpassed its reasonable life expectancy of 10 to 15 
years and should be replaced with a more energy efficient gas fired type unit. 
• Tempering  valves  should  be  installed  on  all  handicapped  accessible  lavatories  and  hand 
sinks to provide ‘tempered’ water per ADA requirements. 
• Recommend  providing  a  wet  type  sprinkler  system  to  the  building  to  improve  the  level  of 
‘life safety’. 
• The existing switchboard is functioning, however the manufacturer is no longer in business 
and  replacement  parts  are  not  available.  The  switchboard  also  does  not  have  space  for 
future  expansion.  In  the  event  of  a  complete  renovation  it  is  recommended  that  the 
switchboard and electrical service equipment be replaced. 
• The  existing  distribution  system  is  functioning;  however,  the  original  base  building  panels 
manufacturer is no longer in business and replacement parts are not available. Through the 
years, other manufacturer’s circuit breakers have been fitted into existing panels. The panel 
boards also do not have many spare circuit breakers. In the event of a complete renovation 
it is recommended that the power distribution equipment be replaced. 
• The  building  emergency  generator  is  in  working  condition  but  is  reaching  the  end  of  its 
useful  life.  The  automatic  transfer  switch  is  also  reaching  the  end  of  its  useful  life.  The 
emergency  panel  is  manufactured  by  Federal  Pacific  which  is  no  longer  in  business,  so 
replacement  parts  are  not  available.    In  the  event  of  a  complete  renovation,  it  is 
recommended that a new properly sized generator and distribution equipment be installed 
for the entire building. 
• The existing lighting system is old and does not meet current code requirements and lighting 
guidelines.  It  is  recommended  to  provide  new  energy  efficient  fixtures  with  T8  lamps  and 
electronic ballasts. It is also recommended that exterior lighting be replaced to meet school 
security lighting requirements. 
 
2‐102 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Thomas Jefferson Elementary School 

 
Hazardous Materials 
 
• “Minor Renovation” Abatement Cost: $19,219 
• “Major Renovation” Abatement Cost: $85,000 
 
Technology 
The  Thomas  Jefferson  Elementary  School  provides  consistent  instructional  technology  resources  at 
different grade levels. The additions of new technologies and their required connections to the network 
are not being installed in a manner that is consistent with the original installation – this situation needs 
to  be  rectified  before  the  infrastructure  becomes  even  more  piecemealed  and  undocumented.  Some 
trip and snag hazards exist that need to be rectified to prevent human or equipment damage through 
accidents. 
 
Summary 
This school is located on a parcel that is centrally located within the city, and which offers valuable green 
space due to a part of the site being wetlands, but which does not lend itself to expansion.  The facility is 
currently  being  over  utilized  for  both  school  and  community  purposes,  and  is  experiencing  significant 
wear as a result.  While this facility is solid, renovations and updates are necessary to ensure that it can 
continue  to  serve  through  the  20‐year  planning  period.    The  capacity  of  the  program  at  this  school  is 
smaller than any of the desired components of the master plan, making its long‐term school usefulness 
questionable. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
2‐103 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Gage House 

Gage House 
 
Site Description 
This facility is located inside Cherry Hill Park, near the site of City Hall.  The structure is located inside the 
park  and  is  City‐owned,  and  has  historical  significance.    Vehicular  access  is  via  the  park,  with  limited 
visitor parking adjacent to the Gage House. 
 
Zoning Requirements 
The subject parcel is zoned ”O‐D Official Design”. 
 
Site Utilities 
The subject site is serviced by public and private utilities. 
 
Environmental Assessment 
The subject site is not within a City designated floodplain or Resource Protection Area (RPA).  The site is 
located within Cherry Hill Park, and is subject to the associated restrictions on site development. 
 
Architectural Assessment  
Gage House is a wood structure two stories in height above ground with a stone wall basement area 
below with pitched green standing seam metal roofs. Individual residential windows and doorways are 
the typical opening elements. A covered porch with monumental stairs faces Great Falls Street to the 
northeast, and an additional entry is on the opposite side of the building and incorporates an accessible 
ramp system from the adjacent parking spaces continuing up to the door. 
 
An outdoor egress escape system is mounted adjacent the door from the upper balcony on this level as 
(facing southwest) a means of egress for upstairs occupants. 
 
The current façade treatment is vinyl siding with painted wood trim. The current paint coating is still in 
good shape in most areas 
 
Site Access 
The accessible entry faces the small adjacent parking area. There is an opportunity for one to come up 
the meandering walkway from the street side, at which point you arrive at the front porch and 
monumental stairs. An accessible sign directs you to the other entry, but there are no paths around the 
building that would allow you to access the ramp and door.  
 
Layout 
The rooms are arranged around a central fireplace area on the first level, and a small connecting 
corridor from front to back on the second level. The interior is arranged around a continuous corridor 
from front to back with an adjacent stair that leads to the basement and second level. 
A small kitchen area and pantry are off this corridor, as well as existing unisex toilet rooms that have 
been modified for accessibility reasons. 
 
 
 

 
2‐104 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations –Gage House 

Lighting 
The existing lighting is of a residential nature and as such does not provide what would be considered 
good light quality for educational tasks. 
 
Acoustics 
Because of the size of the rooms in the facility, larger groups tend to have a higher sound level in the 
facility. Acoustical attenuation is recommended to offset this increased sound level. 
 
Finishes 
The typical interior finishes consist of hardwood flooring and carpet, solid plaster walls with wood lath 
and similar ceilings all painted in neutral tones. Some acoustical tile ceilings have been installed in areas 
where HVAC systems have had modifications made to them. Dark woodwork door and frame accents 
are apparent in all rooms. 
 
As a structure on the historic register, enhancements to the facility would need to be coordinated from 
a historically correct standpoint. 
 
 
Mechanical, Plumbing, Electrical and Life Safety Assessment 
Upgrades to the Utility and Life Safety Systems will need to be made in the future as the systems age. 
 
 
Hazardous Materials Assessment  
F&R  surveyed  the  property  to  identify  ACM,  LBP  and  suspect  PCB  and  mercury  containing  equipment 
utilizing non‐destructive sampling.  The following paragraphs summarize their findings:    
 
• F&R identified asbestos‐containing vibration dampers in the basement and attic.  
• F&R identified asbestos‐containing pipe insulation debris in the basement.  
• F&R identified an asbestos‐containing membrane on the 2nd floor balcony.  
• F&R  identified  lead  based  paint  on  various  wooden  building  components  throughout  the 
interior and exterior of the structure.  
• F&R observed mercury‐containing thermostats in the 1st and 2nd floor hallways.  
• F&R  visually  inspected  the  fluorescent  light  fixtures  in  the  basement.    Based  on  our 
inspection, there does not appear to be any regulated hazardous materials within these light 
fixtures. 
 
Asbestos‐Containing Material 
During F&R’s non‐destructive survey for ACM the following materials were sampled: linoleum flooring, 
ceiling  tiles,  attic  insulation,  siding  and  roofing  felt,  drywall  and  associated  joint  compound,  window 
glazing,  wall  plaster,  vibration  dampers,  pipe  insulation  and  a  balcony  membrane.    The  following 
materials  were  determined  to  be  asbestos‐containing:  vibration  dampers,  pipe  insulation  and  balcony 
membrane. 
 
F&R  identified  three  asbestos‐containing  vibration  dampers  in  the  basement  and  attic.    This  material 
was observed in fair condition at the time of the survey.  Asbestos‐containing pipe insulation debris was 
identified  in  the  basement.    The  entirety  of  the  material  observed  by  F&R  was  submitted  to  the 

 
2‐105 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Gage House 

laboratory for analysis.  Although F&R did not observe additional pipe insulation at the property, for the 
purposes of this feasibility study it should be assumed that approximately 250 linear feet of this material 
exists  behind  solid  walls  and  ceilings  and  within  pipe  chases.    Approximately  150  square  feet  of  an 
asbestos‐containing  balcony  membrane  was  observed  on  the  2nd  floor  balcony.    This  material  was 
observed in poor condition at the time of the survey. 
 
F&R  recommends  that  all  of  the  identified  ACM  be  removed  by  a  Commonwealth  of  Virginia  licensed 
asbestos abatement contractor prior to impact by renovation or demolition activities.  Furthermore, all 
suspect ACM that has not been previously sampled should be analyzed for asbestos prior to impact by 
renovation or demolition activities.  Additionally, the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) 
requires that all schools built prior to 1989 have an Asbestos Management Plan prepared and updated 
every three years to manage any ACM/ACBM located within the facility.  F&R is not aware of an existing 
Asbestos Management Plan for the Gage House, and therefore recommends that one be prepared and 
implemented for the facility. 
 
Lead Based Paint 
F&R conducted a lead based paint screening of the painted surfaces within the Gage House.  Lead based 
paint was identified on the following building components: white wood ceilings and walls located on the 
2nd floor, white wood porch columns and roof on the rear porch, green wood lattice‐work located on the 
exterior,  white  wood  door  frame  located  on  the  2nd  floor  balcony,  grey  wood  door  and  door  frame 
located at the attic entrance and grey wood stair stringers and risers located in the stairwell.  Since this 
was  a  limited  LBP  survey  additional  LBP  surfaces  may  be  present  that  were  not  tested.    All  painted 
surfaces should be assumed to contain LBP or lead‐containing paint. 
 
In general, if structures are to be renovated or demolished, typical demolition techniques can be used 
without  lead  based  paint  becoming  an  issue  of  concern.    However,  if  building  components  containing 
lead‐based paint are to be stripped and repainted, precautions would need to be taken.  Specifically, if 
these  building  components  are  to  be  sanded,  abraded  or  heated  to  remove  the  lead‐based  paint, 
workers trained in lead‐based paint removal should be contracted for the work.   
 
The  “Lead:  Renovation,  Repair  and  Painting  Program”  rule,  which  will  take  effect  in  April  2010  will 
require that contractors involved in renovation, repair or painting activities in which children under the 
age of 6 are present take special precautions to avoid creating a lead hazard.  These precautions include 
posting warning signs; restricting occupants from work areas; containing work areas to prevent dust and 
debris  from  spreading;  conducting  a  thorough  cleanup  and  verification  that  cleanup  was  effective.  
Should renovations activities that disturb LBP take place once this regulation takes effect, there will be a 
cost associated with renovating building components that contain LBP.  At this time F&R believes that 
the presence of LBP will have only a minimal impact to the project, primarily with contractor compliance 
with current OSHA regulations.   
 
 
Mercury‐Containing Equipment 
F&R identified two thermostats that contained mercury‐containing switches.  These thermostats were 
observed on the 1st and 2nd floor hallways.  Fluorescent light tubes were also inspected for the presence 
of  mercury.    All  of  the  fluorescent  light  tubes  observed  by  F&R  contained  the  low‐mercury  symbol.  
Under Virginia regulations, light tubes with the low mercury symbol can be disposed of as general waste 
provided  that  proper  documentation  can  be  provided  by  the  manufacturer  that  these  tubes  do  not 
 
2‐106 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations –Gage House 

contain regulated levels of mercury.  Therefore, the fluorescent light tubes are not likely a concern at 
this property; however some fluorescent light  tubes with regulated levels of  mercury may still remain 
within the facility. 
 
PCB‐Containing Equipment 
F&R visually surveyed the fluorescent light ballasts within the Gage House for the presence of the “No 
PCB”  label.    All  of  the  ballasts  observed  by  F&R  contained  the  “No  PCB”  label  and  therefore  PCB‐
containing  ballasts  are  not  a  concern  at  this  property.    No  other  potential  PCB‐containing  equipment 
was observed by F&R. 
 
Cost Estimates 
F&R has developed conceptual cost estimates for the abatement of hazardous materials associated with 
major and minor renovations at the Gage House.  F&R is assuming that no work is to be conducted on 
the roof. 
 
“Minor Renovation” Cost Estimate 
 
• Balcony Membrane – Approximately 150 square feet of an asbestos‐containing membrane 
was observed on the 2nd floor balcony.  F&R assumes a cost of $15.00 per square foot for 
abatement of the membrane for a total abatement cost of $2,250.  
• Lead  Based  Paint  –  F&R  assumes  that  structures  containing  lead‐based  paint  can  be 
renovated  or  demolished  utilizing  typical  demolition  techniques  without  lead  based  paint 
becoming  an  issue  of  concern  if  renovation  work  impacting  LBP  occurs  before  April  2010, 
when  the  “Lead.  Renovation,  Repair  and  Painting  Program”  takes  effect.    For  renovation 
work  that  impacts  LBP  which  occurs  after  this  date,  F&R  assumes  a  cost  of  approximately 
$5,000 for special precautions that will need to be taken.     
 
The total estimated cost for the removal of the identified hazardous materials associated with a minor 
renovation  at  the  Gage  House  is  $7,250.    F&R  typically  adds  an  additional  25%  contingency  fee  for 
estimates such as these.  Other costs typically associated with the abatement of these materials would 
include  abatement  design,  project  management,  and  oversight/monitoring  of  the  work  which  are 
generally  estimated  at  15  to  25%  of  the  abatement  costs.    The  total  estimated  costs  to  remove  the 
identified hazardous materials associated with a minor renovation at the Gage House, including the 25% 
contingency fee and design, project management and oversight/monitoring fees ranges up to $11,328.   
 
“Major  Renovation”  Cost  Estimate  (Estimate  also  includes  abatement  of  the  hazardous  materials 
referenced in the “minor renovation” cost estimate section) 
 
• Vibration  Dampers  –  Three  asbestos‐containing  vibration  dampers  were  observed  in  the 
basement  and  attic.    F&R  assumes  an  abatement  cost  of  approximately  $250.00  per 
vibration damper for a total abatement cost of $750.  
• Pipe Insulation – For the purposes of this feasibility study, F&R assumes that approximately 
250  linear  feet  of  asbestos‐containing  pipe  insulation  is  located  behind  solid  walls  and 
ceilings and within pipe chases.  F&R assumes an abatement cost of $25.00 per linear foot 
for a total abatement cost of $6,250.  
• Mercury‐Containing  Thermostats  –  F&R  observed  two  mercury‐containing  thermostats 
which  were  located  on  the  1st  and  2nd  floor  hallways.    F&R  assumes  that  removal  of  the 
thermostats will cost a total of $1,000.  
 
2‐107 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations – Gage House 

 
The total estimated cost for the removal of the identified hazardous materials associated with a major 
renovation  at  the  Gage  House  is  $15,250.    F&R  typically  adds  an  additional  25%  contingency  fee  for 
estimates such as these.  Other costs typically associated with the abatement of these materials would 
include  abatement  design,  project  management,  and  oversight/monitoring  of  the  work  which  are 
generally  estimated  at  15  to  25%  of  the  abatement  costs.    The  total  estimated  costs  to  remove  the 
identified hazardous materials associated with a major renovation at the Gage House, including the 25% 
contingency fee and design, project management and oversight/monitoring fees ranges up to $23,828. 
 
 
Findings and Recommendations 
 
Site 
This house is a City‐owned facility on city site within the Cherry Hill Park.   
• Limited parking on site. 
 
Capacity and Operational 
• Program Capacity is limited by facility size and fire code.   
• There is greater demand than capacity permits. 
 
Architectural 
• City historical structure. Any changes require review by Historical Advisory Review Board. 
 
Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, and Life Safety 
• Systems are old and constrained by inability to renovate without review.  
 
Hazardous Materials 
• “Minor Renovation” Abatement Cost: $11,328 
• “Major Renovation” Abatement Cost: $23,828 
 
Technology 
Technology upgrades are necessary for high speed network/ internet access, as well as AV presentation.  
 
 
Summary 
This  facility  has  worked  well  as  the  home  of  the  alternative  program  for  at‐risk  youth;  however,  the 
demand  for  this  program  has  exceeded  the  capacity  at  this  facility.    Summer  use  for  camp  and  other 
competing  demands  for  this  facility  limit  its  use  year‐round  as  a  school.    Since  this  is  a  historical 
structure  located  within  the  boundaries  of  a  park,  with  multiple  recreational  uses,  the  practicality  of 
renovating to custom‐tailor this house to serve as a full‐time alternative school is debatable.  Long‐term 
master plan options will explore moving this program to a larger program space on another site. 
 
 
 
 

 
2‐108 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
2‐3 ‐ Facility Evaluations –Gage House 

 
2‐109 
 

   

Chapter 3 

MASTER PLAN  
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
3-1 – Educational Specifications

3-1 Purpose of a Division-Wide Educational Specification

The National School Boards Association defines the purpose of educational specifications as “to define
the programmatic, functional, spatial, and environmental requirements of the educational facility,
whether new or remodeled, in written and graphic form for review, clarification, and agreement as to
scope of work and design requirements for the architect, engineer, and other professionals working on
the building design.”

An educational specification should not be confused with a design specification, which is the document
developed by an architect to communicate to the contractor regarding building materials, major
systems and design details.

The purpose of this document is to provide a framework for site-specific educational facility
specifications and design for Falls Church City Public Schools (FCCPS).

The goal of establishing a division-wide specification is to maintain equity and parity among educational
facilities. As each facility is developed, it will be important to work with faculty, staff and community at
each site to allow for site-specific needs.

This division-wide specification takes into consideration current programs and services and guidelines
based on Falls Church City Public Schools policy and practices and current Virginia Department of
Education program space guidelines. It should be used as a guide for planning, designing and evaluating
school facilities. It should also be used in helping understand future renovations, additions, and new
construction as needed.

It should be noted, however, that unlike other states, Virginia does not currently have state-wide
educational facility specifications. The state’s guidelines are used only as recommended minimum
standards. Therefore facility size “averages” vary greatly from year to year based on the number of
projects that went under construction and the particular needs of each locality. For example, in many
years there are only two or three new high schools put under construction. One may be for 800
students and may provide many community amenities, while another is a repeat prototype for 2,400
students in a fast-growing district, with few community resources. The process used to create district-
wide specifications in other states often has a basis in state-wide standards, thus it is easy to determine
what a “community-based standard” actually is.

3-2 The Division-Wide Educational Specification Development Process

An educational specification is an important communication tool. It conveys the values of the school
division as they relate to the places where children learn within the community. It is through the
process of developing educational specifications that the range of issues, alternatives, and all
implications of decisions (economic and otherwise) are thoroughly explored and value decisions are

3-1
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
3-2 - Educational Specifications – Development Process

made. The written document rarely conveys the magnitude of the importance of these discussions
throughout the specification work sessions.

Defining the Programmatic Requirements


The most important component of this analysis is the review of all existing instructional PK-12 programs,
including preschool, special education, career and technical education, and alternative education, then
looking at future programs and initiatives desired.

The programmatic review used in compiling the information and preparing this document included:

Review of existing documents and school division web site information


Interviews with administrative and lead instructional staff
Tours of all Falls Church facilities
Data from the Virginia Department of Education
Four work sessions with a community-based “Design Committee”
Educational specification development with various Virginia school divisions
Review and revision of programs with school principals, Steering Committee, Superintendent
and Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum & Instruction.

Defining the Spatial Requirements


The projected enrollment of the entire building and the maximum capacity needed for each space are
important in defining spatial requirements. Program area specifications define how many and what
kinds of spaces are needed to deliver the educational program. This is very different in elementary than
in middle and high school. For the purpose of creating an order of magnitude of size for master
planning purposes, each functional space is assigned an example square footage allocation, allowing the
total building square footage to be determined. These spatial examples are based on the draft version
of the 2007 Virginia Department of Education minimum space guidelines, and have been adjusted
based on the desired educational practices of Falls Church. Obviously, programmatic needs and value
decisions for each facility are required to insure both educationally and fiscally responsible decisions are
made regarding future facilities.

Initial site specific discussions with principals and high school Curriculum Instruction Resource Teachers
(CIRTS) regarding each space size and adjacencies related to classroom/instructional functions,
instructional support functions, building circulation, site activities/functions and site circulation were
held. Once the master plan is finalized, a specific capital improvement plan is prioritized, and projects
are initiated, further detail and refinement should take place. The many value judgments made that
reflect the specific needs of education should be documented and communicated at that time.

Defining the Environmental Requirements


Describing in detail the “environment for learning” is very important, as many special features have
specific cost implications. Special features that should be incorporated such as issues of safety, security,
sustainable design, acoustics, lighting, use of color should be identified. New and planned applications of
instructional technology should be described program by program and in terms of building-wide plans.
Many of these have initial cost implications that, again, are value decisions relating to the specific
location.

3-2
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
3-2 – Educational Specifications – Development Process

Defining the FCCPS Environment for Learning

Falls Church City Public Schools enjoys the reputation of being a “premier small school system” in the
nation. FCCPS serves a cosmopolitan student PK-12 population of about 1900 students including some
tuition students who live in communities outside the City of Falls Church. Beginning with early
education and continuing through adult education, FCCPS offers instructional programs that meet the
needs of all students.

The district currently operates one primary elementary school (PK-1), one upper elementary school
(grades 2-4), one middle school (grades 5-7), one comprehensive high school (grades 8-12), and one
alternative education program at the Gage House building.

Mission and Values (cited from the Falls Church City Public Schools website)
“The Falls Church City Public Schools, in partnership with our families and community, educates and
challenges every student to succeed and become a responsible and contributing member of the global
community.

We value our students and believe that:


decisions of the Falls Church City Public Schools must be based on the needs of students;
students learn best in a secure environment that includes a rigorous and challenging curriculum
and a climate of high expectations and academic excellence;
measurable and achievable student goals must guide teaching and learning; and
schools that value diversity and promote lifelong learning and responsible citizenship provide
students with the foundation for success in a global community.

We value our staff and believe that:


a highly skilled, experienced and dedicated staff is key to effective learning; and
collegiality, collaboration and teamwork are essential.

We value our independent public education system and believe that:


small classes and small schools are the foundation for academic excellence;
data must be used for continuous improvement in teaching and learning; and
the necessary resources must be provided to support student achievement.

We value our partnership with the community and believe that:


our schools must be responsive and accountable to the community; and
community involvement strengthens our schools. “

Specifications to Support the Goals of the Facility Master Plan


The overall goals of the 2008/2009 Facility Master Plan as stated in Chapter 1 are:

Develop a 20-year, phased strategy for maintaining and improving school facilities

3-3
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
3-2 - Educational Specifications – Development Process

Ensure that future school facilities will keep pace with anticipated growth, educational goals,
and the priorities of the City of Falls Church.
Identify opportunities for improvements in infrastructure, in organization, and in teaching by
examining the relationships between technology, academics, and school design.
Innovate where possible to create facilities that are environmentally sensitive, technologically
capable, and that offer a cutting edge learning environment.
Facilitate cooperation between the Falls Church City Public Schools and other community
groups, to provide infrastructure that can meet multiple needs, as appropriate.

The following section defines student, staff, division, community, and division-wide goals and objectives
which support and clarify crucial steps to achieving those goals.

Student Goals
Goal 1: The Falls Church City Public Schools will educate, challenge and support every student to
succeed and become a responsible and contributing member of the global community.

Objective 1.1: To develop strategies that will prepare FCCPS students to be citizens of the global
society.

Goal 2: The Falls Church City Public Schools will sustain a culture that values diversity
and promotes positive and constructive student behavior.

Goal 3: The Falls Church City Public Schools will provide a well rounded education that includes extra
and co-curricular activities and sports.

Objective 3.1: To offer a variety of developmentally appropriate extra and co-curricular


activities.

Objective 3.2: To provide an athletic program that offers diverse, high quality experiences in
athletic skill building, healthy behaviors, competition, sportsmanship and citizenship.

Staff Goals
Goal 1: The Falls Church City Public Schools will attract, retain and develop a highly skilled, experienced
and dedicated teaching, administrative and support staff in a culture of continuous growth.

Goal 2: The Falls Church City Public Schools will create and sustain a culture characterized by teamwork,
collegiality and collaborative decision making.

Objective 2.1: To define and communicate expectations for teamwork, collegiality and
collaborative decision making.

Objective 2.2: To develop an action plan that includes training and other resources to address
these expectations.

3-4
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
3-2 – Educational Specifications – Development Process

Goal 3: The Falls Church City Public Schools expects administrators to provide effective leadership and
management.

Objective 3.1: To manage carefully the resources provided.

Objective 3.2: To provide protected time for teachers to collaborate, plan and deliver
instruction.

Environmental Goals
Goal 1: The Falls Church City Public School buildings will be safe, healthy and comfortable environments
for students, staff and the community.

Objective 1.1: To ensure that FCCPS facilities and grounds are well maintained.

Objective 1.2: To ensure that FCCPS facilities and grounds are kept up to date through the
systems replacement, renewal and modernization schedule.

Objective 1.3: To pursue future planning that addresses ongoing building use, community use
and future construction.

Objective 1.4: To provide a comprehensive environmental assessment in all FCCPS buildings on


an annual basis.

Goal 2: The Falls Church City Public Schools will be prepared to respond to emergency
situations.

Objective 2.1: To ensure that all FCCPS facilities are secure.

Objective 2.2: To develop and practice plans that address emergency and crisis situations

3-5
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
3-2 - Educational Specifications – Development Process

Community Goals
Goal 1: The Falls Church City Public Schools will actively involve families as partners in their child(ren)’s
education.

Goal 2: The Falls Church City Public Schools will actively involve the Falls Church community as a partner
in the education of the city’s children.

Objective 2.1: To develop and cultivate relationships and partnerships to benefit the schools and
community.

Division-Wide Goals
Goal 1: The Falls Church City Public Schools will design and deliver programs that address wellness and
foster resiliency.

Goal 2: The Falls Church City School Board will be a responsible steward of the community’s resources
and an advocate for the FCCPS mission.

Goal 3: The Falls Church City Public Schools will ensure that the division operates efficiently and
effectively.

Objective 3.1: To use technology as an integral tool in data management, instruction and
communication.

The Design Committee was created to provide input for the Division-Wide Education Specification,
outlining the characteristics of teaching and learning in Falls Church City as they relate to the overall
mission and goals of the school division, and creating a vision for future educational facilities from the
perspective of the community as a whole. The purpose of the document is to clearly articulate the
assumptions and beliefs of the educational process and how they affect the design of any new or
renovated facility. The committee also makes recommendations to the Steering Committee regarding
educational and architectural programming of spaces.

The Design Committee met four times during the planning process, with each session focusing on a
specific area of creating the environment for learning: Instruction & Issues of 21st Century Learning;
Technology’s Role in Teaching and Learning; School & Community Connection; and Organization &
Relationship of Space to the Teaching & Learning Process in Falls Church, which culminated in the
creation of the Educational Principles and Design Implications at the elementary, middle and high
school levels during the fourth meeting. Meeting Work Summaries and the culminating Planning
Documents can be found in Appendix D and E.

3-6
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
3-3 - Educational Specifications – Outcomes of Design Committee

3-3 Major Outcomes of Design Committee Process


(Planning Documents – Appendix E)

The Planning Document is divided into sections for elementary, middle and high school concerns.
Within each section are four areas (based on division goals and level needs) with examples of design
implications based on the needs at that level. An overall summary of these areas includes:

Educating, challenging and supporting student success


o Flexibility in layout without interference
o Places for project work and student display
o Variety of size in learning spaces
o Independent learning areas as well as small and whole group
o Technology integration
Attracting, retaining and developing highly skilled staff
o Professional space for all adults
o Technology integration
o Teachers in center of students
o Variety of meeting spaces
o Areas for collaboration
Creating and maintaining safe, healthy and comfortable environments
o Bright, positive, beautiful, inspiring spaces – lots of natural light
o Expansion possibilities
o LEED initiatives
o Appropriate scale
o Accessibility to all locations – removal of any barriers
Actively involving the community as partners in education
o Inviting to community, welcoming upon entry
o Meets needs and interests of variety of groups that use facility
o Safe and secure – good signage
o Child friendly
o Parent work areas

Transitioning From Division-Wide to Site-Specific Programming

The goal of establishing this division-wide specification is to maintain equity and parity among
educational facilities and to outline the Falls Church vision for educational delivery through appropriate
facilities for the 21st Century. The division-wide educational specification is a comprehensive description
of the educational programs offered in the Falls Church City Schools at the elementary, middle, and high
school levels. It also describes the educational philosophy and assumptions within which these program
are offered. Examples of the type, number, size, and functionality of the space required to support
these programs are provided in the division-wide educational specification as a framework for site-
specific educational facility specifications and design for FCCPS. The size of spaces in the space
delineation examples are based on State Guidelines (as of March, 2007) and/or on recommendations
from FCCPS staff.

3-7
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
3-3 - Educational Specifications – Outcomes of Design Committee

The educational specification for any individual new school or school renovation project will be based
upon the division-wide educational specification, but will be “customized” to that particular project at
the time construction is ready to begin. Once these decisions are made then the project specific
educational specification will be developed to inform the architectural design of the school.

Project-specific decisions (to include, but not limited to):


1. The grade level configuration and the student capacity
2. The programs that are or will be offered in the school and the size and space implications of each,
particularly programs for special needs students
3. Specialty programs and space needs
4. Other “community based” services/programs and/or space requirements unique to that particular
school
5. Site requirements – playfields, parking, etc.

The worksheets included in the Appendix C provide a focus to the site-specific programming process.
These worksheets can be used along with the Space Delineation Examples in the Division-Wide
Educational Specification to determine the base site-specific educational program & space needs
requirements prior to the development of architectural specifications. An area for notes and
explanation of rationale for space or space size is included.

3-8
 

   

Chapter 4 

MASTER PLAN  
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-1 – Overview of Space Programming

4-1 Overview of Space Programming

The goal of a master plan is to provide a phased long-range plan to address the facility needs required to
properly support the school division for the future. The master planning process looks at a variety of
inter-related data at a snapshot in time, and attempts to project how that data will influence future
needs. This data includes student enrollment, facility utilization, educational priorities and goals, and
state space ‘guidelines’ compared to local need for instructional and support delivery.

The ultimate goal of space programming for a master plan is to determine the approximate size building
that will accommodate the student population and instructional delivery methodology of the future.
The program can be used as a baseline whether building new or developing an addition/renovation, and
is intended to be adjusted for either purpose.

It is important to note that the resulting space program is not intended to be the final architectural
program that is used when a building program begins, but as a starting point for further discussion
and refinement by community of user groups. It is at that point that the details will be influenced by
the committee and the designer.

Space Requirements for Use in the Master Planning Process

The following space requirements for current programs and practices were developed as the result of:
Tours of the Existing Facilities
Enrollment Projection Analysis – Resulting in a Master Plan for 200 Students/Grade Level
Existing Utilization Practices and Program Capacity Analysis
Design Committee Meetings (previous sections)
Steering Committee Input
Principal Review and Input at Each Level
CIRT Input at the High School Level
Division Superintendent/Asst. Superintendent of Curriculum & Instruction review

The space programs are based on Virginia DOE DRAFT 3/2007 and BICSI 2003 recommendations, and
modified as necessary to comply with the Educational Principles and Design Implications (Appendix E) as
well as anticipated needs based on current practices. These programs serve as the basis for developing
master plan options.

4-1
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-2 – Space Requirements - Elementary

4-2 Space Requirements - Elementary

Suggested Square Foot Guidelines for Elementary Schools


(based on Virginia DOE DRAFT 3/2007 & BICSI 2003 Recommendations)
Classroom Areas: Pre K and Kindergarten 975 SF + 50 SF Toilet (1,025 SF)
First 975 SF + 50 SF Toilet (1,025 SF)
Second through Fifth 800 SF
Core Areas: Student Resource (ESL, Other) 500 SF
Media Center Reading Room 750 + 2x capacity + 570-600 SF office, etc.
Dining Room 1/3 pupils x 12 + 400 SF table storage/1700 SF
storage
Kitchen 1000 + 1 x capacity + 80 SF office
Unique Areas: Computer Lab 800 SF
Level 1 Special Ed Services 400 SF
Level 2 Special Ed Services 750 SF + 50 SF Toilet 800 SF
Music 1000 SF
Art 1200 SF
Gym (Multi-purpose) 3150 SF – min floor + 2000 – 3000 SF (office
w/toilet, storage)
Technology 500 SF MDF / Tech Office
80 SF IDF per every 20,000 SF
Other: Team Planning 300 SF for schools under 600 / 400 SF
For schools over 600: Grade Level Planning 1800 SF
Parent/PTA Resource 2100 SF
Park & Recreation Office 250 SF w/toilet
Remedial Resource Room 400 SF

4-2
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-2 – Space Requirements - Elementary

Elementary Level Space Needs – Based on Current Grade Level Configuration of PK-1 and 2-4

Desired Grade Configuration: TBD


Desired School Size: TBD
Desired Student/Teacher Ratio: PK - 15:1; K-2 - 22:1; 3-4 – 24:1

A baseline architectural program was developed for the master plan using the current grade level
configuration divisions (PK-1) and (2-4). This base program can be found in Appendix F. As master plan
options were reviewed, this base program can be adjusted for grade level groupings accordingly.

Elementary Space Program Highlights – based on FCCPS instructional delivery


Classrooms for 160 students/grade level at K-2 (PTR 22:1); 170 students/grade level at
3-5 (PTR 24:1) with future expansion capabilities to 200 students/grade level
Core areas (gym, dining, media center) sized for 200 students/grade level
All classrooms include additional SF for in-class storage and small group learning
Pre-K through Grade 2 classrooms include toilets
Science classroom for upper elementary
OT/PT classrooms
Self contained SE classrooms are sized as regular classrooms
Music includes addition SF for instrument storage for upper elementary
Learning labs (technology) provided at regular classroom size if needed in the future for
content area lab such as science
A number of additional small classrooms for flexibility with small group or pull out
scenarios
Family literacy classroom for students and a parent resource/learning center
Conference/team spaces for professional needs
Ample office spaces for administrative needs, including guidance
Performance space in cafeteria
Teacher dining with kitchenette
Separate daycare classroom(s) with storage

4-3
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-2 – Space Requirements - Elementary

Figure 4-1
FCCPS Comparison of Space Program to State DOE Guidelines

Space DOE Guidelines FCCPS MP Program


GENERAL CLASSROOMS
Pre-K (PTR 15:1) – Grade 1 (PTR 22:1) 975 + 50 (toilet) 975 + 50 + 30 (2,8)
Grade 2 (PTR 22:1) 800 800 + 50 + 30 (2,8)
Grades 3-4 (PTR 24:1) 800 800 + 30 (2,8)
Science n/a 950 (9,12)
Special Needs Self Contained 750 + 50 (toilet) 750 + 50
Special Needs Resource 400 400 – 500 (2,11)
CORE AREAS (1,6,10) - 200/g.l.
Media Center 750 + 2x capacity +570 750 + 2x capacity +570
Dining 1/3 x capacity x 12 ½ x capacity x 12
Gymnasium 3150 + 2000 storage 6000
Auditorium n/a Performance space
OTHER INSTRUCTIONAL (9)
Learning (computer) Lab 800 Classroom sized (1,9,13)
Music/Choral 1000 1000
Band n/a Addt’l storage (9)
Art 1200 1200
FCCPS SPECIFIC
Family Literacy Program n/a classroom + parent resource rm
OT/PT n/a 500
Extended Day Care n/a classroom + storage
IB-PYP n/a learning lab/resource
Professional collaboration n/a Tchr dining & workrooms

Program Areas Related to Increase in Facility Size


Noted in Figure 4-1 in ( )
1. Anticipated increase in student populations 9. Appropriate sized classrooms for art, music,
– core areas sized larger PE/performance, PYP IB curriculum – not in
2. Right-sizing classrooms for current current designs
guidelines and practices and storage needs 10. Appropriate sized dining facility for future
3. Extended Day Care Program (see below) capacity
4. Teacher resource and student resource 11. Increase in students with ESOL and other
needs special needs
5. Additional administration functions 12. Elementary science lab
6. Additional community use/needs 13. Increased space for technology
7. Family Literacy program 14. Increased mechanical/electrical space
8. Flexibility for student grouping needed

4-4
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-2 – Space Requirements - Elementary

Extended Day Care Program – School Year


The Falls Church City Public Schools day care program includes the Extended Day Care Program at Mt.
Daniel and Thomas Jefferson elementary schools and the After School Activities Program (ASAP) at Mary
Ellen Henderson Middle and is available to provide parents an alternate, safe, supervised, enriching
environment for school-age children during hours when parents are unable to provide such an
environment for a variety of reasons. Families enroll for after school full time day care, after school part
time day care and/or before school full time day care.

FCCPS School Board Policy 5.36 (adopted 7/1/08) states “Under the auspices of the Office of the
Assistant Superintendent of Finance and Operations, the School Board approves the use of school
buildings for an Extended Day Care Program outside of regular school hours during the public school
year. The program is available to all school age students (grades K-7) who reside in the City of Falls
Church or who are enrolled in a public or private school in the City of Falls Church. The Superintendent,
in consultation with the Extended Day Care Advisory Board, will issue a regulation which defines
eligibility priorities and adopts administrative procedures for the program.”

It further states: “The School Board will provide facilities to house the Extended Day Care Program,
custodial services, and such equipment as may be shared without affecting adversely the educational
programs in the schools. Use of all facilities and equipment is subject to approval of the Superintendent
or designee.”

Current Capacity and Space Comparison to Master Plan Space Program


Elementary School

Figure 4-2 Current Model

Program Capacity (Student Seats) Facility Size (SF)


Facility Grades Current Projected Shortfall Current MP Shortfall
Program
Mount Daniel PK - 1 275 430 155 (56%) 44,100 81,400 37,300
T Jefferson 2-4 490 525 35 (7%) 60,900 80,800 19,900

Figure 4-3 Efficiency Shift

Program Capacity (Student Seats) Facility Size (SF)


Facility Grades Current Projected Shortfall Current MP Shortfall
Program
Mount Daniel PK - 2 275 600 325(118%) 44,100 95,100 51,000
T Jefferson 3-5 490 525 35 (7%) 60,900 80,600 19,700

4-5
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-3 – Space Requirements – Middle School

4-3 Space Requirements – Middle School

Suggested Square Foot Guidelines for Middle Schools


(based on Virginia DOE DRAFT 3/2007 & BICSI 2003 Recommendations)
Classroom Areas: General Classroom 700 SF
Resource Classroom 500 SF
Science 1200 SF lab/classroom
Core Areas: Media Center Reading Room 1000 SF + 3x capacity - 2800 SF +
office/storage 800 SF
Dining Room 1/3 pupils x 12 – 2400 SF
Kitchen 1000 SF + 1 x capacity – 1600 SF + table/chair
storage 400 SF
Unique Areas: Business/Computer Lab 800 SF
Exploratory Lab 1600 SF
Life Management Lab 1600 SF
Level 1 Special Ed Services 400 SF
Level 2 Special Ed Services 750 SF + 50 SF Toilet - 800
Band/Orchestra 1200 SF
Choral 1000 SF
Art 1200 SF + kiln and storage
Other: Gym 10,000 SF (+ stage 1200 SF)
Lockers 3000 SF each, Offices 200 SF each,
storage 850 SF in/out
For schools over 600: Auxiliary Gym 5000 SF
Health 800 SF
Technology 500 SF MDF / Tech Office
80 SF IDF per every 20,000 SF
ISS 600 SF

4-6
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-3 – Space Requirements – Middle School

Middle School Level Space Needs – Based on Current Grade Level Configuration of Grades 5-7

Desired Grade Configuration: 5-7 or 6-8 (TBD)


Desired School Size: 600
School-within-a-school groups of no more than 200 students
Desired Student/Teacher Ratio: 24:1

Mary Ellen Henderson was designed as a middle grades facility and opened in 2005. As most modern
middle school faculties, Mary Ellen Henderson is organized into interdisciplinary teams for the core
subject areas, which include math, science, social studies and English. The middle school organizational
structure lends itself to a “house” concept. This organization provides a sense of smallness, or “school-
within-a-school” and identity for faculty and students in a building. If the school continues to serve 3
grade levels, it does not appear it will need any near-term programmatic changes. Therefore, a new
space program was not deemed necessary for the purpose of this master plan.

Modifications for program needs such as the band/performance/cafeteria area have been suggested as
part of the interview process. At the time of routine maintenance to the facility, these adjustments can
be considered.

The largest consideration for Mary Ellen Henderson in the master planning process is how the facility
and students will relate to other needs on the existing site.

Current Capacity and Space Comparison to Master Plan Space Program


Middle School

Figure 4-4 Current Model

Program Capacity (Student Seats) Facility Size (SF)


Facility Grades Current Projected Shortfall Current MP Shortfall
Program
ME Henderson 5-7 or 6- 600 600 0 128,800 N/A N/A
8

4-7
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-4 – Space Requirements – High School

4-4 Space Requirements – High School

Suggested Square Foot Guidelines for High Schools


(based on Virginia DOE DRAFT 3/2007 & BICSI 2003 Recommendations)
General Classroom 700 SF
Science 1400 SF if lab/classroom
Resource Classrooms 700 SF
Reading/ESL Lab 600 SF
Media Center Reading Room 1000 SF + 3x capacity - 4000 SF
+ library office / rooms 1000
Dining Room 1/3 pupils x 12 – 4000 SF
Kitchen 1000 SF + 1 x capacity – 2000 SF
Kitchen Serving 2300 SF
Computer Lab 800 SF
Business Lab 900 + office / storage 250 SF
World Language Lab 700 SF
Testing/Itinerant 100 SF
Specialized Learning Labs 900 – 3000 SF, depending on program &
equipment
Level 1 Special Ed Services 400 SF
Level 2 Special Ed Services 750 SF + 50 SF Toilet - 800 SF
Band/Orchestra 1600 SF + 450 SF storage
Choral 1000 SF +storage
Art 1400 SF lab + 400 SF kiln and storage
700 SF classroom / 750 SF darkroom
Gym 10,000 SF
Auxiliary Gym 5000 SF
5000 SF each lockers, 100 SF each offices,
1000 SF each storage
Health 800 SF
Auditorium #/grade x 8 SF/pupil + 4000 SF stage
and support areas
Technology 500 SF MDF / Tech Office
80 SF IDF per every 20,000 SF
Career Center 200 SF
Drama 1000 SF
Teacher Planning 275 SF each
Distributive Ed 750 SF
ISS 600 SF
Student Commons 2000 SF

4-8
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-4 – Space Requirements – High School

High School Level Space Needs – Based on Current Grade Level Configuration of Grades 8-12

Desired Grade Configuration: 8 – 12 or 9 – 12 (TBD)


Desired School Size: 800 – 1000
(depending on 4 or 5 grade level configuration)
Desired Student/Teacher Ratio: 24:1 in core classes; 20:1 in CTE

A baseline architectural program was developed for the master plan using the current grade level
configuration of grades 8-12 with a comparison program for grades 9-12. This base program can be
found in Appendix F.

High School Space Program Highlights – based on FCCPS instructional delivery


Classrooms for 185 students/grade level (PTR 24:1) with future expansion capabilities to
200 students/grade level
Core areas (gym, dining, media center) sized for 200 students/grade level
Five ‘discipline’ departments – English, Math, Science, Social Studies, World Language
Each department area contains variety of classroom, computer resource, learning labs –
depending on content area needs and teacher resource area, ESOL and special needs
content, student toilets, technology
Key relationships to each discipline have been identified (i.e. World Language and film
study to English)
An interdisciplinary commons that includes the media center and resources such as a
presentation (black box) area, small group and individual assessment, and
computer/media resources to connect to core disciplines
Separate visual and performing arts departments with associated learning labs
Auditorium w/seating for 1000 anticipating community use
Changing Career and Technical needs anticipated, several large labs with teacher
resource area
Athletic facilities sized for student body and community use, including fitness center for
students and faculty
Variety of Special Education classrooms for specific needs (OT/PT, life skills, sensory
room, etc.)
Special Education Transition Center
Ample office spaces for administrative needs, including guidance
Technology support services with testing lab/student resource area
Separate guidance/career center/parent support area
Dining sized for ½ student body to allow flexibility of space use for community
Community use maintained – TLC and community TV station

4-9
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-4 – Space Requirements – High School

Figure 4-5
FCCPS Comparison of Space Program to State DOE Guidelines

Space DOE Guidelines FCCPS MP Program


GENERAL CLASSROOMS
Classrooms (PTR 24:1) 700 800 (2,6)
Science 1400+prep/storage 1800 (2)
Special Needs Self Contained 750 + 50 (toilet) 750 + 50
Special Needs Resource 400 500 (2,10)
CORE AREAS (1,5,8) - 200/g.l.
Media Center 1000 + 3x capacity + 1000 + 3x capacity ++ (6, 11)
Dining 1/3 x 12 ½ x 12 (5,8)
Gymnasium 10,000 + storage 12,000 + storage
Auditorium 8 x GL + 4000 8 x 1000 + 4000 (5)
OTHER INSTRUCTIONAL (6,7)
Learning (computer) Lab 800 900 (2)
Music/Choral 1000 + storage 1000 + storage
Band 1600 + storage 1600 + storage
Art 1400 + storage 1400 + storage
Health 800 800
Career & Tech Classroom (PTR 20:1) 900 – 1200 900 - 1200
Career & Tech Lab/Classroom 900 – 3000 1500 (7)
FCCPS SPECIFIC
5 Departmental Areas n/a classrooms/labs/storage/teacher
work/toilets/ESOL/SE in each
Interdisciplinary Commons n/a Includes MC, student work/display
Independent Study n/a dispersed throughout
Integrated ESOL n/a based in WL & dispersed
Changing C&T n/a flexible lab space
SE Transitional Center n/a own entry/integrated
TLC/HE n/a A TLC –type space per agreement
Community TV n/a similar to present space
Alternative Ed n/a potential to move on campus
Professional collaboration n/a teacher workrooms, guidance,
administration

4-10
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-4 – Space Requirements – High School

Program Areas Related to Increase in Facility Size


Noted in Figure 4-5 in ( )

1. Right-sizing for student populations 7. Appropriate sized classrooms for art, music,
2. Right-sizing classrooms for current PE, Performance, IB curriculum, Career and
guidelines and practices, project-based and Technical – not in current2 design
inquiry-based learning and storage needs 8. Appropriate sized dining facility for capacity
3. Teacher resource and student resource 9. Increase in ESOL needs
needs 10. Increase in students with special needs
4. Additional administration functions 11. Increased space for technology
5. Additional community use/needs 12. Increased mechanical/electrical space
6. Flexibility for modern programming needed

Figure 4-6
High School Level Space Program Summary – Comparison for 800 and 1000 Students

HS 800 HS 1000
Area 9-12 8-12 Difference
English 13,110 14,710 2 classrooms
Math 10,910 12,510 2 classrooms
Science 17,310 20,910 2 classrooms
Social Studies 11,510 12,310 1 classroom
World Language 10,660 13,310 3 classrooms, 2 breakouts
Library/Media Services 6,450 7,350 1 conference
Interdisciplinary Resources 3,000 3,000 1 small group
Fine & Performing Arts 28,100 28,100
Career & Techical 8,300 8,300
Health/Physical Education 35,100 36,900 health classrooms
Special Education 6,900 6,900
Technology Support Services 3,370 3,450 data closets
Guidance 3,800 4,400 counselors, itinerants, conference
Health Services 1,000 1,000
Food Services 11,050 12,450 dining area
Administration 3,170 3,170
Safety/Security 410 410
Mechanical and Maintenance 11,030 11,783 mechanical equipment
Subtotal 185,180 200,963
35% circulation and walls 64,813 70,337
Total Area 250,000 271,300

4-11
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-4 – Space Requirements – High School

Key Relationships Identified in High School Programming

English World Languages, Film Study, Interdisciplinary Commons, Outdoor


Amphitheater

Mathematics Science, Cafeteria (math lab during lunch), Interdisciplinary Commons

Science Mathematics & Technology (STEM), IB Design Tech/Robotics,


Technical/Engineering/Architectural Drawing, Photo/Art (chemical
storage), Interdisciplinary Commons, Outdoor Amphitheater / Demo

Social Studies English, Interdisciplinary Commons

World Language English, Theatre Arts/Black Box, Counseling (for ESOL), Gourmet Cooking,
Film Study, Interdisciplinary Commons

Interdisciplinary Core Disciplines (especially English and Social Studies), IB Project Display,
Commons Teaching and Student Services Department, Outdoor Amphitheater

Fine and Performing World Languages, English, Career Ed, Outdoor Access
Arts

Career & Technical Core Disciplines (mostly science), Visual and Performing Arts
Education

Health/PE/Athletics Outdoor access, Community

Teaching & Student Counseling, Administration, Library, Interdisciplinary Commons


Support Services

Administration/Safety Community, Students


and Building Services

Current Capacity and Space Comparison to Master Plan Space Program - High School

Figure 4-7 – Current Model


Program Capacity (Student Seats) Facility Size (SF)
Facility Grades Current Projected Shortfall Current MP Shortfall
Program
George Mason 8-12 1055 1000 0 200,025 272,000 71,975

Figure 4-8 – Traditional Grade Level Model


Program Capacity (Student Seats) Facility Size (SF)
Facility Grades Current Projected Shortfall Current MP Shortfall
Program

4-12
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-4 – Space Requirements – High School

George Mason 9-12 1055 800 0 200,025 250,000 49,975

4-5 Other FCCPS Educational Programs/Centers

High School Alternative Education – Currently Housed at the Gage House

The Falls Church City Public Schools endeavors to provide alternative educational programming to meet
the needs of identified students and to better ensure their future success. The high school alternative
education program, designed for students who are not successful due to academic, social or behavioral
difficulties in the traditional high school setting, operates on the following mission, philosophy and
goals:

Mission

To provide small, individualized educational programs that promote the development of academic and
behavioral competencies for students whose needs are not met in the traditional high school setting.

Philosophy/Beliefs

Responsibility and ownership for programs must be shared.


Programs are flexible and transparent.
Programs that provide unique and authentic experiences in caring and enriching environments.
Staff collaboration is essential.
Community respect and recognition is imperative.
Alternative education programs are inclusive and provide opportunities for all identified general
and special education students.
Positive student-teacher relationships promote learning.

Goals

All academic programs and services will be responsive to students’ needs.


Programs will foster shared conversations among counseling staff, school administrators, and
teachers.
Critical achievement data will be shared about each student.

The master planning process includes the assessment of the Gage House facility and discussions about
the implications of moving the program from off campus to an on campus facility (per recommendation
of the 2007-2008 Alternative Education Program Evaluation).

The program currently operates in a single classroom accommodating no more than 8 students. It has
been suggested that if considering a move, the facility program should include:

private, yet not isolated, self-contained classrooms

4-13
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-5 – Other FCCPS Educational Programs/Centers

the ability to use all high school resources (library, PE, Science, labs, cafeteria)
storage for all course books and other materials, more than a regular classroom
duplication of the domestic characteristics (food, refrigerator, microwave, stove, etc.) of Gage
House
separate meeting room for 2-3 people, visitors, social workers, probation officers,
counselors, etc.
separate small parking area (students, visitors)

A facility of approximately 5,000 SF would provide the above program and allow for expandability of
services to include:

2 classrooms
2 break out rooms for testing/1:1 work
administrative office
conference room
teacher work room
student break room
toilets
related mechanical/technology spaces

Non-Program Facilities

Other facilities to consider in the final master plan include:

School Board Offices 7,500 SF

Central Operations (currently housed in George Mason):


Security, Facilities, Maintenance,
Transportation 10,000 SF

4-14
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-6 – Conclusion – Programming that Meets Master Plan Goals

4-6 Conclusion – Programming That Meets Master Plan Goals

The development of educational specifications and resulting space programs meet the master plan
goals:

Ensure that future school facilities will keep pace with anticipated growth, educational goals, and the
priorities of the City of Falls Church.

Enrollment projections were considered on a low to high scale to develop near and long term
capacities.
Space programs for the master plan consider short term needs with expandability for future
enrollments at the elementary level, and at highest anticipated enrollment (200/g.l.) at the high
school level.
Considerations for enrollment increases from kindergarten to high school were included.

Identify opportunities for improvements in infrastructure, in organization, and in teaching by


examining the relationships between technology, academics, and school design.
Innovate where possible to create facilities that are environmentally sensitive, technologically
capable, and that offer a cutting edge learning environment.

Steering and Design Committee included members from staff at all levels, administration,
governing bodies, government, and community.
Design Committee was tasked with exploring the relationship between teaching and learning
and space needs.
State guidelines were considered for space programs, but Falls Church program delivery was
higher priority.

Facilitate cooperation between the Falls Church City Public Schools and other community groups, to
provide infrastructure that can meet multiple needs, as appropriate.

All master plan programs include core facilities sized to serve community use needs (dining
rooms, auditorium, gymnasiums, meeting rooms, daycare)

4-15
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
4-7 – Summary of Long-Term Space Needs

4-7 - Summary of Long-Term Space Needs

Using the baseline master plan architectural program (Appendix F), and adjusting for potential option
scenarios, long term space needs were developed. Options for consideration should include
demonstration of the space implications of various grade level configurations. Because Mary Ellen
Henderson was opened in 2005 (128,800SF), a new space program was not deemed necessary at the
middle grades level for the purpose of this master plan. It will serve grades 5-7 or grades 6-8 well into
the future.
Figure 4-9 – Master Plan Options - Elementary Level

Grade Level Facility Size Expandable Capacity


Configuration Design Capacity MP Program
PK – 1 430 81,400 490
2-4 525 80,800 630
PK-2 600 95,100 680
3-5 525 80,600 650
PK-K 250 62,000 290
1-4 700 98,400 830
PK-5 1125 152,300 1330
PK-4 950 139,000 1120

Figure 4-10 - Current Elementary Facilities

Grade Level
Configuration Program Capacity Facility Size
PK – 1 275 44,100
2-4 490 60,900

Figure 4-11 – Master Plan Options - High School Level

Grade Level Facility Size


Configuration Design Capacity MP Program
8-12 1000 272,000
9-12 800 250,000

Figure 4-12 – Current High School Facility

Grade Level
Configuration Program Capacity Facility Size
8-12 1055 200,025

4-16
 

   

Chapter 5 

MASTER PLAN  
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
5‐ –1 Option Development 

 
5‐1 – Option Development 
 
Options for meeting the future facility need were developed based on the parameters established in 
previous stages of work.  These parameters included the following: 
 
• Existing Infrastructure (Chapter 2) 
• Enrollment Forecast (Chapter 2) 
• Planning Numbers (Chapter 2) 
• Educational Specification (Chapter 3) 
• Space Standards (Chapter 4) 
• Estimate of Space Needs (Space Program) (Chapter 4) 
 
Combining these items creates a summary of the square footages that are needed to meet the future 
educational needs of the Falls Church City Public Schools through the year 2028. 
 
The two “bookend” options – Minimum (minimum physical change) and Maximum (maximum physical 
change) establish the endpoints for the range of options available.  The Scheme A (minimum) option 
defines a manner in which a series of minimum renovations and grade level adjustments can be made to 
accommodate the anticipated future growth in school population.   The Scheme E (maximum) option 
explores the possible result of making maximum operational and physical changes, in order to 
accomplish the ideal vision of the future Falls Church City Public Schools in twenty years.  This vision 
disregards the existing infrastructure and anticipates a fresh start, with the goal of achieving the ideal 
grade level configuration and all desired services for both the schools and the community. 
 
The interim schemes, Schemes B, C, and D show various approaches to meeting the future needs using 
variations of the following: 
 
• Grade Level Configurations 
• Utilization of Sites 
• Maximization of Existing Infrastructure  
• Approximation of the Ideal Future Vision 
 
The images on the following pages are massing diagrams, showing the relative volume of space 
renovated, used as‐is, or constructed under each scheme.  The use of sites is depicted in columns, to 
illustrate the difference between options in which one existing site is used to those in which all existing 
sites are used. 
 
Detailed sketches, phasing, and costing information are included for the final recommended option in 
Chapter 6 – Recommended Option. 
 

5‐1 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
5‐2 Scheme A 

5‐2 – Scheme A (Minimum)  
PRE K AND K 62,000SF/ 1THROUGH 4 98,700SF /5 THROUGH 7 128,788SF / 8 THROUGH 12 272,000SF 
 
The Scheme A Minimum option maintains the schools as closely to the current location and utilization as 
possible, while still meeting future needs.  Under this option, there are some grade level re‐alignments 
to accommodate increasing numbers of students on sites capable of handling that increase.  The result 
is the following, by school site: 
 
Mount Daniel ‐ Pre‐K to K 
This option leaves Mount Daniel largely as an existing building, with the western portion receiving 
renovation, while the eastern portion would be demolished , reconfigured, and expanded for better 
efficiency and accessibility This multilevel addition creates a compact and efficient footprint to minimize 
land use. 
a. Land Issues‐existing zoning allowable square footage‐ height restrictions acceptable‐
additional parking‐reconfigured play area‐stormwater configurations‐utility capacity 
confirmation 
b. Site Issues ‐ existing vehicular circulation to remain 
c. Architectural Issues‐ eastern portion of building reconfigured to meet accessibility 
requirements and growth projections 
d. MEP Issues‐ existing systems for renovation and new system for new construction 
e. Phasing Issues‐ demolition, new construction, and renovation of existing extends 
construction schedule into school year and leans towards closure of school and needed 
swing space 
 
Thomas Jefferson – Grades 1‐4 
Thomas Jefferson is renovated in the eastern portions of the facility, and demolition, reconfiguration, 
and expansion takes place along the western portion of the building to accommodate the projected 
growth. This multilevel addition creates a compact and efficient footprint to minimize land use. Limited 
land square footage will require compromises in elements such as parking and play space unless 
additional land is acquired to allow full expansion of these elements. 
a. Land Issues‐ rezoning required for square footage‐ height restrictions acceptable‐
additional parking‐ reconfigured play area ‐stormwater configurations‐ utility capacity 
confirmation‐ land acquisition is recommended 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ vehicle drop off areas created 
c. Architectural Issues‐ western portion of the building reconfigured to provide efficient 
class space and drop off/ pick up capabilities 
d. MEP Issues‐ existing systems for renovation and new system for new construction 
e. Phasing Issues‐ demolition, new construction, and renovation of existing extends 
construction schedule into school year and  leans towards closure of school until 
completion and needed temporary swing space 
 
Mary Ellen Henderson ‐ Grades 5‐7  
This option involves minor renovation to maintain Mary Ellen Henderson in good condition and 
reconfigure some group space elements. 
a. Land Issues‐ existing zoning allowable square footage‐ height restrictions acceptable‐
existing parking‐existing play area‐existing stormwater‐ utility capacity confirmation 

5‐2 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
5‐2 Scheme A 

b. Circulation Issues‐ existing vehicle configurations 
c. Architectural Issues‐ existing large group gathering spaces reconfigured for enhanced 
acoustics and sightlines 
d. MEP Issues‐ existing systems modified for the food service/ performance area of the 
school 
e. Phasing Issues‐ renovation of gathering space over summer months 
 
George Mason  ‐ Grades 8‐12 
This option creates a new more efficient academic wing on the existing building by means of an east end 
demolition /reconstruction/new addition.  The multilevel addition includes more appropriate space for 
academic teaching, theater and other arts classes, athletics, as well as for spaces community use.  A new 
welcoming entrance establishes the building’s identity and simplifies way‐finding. A possible joint use 
library would be developed in the area currently occupied by the practice gym on the northern side. 
a. Land Issues‐ existing zoning allowable square footage‐ height restrictions acceptable‐
additional parking‐reconfigured outdoor area‐stormwater configurations ‐ utility 
capacity confirmation – playing fields remain in position 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ vehicular access reconfigured for ring road configuration‐
relocated parking areas 
c. Architectural Issues‐ reconfiguring eastern portion of school for efficiency and public 
use‐ existing building renovations still inefficient 
d. MEP Issues‐area demolished houses major MEP for existing building‐staged 
reconstruction to support existing building and new construction during off school 
portion of year 
e. Phasing Issues‐ demolition, new construction, of spaces that house major MEP elements 
requires a summer construct for this area‐ renovations could then take place the 
next summer 
 
PROS ‐Mt Daniel receives needed reconfigurations ‐Thomas Jefferson expands to meet needs with new 
images  ‐Mary Ellen Henderson gets needed corrections ‐ Portions of  George Mason are reoriented and 
made more efficient and public friendly  
CONS ‐ no real redesign of existing outdated buildings ‐continued maintenance of existing older 
facilities‐ temporary academic swing space needed during construction 
 
 

5‐3 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
5‐3 Scheme B 

5‐3 – Scheme B  
PRE K AND K 62,000SF/ 1THROUGH 4 98,700SF /5 THROUGH 7 128,788SF / 8 THROUGH 12 272,000SF 
 
Mt Daniel Grades Pre K‐ K 
Mt Daniel receives a combination of renovation on the western portion of the existing building and 
demolition, reconfiguration, and multilevel expansion on the eastern end of the building to 
accommodate the projected student growth 
a. Land Issues‐existing zoning allowable square footage‐ height restrictions acceptable‐
additional parking‐reconfigured play area‐stormwater configurations‐utility capacity 
confirmation 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ existing vehicular circulation to remain 
c. Architectural Issues‐ eastern portion of building reconfigured to meet accessibility 
requirements and growth projections 
d. MEP Issues‐ existing systems for renovation and new system for new construction 
e. Phasing Issues‐ demolition, new construction, and renovation of existing extends 
construction schedule into school year and leans towards closure of school and needed 
swing space 
 
Thomas Jefferson ‐ Grades 1‐4 
Thomas Jefferson is renovated in the eastern portions of the facility, and demolition, reconfiguration 
and expansion takes place along the western portion of the building to accommodate the projected 
growth. This multilevel addition creates a compact and efficient footprint to minimize land use. Limited 
land square footage will require compromises in elements such as parking and play space unless 
additional land is acquired to allow full expansion of these elements. 
a. Land Issues‐ land acquisition recommended‐ rezoning required for square footage‐ 
height restrictions acceptable‐additional parking‐ reconfigured play area‐ stormwater 
configurations‐ utility capacity confirmation 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ vehicle drop off areas created 
c. Architectural Issues‐ western portion of the building reconfigured to provide efficient 
class space and drop off/ pick up capabilities 
d. MEP Issues‐ existing systems for renovation and new system for new construction 
e. Phasing Issues‐ demolition, new construction, and renovation of existing extends 
construction schedule into school year and  leans towards closure of school until 
completion and needed temporary academic swing space 
 
Mary Ellen Henderson ‐ Grades 5‐7 
This option involves minor renovation to maintain Mary Ellen Henderson in good condition and 
reconfigure some group space elements. 
a. Land Issues‐ existing zoning allowable square footage‐ height restrictions acceptable‐
existing parking‐existing play area‐existing stormwater‐ utility capacity confirmation 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ existing vehicle configurations 
c. Architectural Issues‐ existing large group gathering spaces reconfigured for enhanced 
acoustics and sightlines 
d. MEP Issues‐ existing systems modified for the food service/ performance area of the 
school 
e. Phasing Issues‐ renovation of gathering space over summer months 

5‐4 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
5‐3 Scheme B 

 
 
George Mason ‐ Grades 8‐12 
The Existing George Mason Facility and related  site elements would be demolished to make way for an 
new multilevel School Building, associated site elements, and expanded parking, all reoriented for 
enhanced community access and use. 
a. Land Issues‐ rezoning required for needed square footage‐ height restrictions 
acceptable‐additional parking‐reconfigured outdoor area‐stormwater configurations ‐ 
utility capacity confirmation – playing fields reconfiguration for construction phasing 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ vehicular access reconfigured for ring road configuration‐
relocated parking areas 
c. Architectural Issues‐ new construction coordinated with existing demolition 
d. MEP Issues‐ new building systems with solar add on capabilities 
e. Phasing Issues‐ minimized disruption of High School involves construction of new facility 
on existing playing fields, demolition of existing, and redevelopment of playing fields in 
the old building location. Alternatively, if the physical position of the high school is to 
remain at the corner with no relocation of playing fields, then temporary academic 
swing space (trailers, vacant buildings, etc) would be utilized during the demolition and 
reconstruction in the same position. 
 
PROS ‐Mt Daniel receives needed reconfigurations ‐Thomas Jefferson expands to meet needs with new 
images  ‐Mary Ellen Henderson gets needed corrections ‐ George Mason is reconstructed and made 
more efficient and public friendly  
CONS – construction disturbs each site ‐continued maintenance of existing older facilities‐ temporary 
academic swing space needed during construction 
 

5‐5 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
5‐4 Scheme C 

5‐4 – Scheme C 
PRE K ‐1 82,000SF/2 THROUGH 5 98,700 /6 THROUGH 8 128,788SF / 9 THROUGH 12 250,000SF 
 
Mt Daniel ‐ Grades Pre K –1 
This option leaves Mount Daniel largely as an existing building, with the western portion receiving 
renovation, while the eastern portion would be demolished , reconfigured, and expanded for better 
efficiency and accessibility This multilevel addition creates a compact and efficient footprint to minimize 
land use. 
a. Land Issues‐existing zoning allowable square footage‐ height restrictions acceptable‐
additional parking‐reconfigured play area‐stormwater configurations‐utility capacity 
confirmation 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ existing vehicular circulation to remain 
c. MEP Issues‐ existing systems for renovation and new system for new construction 
d. Phasing Issues‐ demolition, new construction, and renovation of existing extends 
construction schedule into school year and leans towards closure of school and needed 
swing space 
 
Thomas Jefferson ‐ Grades 2‐5 
This option involves the demolition of the existing facility and site elements, and creates a 2‐5 
elementary school on this site. This multilevel addition creates a compact and efficient footprint to 
minimize land use. 
a. Land Issues‐ land acquisition recommended‐ rezoning required for square footage‐ 
height restrictions acceptable‐additional parking‐ reconfigured play area stormwater 
configurations‐ utility capacity confirmation 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ community and site vehicle and pedestrian circulation 
reconfiguration possible 
c. Architectural Issues‐ new construction 
d. MEP Issues‐ new building systems with solar add on capabilities 
e. Phasing Issues‐ demolition, new construction requires relocation of students to 
alternative temporary academic swing space until completion‐ no cross construction 
allowed in flood plane 
 
Mary Ellen Henderson ‐ Grades 6‐8 
This option involves minor renovation to maintain Mary Ellen Henderson in good condition and 
reconfigure some group space elements. 
a. Land Issues‐ existing zoning allowable square footage‐ height restrictions acceptable‐
existing parking‐existing play area‐existing stormwater‐ utility capacity confirmation 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ existing vehicle configurations 
c. Architectural Issues‐ existing large group gathering spaces reconfigured for enhanced 
acoustics and sightlines 
d. MEP Issues‐ existing systems modified for the food service/ performance area of the 
school 
e. Phasing Issues‐ renovation of gathering space over summer months 
 
George Mason ‐ Grades 9‐12 

5‐6 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
5‐4 Scheme C 

The Existing George Mason Facility and related  site elements would be demolished to make way for an 
new multilevel School Building, associated site elements, and expanded parking, all reoriented for 
enhanced community access and use. 
a. Land Issues‐ rezoning required for needed square footage‐ height restrictions 
acceptable‐additional parking‐reconfigured outdoor area‐stormwater configurations ‐ 
utility capacity confirmation – playing fields reconfiguration for construction phasing 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ vehicular access reconfigured for ring road configuration‐
relocated parking areas 
c. Architectural Issues‐ new construction coordinated with existing demolition 
d. MEP Issues‐ new building systems with solar add on capabilities 
e. Phasing Issues‐ minimized disruption of High School involves construction of new facility 
on existing playing fields, demolition of existing, and redevelopment of playing fields in 
the old building location. Alternatively, if the physical position of the high school is to 
remain at the corner with no relocation of playing fields, then temporary academic 
swing space ( trailers, vacant buildings, etc) would be utilized during the demolition and 
reconstruction in the same position. 
 
PROS ‐Mt Daniel receives needed reconfigurations ‐Thomas Jefferson new construction to meet needs 
with new aesthetics  ‐Mary Ellen Henderson gets needed corrections ‐ George Mason new construction 
made more efficient and public friendly  
CONS – construction disturbs each site ‐continued maintenance of existing older facilities‐ temporary 
academic swing space needed during construction 

5‐7 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
5‐5 Scheme D 

5‐5 – Scheme D 
Option 1 
PRE K THROUGH 1 82,000SF / 2 THROUGH 5 98,700SF /6 THROUGH 8 128,788SF / 9 THROUGH
12 250,000SF
Option 2 
PRE K THROUGH 2 95,456SF / 3 THROUGH 5 80,595SF /6 THROUGH 8 128,788SF / 9 THROUGH
12 250,000SF
 
Mt Daniel –Site  existing building expanded and reconfigured to accommodated additional sf 
 
Thomas Jefferson ‐ Grades  2‐5 OR 3‐5    
The existing Thomas Jefferson Building and Site elements are demolished to make way for the 
construction of a new multilevel Pre K through 2 facility and related support functions on site . 
a. Land Issues‐ land acquisition recommended‐ rezoning required for square footage‐ 
height restrictions acceptable‐additional parking‐ reconfigured play area stormwater 
configurations‐ utility capacity confirmation 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ community and site circulation reconfiguration 
c. Architectural Issues ‐new construction 
d. MEP Issues‐ existing systems for renovation and new system for new construction 
e. Phasing Issues‐ demolition, new construction requires relocation of students to 
alternative temporary academic swing space until completion‐ no cross construction 
allowed in flood plane 
 
 
Mary Ellen Henderson ‐ Grades 6‐8  
This option involves minor renovation to maintain Mary Ellen Henderson in good condition and 
reconfigure some group space elements 
a. Land Issues‐ existing zoning allowable square footage‐ height restrictions acceptable‐
existing parking‐existing play area‐existing stormwater‐ utility capacity confirmation 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ existing vehicle configurations 
c. Architectural Issues‐ existing large group gathering spaces reconfigured for enhanced 
acoustics and sightlines 
d. MEP Issues‐ existing systems modified for the food service/ performance area of the 
school 
e. Phasing Issues‐ renovation of gathering space over summer months 
 
 
 
George Mason ‐ Grades 9‐12 
The Existing George Mason Facility and related  site elements would be demolished to make way for an 
new multilevel School Building, associated site elements, and expanded parking, all reoriented for 
enhanced community access and use. 
a. Land Issues‐ rezoning required for needed square footage‐ height restrictions 
acceptable‐additional parking‐reconfigured outdoor area‐stormwater configurations ‐ 
utility capacity confirmation – playing fields reconfiguration for construction phasing 

5‐8 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
5‐5 Scheme D 

b. Site Circulation Issues‐ vehicular access reconfigured for ring road configuration‐
relocated parking areas 
c. Architectural Issues‐ new construction coordinated with existing demolition 
d. MEP Issues‐ new building systems with solar add on capabilities 
e. Phasing Issues‐ minimized disruption of High School involves construction of new facility 
on existing playing fields, demolition of existing, and redevelopment of playing fields in 
the old building location. Alternatively, if the physical position of the high school is to 
remain at the corner with no relocation of playing fields, then temporary academic 
swing space ( trailers, vacant buildings, etc) would be utilized during the demolition and 
reconstruction in the same position. 
 
PROS ‐ Thomas Jefferson recreated to meet needs with new aesthetics  ‐Mary Ellen Henderson gets 
needed corrections ‐  a new elementary facility is created George Mason is reconstructed and made 
more efficient and public friendly  
CONS – construction disturbs each site ‐ temporary academic swing space needed during construction

5‐9 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
5‐6 Scheme E 

5‐6 – Scheme E 
Maximum Scheme E
PRE K THROUGH 2 95,456SF / 3 THROUGH 5 128,788SF / 6 THROUGH 12 378000SF
 
Mt Daniel –Site used for alternative community use 
 
Thomas Jefferson ‐ Grades PRE K –2    
The existing Thomas Jefferson Building and Site elements are demolished to make way for the 
construction of a new multilevel Pre K through 2 facility and related support functions on site. 
a. Land Issues‐ land acquisition recommended‐ rezoning required for square footage‐ 
height restrictions acceptable‐additional parking‐ reconfigured play area stormwater 
configurations‐ utility capacity confirmation 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ community and site circulation reconfiguration 
c. Architectural Issues ‐new construction 
d. MEP Issues‐ existing systems for renovation and new system for new construction 
e. Phasing Issues‐ demolition, new construction requires relocation of students to 
alternative temporary academic swing space until completion‐ no cross construction 
allowed in flood plane 

Mary Ellen Henderson ‐ Grades 3‐5 
This option involves minor renovation to accommodate the switch to a 3‐5 grade occupation and 
maintain Mary Ellen Henderson in good condition and reconfigure some group space elements. 
a. Land Issues‐ existing zoning allowable square footage‐ height restrictions acceptable‐
existing parking‐existing play area‐existing stormwater configuration ‐ utility capacity 
confirmation 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ existing vehicle configurations 
c. Architectural Issues‐ existing large group gathering spaces reconfigured for enhanced 
acoustics and sightlines 
d. MEP Issues‐ existing systems modified for the food service/ performance area of the 
school 
e. Phasing Issues‐ renovation of gathering space over summer months 
 
New George Mason ‐ Grades 6‐12 
The Existing George Mason Facility and related  site elements would be demolished to make way for an 
new multilevel School Building, associated site elements, and expanded parking, all reoriented for 
enhanced community access and use. A possible joint use library would be included. 
a. Land Issues‐ rezoning required for needed square footage‐ height restrictions 
acceptable‐additional parking‐reconfigured outdoor area‐stormwater configurations ‐ 
utility capacity confirmation – playing fields reconfiguration for construction phasing 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ vehicular access reconfigured for ring road configuration‐
relocated parking areas 
c. Architectural Issues‐ new construction coordinated with existing demolition 
d. MEP Issues‐ new building systems with solar add on capabilities 
e. Phasing Issues‐ minimized disruption of High School involves construction of new facility 
on existing playing fields, demolition of existing, and redevelopment of playing fields in 
the old building location. Alternatively, if the physical position of the high school is to 

5‐10 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
5‐6 Scheme E 

remain at the corner with no relocation of playing fields, then temporary academic 
swing space (trailers, vacant buildings, etc) would be utilized during the demolition and 
reconstruction in the same position. 
 
 
PROS ‐all existing dated buildings are removed from the system ‐ new construction oriented for school 
system and community joint uses  
CONS ‐high construction costs and multiyear phasing scenarios‐ temporary academic swing space 
needed during construction 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

5‐11 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
5‐6 Scheme E 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This page intentionally left blank 

5‐12 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Massing Diagrams Schemes A‐E 

 
5‐13 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Massing Diagrams Schemes A‐E 

 
5‐14 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Massing Diagrams Schemes A‐E 

 
5‐15 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Massing Diagrams Schemes A‐E 

 
5‐16 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Massing Diagrams Schemes A‐E 

 
5‐17 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Massing Diagrams Schemes A‐E 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This page intentionally left blank. 
 
 
 

5‐18 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Areas of Construction/Expansion – Existing Sites 

 
5‐19 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Areas of Construction/Expansion – Existing Sites 

5‐20 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Areas of Construction/Expansion – Existing Sites 

 
5‐21 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Areas of Construction/Expansion – Existing Sites 

 
5‐22 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Areas of Construction/Expansion – Existing Sites 

5‐23 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Areas of Construction/Expansion – Existing Sites 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This page intentionally left blank. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

5‐24 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme A 

5‐25 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme A 

5‐26 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme A 

5‐27 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme A 

5‐28 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme A 

5‐29 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme A 

5‐30 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme B 

5‐31 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme B 

5‐32 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme B 

5‐33 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme B 

5‐34 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme B 

5‐35 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme B 

5‐36 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme C 

5‐37 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme C 

5‐38 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme C 

5‐39 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme C 

5‐40 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme C 

5‐41 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme C 

5‐42 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme D 

5‐43 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme D 

5‐44 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme D 

5‐45 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme D 

5‐46 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme D 

5‐47 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme D 

5‐48 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme D 

5‐49 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme D 

5‐50 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme D 

5‐51 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme D 

5‐52 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme E 

5‐53 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme E 

5‐54 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme E 

Scheme E Thomas Jefferson

5‐55 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme E 

5‐56 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme E 

 
5‐57 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Scheme E 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

5‐58 
 

Chapter 6 

MASTER PLAN  
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Preferred Option 
 
6–1  Preferred Option 

 
6‐1 – Preferred Option 
 
The range of schemes described in Chapter 5 were discussed and reviewed by the administration and 
the school board for the Falls Church City Public Schools, and a preferred strategy was developed for 
moving forward.   
 
One of the driving factors contributing to the decision to focus the bulk of construction and expansion at 
Thomas Jefferson Elementary School is the pressure of increasing enrollment at the elementary level.  
Throughout the planning study, the elementary grades (1‐5) have required approximately seven 
classrooms per grade level, with numbers of students varying between 20 and 25 students per class.  
Moving into the future, the enrollment numbers already bear out the forecasted increases in 
elementary students, and administration is beginning to plan for eight classrooms per grade level.  This 
increase is expected to ripple through the school system over time, eventually affecting all grade levels. 
 
A second key factor applied to the decision‐making between options was the desire to address as many 
issues as possible with the minimum construction required.  While the capacity issue appears most 
critical at the elementary level, George Mason High School is also reaching a breaking point in terms of 
ability to handle increased capacity, and has problems that will need to be addressed during the next 20 
years.   
 
This preferred option recommended for implementation was identified as a combination of the schemes 
defined in the previous chapter, with minor modifications as follows:   
 
• Mt. Daniel (PreK‐1)– Primarily follows Scheme A, with adjustment for grade level utilization to 
retain Grade 1. 
• Thomas Jefferson (2‐5) – Primarily follows Scheme C, with adjustment for minimal 
renovation/addition in lieu of major reconstruction 
• Mary Ellen Henderson (6‐8) – Follows Scheme D 
• George Mason (9‐12) – Primarily follows Scheme A, with adjustment for grade level 8 to move to 
Mary Ellen Henderson, and for minimal renovations to occur over the 20 year planning period in 
lieu of complete facility replacement. 
 
This blended option offers the unique ability to address a series of facility and curriculum problems in 
the system through one initial step – moving fifth grade from Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School to 
Thomas Jefferson Elementary School.  This shift will create the following improvements throughout the 
Falls Church City Public Schools: 
 
• Grade levels will be better aligned with curriculum and contemporary pedagogical approach, 
with fifth grade in the elementary school, sixth to eighth grades in the middle school, and a high 
school consisting of ninth to twelfth grades.   
• Eighth grade will still be adjacent to George Mason, allowing the current blending of coursework 
to continue across grade levels. 
• George Mason will have expansion capacity at the high school grade levels. 

6‐1 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
6‐1 – Preferred Option 

• Thomas Jefferson will have an opportunity to improve undersized spaces, remedy poor lighting 
in the building interior, bring outdated life safety systems up to current standards, remove 
trailers in front of the building, and add sufficient classrooms for 20‐year growth.   
 
This chapter describes details of the final option recommended for implementation.  The 20‐year 
planning window is divided into five‐year intervals of activity.  This chapter places heavy emphasis on 
Phase I, with brief, general descriptions of subsequent phases.  Those phases will require further 
definition closer to the time of implementation to determine, within that context, the details of what 
will be required to complete the goals identified in this study for each phase.   
 
Graphics on the following pages represent the final preferred option in the manner in which options A 
through E were depicted in Chapter 5.  The first image shows an order‐of‐magnitude graphic for the 
amount of effort to occur (both new and renovated space) at each school facility.  The subsequent 
images show the final anticipated site build‐out at each location at the end of the fully executed Master 
Plan. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

6‐2 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Preferred Option 
 
6–1  Preferred Option 

6‐3 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
6‐1 – Preferred Option 

6‐4 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Preferred Option 
 
6–1  Preferred Option 

6‐5 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
6‐1 – Preferred Option 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This page intentionally left blank. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

6‐6 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Preferred Option 
 
6‐ –2  Phase I (2011‐2016) – Overview 

 
6‐2 ‐ Phase I (2011‐2016) 
 
Phase I of the Preferred Option includes a major renovation/addition effort at Thomas Jefferson 
Elementary School to allow the fifth grade to re‐join the older elementary school children.  This addition 
will also size up the cafeteria and other core spaces to meet the anticipated 20‐year needs, will add the 
necessary expansion classrooms for 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grades, and will allow capacity inside the school so 
that all the trailers can be removed from the front of the school.   
 
Thomas Jefferson – Grades 2‐5 
This option focuses all construction and renovation efforts at Thomas Jefferson.   
a. Land Issues‐ land acquisition recommended‐ rezoning required for square footage‐ 
height restrictions acceptable‐additional parking‐ reconfigured play area stormwater 
configurations‐ utility capacity confirmation 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ community and site vehicle and pedestrian circulation 
reconfiguration possible.  Loading zone and employee parking modifications required, 
which may involve re‐zoning or at a minimum careful phasing. 
c. Architectural Issues‐ new construction, renovation.   Staging on limited site area may be 
a concern. 
d. MEP Issues‐ new building systems with solar add on capabilities, life‐safety upgrades to 
add sprinklers throughout facility. 
e. Phasing Issues‐ demolition, new construction requires relocation of students to 
alternative temporary academic swing space until completion‐ no cross construction 
allowed in flood plane 
 
Mary Ellen Henderson ‐ Grades 6‐8 
This phase involves minor renovation to maintain Mary Ellen Henderson to accommodate the specific 
requirements of eighth grade science laboratories.  The facility is generally in good condition and has 
sufficient expansion capabilities to allow all other work to be completed under the CIP budget. 
a. Land Issues‐ n/a 
b. Site Circulation Issues‐ n/a 
c. Architectural Issues‐ existing large group gathering spaces reconfigured for enhanced 
acoustics and sightlines, laboratory upgrades required. 
d. MEP Issues‐ n/a 
e. Phasing Issues‐ renovation completed over summer months 
 
Activity at Mt. Daniel and George Mason will be minimal during this phase  
 
 
 
 
 

6‐7 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
6‐2 – Phase I (2011‐2016) – Space Requirements 

 
Space Requirements 
 
A detailed program of space needs was developed in order to complete massing and preliminary costing 
on the Thomas Jefferson Elementary School site, recommended for Phase I.  This program, included 
below, incorporates the appropriate codes and standards government elementary school design in the 
Commonwealth of Virginia and in the City of Falls Church, and gives the closest possible pre‐design 
estimate of square footages of new and renovated space required in order to meet the goals of moving 
5th grade into this facility and right‐sizing other existing spaces.  
 
The program included here uses estimates of current room sizes taken from building floor plans to assist 
in creating an inventory of rooms which exist and rooms which are needed as part of the expansion.  
Rooms for which there was no specific use identified are labeled “??”. Spaces are organized by function, 
rather than by current locations or adjacencies within the building, and include existing room numbers 
to assist with matching spaces listed here to actual rooms. 
 
The right side of the table summarizes the new and renovated space that is estimated to be required to 
complete Phase I at Thomas Jefferson Elementary School.  These columns total where new rooms are 
needed, indicate any relevant space standard (including interior wall thicknesses), and then calculate the 
total square footage of new or renovated space.  The total departmental gross square feet per function 
(minus public corridors) are included in the TOTAL SF/FUNCTION column at the far right of the table.   
 
The building grossing factor was estimated based on the existing net‐to‐gross efficiency and was applied 
to the total new and renovated square footages.  This grossing factor should account for public corridor 
spaces and exterior wall thicknesses. 
 
The recommended renovations/additions will bring the existing school structure’s approximately 64,000 
building gross square feet up to a total of approximately 89,000 building gross square feet, adding 
roughly 25,000 building gross square feet of new space and renovating approximately 2,600 square feet 
of existing building space. 

1.000 Administration 
1.000 Administration PHASE I
Room  Floor  NSF  No. of  TOTAL SF /  No. of  Space  SF  TOTAL SF / 
No. Room Name (current) (current) Rooms FUNCTION New  Standard Shortfall SF New Renovation FUNCTION
Building Entrance 1             425 1               425       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   425
RR Main Restrooms  1             125 2               250       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   250
210 Main Office 1             820 1               820       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   820
212 Principal's Office 1             200 1               200       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   200
216 Teacher's Lunch Room 1             300 1               300       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   300
214 School Nurse 1             195 1               195       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   195
Counselor's Office 1             110 1               110       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   110
220 ?? 1             100 1               100       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   100
218 ?? 1               64 1                  64       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                     64
        2,339            2,464       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐               2,464  

6‐8 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Preferred Option 
 
6‐2 – Phase I (2011‐2016) – Space Requirements 

2.000 Physical Education 
2.000 Physical Education PHASE I
Room  Floor  NSF  No. of  TOTAL SF /  No. of  Space  SF  TOTAL SF / 
No. Room Name (current) (current) Rooms FUNCTION Rooms Standard Shortfall SF New Renovation FUNCTION
100 Gymnasium G         5,100 1            5,100       ‐           6,010             910                 ‐                   910               6,010
Entry Gym Building Entry/Exit G             348 1               348       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   348
104 Gym Storage G             630 1               630       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   630
RR Gym Restrooms G             306 2               612       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   612
CL Janitor's Closet G               30 1                  30       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                     30
Gymnasium Office G             150 1               150       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   150
        6,564            6,870       ‐             910                 ‐                   910               7,780  
3.000 Specialty Classrooms 
3.000 Specialty Classrooms PHASE I
No. of 
Room  Floor  NSF  No. of  TOTAL SF /  New  Space  SF  TOTAL SF / 
No. Room Name (current) (current) Rooms FUNCTION Rooms Standard Shortfall SF New Renovation FUNCTION
101 Math G             115 1               115       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   115
104 Storage G         1,550 1            1,550       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐               1,550
105 OT/PT G             560 1               560       ‐ 560             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   560
106 Music G             760 1               760       ‐ 1000             240             1,000                    ‐               1,000
106 S Music Storage G             150 1               150       ‐ 300             150                 300                    ‐                   300
109 ?? G             300 1               300       ‐ 300             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   300
127 ESOL G             450 1               450           1 500               50                 500                    ‐                   500
125 Art G             920 1               920           1 1200             280                 ‐                   446               1,366
125 K Kiln G             125 1               125           1 125             ‐                 ‐                   125                   125
128 Science Lab G             490 1               490           1 900             410                 410                    ‐                   900
129 Tech G             490 1               490           1 500               10                 500                    ‐                   500
133 Special Education G             260 1               260       ‐ 400             140                 140                    ‐                   400
137 Special Education G             325 1               325       ‐ 400               75                   75                    ‐                   400
140 TAAP Teacher's office (trailer) G             744 1               744           1 900             900                 900                    ‐                   900
141 Tech. Resource Teacher (trailer) G             744 1               744           1 900             900                 900                    ‐                   900
142 Spanish (trailer) T             960 1               960           1 900             900                 900                    ‐                   900
143 Spanish/Health (trailer) T             960 1               960           1 900             900                 900                    ‐                   900
209 Spanish (second grade hall) 1             300 1               300           1 450             150                 150                    ‐                   450
144 ESOL (trailer) T             836 1               836           1 900             900                 900                    ‐                   900
145 Daycare (trailer) T             836 1               836           1 900             900                 900                    ‐                   900
108 Daycare Storage T             125 1               125           1 150             150                 150                    ‐                   150
Science Lab           1 900             900                 900                    ‐                   900
Total ‐ Specialty Classrooms       12,000         12,000         7,955             9,525                   571             14,916  
4.000 Second Grade Wing 
4.000 Second Grade Wing PHASE I
Room  Floor  NSF  No. of  TOTAL SF /  No. of  Space  SF  TOTAL SF / 
No. Room Name (current) (current) Rooms FUNCTION Rooms Standard Shortfall SF New Renovation FUNCTION
201 Second Grade Classroom 1             828 1               828       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   828
203 Second Grade Classroom 1             840 1               840       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   840
205 Second Grade Classroom 1             840 1               840       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   840
211 Second Grade Classroom 1             780 1               780       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   780
237 Second Grade Classroom 1             780 1               780       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   780
200 Second Grade Classroom 1             978 1               978       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   978
202 Second Grade Classroom 1             828 1               828       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   828
204 A Reading 1             300 1               300       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   300
204 B Reading 1             240 1               240       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   240
207 Special Education 1             688 1               688       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   688
223 Special Education 1             288 1               288       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   288
Total ‐ Second Grade Wing         7,390            7,390             ‐                 ‐                    ‐               7,390  

6‐9 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
6‐2 – Phase I (2011‐2016) – Space Requirements 

5.000 Third Grade Wing 
5.000 Third Grade Wing PHASE I
Room  Floor  NSF  No. of  TOTAL SF /  No. of  Space  SF  TOTAL SF / 
No. Room Name (current) (current) Rooms FUNCTION Rooms Standard Shortfall SF New Renovation FUNCTION
206 Third Grade Classroom 1         1,028 1            1,028       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐               1,028
208 Third Grade Classroom 1             880 1               880       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   880
226 Third Grade Classroom 1             805 1               805       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   805
230 Third Grade Classroom 1             835 1               835       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   835
229 Third Grade Classroom 1             936 1               936       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   936
227 Third Grade Classroom 1             680 1               680       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   680
228 Third Grade Classrm (Math Lab) 1             812 1               812       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   812
221 Special Education 1             288 1               288       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   288
231 A Special Education 1             560 1               560       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   560
231 B Speech 1             195 1               195       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   195
225 ?? 1             235 1               235       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   235
RR Restrooms 1             316 2               632       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   235
Total ‐ Third Grade Wing         7,570 13            7,886             ‐                 ‐                    ‐               7,489

6.000 Fourth Grade Wing 
6.000 Fourth Grade Wing PHASE I
Room  Floor  NSF  No. of  TOTAL SF /  No. of  Space  SF  TOTAL SF / 
No. Room Name (current) (current) Rooms FUNCTION Rooms Standard Shortfall SF New Renovation FUNCTION
300 Fourth Grade Classroom 2             586 1               586       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   586
302 Fourth Grade Classroom 2             782 1               782       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   782
304 Fourth Grade Classroom 2             734 1               734       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   734
306 Fourth Grade Classroom 2             720 1               720       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   720
309 Fourth Grade Classroom 2             805 1               805       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   805
307 Fourth Grade Classroom 2             886 1               886       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   886
305 Fourth Grade Classroom 2             751 1               751       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   751
303 A Special Education 2             370 1               370       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   751
303 B Special Education 2             370 1               370       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   370
RR Restrooms 2             330 2               660       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   370
Total ‐ Fourth Grade Wing         6,334 11            6,664             ‐                 ‐                    ‐               6,755

7.000 Fifth Grade Wing 
7.000 Fifth Grade Wing PHASE I
Room  Floor  NSF  No. of  TOTAL SF /  No. of  Space  SF  TOTAL SF / 
No. Room Name (current) (current) Rooms FUNCTION Rooms Standard Shortfall SF New Renovation FUNCTION
NEW Fifth Grade Classroom                ‐           8               900         7,200             7,200                    ‐               7,200
NEW Special Education                ‐           2               450             900                 900                    ‐                   900
NEW Restrooms                ‐           2               400             800                 800                    ‐                   800
Total ‐ Fifth Grade Wing              ‐          ‐                ‐         8,900             8,900                    ‐               8,900  
8.000 Kitchen/Cafeteria 
8.000 Kitchen/Cafeteria PHASE I
Room  Floor  NSF  No. of  TOTAL SF /  No. of  Space  SF  TOTAL SF / 
No. Room Name (current) (current) Rooms FUNCTION Rooms Standard Shortfall SF New Renovation FUNCTION
Entry Cafeteria Exterior Entrance G             363 1               363       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   363
110 Cafeteria G         2,665 1            2,665           1           3,600             935                 935                    ‐               3,600
ST Cafeteria Storage G             200 1               200       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   200
113 Serving Line G             360 1               360       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   360
115 Kitchen G         1,353 1            1,353           1           1,353             ‐                 ‐                   197               1,550
ST Cold Storage G             197 1               197           1               300             103                 300                    ‐                   300
Annex G             601 1               601       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   601
RR Restroom  G             282 2               564       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   564
Total ‐ Kitchen/Cafeteria         6,021 9            6,303         1,038             1,235                   197               7,538  

6‐10 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Preferred Option 
 
6‐2 – Phase I (2011‐2016) – Space Requirements 

9.000 Library/Media Center 
9.000 Library/Media Center PHASE I
Room  Floor  NSF  No. of  TOTAL SF /  No. of  Space  SF  TOTAL SF / 
No. Room Name (current) (current) Rooms FUNCTION Rooms Standard Shortfall SF New Renovation FUNCTION
217 Library 1         1,845 1            1,845           1           2,950         1,105                 200                   905               2,950
233 ?? 1             129 1               129       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   129
213 ?? 1             129 1               129       ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   129
        2,103            2,103         1,105                 200                   905               3,208  
10.000 Mechanical/Building Support 
10.000 Mechanical/Building Support (also included in building grossing) PHASE I
Room  Floor  NSF  No. of  TOTAL SF /  No. of  Space  SF  TOTAL SF / 
No. Room Name (current) (current) Rooms FUNCTION Rooms Standard Shortfall SF New Renovation FUNCTION
135 Boiler/Mechanical G 644 1               644       ‐                ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   644
135 S Boiler/Mechanical Storage G 83 1                  83       ‐                ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                     83
M1 Mechanical (kitchen) G 87 1                  87       ‐                ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                     87
M2 Mechanical (kitchen) G 168 1               168       ‐                ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   168
M3 Mechanical (tower) G 545 1               545       ‐                ‐             ‐                 ‐                    ‐                   545
Mnew New Mechanical 1               250             250                 250                    ‐                   250
        1,527            1,527                 250                    ‐               1,777

Totals 
SF  TOTAL SF / 
SF New Renovation FUNCTION
School Total DGSF          53,207 DGSF             20,110
               2,583
School Total BGSF          64,158 BGSF             25,138             89,296

Grossing Factor Current               1.21 Addition 1.25

The following pages indicate possible stacking and phasing options for implementation of Phase I at 
Thomas Jefferson Elementary School.  Graphics on the subsequent pages illustrate the final 
recommended activity on each site during Phase I, and the ultimate anticipated build out.   

6‐11 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
6‐2 – Phase I (2011‐2016) – Space Requirements 

 
Stacking and Phasing 
 
The scope of the project defined as Phase I for Thomas Jefferson has two different goals and areas of 
focus within the building, which enable the Phase I work to easily be divided into a two‐stage project.   
 
The first stage is the fifth grade addition.  This portion of the Phase I work will add the classrooms 
required to bring the fifth grade back into Thomas Jefferson, to remove two of the trailers, and to 
expand the kitchen and cafeteria for the full master planned build‐out of the school.  This first stage of 
Phase I would add approximately 14,000 new building gross square feet to the existing structure and 
would renovate approximately 1,000 SF of existing space.  The table below indicates the program 
elements that would be included in the first stage, which would be vertically stacked in one single three‐
story addition to the existing facility. 
 
5th Grade Addition:
Room  Floor  NSF  No. of  Users  Avg SF  TOTAL SF /  No. of  Space  SF  TOTAL SF / 
No. Room Name (current) (current) Rooms (current) per User FUNCTION Rooms Standard Shortfall SF New Renovation FUNCTION
0 Total ‐ Fifth Grade Wing            ‐            ‐            ‐            ‐            ‐                 ‐            ‐            ‐        8,900          8,900               ‐            8,900
110 Cafeteria G        2,665               1            ‐            ‐             2,665               1        3,600           935             935               ‐            3,600
115 Kitchen G        1,353               1            ‐            ‐             1,353               1        1,353            ‐              ‐              197            1,550
Mnew New Mechanical            ‐            ‐            ‐            ‐            ‐                 ‐               1           250           250             250               ‐               250
100 Gymnasium G        5,100               1            ‐            ‐             5,100            ‐        6,010           910              ‐              910            6,010
145 Daycare (trailer) T           836               1            ‐            ‐                836               1           900           900             900               ‐               900
108 Daycare Storage T           125               1            ‐            ‐                125               1           150           150             150               ‐               150

     10,079           10,079        11,135           1,107         21,360


BGSF       13,919          1,107         15,026  
 
The second stage of Phase I consists of renovating internal circulation of the building, adding specialty 
classrooms, and adding the regular classrooms needed for the final master‐planned build‐out of second, 
third, and fourth grades.  It would also allow the last remaining trailers to be removed from the site.  
This second stage of Phase I would add approximately 10,600 building gross square feet in a two‐story 
addition and would renovate at least 1,500 SF of existing space.  Additional renovations beyond those 
indicated in the program table below are possible, due to disruption along existing corridors.   
2nd Grade Wing Addition:

Room  Floor  NSF  No. of  Users  Avg SF  TOTAL SF /  No. of  Space  SF  TOTAL SF / 
No. Room Name (current) (current) Rooms (current) per User FUNCTION Rooms Standard Shortfall SF New Renovation FUNCTION
ST Cold Storage G           197               1            ‐            ‐                197               1           300           103             300               ‐               300
217 Library 1        1,845               1            ‐            ‐             1,845               1        2,950        1,105             200              905            2,950
106 Music G           760               1            ‐            ‐                760            ‐        1,000           240          1,000               ‐            1,000
106 S Music Storage G           150               1            ‐            ‐                150            ‐           300           150             300               ‐               300
127 ESOL G           450               1            ‐            ‐                450               1           500              50             500               ‐               500
125 Art G           920               1            ‐            ‐                920               1        1,200           280              ‐              446            1,366
125 K Kiln G           125               1            ‐            ‐                125               1           125            ‐              ‐              125               125
128 Science Lab G           490               1            ‐            ‐                490               1           900           410             410               ‐               900
129 Tech G           490               1            ‐            ‐                490               1           500              10             500               ‐               500
133 Special Education G           260               1            ‐            ‐                260            ‐           400           140             140               ‐               400
137 Special Education G           325               1            ‐            ‐                325            ‐           400              75                75               ‐               400
140 TAAP Teacher's office (trail G           744               1            ‐            ‐                744               1           900           900             900               ‐               900
141 Tech. Resource Teacher (traG           744               1            ‐            ‐                744               1           900           900             900               ‐               900
142 Spanish (trailer) T           960               1            ‐            ‐                960               1           900           900             900               ‐               900
143 Spanish/Health (trailer) T           960               1            ‐            ‐                960               1           900           900             900               ‐               900
209 Spanish (second grade hall) 1           300               1            ‐            ‐                300               1           450           150             150               ‐               450
144 ESOL (trailer) T           836               1            ‐            ‐                836               1           900           900             450               ‐               900
0 Science Lab               1           900           900             900               ‐               900

     10,556           10,556          8,525           1,476         14,591


BGSF       10,656          1,476         12,132  
TOTALS BGSF        24,575           2,583         27,158  

6‐12 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Preferred Option 
 
6‐2 – Phase I (2011‐2016) – Conceptual Images 

6‐13 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
6‐2 – Phase I (2011‐2016) ‐ Conceptual Images 

6‐14 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Preferred Option 
 
6‐2 – Phase I (2011‐2016) – Conceptual Images 

6‐15 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
6‐2 – Phase I (2011‐2016) ‐ Conceptual Images 

6‐16 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Preferred Option 
 
6‐3 – Phase II 

6‐3 ‐ Phase II (2017‐2021) 
With the elementary and middle school needs met through the planning period by the work completed 
in Phase I, Phase II will focus on George Mason High School.  This phase will include a major renovation 
and possible partial replacement of George Mason High School, with a focus on  
 
• improving internal building and external site circulation,  
• enhancing community access to and use of the facility during non‐school hours, and  
• replacement of outdated/failing mechanical systems with high‐efficiency systems utilizing solar 
or other renewable energy.   
 
As part of this renovation process, some of the multi‐level areas in George Mason will be modified to 
give the facility a more consistent feel and flow, to improve way‐finding, and to help co‐locate related 
functions in closer proximity to one another. 
 
 
6‐4 ‐ Phase III (2022‐2026) 
Phase III will return to the elementary schools, and two possible options.   
 
Phase III A could include a buildout of Thomas Jefferson Elementary School to allow one elementary to 
accommodate children from pre‐Kindergarten level through 5th grade.  Some details related to this 
project include the following: 
 
• This addition is anticipated to occur on the front of the existing building, and will require 
adjacent land acquisition.   
• Some reconfiguration of vehicular circulation along Oak Street is recommended as part of this 
project to provide a drop‐off/pick‐up zone away from the road. 
• The classroom “community” for the younger children will be separate from the “community” of 
older children, to maintain the sense of scale Falls Church has had with two separate elementary 
schools. 
 
This project will free the Mt. Daniel campus for sale or re‐use by the City. 
 
Alternatively, should two campuses for elementary schools continue to be the preferred option, Phase 
III B would focus on demolition of older, inefficient portions of Mt. Daniel and new construction of a 
three story addition to the existing building.  The current footprint would be maintenance to protect 
play area and trailers would be removed.  This option will maintain the current four schools and three 
campuses familiar to the City, while providing all necessary expansion at the elementary levels. 
 
6‐5 ‐ Phase IV (2027‐2031) 
If all other phases are executed successfully and growth continues as anticipated, Phase IV will see a 
break from capital construction.  During this phase CIP is expected to be required at Mary Ellen 
Henderson to update and replace any damaged or outdated components to what will be a 20+ year old 
facility.  An updated master plan is also recommended during this phase to adjust and re‐direct efforts in 
the subsequent years.  It is recommended that the master plan be completed prior to any re‐use or 
disposal decisions on Mt. Daniel Elementary School. 

6‐17 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Summary 

 
6‐5 ‐ Summary 
This Master Plan has given a general direction overall for the Falls Church City Public Schools to follow in 
maintaining stable, safe, and appropriate school facilities to meet the needs of all students at all grade 
levels over the coming 20 years.  This plan, as all plans, is more specific in the near future, becoming less 
specific moving into the further and less defined future years at the outside of the planning window. 
 
As with any planning document, any initiatives derived from this document should be thoroughly 
reviewed within the context in which they are being implemented to determine any deviations from the 
original recommendations, and to provide the necessary detail for complete execution of the plan. 

6‐18 
 

   

Appendix A 

MASTER PLAN  
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
Appendix A - FCCPS Facility Master Plan Committee Members

FCCPS Facility Master Plan Steering Committee


Lois Berlin, Superintendent Cindy Mester, Assistant City Manager
Bob Burnett, Citizen/Parent Bob Nissen, FCCPS Maintenance
Gloria Guba, Assistant Superintendent Supervisor
of Instruction Seve Padilla, Security and Facility Use
Susan Kearney, School Board Member Coordinator
(Ron Pepe, alternate) Melissa Teates, FC Planning
Hunter Kimble, Assistant Committee/Parent
Superintendent of Finance & Ex Officio: Warren Walker,
Operations CDG/Arcadis

FCCPS Facility Master Plan Design Committee


Debbie Baird, Visual and Performing Mary McDowell, Interim Principal,
Arts K-12 George Mason High School
Vincent Baxter, Principal, Thomas Carol Monsess, Language Arts K-1
Jefferson Elementary Briana Platt, Special Education K-4
Lisa Blandford, Science 5-7 Louisa Porzel, Social Studies 8-12
Barry Buschow, Village Preservation & Bill Royce, President, Mary Ellen
Improvement Society Henderson Middle School PTA
Sally Cole, Exec. Director, Falls Church Debbie Schantz-Hiscott, President,
Chamber of Commerce Elementary PTA
Rory Dippold, Social Studies 5-7 Danny Schlitt, Recreation & Parks
Donna Englander, Exec. Director, Falls Jeanne Seabridge, Career & Technical
Church Education Foundation Education 5-12
Vicki Galliher, Health/PE K-10 Rachelle Sharrer, Elementary PTA
Kathy Halayko, Principal, Mt. Daniel Sarah Shaw, English 5-7
Elementary School Sydney Snyder, ESOL K-12
Tom Horn, Athletic Director, George Janet Weber, Math K-12
Mason High School Nick Werkman, Special Education 5-7
Jane Johansen, George Mason PTSA Paige Whitlock, English 8-12
Linda Johnsen, Foreign Language K-12 Maggie Wiseman, Science 8-12
Mary Klink, Language Arts 2-4 Mike Wolfe, Athletic Boosters
Steve Knight, Technology K-12 TBA, Band Boosters
Pam Mahony, Special Education 8-12
Ann McCarty, Principal, Mary Ellen Ex-Officio, All Members of the
Henderson Middle School Steering Committee

Appendix A - 1
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
Appendix A - FCCPS Facility Master Plan Committee Members

This page intentionally left blank

Appendix A - 2
 

   

Appendix B 

MASTER PLAN  
 

   

Appendix C 

MASTER PLAN  
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix C ‐ Site‐Specific Educational Specification Worksheets 

 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Site‐Specific Educational Specification Worksheet – Elementary School 
 
Date: 
Project Name and Location:  
Total Student Capacity Planned for this Project:  _____  600    _____ 700 
  _____ other (specify) 
 School‐Within‐a‐School Model:   
Student/Teacher Ratio Upon Which to Determine Number of Core Academic Classrooms Needed: 
Pre‐K: ________  K: ________  1: ________  2: ________  3: ________               
4: ________  5: ________ 
 
Elementary Amenities per School‐Within‐a‐School Unit: 
    SF per MP Space       
Amenity  Yes  Delineation Example  No  Possibly  Notes / Rationale 
    Same  Adjusted       
PK Classroom             
K‐2 Classrooms             
3‐5 Classrooms             
Teacher Mtg/Wkrm             
Student Toilets             
Storage             
Special Needs SC             
Special Needs Res             
OT/PT             
ESOL             
Other (Specify)             
 

 
Appendix C ‐ 1 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix C ‐ Site‐Specific Educational Specification Worksheets 

Elementary Resource Areas to be offered: 
    SF per MP Space       
Resource Area  Yes  Delineation Example  No  Possibly  Notes / Rationale 
    Same  Adjusted       
Art             
Music             
Science             
Physical Education             
Media Center             
Computer Lab             
Dining             
Site‐based Program(s)             
Other (specify)             
Extended Daycare             
             
 
Elementary Administration & Related Areas: 
    SF per MP Space       
Service/Support Area  Yes  Delineation Example  No  Possibly  Notes / Rationale 
    Same  Adjusted       
Administration             
Records/Work Area             
Guidance             
Clinic             
Student Support             
Services 
Family Literacy             
ITRT             
Data Closets             
Parent Resource             
Toilets             
Resource Officer (SRO)             
Mech/Maintenance             
Other (Specify)             
 
Grossing Factor to Be Used When Calculating Total Building Size: 
Target Building Size:    ________ SF        Estimated Building Size:  ________ SF 

 
Appendix C ‐ 2 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix C ‐ Site‐Specific Educational Specification Worksheets 

 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Site‐Specific Educational Specification Worksheet – Middle School 
 
Date: 
Project Name and Location:  
Total Student Capacity Planned for this Project:  _____ 600    _____ 800 
  _____ other (specify) 
 School‐Within‐a‐School Model:   
Student/Teacher Ratio Upon Which to Determine Number of Core Academic Classrooms Needed: 
5th/6th grade: ________   6th/7th grade: ________   7th/8th grade: ________ 
 
Middle School Amenities per School‐Within‐a‐School Unit: 
    SF per MP Space       
Amenity  Yes  Delineation Example  No  Possibly  Notes / Rationale 
    Same  Adjusted       
Teacher Workroom             
Student Toilets             
Administration Office             
Itinerant Office             
Storage             
Computer Lab             
SE Services             
ESOL Services             
Other (Specify)             
             
             
 
 

 
Appendix C ‐ 3 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix C ‐ Site‐Specific Educational Specification Worksheets 

Middle School Expanded Core Areas to be Offered:  
    SF per MP Space       
Expanded Core Area  Yes  Delineation Example  No  Possibly  Notes / Rationale 
    Same  Adjusted       
Art             
Band             
Orchestra             
Chorus             
P.E.             
Health             
World Language             
Exploratory (specify)             
CTE (specify)             
Teacher Workroom             
Site‐based Program(s)             
Other (specify)             
 
Middle School Administration & Other Services/Support Areas: 
    SF per MP Space       
Admin/Service Area  Yes  Delineation Example  No  Possibly  Notes / Rationale 
    Same  Adjusted       
Media Center             
Dining             
Forum             
Administration             
Guidance             
ISS             
Clinic             
Student Services             
SE Services             
Title I             
Conference             
ITRT             
Data Closets             
Parent Resource             
Toilets             
Resource Officer (SRO)             
Site‐based Program(s)             
Mech/Maintenance             
Other (Specify)             
 
Grossing Factor to Be Used When Calculating Total Building Size: 
Target Building Size:    ________ SF        Estimated Building Size:  ________ SF 

 
Appendix C ‐ 4 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix C ‐ Site‐Specific Educational Specification Worksheets 

 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Site‐Specific Educational Specification Worksheet – High School 
Date: 
Project Name and Location:  
Total Student Capacity Planned for this Project:  _____  800    _____ 1000 
  _____ other (specify) 
Student/Teacher Ratio Upon Which to Determine Number of Core Academic (Eng/Math/Sci/SS/WL) 
Classrooms Needed: 
dep 1:   ________    dep 2:   ________    dep 3:   ________ 
  dep 4:   ________ 
  dep 5:   ________    dep 6:    ________    dep 7:   ________ 
  dep 8:   ________ 
 
High School Amenities per Department Unit: 
    SF per MP Space       
Amenity  Yes  Delineation Example  No  Possibly  Notes / Rationale 
    Same  Adjusted       
English Classrooms             
Math Classrooms             
Social Studies             
Classrooms 
World Lang Classrooms             
Science Classrooms             
Labs             
Interdisciplinary Lab             
Teacher Resource             
Academic Storage             
Data Closet             
Student Toilets             
SE Services             
ESOL Services             
Other (Specify)             
             
             

 
Appendix C ‐ 5 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix C ‐ Site‐Specific Educational Specification Worksheets 

High School Expanded Core/Electives/CTE Areas to be Offered: 
    SF per MP Space       
Expanded Core Area  Yes  Delineation Example  No  Possibly  Notes / Rationale 
    Same  Adjusted       
Art             
Graphics Lab             
Band             
Orchestra             
Chorus             
Drama/Black Box/TV             
P.E./Athletics             
Fitness             
Health             
Distance Learning             
Electives (specify)             
CTE (specify)             
Teacher Workroom             
Other:             
 
High School Community, Administration & Related Areas: 
    SF per MP Space       
Admin/Service Area  Yes  Delineation Example  No  Possibly  Notes / Rationale 
    Same  Adjusted       
Library Media Center             
Dining             
Auditorium             
Administration             
Guidance & Career             
Compliance Specialist             
ISS             
Clinic/Health Services             
Student Services             
SE Services             
Transition Center             
ESOL             
ITRT / Tech Support             
Data Closets             
Community Use (TLC)             
Toilets             
Resource Officer             
Site‐based Program(s)             
Mech/Maintenance             
Other (Specify)             

 
Appendix C ‐ 6 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix C ‐ Site‐Specific Educational Specification Worksheets 

Grossing Factor to Be Used When Calculating Total Building Size: 
Target Building Size:    ________ SF        Estimated Building Size:  ________ SF 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Appendix C ‐ 7 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix C ‐ Site‐Specific Educational Specification Worksheets 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This page intentionally left blank 

 
Appendix C ‐ 8 
 

   

Appendix D 

MASTER PLAN  
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D ‐ Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

Design Committee Meeting 1 Summary ‐ Instruction & Issues of 21st Century Learning 
 
The objective for Meeting 1 was to begin discussion around the Master Plan goal of ‘identifying 
opportunities for improvements in infrastructure, in organization, and in teaching by examining the 
relationships between technology, academics, and school design.’   This was done by breaking the 
committee into six break‐out groups to review and react to an instructional theory.  During discussion, 
the groups answered a series of questions, and then shared their findings with the entire committee for 
further discussion. 
 
 
Dede – 21st Century Skills 
 
Summary of Theory: 
THE PARTNERSHIP FOR 21ST CENTURY SKILLS  
CHRIS DEDE / HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
 
Emphasize core subjects 
Knowledge and skills for the 21st century must be built on core subjects.  No Child Left Behind 
identifies these as English, reading or language arts, mathematics, science, foreign languages, 
civics, government, economics, arts, history and geography.  Further, the focus on core subjects 
must expand beyond basic competency to the understanding of core academic content at much 
higher levels. 
 
Emphasize Learning Skills 
As much as students need to know core subjects, they also need to know how to keep learning 
continuously throughout their lives.   
Learning skills comprise three broad categories of skills: 
Information and communication skills 
Thinking and problem‐solving skills 
Interpersonal and self‐directional skills 
Incorporate learning skills into classrooms deliberately, strategically and broadly 
 
st
Use 21  Century Tools to Develop Learning Skills 
Students need to learn to use the tools that are essential to everyday life and workplace 
productivity 
ICT Literacy: the interest, attitude and ability of individuals to appropriately use digital 
technology and communication tools to access, manage, integrate and evaluate information, 
construct new knowledge, and communicate with others in order to participate effectively in 
society 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 1 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D – Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

Teach and Learn in a 21st Century Context 
Learn academic content through real‐world examples, applications, and experiences 
Schools must reach out to their communities, employers, community members and, of course, 
parents to reduce the boundaries that divide schools from the real world 
 
Teach and Learn 21st Century Content 
Education and business leaders identified three significant, emerging content areas that are 
critical to success in communities and workplaces:   
global awareness 
financial, economic and business literacy 
civic literacy 
 
Use 21st Century Assessments that Measure 21st Century Skills 
High quality standardized tests measure student’s performance of the elements of a 21st century 
education 
A balance of assessments – high‐quality standardized testing for accountability purposes and 
classroom assessments for improved teaching and learning in the classroom – offers students a 
powerful way to master the content and skills central to success in the 21st century. 
To be effective, sustainable and affordable, sophisticated assessment at all levels must use new 
information technologies to increase efficiency and timeliness 
 
Learning Skills    +  21st Century Tools    =  ICT Literacy 
 
 
THINKING AND      Problem‐solving tools (such    Using ICT to manage, 
PROBLEM‐SOLVING    as spreadsheets,  decision   complexity, solve 
SKILLS        support, design tools)      problems and think 
                  critically, creatively, 
                  and systematically 
 
 
INFORMATION      Communication, information    Using ICT to access, 
AND         processing and research tools  manage, integrate, 
COMMUNICATION    (such as word processing,    evaluate, create and 
SKILLS        e‐mail, groupware, presentation,  communicate 
        Web development, Internet    information 
        search tools 
 
 
INTERPERSONAL    Personal development and  Using ICT to enhance 
AND        productivity tools (such as    productivity and 
SELF‐DIRECTION    e‐learning, time management/  personal development 
SKILLS        calendar, collaboration tools) 
 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 2 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D ‐ Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

What did you find surprising/interesting about your topic? 
• Taking core knowledge and applying it to real‐life situations 
• Breaking down boundaries between school and real world 
• Global awareness 
• Business/financial literacy 
• Innovative thinking (out‐of‐the‐box) 
 
What are the implications for student learning? 
• Are prepared for the adult world at graduation 
• Some concepts aren’t taught 
• More challenging for special populations 
• Students take ownership of their learning 
• Technology focus 
• Different options for learning environments 
 
What are the implications for teaching? 
• Teachers don’t have to be the “expert” 
• Comfort level with technology 
• Differentiation 
• Teachers have to lead the students understanding of curriculum 
• Integration  
 
Is / how is the topic applied today in Falls Church? 
• PYP and MYP are being introduced 
• Arlington Career Center 
• UBD Performance Assessments 
• Technology 
 
How can the findings be applied in the future? 
• Internships 
• E‐learning 
• Dual enrollment 
• Guest speakers from the business world 
• Career study/plan when choosing courses 
• Flexible use of time/space/grouping 
• More student‐driven projects (research) 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 3 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D – Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

Breaking Ranks – Strategies for Improved Performance 
 
Summary of Theory:   
BREAKING RANKS II – SEVEN CORNERSTONE STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVED STUDENT PERFORMANCE, 
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SECONDARY SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 
 
Establish the essential learnings a student is required to master in order to graduate, and adjust the 
curriculum and teaching strategies to realize that goal 
  Focus on mastery, not coverage 
  Raise the level of academic rigor 
Initiate interdisciplinary instruction, teaming and an appropriate emphasis on real‐world 
applications 
Reorganize traditional departmental structures 
 
Increase the quantity and improve the quality of interactions between students, teachers, and other 
school personnel by reducing the number of students for which any adult of adults is responsible 
Reduce a large school into smaller units 
Reduce the number of students for which an individual teacher is responsible 
Create interdisciplinary teams of both teachers and students 
Loop teachers 
 
Implement a comprehensive advisory program that ensures that each student has frequent and 
meaningful opportunities to plan and assess his or her academic and social progress with a faculty 
member 
Personal Adult Advocates for every student 
Personal Plan for Progress 
Specific products or portfolio items demonstrating accomplishment and progress in academic 
areas, school activities, sports and school or community leadership 
 
Ensure that teachers use a variety of instructional strategies and assessments to accommodate 
individual learning styles 
Provide development and teaching opportunities regarding incorporation of seminars, inquiry‐
based learning, cooperative learning, debates, field experience, etc. 
 
Implement schedules flexible enough to accommodate teaching strategies consistent with the ways 
students learn most effectively and that allow for effective teaming and lesson planning 
Adjust the length of the class periods 
Adjust the length of the school day 
Adjust the length of the school year 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 4 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D ‐ Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

Institute structural leadership changes that allow for meaningful involvement in decision making by 
students, teachers, family members, and the community that support effective communication with 
these groups 
 
Align the school wide comprehensive, ongoing professional development program and the individual 
Personal Learning Plan of staff members with the content knowledge and instructional strategies 
required to prepare students for graduation 

Collaborative Leadership/
Professional Learning
Communities

Principal: Vision, Redefine teacher role


Direction & Focus Personal Learning Plans
Site Council for Principal & Teachers
Staff Collaboration Political/Financial
Alliances
Five-Year Review

Small Units Higher Education


Flexible Scheduling Partnerships
Democratic Values Celebrate Diversity
90-Student Coaching Students
Maximum
Improved
Student
Performance Essential Learnings
Alternatives to Tracking
Integrated Curriculum
Personal Plans for Real-World Applications
Progress Caring Teachers Knowledgeable Teachers
Personal Adult Advocate Activities/Service Tied to Integrated Assessment
Families as Partners Learning K-16 Continuity
Community Learning Integrated Technology
Critical Thinking
Learning Styles
Youth Services

Personalizing Your Curriculum, Instruction, and


School Environment Assessment

 
 
What did you find surprising/interesting about your topic? 
• “Focus on mastery, not coverage” yet we have SOL tests 
 
What are the implications for student learning? 
• How do students deal with longer classes/school day/school year when they are currently already 
having issues with stress? 
• Can we have students assess their learning style/needs and essentially “choose” the class that meets 
their learning needs? 
• Develop a “personal action plan for progress” at beginning of students’ careers – allow to see 
purpose/plan for their education 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 5 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D – Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

What are the implications for teaching? 
• How do you find/provide time to staff to create meaningful, real‐life learning?  (planning lessons, 
collaboration) 
• Do the teachers have the resources to keep the students’ attention?  (projectors, easy access to 
Internet, etc.) 
 
Is / how is the topic applied today in Falls Church? 
• We currently try to keep student to teacher ratio low 
• Students are given choices in product (especially in technology)  Is there a way to expand this? 
• Teachers currently work on a Professional Growth Plan (PGP) 
• Efforts to increase interdisciplinary/cross‐curricular connections 
 
How can the findings be applied in the future? 
• Find ways for students to have even more relationships with adults in the school setting who don’t 
grade them 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 6 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D ‐ Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

International Baccalaureate 

Summary of Theory: 
INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM 
INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE ORGANIZATION 
 
Founded in 1968, to date the IBO has authorized 1,123 Diploma Programme schools, 259 Middle Years 
Programme schools and 138 Primary Years Programme schools in 115 countries.  The IBO examines 
nearly 60,000 students per year in the Diploma Programme and trains thousands of teachers each year 
in workshops and at conferences.  The organization has grown consistently at the rate of about 15% per 
annum for the past 10 years. 
 
The International Baccalaureate Program promotes intercultural understanding and respect, not as an 
alternative to a sense of cultural and national identity, but as an essential part of life in the 21st century.  
All of this is captured in their mission statement: 
 
The International Baccalaureate Organization aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable 
and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through 
intercultural understanding and respect. 
 
To this end the IBO works with schools, governments and international organizations to 
develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment. 
These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, 
compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their 
differences, can also be right. 
 
The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme is a challenging two‐year curriculum, primarily 
aimed at students aged 16 to 19. It leads to a qualification that is widely recognized by the world’s 
leading universities.  Students learn more than a collection of facts. The Diploma Programme prepares 
students for university and encourages them to: 
• ask challenging questions  
• learn how to learn  
• develop a strong sense of their own identity and culture  
• develop the ability to communicate with and understand people from other countries and 
cultures.  
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 7 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D – Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

The three core requirements of the IB Diploma Programme are:  extended essay, theory of knowledge, 
creativity, action, service.  All Diploma Programme students must engage in these three activities. 
  
Extended essay 
The extended essay has a prescribed limit of 4,000 words. It offers the opportunity to investigate a topic 
of individual interest, and acquaints students with the independent research and writing skills expected 
at university. 
 
Theory of knowledge (TOK) 
The interdisciplinary TOK course is designed to provide coherence by exploring the nature of knowledge 
across disciplines, encouraging an appreciation of other cultural perspectives. 
   
Creativity, action, service (CAS) 
Participation in the school’s CAS programme encourages students to be involved in artistic pursuits, 
sports and community service work, thus fostering students’ awareness and appreciation of life outside 
the academic arena. 
 

This is illustrated by a hexagon with the three parts 
of the core at its centre. 

Students study six subjects selected from the subject 
groups. Normally three subjects are studied at higher 
level (courses representing 240 teaching hours), and 
the remaining three subjects are studied at standard 
level (courses representing 150 teaching hours). 

 
 
 
 
 
At the end of the two‐year programme, students are 
assessed both internally and externally in ways that measure individual performance against stated 
objectives for each subject.  
  
Internal assessment  
In nearly all subjects at least some of the assessment is carried out internally by teachers, who mark 
individual pieces of work produced as part of a course of study. Examples include oral exercises in 
language subjects, projects, student portfolios, class presentations, practical laboratory work, 
mathematical investigations and artistic performances. 
  

 
Appendix D ‐ 8 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D ‐ Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

External assessment  
Some assessment tasks are conducted and overseen by teachers without the restrictions of examination 
conditions, but are then marked externally by examiners. Examples include world literature assignments 
for language A1, written assignments for language A2, essays for theory of knowledge and extended 
essays. 
 
Because of the greater degree of objectivity and reliability provided by the standard examination 
environment, externally marked examinations form the greatest share of the assessment for each 
subject. 
 
The grading system is criterion based (results are determined by performance against set standards, not 
by each student’s position in the overall rank order); validity, reliability and fairness are the watchwords 
of the Diploma Programme’s assessment strategy. 
 
The IBO works closely with universities in all regions of the world to gain recognition for the IB diploma. 
To aid this process, university admissions officers and government officials have direct online access to 
all syllabuses and recent examinations.  
 
 
What did you find surprising/interesting about your topic? 
• Only 138 PYP 
• 1000 + schools (DP) 
• Must build literacy for successful DP completion 
• Nothing new / minimal PYP description 
 
What are the implications for student learning? 
• The design (our implementation) is perhaps backwards (beginning in HS) 
• Holistic learning approach – multi‐component 
• Is it OK that PYP is for all and DP is exclusive (increase of IP involvement) 
• How does remediation/SPED work/fit? 
 
What are the implications for teaching? 
• How does planning work? 
• Collaboration 
• Professional development 
• Technology can help 
 
Is / how is the topic applied today in Falls Church? 
• Differentiation 
• Inclusion 
• Note ‐ facilities at TJ make this difficult/challenging 
 
How can the findings be applied in the future? 
• Collaborative spaces for learning/planning 
• Technology tools 
 
 
Appendix D ‐ 9 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D – Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

Jukes – Future of Learning 
 
Summary of Theory: 
WINDOWS ON THE FUTURE – EDUCATION IN THE FUTURE 
TED MCCAIN AND IAN JUKES 
 
Education will not be confined to a single place 
Learning will not need to be confined to a single place or a single source – learning will happen 
at home, on the job, or in the community 
 
Education will not be confined to a specific time 
The school day and school year will no longer be predicated on a 5.5 hour day, 180 days a year 
that is a remnant of a time when children were needed in the fields 
There will be much less emphasis on the amount of material memorized and much more 
emphasis on making connections, thinking through issues, and solving problems 
The past – just in case learning, The future – just in time or need to know learning 
 
Education will not be confined to a single person 
By removing the constraints of a physical location and time of day, the new technologies will 
allow people other than teachers to enhance the instruction of students 
 
Education will not be confined to human teachers 
Students will be able to use a personal learning system that knows how they learn 
Teachers will be able to spend more time on the higher‐level thinking skills associated with 
evaluating the information retrieved by the smart agents 
The future will not see teachers replaced, rather technology will create the long desired and 
needed shift in the instructional role that the teacher plays 
 
Education will not be confined to paper‐based information 
As strategic alliances between communications and media companies continue to develop new 
products and services, digital information and learning technologies will become the norm in 
schools 
When students go to school, it is difficult to get them interested in the 2‐dimensional world of 
paper.  That is because they live in a digital, 3‐dimensional, interactive video world outside the 
classroom. 
 
Educational will not be confined to memorization 
As the amount of information continues to double, academic success will depend less and less 
on rote learning and more and more on a student’s ability to process information and use it in a 
discerning manner 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 10 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D ‐ Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

Education will not be confined to linear learning 
Linear learning is compatible with the assembly line model – as technology creates an 
interconnected world, people can construct their own learning webs and personal pathways 
 
Education will not be confined to the intellectual elite 
Until recently the real power in our country was in the hands of the literati – the people of 
paper.  Increasingly that power has been transferred to the clickerati, mouserati, digerati 
 
Education will not be confined to childhood 
Given the rapidly changing nature of our world, people of all ages much constantly learn and 
relearn what they need to know 
 
Education will not be confined to controlling learners 
The traditional educational mind set used a predetermined, predefined, generic cookie cutter 
curriculum that led to a one‐size‐fits all approach the learning 
Learning needs to become a lifelong empowerment process, and technology can help create the 
customized learning experiences that have personal relevance for students 
 
Windows on the Future
New Skills for Students

Reading, Writing,
Arithmetic
+
9 Process Skills

• Problem solving and critical thinking

• Communication skills

• Technical reading and writing

• Applied technical reasoning skills

 
 
 
 
What did you find surprising/interesting about your topic? 
• Scheduling 
 
Appendix D ‐ 11 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D – Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

• So VERY different from current structure 
• No real need for big building??? 
 
What are the implications for student learning? 
• Bridge gap between generation/parents having common “language” with kids 
• Assessment tools – SO varied 
• Pre‐assessments of “starting points” of knowledge of students 
• Grades? 
 
What are the implications for teaching? 
• More responsibility on students/less on teachers/classroom 
• Other adults tasked with teaching beyond teachers (i.e. parents) 
• TIME (lack thereof) 
• Training (lack thereof) 
• Grades? 
 
Is / how is the topic applied today in Falls Church? 
• Angel communication system 
• “UBD” 
• Process skills vs. facts/memorization 
• New TJ report card 
• Differentiated instruction 
 
How can the findings be applied in the future? 
• More Angel/less paper 
• Less class time 
• Authentic assessment 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 12 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D ‐ Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

Stager – Constructionist Learning 
 
Summary of Theory: 
THE CONSTRUCTIONIST LEARNING ENVIRONMENT (PROJECT‐BASED LEARNING) 
GARY STAGER / SEYMOUR PAPERT / JOHN DEWEY 

It takes time to learn: learning is not instantaneous. For significant learning we need to revisit ideas, 
ponder them try them out, play with them and use them. If you reflect on anything you have learned, 
you soon realize that it is the product of repeated exposure and thought. Even, or especially, moments 
of profound insight, can be traced back to longer periods of preparation.  

Motivation is a key component in learning. Not only is it the case that motivation helps learning, it is 
essential for learning. This idea of motivation as described here is broadly conceived to include an 
understanding of ways in which the knowledge can be used. Unless we know "the reasons why", we 
may not be very involved in using the knowledge that may be instilled in us ‐‐ even by the most severe 
and direct teaching.  

Stager’s Work in Applying Constructionist Theory Using Technology 

From 1999 to 2002 Stager was the principal investigator and one of three architects of an alternative 
learning environment operated inside The Maine Youth Center, the state’s troubled juvenile detention 
facility.  Guided by the learning theory of constructionism, a multi‐age, interdisciplinary technology‐rich 
learning environment was created to support the development of personally meaningful projects based 
on student interest, talent and experience. 
 
Students often classified as learning disabled engaged in 
rigorous learning adventures and developed positive personal 
behaviors.  Personal and collaborative long‐range student 
projects incorporated powerful ideas from mathematics, 
science, computer science, engineering and the arts.  
Sophisticated projects resulted from a more expansive view of 
technology that included programming, robotics, 
woodworking and communications via a variety of media. 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 13 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D – Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

The ubiquitous access to computers and computationally rich building materials made a significant 
contribution to both the learning process and the learning environment.  The routine use of computer 
and related technologies allowed students to engage in serious intellectual work, perhaps for the first 
time in their lives.  Technology allowed them to experience the feeling associated with being a 
mathematician, a scientist, an engineer or a filmmaker.  This ‘feeling of wonderful ideas’ is profound and 
absent from even the most successful school reform efforts.  Image a school system in which every child 
felt that he had the personal power, potential and intellect required to meet any challenge. 
 
Since the theory of constructionism suggests that the best way to learning is through the construction of 
something shareable, projects were not a means to an end, but the goal itself.  Projects possess a 
narrative comprised of debugging, experimentation, serendipity, research, collaboration, perspective, 
creativity and ingenuity.  Projects also exhibit habits of mind.  A student’s ability to complete a project 
and explain its creation or how it works represents sophisticated understanding. 
  
What did you find surprising/interesting about your topic? 
• Tie of technology to constructivism 
• Hands‐on projects 
• Active learning 
• Scaffolding 
• Movement 
 
What are the implications for student learning? 
• Movement 
• Space, variety of environments 
• Technology, collaboration 
 
What are the implications for teaching? 
• Pacing, assessment 
• Time‐reflection, multi‐disciplinary 
• Collaboration 
 
Is / how is the topic applied today in Falls Church? 
• IB – diploma, PYP 
• Outdoor classrooms 
 
How can the findings be applied in the future? 
• Variation of teacher certification 
• Differentiation 
• Project‐based learning 
• More focus on process 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 14 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D ‐ Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

Millennials Rising 
 
Summary of Theory: 
MILLENNIALS RISING – THE NEXT GREAT GENERATION 
NEIL HOWE / WILLIAM STRAUSS 
 
If most Americans aren’t very hopeful about today’s rising generation, it’s because so many of them 
figure that history generally moves in straight lines. They assume the next batch of youths will follow 
blindly along all the life‐cycle trends initiated (thirty and forty years ago) by Boomers and confirmed (ten 
and twenty years ago) by Gen Xers. These trends point to more selfishness in personal manner, more 
splintering in public purpose, more profanity in culture and daily discourse, more risk‐taking with sex 
and drugs, more apathy about politics, and more crime, violence, and social decay. 
 
How utterly depressing. And how utterly wrong. 
Yes, there’s a revolution under way among today’s kids—a good news revolution. This generation is 
going to rebel by behaving not worse, but better. Their life mission will not be to tear down old 
institutions that don’t work, but to build up new ones that do. Look closely at youth indicators, and 
you’ll see that Millennial attitudes and behaviors represent a sharp break from Generation X, and are 
running exactly counter to trends launched by the Boomers.  
 
Across the board, Millennial kids are challenging a long list of common assumptions about what 
"postmodern" young people must become. The name ‘Millennial’ hints at what this rising generation 
could grow up to become—not a lame variation on old Boomer/Xer themes, but a new force of history, 
a generational colossus far more consequential than most of today’s parents and teachers (and, indeed 
most kids) dare imagine. 
 
Today’s kids are on track to become a powerhouse generation, full of technology planners, community 
shapers, institution builders, and world leaders, perhaps destined to dominate the twenty‐first century 
like today’s fading and ennobled G.I.Generation dominated the twentieth.  
 
In today’s America, one hears much praise for what the G.I. Generation built, but no one ever asks,  
“Who built the G. I. Generation?”  The answer is the generations of Roosevelt and Truman – elders who 
provided young people with principled leadership, challenges to character, ambitious national goals, and 
solid foundations for long‐term achievement. 
 
 
SO ASK YOURSELF. . . . What are the implications of CHILDREN of the Millennials 
entering our schools in the next six years? 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 15 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D – Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

Characteristics of Millenials 
Forging a new youth ethic of teamwork and civic purpose – becoming a regular kid counterpoint to the 
worst ego‐excesses of older generations. 
 
Biggest youth spenders in history – not BY them, but ON them – often in co‐purchases with parents. 
The generations can’t help but be influenced by the events and conditions that have shaped who they 
are and how they see the world. 
 
Fascination and mastery of new technologies.  The left brained indicators of achievement – for math, 
science, and technology – are where this generation is making its strongest strides – will apply 
technology not to empower individuals, but to empower the community. 
 
To Millennials diversity doesn’t mean black or white, it means Korean, Malaysian, Latvian, Guatemalan, 
Peruvian, Nigerian, Trinidadian, and skins in more hues from more places than seen on any generation in 
any society in the history of humanity.  1 in 5 has at least one immigrant parent;  
1 in 10 has at least 1 non‐citizen parent. 
 
Most watched‐over generation in history.  7 out of 10 parents of elementary school students now say 
it’s extremely important for them to get their kids to do their homework; 4 out of 10 spoken to teacher 
more than 5 times during the year 
 
Columbine most influential event until 9‐11. Those in college – first time there was an emergency and 
parents weren’t there – other millennials were.  
 
Far more permissive attitude towards government intrusion on civil liberties than 20‐year norms 
would suggest – far more positive attitudes toward America in general. 
 
Biggest problem of millennial teens – pressure: on time, on achievement, living up to high expectations 
of adults and friends. 
 
Feedback whenever I want it at the push of a button.  Continuous learning is a way of life.  Media blurs 
reality and fantasy.   
 
First millennials were barely a year old when education hit its modern ground zero – the 90’s were 
decade of back to basics, teaching values, setting standards, holding schools and students accountable – 
they’ve always known standardized testing 
 
Freedom of school choice – competition for public schools – religious, charter, home‐schooling rises 
(enrollment from 1990‐99 rose 48% in non‐traditional public schools) 
 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 16 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D ‐ Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

A generation is composed of people whose common location in history lends them a collective 
persona. The span of one generation is roughly the length of a phase of life. 
 
Traditionalists  Baby Boomers  Generation X‐ers  Millennials 
1900 to 1945  1946 to 1964  1965 to 1980  1981 to 2002 
‘The Greatest  Reflected evolving  Media explosion –  The ‘next great 
Generation’  identity & explosion of  mystique stripped  generation’ 
  products in  away, including   
Things were scarce,  marketplace  personal computer  Highly techno‐savvy 
learned to do without       
  TV – events revealed  Moms working –  Appreciation for 
God‐fearing, hard‐   resourceful  diversity 
working, patriotic  Focus on self, challenge     
character  authority    Hovering parents – 
      always part of day‐to‐
      day 
Loyal – put aside own  Optimistic – anything is     
needs and work toward  possible  Skeptical ‐ more faith in  Realistic – a 
common goals    self than institution  combination of loyal, 
    optimistic and skeptical 
 
 
 
What did you find surprising/interesting about your topic? 
• Vocabulary – what a millennial is 
• Group definitions of generations 
• Categorical descriptions of ages 
• Helicopter parents – affect 
• Student schedules in and out of school 
 
What are the implications for student learning? 
• Technology 
• More space 
• Content delivery 
• Feedback 
• State influence and its impact on testing, curriculum 
 
What are the implications for teaching? 
• Training 
• “Tech” knowledge 
• Role changes to facilitator 
• Multi‐purpose teaching 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 17 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D – Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 1 

Is / how is the topic applied today in Falls Church? 
• Implementation of programs and tools 
 
How can the findings be applied in the future? 
• Flexible technology 
• Facilities that support technology, different learning spaces and teaching styles 
 
Whole group discussion:  common themes/planning considerations from the Topic Area that apply to 
the future of Falls Church Public Schools  
• Flexibility 
• Time 
• Collaboration 
• Individual‐based instruction for students 
• Training – teacher / parent 
• Generation gap 
• Technology –virtual learning (on‐line) 
• Middle/High School working together 
• Inquiry‐based 
• Goals of SOLs – integration with new thoughts on instruction 
• Connection to real world 
• Space in general – away from the traditional ‐ outdoor classrooms 
• Critical thinking/problem solving/interdisciplinary instruction 
• Real‐life skills 
• Evolving nature of education 
 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 18 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D – Design Committee Work Summaires – Meeting 2 

Design Committee Meeting 2 Summary  ‐ Technology’s Role in Teaching and Learning 
 
Categorizing Teaching and Learning by Location 
Teaching and learning takes place in different locations throughout a student’s career. Taking all of the 
learning a student accomplishes in a year, one could sort these activities into two categories: place‐
based and non‐place‐based. Generally speaking in K‐12 learning, these activities were dependent upon a 
student being in a classroom, school facility, or specific field trip – or they were not. Prior to the 
technological advances of audio and video recording, televisions and VCRs, and the Internet, place‐
based simply meant that a student was in school, while non‐place‐based generally consisted of 
homework and other assignments. The Internet and other on‐demand resources have dramatically 
changed these generalizations, particularly when considering that a school’s library collection is now 
extremely limited compared to worldwide collections that are available electronically. 
 
Place‐based Learning 
Students in this learning situation are constrained by the environment of the space. Typically these 
situations require that a student be in a particular location in order for learning to occur such as a 
classroom, gymnasium, lab, or a specific field trip location. The key is that the desired instruction and 
learning process are both tied directly to the environment. “Real time” teacher led instruction and 
demonstrations, interacting with a museum interpreter, participating in team activities or sports, are all 
examples of activities dependent upon a specific learning location. 
 
Non‐Place‐based Learning 
In this situation the instruction and learning process is not dependent upon the specific location. 
Homework, papers, projects, reading, watching video programming, listening to audio materials, and 
research are activities that are not dependent upon being in any particular location. While these 
activities may require a computer, television, MP3 player, or book they are not dependent on being in a 
specific learning location. Activities done in a general computer lab situation could also be classified as 
non‐place‐based if the activities can be just as easily accomplished on a student’s home computer and 
are not dependent upon real time instruction.  
 
Sub‐Categorizing Teaching and Learning by Time 
Teaching and learning that is place‐based versus non‐place‐based can be further subdivided by when 
and how they occur. In today’s place‐based classrooms, students learn in multiple ways and at multiple 
times through group assignments, independent study, and shared class experiences, meaning that not 
every student is studying or learning necessarily at the same time. Similarly, when students are not at 
school they may still be learning through group projects that require real time collaboration, thus while 
they may not be dependent upon the location for their learning they may still need to learn in concert 
with their classmates through instant messaging, email, telephone conversations, off‐site meetings, or 
social networking websites. 
 
Synchronous Learning 
Instruction and learning in this category requires students to learn with others at the same time as other 
students. This is not to say that synchronous learning is the same as group learning. While repeatable, a 
teacher’s classroom demonstration cannot necessarily be done on an individual basis – this is not group 
work, but it is synchronous learning. Common instruction and learning activities are considered 

 
Appendix D ‐ 19 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D – Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 2 

synchronous if they must happen at the same instant for multiple students in order for the full effect of 
learning to occur. 
 
Asynchronous Learning 
Student learning is independent of time, other students, or teachers in asynchronous learning. Group 
assignments can be done asynchronously if the group does not have to be together at the same time to 
complete a task (e.g., each member of the group writes a chapter of an assignment). Individual 
homework and research assignments are typically asynchronous activities even though an entire class 
may have the same requirements. Practicing basketball free throws is an example of an asynchronous 
activity even though it ultimately contributes to a group “assignment”. 
 
The Design Committee breakout groups created scenarios comparing their perception of today and ten 
years from now in terms of technology practices in FCCPS.  They considered these questions in their 
work: 
• What form(s) of technology do elementary students use today (in and out of the learning process)?  
What form(s) do you think they will be using 10 years from now? (i.e. computers, cell phones, voice 
enhancement, etc.)  
• What is your observation about the perception of the learning continuum in the charts from 
elementary to middle to high? 
• Is there now or will there by a technology gap as students progress through Falls Church schools?  If 
so, what are they? 
 
The following pie charts were created by Design Committee sub groups for each grade level grouping. 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 20 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D – Design Committee Work Summaires – Meeting 2 

Figure D‐1 ‐ Place‐based/Non place‐based and Synchronous/Asynchronous charts ‐ Elementary School  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure D‐2 ‐ Place‐based/Non place‐based and Synchronous/Asynchronous charts ‐ Middle School 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 21 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix D – Design Committee Work Summaries – Meeting 2 

Figure D‐3 ‐ Place‐based/Non place‐based and Synchronous/Asynchronous charts ‐ High School 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 22 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 

Design Committee Meeting 3 Summary ‐ School & Community Connection 
 
What is the Implications Wheel? 
• Designed by Dr. Joel Barker (Father of the Paradigm Shift) as a way to explore the future before 
introducing an innovation or embarking on a new pathway 
• Systematic way of thinking about and evaluating any change and determining its potential long 
term, positive and negative implications 
• A small group tool that uses teams made up of diverse individuals to “scout” the future using first, 
second, third order implications. 
• Strategic exploration is what you do before you do strategic planning – provides information and 
insights that make strategic planning easier, faster and more effective 
 
Exploration:  What are the direct implications of achieving the goal of actively involving the Falls 
Church community as a partner in the education of the city’s children? 
Key:  (+) the group determined this is a positive implication 
  (‐) the group determined this is a negative implication 
 
Scoring: Desirability is show with a ‐5 to +5 range (+50 and ‐50 are special scores) 
    Likelihood is shown with a 9 (highly likely) to 1(highly unlikely) range 
    Indicated together with a  /  in between 
    MR – Minority Report shows a disagreement with group and statement why 
 
nd
First Order Ring  2  Order Implications  3rd Order Implications 
Student enrollment increases (+)  Salary costs increase (‐)   ‐4/9 
  More course offerings (diversity) 
(+)   +5/7 
More staff need to be hired (+) 
Increase in training and 
professional development (+)   
+2/6 
Increased 
Larger and more diverse student 
understanding/acceptance of 
population (+) 
other cultures (+) 
Instructional materials costs 
increase (‐)   ‐1/8 
Maintenance costs increase due 
to wear and tear (‐) 
Higher demand of resources 
Newer/up to date materials are 
(students) (‐) 
purchased (+)   +3/7 
Cost of technology 
(infrastructure) increases (‐)   ‐
3/9 
Costs of building and/or 
maintaining/renovating (‐)   ‐5/9 
Expanding instructional space (+)   
Acquiring land cost and difficulty 
+5/9 
(‐)   ‐1/2 
Security monitoring costs 
 
Appendix D ‐ 23 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix B ‐ FCCPS Facility Master Plan Design Committee 

increase (‐)   ‐1/8 
Up to date facilities meet 
student learning needs (+)   +5/4 
nd
First Order Ring  2  Order Implications  3rd Order Implications 
There is increased demand for  Increased financial demands  Funding sources become 
staff time spent on issues other  from overall school budget (‐)  increasingly unclear (‐) 
than students (‐)  Bringing together groups that 
don’t see eye‐to‐eye (‐) 
Increased use of facility for more 
Can enhance existing facilities 
diverse learning/community 
with profits from rentals (+) 
purposes (+) 
Increased community pride in 
facility (+) 
Increased income for 
staff/teachers  (+) 
Increased employee burnout (‐) 
Increased opportunity for extra 
Increased employee loyalty (they 
pay extra duty (+) 
are needed) (+) 
Increased opportunity for 
community (+) 
Higher employee turnover (‐)      
‐5/4.5 
Lower learning outcomes (‐)         
‐5/1 
Lower productivity (‐)   ‐5/4.5 
Increased employee burnout (‐)   
Administration improves 
‐5/4.5 
climate/culture for staff (+)   
+5/8 
Staff increases stress 
management techniques (+)  + 
5/8 
Increased awareness of how 
community can support school 
(+) 
Increased awareness of how 
Improved bond between staff  school can best serve community 
and community (+)   +5/9  (+) 
Higher overall school community 
morale (+)   +5/9 
“Too much info”  between staff 
and community (‐)   ‐1/3 
First Order Ring  2nd Order Implications  3rd Order Implications 
Rich and diverse resources are  Share their skills with students  Career education (+)   +5/9 
added to each school (+)  (+)   +3/7  Authentic real‐world learning (+)   
 
Appendix D ‐ 24 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 

+5/6 
Loss of autonomy (‐)   +1/4 
Staff resource to monitor (‐)   0/9 
Increased student achievement 
(+)   +50/5 
Increased student achievement 
(+)   +50/ 
Internationally‐minded citizens 
Promotes knowledge of diversity  (+)   +50/ 
and backgrounds (+)  Potential conflicts between 
groups (‐)   ‐5/4 
Decreased instruction time (‐)   ‐
5/4 
Increased student achievement 
(+)    
Post‐secondary opportunities  Highly educated and prepared 
increase (+)  community (+) 
Negative impact on existing 
programs (i.e. IB) (‐) 
Strings attached to resources (‐)  Opportunity cost (+) 
Brings supplemental  Increase student achievement 
contributions to schools (+)    (+)   +50/5 
+3/8 
First Order Ring  2nd Order Implications  3rd Order Implications 
There is an increase in available  Enables risk taking (+) 
human and financial resources  New and better ways/methods 
(+)  are considered (+) 
Innovative programs are added  Compete with curriculum (‐) 
(+)   +50/6  Expectation created (+) (that 
requires more money) (‐)  
Schools become models for 
others (+) 
Oversight/controls become more 
necessary (+) (takes time) (‐) 
School personnel become  Community backlash (‐) 
wasteful (‐)   ‐5/2  Expected rather than 
appreciated (‐) 
Take volunteers for granted (‐) 
Culture changes (+)   0/7   
Difficult for staff to prioritize (‐)     
‐4/ 
Service learning opportunity   
enhanced (+) 
First Order Ring  2nd Order Implications  3rd Order Implications 
There are increased financial  Focus on efficiencies and  Better understanding by the 
 
Appendix D ‐ 25 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix B ‐ FCCPS Facility Master Plan Design Committee 

responsibilities for the school  priorities with the school (+)    school administration of how the 


division (‐)   0/9  +3/4  numbers work (+) 
Opportunity to diversify revenue  Some new revenue sources may 
sources (+)   +5/2  be unreliable (‐) 
Increase expectations of 
Higher level of accountability to 
community (‐) 
community/citizens (+) 
Increase workload on staff (‐) 
Could increase multi‐purpose 
General government vs. schools  use and consolidation (+) 
competition (‐)   ‐4/8  Done incorrectly produces 
“winners” and “losers” (‐) 
Clear articulation and 
justification of services (+) 
Increased opportunity for role of 
Intra‐school competition for 
implementation (+) 
resources (‐)   ‐4/8 
Potential for conflict among 
administrators and student 
groups (‐) 

 
Appendix D ‐ 26 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 

 
First Order Ring  2nd Order Implications  3rd Order Implications 
There is increased ownership,  Increased expectations on school  More use of facilities (+)    
buy in and support by the  system (‐)   +4/9 
community as a whole  (+)   +4/9  Shared decision making (‐)   /6   
Tax burden on citizens increases 
Shared responsibility to  (‐) 
fund/supply (+)  Encourage political participation 
(+) 
Business support of programs 
increases (+) 
Synergy (+) 
City and school programs 
paired/shared (+) 
Open lines of communication (+) 
New owners become vehicle for 
Enhanced community awareness 
positive change (+) 
of how school system works (+) 
More questions more time 
explaining (‐) 
nd
First Order Ring  2  Order Implications  3rd Order Implications 
There are less disenfranchised  More diverse family  Exposure to different cultures 
families (+)  participation in school (+)   +5/  for all (+) 
Some may not value these 
values (‐) 
Increased adult education (+) 
Unknown needs may arise (‐) 
May require more staff (‐) 
‐3/ 
Requires more financial 
resources (‐) 
Diversity training for staff (+) 
Shrink achievement gap (+) 
Improve graduation rate (+) 
Improve college entry and 
Improve student achievement  completion rate (+) 
(+)   +50/  Increase CTE opportunities (+) 
Increased enrollment (‐) 
**MR – increased enrollment 
could be positive 
Value greater diverse family  Improve job opportunities (+) 
involvement in community (+)   
+5/ 
Promotes inclusive community   
(+) 
 
First Order Implications that were not explored by a group: 
 
First Order Ring  2nd Order Implications  3rd Order Implications 

 
Appendix D ‐ 27 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix B ‐ FCCPS Facility Master Plan Design Committee 

Parents feel comfortable     
enabling irresponsibility in 
students 
There is increased demand for     
use of facilities 
There is increased opportunity     
for multi‐cultural events 
There is an increase in students’     
perception of the value of 
education as they see more 
relevancy 
The decision making process     
takes more time 
The open door policy     
compromises safety 
 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 28 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 

What DOES the school and community connection look like? 
• Major linkage is BIE (Business in Education) 
Donations for supplies 
Partnerships with businesses 
All levels – elementary, middle, high 
Shadowing opportunities / guest speakers 
Provide some financial support 
• High level of cooperation among all government components 
Between schools and community 
MOU between parks and recreation and schools 
Synthetic turf field 
Shared use of gymnasium 
Student performances in community 
• Student art 
Displays at gallery (use to develop calendar) 
“First Friday” shows 
Sister City in Africa – send art 
• Schools as community magnet 
Schools seen as an integral factor in providing positive environment for children, attracts residents 
that want to live her for the school and community 
• Extended daycare program 
• Shared classrooms for continuing education (parks & recreation and schools) 
Partnership in lifelong learning 
• Participate in decision making – extensive community process (The Falls Church Way) 
• Expectation of participation – parents expect it of themselves  
• Educational service requirements – positive for community 
Blood drive 
Recycling 
Rain gardens, etc. 
• Alliance For Youth 
At‐risk youth, but supports all youth in a collaborative way 
• The PTA 5: 
Band Boosters 
Athletic Boosters 
Educational Foundation 
• All night graduation party 
• Positive relationship with Grad Center 
Built‐in 40 year lease 
Grew into strong relationship 
• Shared facilities for revenue 
Parks & Recreation 
Other community groups 
Cable access 
• Special needs youth – transitioning into jobs within community 
• CDC – sit on committees to ensure educational voice is heard 
• Week‐long career fair at the Middle School 
• Parent involvement strong at all levels 
 
Appendix D ‐ 29 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix B ‐ FCCPS Facility Master Plan Design Committee 

Daily involvement 
Active parent volunteers (know can call on at a moment’s notice for help) 
Highly participate in activities 
Strong sense of ownership 
• Combined City involvement and outreach beyond Falls Church 
• Parents were substitute teachers for a “crisis” situation 
 
What SHOULD the school and community connection look like? 
• Less than 20% of the population sends their children to public school – work to engage the other 
80% 
• 20% of the group that sends students is not engaged due to various reasons 
• Better meeting space to demonstrate connection/enhance relationship (both large and small 
groups) 
• Share community resources such as recreational, social services, library, fine arts facility 
• Enhance alternative education – current space too small 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Appendix D ‐ 30 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This page intentionally left blank 

 
Appendix D ‐ 31 
 

   

Appendix E 

MASTER PLAN  
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document ‐ Elementary School 

Design Committee Meeting 4 Summary  ‐ Educational Principles With Design Implications 
 
Any new or renovated Falls Church City schools and the spaces within them should be designed on the 
basis of the following educational principles that fall under four categories: 
• Educating, Challenging and Supporting Student Success 
• Attracting, Retaining and Developing Highly Skilled Staff  
• Creating and Maintaining Safe, Healthy and Comfortable Environments  
• Actively Involving the Community as Partners in Education 
 
These principles are specific to grade levels, and should form the basis of determining site‐specific 
design implications when combined with community need and program delivery. The principles have 
been numbered for ease of reference for justification of space/size of space when creating site specific 
educational programs.   
 
Elementary School 
The elementary instructional program is designed to help each student develop competence in the basic 
learning skills, develop the intellectual skills of rational thought and creativity, acquire the knowledge 
and process skills of science and technology and acquire the broad knowledge and understanding of the 
humanities.  Traditionally, the majority of the elementary instructional program has been provided in a 
single classroom setting.  However, in today’s instructional environment, several factors influence the 
ability to effectively deliver this instructional program both within and beyond the classroom setting:  
technology, multiplicity of student and teacher support services, resource instruction, and parent 
support services. 
 
Educating, Challenging and Supporting Student Success 
1.1  Educational Principle 
The culture of the school values diversity and promotes positive and constructive student behavior. 
Design Implications 
• First impression is welcoming 
• Administrative office accessible and transparent 
• Clinic is big enough and is near office 
• Be mindful of the needs of all learners in allocating space 
• Inclusivity 
 
1.2  Educational Principle 
Students require a wide range of settings to learn, work and socialize in small and large groups as well as 
individually. 
Design Implications 
• Room to display student work 
• Look at current rooms to evaluate what is working 
• More space for individual work/assessment 
 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 1 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Chapter 3 ‐ Educational Specifications – Meeting 4 ‐ Elementary School 

1.3  Educational Principle 
Technology is an essential tool for instruction and administration.  Students will use digital technology 
and communication tools to access, manage, integrate and evaluate information, construct new 
knowledge, and communicate with others. Many knowledge systems and resources will no longer need 
to be place‐based but can be accessed from anywhere by both teachers and students. 
Design Implications 
• Combination of portable laptops and computer labs 
• Consider distance traveled in transition to special classes 
• Interactive technology of all kinds 
• Sound enhancement 
 
1.4  Educational Principle 
Learning is interactive, group oriented, hands‐on, and based in the core subjects with a focus on thinking 
through issues, solving problems and making connections.  Students demonstrate authentic 
understanding through work products, projects, and other activities. 
Design Implications 
• Classrooms that provide space to move around 
• Small scale performance space 
• To have private learning spaces 
• More display cases to showcase student work 
• Dedicated space for Daycare services 
 
1.5  Educational Principle 
Curriculum, assessment, and instruction are focused on enhancing student understanding (at all 
performance levels) while being responsive to differences in student readiness, learning profiles, and 
interests (Understanding by Design ‐ UBD).  
Design Implications 
• Inclusive use of space 
• Storage for reading and math materials (common) 
 
1.6  Educational Principle 
Provide well‐rounded education that includes developmentally appropriate extra and co‐curricular 
activities and sports. 
Design Implications 
• Space for Daycare that meets needs of participants 
• Space for outdoor planning/storage for outdoor classroom activities 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 2 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document ‐ Elementary School 

1.7  Educational Principle 
In IB PYP learning is authentic, engaging, relevant to “real” world, challenging and significant with a 
commitment to a transdisciplinary model.  Students are encouraged to be curious, inquisitive, explore 
and interact with the environment physically, socially and intellectually. 
Design Implications 
• Meeting and office space for staff 
• Easy access to outdoor space 
• Opportunity for research – technology and library 
• Space for sharing investigations 
• Space for projects/construction that doesn’t have to be taken down 
 
Attracting, Retaining and Developing Highly Skilled Staff 
2.1  Educational Principle 
The changing role of the teacher brought on by the self‐directed student and the development of 
technology will require change in teaching methods and styles, including self‐contained, multi‐
disciplinary, and team teaching. Teachers will use a variety of instructional strategies and assessments 
and incorporate the use of technology as a teaching and administrative tool. 
Design Implications 
• Large spaces for common use and varied student learning experiences 
• Smaller learning spaces attached to larger instructional areas (areas with glass doors/windows 
looking into larger space) 
• Built‐in spaces to store technology (laptop storage/charging stations) 
 
2.2  Educational Principle 
The necessary resources and services must be provided to support student achievement. 
Design Implications 
• Classrooms feeding into larger commons spaces 
• Adjoining classrooms (general education to specialists) 
• Resources and materials and shared specialists should be in spaces accessible to staff and 
students 
• Movable furniture/storage 
 
2.3  Educational Principle 
Data must be used for continuous improvement of teaching and learning. 
Design Implications 
• Classrooms with spaces to perform assessments (1‐1, small group) within room or adjoining 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 3 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Chapter 3 ‐ Educational Specifications – Meeting 4 ‐ Elementary School 

2.4  Educational Principle 
Collegiality, collaboration, and teamwork are essential.  The school environment should support 
continued professional development and mentoring by providing teachers with opportunities to 
collaborate on a routine basis and to explore new teaching strategies, tools and other resources. 
Design Implications 
• Team planning and workroom with storage for resources/materials 
 
2.5  Educational Principle 
Teachers develop individual professional growth plans to focus and monitor continual refinement of 
their practice. A PGP should support reflective thinking ‐ a conscious and intentional process that 
provides time for thinking about teaching practices and how to refine them. 
     Design Implications 
 
2.6  Educational Principle 
Adults will help students develop learning goals and plan and assess progress. 
Design Implications 
• Small student rooms located off hallways, classrooms or large learning spaces 
 
2.7  Educational Principle 
Administrators provide effective leadership and management. 
Design Implications 
• Offices or conference spaces throughout school for administrative staff (better monitoring, 
more “presence,” connect more to school) 
 
Creating and Maintaining Safe, Healthy and Comfortable Environments 
3.1  Educational Principle 
School facilities should be inviting and inspiring.  They must create a strong sense of belonging and be a 
statement about how Falls Church feels about education and community.  They should be welcoming 
and non‐institutional.  
Design Implications 
• School facilities’ assumes bricks and mortar – non‐traditional “online” facilities will need the 
same energy and intent to showcase learning and enlighten (podcasts, distance learning, etc.) 
• Overall form of building open, original, bright lighting, natural light (windows/skylights) 
• OPEN, design innovative – beyond the cinder blocks 
• Community room – invites all members of the community to “belong” 
• Trail system and playground accessible to community and students 
• Use of technology is forward‐looking and accessible community‐wide 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 4 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document ‐ Elementary School 

3.2  Educational Principle 
An educational facility should be designed to conserve resources; good stewards of the environment. 
Design Implications 
• Energy clocks (usage of/savings compared to …) 
• Draining/cistern and water usage 
• Solar panels, recycled, green building materials and landscaping 
• Native landscaping, recycling focus, solar grid wide/renewable energy 
• LEEDS certified (level?), wildlife certified, outdoor use of space 
• Community role model, playground equipment of natural community 
 
3.3  Educational Principle 
An engaging environment (facilities and grounds) is an active showcase of learning and discovery. 
Design Implications 
• Better use of outdoor space (all hardtop surfaces outside becoming giant blackboard) 
• A showcase of learning should be active/initial intent of design – art, literature, technology, 
connects to the community 
 
3.4  Educational Principle 
An engaging learning environment must be easily managed and maintained. 
Design Implications 
• Native landscaping – outdoors 
• Materials planning crucial to starting off facilities to be easily managed 
• Technology makes much more easily managed – educational, facilities (HVAC, electricity) 
• Efficient layout (cleaning, teaching, people management) 
 
3.5  Educational Principle 
Small classes and small schools are the foundation of academic excellence. 
Design Implications 
• Flexible classrooms for ability to create small classes 
• Small classes if able but can expand due to population or lesson/educational need 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 5 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Chapter 3 ‐ Educational Specifications – Meeting 4 ‐ Elementary School 

3.6  Educational Principle 
There must be safety from physical threat and a sense of emotional security for students and all who 
use the building. 
Design Implications 
• Design for entrance/exits 
• Security system/monitoring 
• Lockdowns and emergency exits 
• Comfortable scale for elementary sized people 
• Emotional security – communication systems/video systems 
• Internal/external lighting 
• Bright, open space for emotional and physical security 
• Appropriate landscaping 
 
Actively Involving the Community as Partners in Education 
4.1  Educational Principle 
Schools are the center of education that supports life‐long learning for all ages and interests within the 
community while also preparing students for the workforce.   
Design Implications 
• Storage – school needs and community needs separate and lockable 
• Security of equipment 
 
4.2  Educational Principle 
Family involvement is welcome and encouraged 
Design Implications 
• Safety/security that is people friendly 
• Community room(s) not dedicated to education 
 
4.3  Educational Principle 
The Falls Church community will continue to face change and growth. 
Design Implications 
• Flexible rooms – non dedicated 
• Properly prepare and research for additions or future changes 
 
4.4  Educational Principle 
Partnerships with the community and advancing technologies will help create customized learning 
experiences that have personal relevance for a variety of students’ needs. 
Design Implications 
• Flexible technology – all rooms multi‐use 
• Wireless technology throughout the City 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 6 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document ‐ Elementary School 

4.5  Educational Principle 
Community involvement strengthens our schools. 
Design Implications 
• Community use rooms allow students to remain on campus for community activities 
• PARKING! 
• Transportation 
 
4.6  Educational Principle 
Schools are seen as an integral factor in providing a positive environment for children, and attracting 
residents that want to live here for the school and community. 
Design Implications 
• Space for family functions (PTA) 
 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 7 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document – Middle School 

Middle School 
Middle school education is centered on the development of the individual learner.  During the middle 
school years, students experience great changes physically, socially, emotionally, and academically.  The 
school building should be designed to accommodate individual needs as well as the changes students 
experience as they move through these middle years.  The middle school philosophy impacts the 
instruction, curriculum, structure, organization, and environment of the school. 
 
Educating, Challenging and Supporting Student Success 
1.1  Educational Principle 
The culture of the school values diversity and promotes positive and constructive student behavior. 
Design Implications 
• Showcase 3D projects 
• Exhibit/gallery space ‐ public 
• Explanations 
• Used for communication 
• Clubs/classes can present info/artifacts 
 
1.2  Educational Principle 
Students require a wide range of settings to learn, work and socialize in small and large groups as well as 
individually. 
Design Implications 
• Display work 
• Non‐standard room shapes can present challenges 
• Informal spaces 
• Paint 
• Less institutionalized materials 
 
1.3  Educational Principle 
Technology is an essential tool for instruction and administration.  Students will use digital technology 
and communication tools to access, manage, integrate and evaluate information, construct new 
knowledge, and communicate with others. Many knowledge systems and resources will no longer need 
to be place‐based (lab) but can be accessed from anywhere by both teachers and students. 
Design Implications 
• Teacher does not have to GO to tech, tech can come to him/her 
• Wireless infrastructure 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 8 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E ‐ Planning Document – High School 

1.4  Educational Principle 
Learning is interactive, group oriented, hands‐on, and based in the core subjects with a focus on thinking 
through issues, solving problems and making connections.  Students demonstrate authentic 
understanding through work products, projects, and other activities. 
Design Implications 
• Flexible furniture – to support various group sizes for small group, pairs, etc. 
 
1.5  Educational Principle 
Curriculum, assessment, and instruction are focused on enhancing student understanding (at all 
performance levels) while being responsive to differences in student readiness, learning profiles, and 
interests (Understanding by Design ‐ UBD).  
Design Implications 
• User friendly storage 
• Multi‐use, compact furniture/spaces 
• Flexible space 
 
1.6  Educational Principle 
Provide well‐rounded education that includes developmentally appropriate extra and co‐curricular 
activities and sports. 
Design Implications 
• Flexible spaces (multiple ones) 
• Multiple indoor/outdoor spaces 
 
1.7  Educational Principle 
Grade level identity and transitions are important to the learning and maturing process 
Design Implications 
• Common space with rooms off of it 
 
1.8  Educational Principle 
Instructional teaming is essential to good educational delivery 
Design Implications 
• Common team space lends to camaraderie horizontally (each grade) 
• Space for everyone to get together at times (whole grade) 
 
1.9  Educational Principle 
Students will progress through less and less structured educational experiences as they move toward 
becoming independent, mature, spontaneous learners who have the confidence to continually expand 
and adapt their knowledge. 
Design Implications 
• Increasing flexibility and movement by grade and development 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 9 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document – Middle School 

1.10  Educational Principle 
In IB Middle Years, teachers provide students with the tools to enable them to take responsibility for 
their own learning, thereby developing an awareness of how they learn best, of thought processes and 
of learning strategies. Students participate actively and responsibly in a changing and increasingly 
interconnected world. Learning how to learn and how to evaluate information critically is as important 
as learning facts. 
Design Implications 
• Student access to their work 
• Increasingly independent learning 
 
Attracting, Retaining and Developing Highly Skilled Staff 
2.1  Educational Principle 
The changing role of the teacher brought on by the self‐directed student and the development of 
technology will require change in teaching methods and styles, including self‐contained, multi‐
disciplinary, and team teaching. Teachers will use a variety of instructional strategies and assessments 
and incorporate the use of technology as a teaching and administrative tool. 
Design Implications 
• Connectivity (wireless) 
• Technology re‐fresh 
• Whole room presentation capability 
 
2.2  Educational Principle 
The necessary resources and services must be provided to support student achievement. 
Design Implications 
• Technology re‐fresh and support 
• Web‐based access to curriculum and instructional support 
 
2.3  Educational Principle 
Data must be used for continuous improvement of teaching and learning. 
Design Implications 
• Master database access/analysis 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 10 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E ‐ Planning Document – High School 

2.4  Educational Principle 
Collegiality, collaboration, and teamwork are essential.  The school environment should support 
continued professional development and mentoring by providing teachers with opportunities to 
collaborate on a routine basis and to explore new teaching strategies, tools and other resources. 
Design Implications 
• Dedicated teacher work space 
• Lab or instructors (lab cells for small group work) 
• Access doorways to adjacent classrooms for instructor and/or student collaboration and 
assistance 
 
2.5  Educational Principle 
Teachers develop individual professional growth plans to focus and monitor continual refinement of 
their practice. A PGP should support reflective thinking ‐ a conscious and intentional process that 
provides time for thinking about teaching practices and how to refine them. 
Design Implications 
• Dedicated instructor work/lab space (cell concept for collaboration) 
• Schedule accommodation 
 
2.6  Educational Principle 
Administrators provide effective leadership and management. 
Design Implications 
• Adequate space to accommodate large and small group meetings (staff/administrators) 
 
Creating and Maintaining Safe, Healthy and Comfortable Environments 
3.1  Educational Principle 
School facilities should be inviting and inspiring.  They must create a strong sense of belonging and be a 
statement about how Falls Church feels about education and community.  They should be welcoming 
and non‐institutional.  
Design Implications 
• Ample daylight 
• Building as a learning tool 
• Easily updateable 
• Community represented 
• Pictures of positive  moments 
• Pictures of teachers in grade 
• Display case of teacher artifacts 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 11 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document – Middle School 

3.2  Educational Principle 
An educational facility should be designed to conserve resources; good stewards of the environment. 
Design Implications 
• Timed lights 
• Recycling 
• ‘Green’ elements 
 
3.3  Educational Principle 
An engaging environment (facilities and grounds) is an active showcase of learning and discovery. 
Design Implications 
• Lots of display 
• Outdoor education 
• Color 
 
3.4  Educational Principle 
An engaging learning environment must be easily managed and maintained. 
Design Implications 
• Lots of storage 
• Linoleum floor (easier to clean) 
 
3.5  Educational Principle 
Small classes and small schools are the foundation of academic excellence. 
Design Implications 
• Expansion possibilities 
• Keep in mind vertical (5‐7) planning and grouping as a possibility 
 
3.6  Educational Principle 
There must be safety from physical threat and a sense of emotional security for students and all who 
use the building. 
 
Design Implications 
• Counseling office that is relaxing 
• Security locks 
• Central entrance 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 12 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E ‐ Planning Document – High School 

Actively Involving the Community as Partners in Education 
4.1  Educational Principle 
Schools are the center of education that supports life‐long learning for all ages and interests within the 
community while also preparing students for the workforce.   
Design Implications 
• Accessibility to all/central location (remove barriers of opportunity for students/people to 
access) 
• Facilities and equipment that meet the needs and interests of different groups that may use the 
school 
• Limited access to areas available to community (safety concerns) – separate entrance? 
 
4.2  Educational Principle 
Family involvement is welcome and encouraged 
Design Implications 
• Parking 
• Welcoming foyer/atrium/information desk 
• Community athletic facilities (i.e. pool) 
 
4.3  Educational Principle 
The Falls Church community will continue to face change and growth. 
Design Implications 
• Flexible design (moveable equipment) 
• Building designed so it can be expanded 
• Design is effective and efficient (especially energy efficient) 
 
4.4  Educational Principle 
Partnerships with the community and advancing technologies will help create customized learning 
experiences that have personal relevance for a variety of students’ needs. 
Design Implications 
• State‐of‐the‐art technology 
• Opportunities for students to apply and show their technology knowledge/skills 
 
4.5  Educational Principle 
Schools facilitate use by multiple populations for multiple purposes at all hours and days of the week, 
while protecting the core instructional program. 
Design Implications 
• Central location 
• Security 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 13 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document – Middle School 

4.6  Educational Principle 
Community involvement strengthens our schools. 
Design Implications 
• Opens up communication and builds trusting relationships (the “use it – believe it” cycle) 
• Create a welcoming environment / easy access 
 
4.7  Educational Principle 
Schools are seen as an integral factor in providing a positive environment for children, and attracting 
residents that want to live here for the school and community. 
Design Implications 
• “WOW!” factor to design – the building inspires success 
• Child friendly / not institutionalized 
• Sense of ownership/pride/upkeep 
 
Design Implications by Discipline 
English 
• Space that allows for flexible discussion without interference from other groups 
• Comfortable reading spaces/nooks 
 
Mathematics 
• Common storage space for materials 
• Dedicated computer lab facilities 
 
Social Studies 
• Comfortable and large pod space to provide student‐led meetings 
 
Science 
• Living lab/green house 
 
World Languages 
• Computer lab facilities that allow student interactive voice activities, preferably in the classrooms 
 
Special Education 
• Partitioned rooms with sunlight 
 
Performing Arts 
• Amphitheater (outdoors) 
 
Dining/Food Services 
• Refrigerator equipment on generator power 
 
 
Auditorium 
• Sound system, seating 
 
Teacher and Professional Development Resources 
 
Appendix E ‐ 14 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E ‐ Planning Document – High School 

• Skylights (or natural lighting) in team rooms 
 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 15 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document – Middle School 

High School 
The purpose of high schools is to prepare students adequately for their future, focusing on: 
Engagement – reducing dropouts and increasing school completion at both the secondary and 
postsecondary levels in a diverse, rapidly evolving and increasingly complex society. 
Achievement – strengthening academic and technical knowledge and skills in a manner that 
values and nurtures individuality. 
Transition – increasing the movement of students from high school to postsecondary education 
and from education into the workplace, properly equipping them as literate, well‐informed, and 
responsible citizens. 
 
Challenge Statement 
At George Mason we are an exciting and collaborative community of learners who strive toward 
excellence.  We care for each other and take pride in and responsibility for our individual and mutual 
growth and accomplishments.  We celebrate our diversity and seek to foster respect for all in the 
community through global awareness and appreciation of our individual and cultural differences. 
 
George Mason prides itself on providing an environment that is welcoming to all students.  We are 
committed to appropriately challenging all students by providing a diversified curriculum, a strong 
program of extracurricular activities, and opportunities for leadership and volunteer experiences.  We 
are a collaborative community of learners, encouraging active input from staff members, students, and 
our families.  We enjoy strong parental and community support in our efforts to provide the optimal 
educational experience for all students.  
 
Educating, Challenging and Supporting Student Success 
1.1  Educational Principle 
The culture of the school values diversity and promotes positive and constructive student behavior. 
Design Implications 
• Seating changes/flexible layout 
• Cafeteria – promotes interaction 
• Gathering spaces for students – common area 
• Place to display student work 
• Club space for different activities (robotics, etc.) 
• Storage for various groups 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 16 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E ‐ Planning Document – High School 

1.2  Educational Principle 
Students require a wide range of settings to learn, work and socialize in small and large groups as well as 
individually. 
 
Design Implications 
• Common area 
• Flexible seating and furniture 
• Auditorium seating for large events 
 
1.3  Educational Principle 
Technology is an essential tool for instruction and administration.  Students will use digital technology 
and communication tools to access, manage, integrate and evaluate information, construct new 
knowledge, and communicate with others. Many knowledge systems and resources will no longer need 
to be place‐based but can be accessed from anywhere by both teachers and students. 
Design Implications 
• Mobile labs 
• Wireless Internet access/printing 
• Modems 
• Easy monitoring of space to allow for freedom with responsibility 
 
1.4  Educational Principle 
Learning is interactive, group oriented, hands‐on, and based in the core subjects with a focus on thinking 
through issues, solving problems and making connections.  Students demonstrate authentic 
understanding through work products, projects, and other activities. 
Design Implications 
• Gallery space for student work 
• Project work space for students 
• Equipment safe use 
 
1.5  Educational Principle 
Curriculum, assessment, and instruction are focused on enhancing student understanding (at all 
performance levels) while being responsive to differences in student readiness, learning profiles, and 
interests (Understanding by Design ‐ UBD).  
Design Implications 
• Work centers for different readiness levels 
• Space that allows for active engagement 
• Technology 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 17 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document – Middle School 

1.6  Educational Principle 
Provide well‐rounded education that includes developmentally appropriate extra and co‐curricular 
activities and sports. 
Design Implications 
• Auditorium to fit student body and community (think graduation) 
• Black box theater 
• Art 
• Band/music/chorus 
• Athletic complex 
• Exercise room 
• Swimming pool 
• Indoor track 
•  
1.7  Educational Principle 
Exposure to curriculum customized to the individual and/or more learning choices will be commonplace.  
Opportunities for choice in learning will allow students to be competitive for any endeavor beyond high 
school – where academic content is learned through real‐world examples, applications, and experiences.  
Design Implications 
• Career education 
• Emphasize technology 
• Media center 
• Teleconference capabilities 
• Distance learning 
 
1.8  Educational Principle 
The introduction of IB in the early years creates an increasing expectation for interdisciplinary and cross‐
curricular connections. 
Design Implications 
• Teacher meeting spaces 
• Class space to accommodate combined groups (2 classes at once) 
 
1.9  Educational Principle 
Students will progress through less and less structured educational experiences as they move toward 
becoming independent, mature, spontaneous learners who have the confidence to continually expand 
and adapt their knowledge. 
Design Implications 
• Rooms for project centered learning 
• Easy communication with outside resources 
• More computer labs strategically located 
• Space in computer labs for projects 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 18 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E ‐ Planning Document – High School 

1.10  Educational Principle 
Off campus sites serve as an extension of the programs at the high school in the areas of occupation 
exploration, career prep, enrichment, and to those seeking a hands‐on style of learning or alternative 
learning experience. 
Design Implications 
• Community involvement 
• Ease of communication 
• Class space for combined groups 
 
1.11  Educational Principle 
The core of the IB Diploma Programme curriculum model consists of investigating a topic of individual 
interest using independent research and writing skills expected at tertiary level, exploring the nature of 
knowledge across all disciplines, encouraging an appreciation of other cultural perspectives, and 
involvement in artistic pursuits, sports and community service work, thus fostering an awareness and 
appreciation of life outside the academic arena.  
Design Implications 
• Student project area 
• Media access 
• Accessibility outside school hours 
 
Attracting, Retaining and Developing Highly Skilled Staff 
2.1  Educational Principle 
The changing role of the teacher brought on by the self‐directed student and the development of 
technology will require change in teaching methods and styles, including self‐contained, multi‐
disciplinary, and team teaching. Teachers will use a variety of instructional strategies and assessments 
and incorporate the use of technology as a teaching and administrative tool. 
Design Implications 
• Mobile technology / lots of live ports and outlets (possibly in the floor) 
• Be able to move about room without tripping over cords 
 
2.2  Educational Principle 
The necessary resources and services must be provided to support student achievement. An 
administrative tool used to assist the school in managing student concerns and issues is the House 
Structure – designed to address the need for consistency in administrative‐student relations and to 
facilitate the access of students and parents to administrative interventions.  Each house supports 
approximately 200 ‐ 250 students. 
Design Implications 
• Technology available to students at any point during the day 
• Space for specialist within appropriate department  
• Meeting space for a large meeting 15‐20 people/ 20‐30 people 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 19 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document – Middle School 

2.3  Educational Principle 
Data must be used for continuous improvement of teaching and learning. 
Design Implications 
• All data housed in a central secure location with seating to review paper data 
 
2.4  Educational Principle 
Collegiality, collaboration, and teamwork are essential.  The school environment should support 
continued professional development and mentoring by providing teachers with opportunities to 
collaborate on a routine basis and to explore new teaching strategies, tools and other resources. 
Design Implications 
• Collaboration space close to classrooms 
• Make it difficult for teachers to remain isolated 
 
2.5  Educational Principle 
Teachers develop individual professional growth plans to focus and monitor continual refinement of 
their practice. A PGP should support reflective thinking ‐ a conscious and intentional process that 
provides time for thinking about teaching practices and how to refine them. 
Design Implications 
• Private spaces for teachers 
• Student work display areas 
• Technology to video teaching  ‐ space and technology to review it 
• Bright/positive/beautiful/inspiring places – lots of  natural light 
 
2.6  Educational Principle 
Adults will help students develop learning goals and plan and assess progress. 
Design Implications 
• Storage for student work (particularly for large work) 
• Conference space that still allows teachers to monitor the whole class 
 
2.7  Educational Principle 
Administrators provide effective leadership and management. 
Design Implications 
• Consider decentralized offices 
 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 20 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E ‐ Planning Document – High School 

Creating and Maintaining Safe, Healthy and Comfortable Environments 
3.1  Educational Principle 
School facilities should be inviting and inspiring.  They must create a strong sense of belonging and be a 
statement about how Falls Church feels about education and community.  They should be welcoming 
and non‐institutional.  
Design Implications 
• Campus feel – inviting 
• Parking/signage  
• Greenspace 
 
3.2  Educational Principle 
An educational facility should be designed to conserve resources; good stewards of the environment. 
Design Implications 
• Follow LEEDS 
 
3.3  Educational Principle 
An engaging environment (facilities and grounds) is an active showcase of learning and discovery. 
Design Implications 
• Display areas 
• Active, stimulating objects/decor 
 
3.4  Educational Principle 
An engaging learning environment must be easily managed and maintained. 
Design Implications 
• Choice of building materials 
 
3.5  Educational Principle 
Small classes and small schools are the foundation of academic excellence. 
Design Implications 
• Building has to allow for expansion/division within existing walls to allow more classes 
 
3.6  Educational Principle 
There must be safety from physical threat and a sense of emotional security for students and all who 
use the building. 
Design Implications 
• Lighting 
• Campus setting for emotional sense of security 
• Defined entry/access points 
• Hallway lines of sight 
 

 
Appendix E ‐ 21 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document – Middle School 

Actively Involving the Community as Partners in Education 
4.1  Educational Principle 
Schools are the center of education that supports life‐long learning for all ages and interests within the 
community while also preparing students for the workforce.   
Design Implications 
• Spaces flexible enough to accommodate wide range of ages/activities 
• Ability to define boundaries/use of space limits/secure areas 
• Large enough space for community events 
 
4.2  Educational Principle 
Family involvement is welcome and encouraged 
Design Implications 
• Clearly defined entry – logical layout with good signage 
• Parking 
• Meeting and conference spaces 
 
4.3  Educational Principle 
The Falls Church community will continue to face change and growth. 
Design Implications 
• Site plan allows for expansion without interruption 
• Interior layout allows for easy room changes 
 
4.4  Educational Principle 
Partnerships with the community and advancing technologies will help create customized learning 
experiences that have personal relevance for a variety of students’ needs. 
Design Implications 
• Very specialized spaces 
 
4.5  Educational Principle 
Schools facilitate use by multiple populations for multiple purposes at all hours and days of the week, 
while protecting the core instructional program. 
Design Implications 
• Durability 
• Security 
 
4.6  Educational Principle 
Community involvement strengthens our schools. 
Design Implications 
• Welcoming design (entry, parking, signage, etc.) 
• Parent work areas within the school 
 
 
4.7  Educational Principle 
Schools are seen as an integral factor in providing a positive environment for children, and attracting 
residents that want to live here for the school and community. 
Design Implications 
 
Appendix E ‐ 22 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E ‐ Planning Document – High School 

• “Campus” feel/setting 
• Materials easily maintained 
 
 
Design Implications by Discipline 
Grade 12  
• A senior lounge (in lieu of a hallway) 
 
English   
• We use computer labs frequently and there are often conflicts, particularly during exam times. We 
need at least another lab.   
• Journalism needs its own lab space for each class because the lap tops do not have all the software 
necessary. 
• We still have three English teachers in trailers and would like to have all of our teachers in one wing 
in the building.  
• Floor in A112 is peeling up and needs to be replaced.  
   
Mathematics  
• Dedicated Math Computer Lab  (24 network stations) 
• Department Office large enough to hold department meetings, work stations, and all supplies 
• Department copy machine 
• All math classrooms in close proximity to each other 
• All classrooms with the same technology at present or better 
• Computer science classroom should be large enough to use for a regular math class as well as a 
computer science class.  The computers in this room should not be networked. 
• High ceilings  
• Every classroom with windows 
• Individual classroom thermostats controllable by teacher 
• All full time teachers have their own classroom 
• Reasonable storage space and bookshelves in classrooms 
• At least 50% of the wall space should be white boards. 
• Chairs that are detachable from desk 
• File cabinets and desks that lock in each classroom with keys 
• Minimally exposed wires 
• No carpeting 
 
Social Studies 
• New classroom ceilings 
• “Green” lights – more eco‐friendly lights 
• Multiple windows in all classrooms 
• Temperature control in all classrooms 
• Wireless network 
• Multiple wired drops 
• Multiple computers in classroom 
• All social studies classrooms clustered together in the building 
• Social studies office/ bookroom located near social studies classrooms 
 
Appendix E ‐ 23 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document – Middle School 

• LCD projectors mounted in all classrooms 
• Smartboards 
• More computer labs/ more laptop carts 
• Larger classrooms 
• Teacher desks/ closets that can be locked 
• Plenty of bookshelves 
• Place clocks away from audiovisual screens/ boards 
• Bulletin boards/ wall space for display 
• Flexible work space for students outside of classrooms 
• Larger bookroom, more flexible department storage options 
• Copy facilities closer to classrooms 
• Common color printer in office 
• Classroom for each teacher, no sharing, especially during planning 
• In‐house TV/ broadcast network 
• Large lecture room for speakers, etc 
• Green space 
• Outdoor classroom space 
• Telephones in computer labs 
• Placement of phone jacks near computer drops 
 
Science 
• Larger lab space (current space does not allow for 24 different experiments to occur during a typical 
IB lab period),  
• Outdoor classroom (amphitheater, compost pile, garden, greenhouse, stage for demos),  
• Separate lab and lecture space (because lab benches cannot be rearranged),  
• More fume hoods per chemistry classroom,  
• Way for darkening rooms for light experiments,  
• Student project display areas (for 3‐D objects),  
• Mounted televisions in classroom,  
• Hallway computer screen for video announcements (student video project display, upcoming tests, 
make‐up sessions, summer opportunities),  
• Student work room with water, gas, fume hood, wireless technology (to make it more flexible and 
reduce the hazard of loose wires),  
• Plugs that aren’t too close to water supply, 
• Plentiful outlets from ceiling or floor,  
• Student storage areas (back packs),  
• Open (but monitored) lab space so that as student’s learning becomes less structured they will have 
the ability to conduct experiments outside of classroom time.   
• Department conference room (for dept. meetings, parent conf., collaboration among teachers),  
• More flexible classroom space so teachers can team‐teach two classes at the same time,  
• Amphitheater for large group instruction, planetarium 
 
 
World Languages + ESOL 

 
Appendix E ‐ 24 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E ‐ Planning Document – High School 

• “Green” building with foreign language classrooms in proximity to each other, with no shared 
classrooms, and with central FL workspace with ample space, desks, computers, storage for shared 
materials and shelves for FL library 
• 10 Internet‐connected computers in each classroom  
• Wireless Internet access throughout school + laptops for each student 
• Multimedia capacities in each classroom, with Smart Board 
• Centralized media control panel/system for all media devices in the room 
• Small enclosed spaces adjoining classrooms that can be used for oral interviews, small group work, 
individual testing 
 
International Baccalaureate Program  
• An IB Center 
o Two adjacent offices 
o IB Diploma Program Coordinator 
o IB MYP Program Coordinator 
o Center Area – Large Conference Table 
o Book Shelves 
o Couches for Visitors 
• This would be an area large enough to hold meetings and would allow teachers and students a quiet 
place to reflect and get assistance from the IB program coordinators.  
• Bathroom for visitors  
 
Special Education 
• Each staff member has their own classroom  
• English classrooms have 6‐10 computers within the room 
• Science room that is equipped with a lab 
• Large resource room with test taking space and computers  
• ILMS classrooms that have a minimum of 12 computers 
• A Para office/secure space to lock materials 
• Storage space for special education materials 
• Conference room dedicated to special education meetings 
• Testing room  
• Counseling room 
• OT/PT adaptive room 
• Sensory room 
• Mounted TV’s with cable access in each classroom 
• Transition room that is not in basement next to boiler room 
• Life skills room with kitchen, laundry, separate entrance, accessible bathroom and coffee machine 
for school store  
 
Physical Education  
• Indoor swimming pool 
• Workout room in which mats can be put down and left out 
• Free weights weight room 
• Practice field space 
• Expand the weight room/update the equipment 
 
Appendix E ‐ 25 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document – Middle School 

 
Visual Arts, Performing Arts, Music/Chorus, Band 
• Proximity between teachers and departments 
• Auditorium 
o Seating for the entire school population, today’s estimate is 900  
o What does the demographic for the future suggest?? 
o Stage‐ 60 ft square 
o Storage space for full set behind mid curtain 
o Storage‐props/flats 
o Fly system 
o Men/Women dressing rooms for 15 plus people 
o Small rehearsal rooms 
o A facility that is shared w/the community 
o Performing arts center with multiple theaters: a main stage and a smaller black box space 
o Storage‐costume and tailoring/fitting area (washer, dryer) 
• Music Department 
o Band Room 
• Flat, large rehearsal room for band 
• Attached room for instrument storage (150 instruments, today)  
• Storage for music library (attached to office is best) 
• Storage for uniforms for band and chorus 
• Percussion storage room 
o Guitar Room 
• Guitar Classroom 
• Guitar Storage 
• PA system with headphone ports for each chair in the room 
• A separate sound proof recording / testing / practice room with large windows for 
observation 
• Smart board 
• Work bench for guitar maintenance 
o Chorus Room 
• Chorus classroom with risers 
• Chorus library area 
• FOUR INDIVIDUAL PRACTICE ROOMS ‐ One large practice area to fit piano and group of 10 ‐ 
15 instrumentals.   Three smaller practice rooms to accommodate 4 or 5 students.  
• MUSIC LAB ‐ IB MUSIC/BAND/CHORUS/GUITAR students could use Sibelius and keyboards 
that would stay hooked up. 
• Adaptable/appropriate lighting 
• Performance space must be dedicated to the performing arts (not shared with other 
academic subjects).  Currently we are sharing classrooms with study hall, art and theatre 
and the computer lab with school which doesn't allow us to leave keyboards hooked up.  
• Visual Arts 
o Dedicated Art space 
o Experiential (Studio) Space 
o Good lighting 
o Exterior Door 
 
Appendix E ‐ 26 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E ‐ Planning Document – High School 

o Appropriate sinks (triple spigots per room) 
o Big and open space to allow for storage of in‐process work 
o Built in for flat storage and 3‐dimensional shelves 
o Kiln/exhaust fan in studio space 
o Appropriate display space in classrooms to hang/display student work and educational materials 
o Clean, non‐studio, Portfolio preparation room (matting materials) 
o Visual arts/ digital arts computer lab  
o Appropriate flooring  
o High ceilings 
o Lecture space 
o Good visual sightlines for supervision in multiple spaces simultaneously 
 
Film Studies/Robotics/Technical Education 
• Production oriented, small studio environment 
• Computer editing facilities‐ to accommodate 20‐25 students 
• Accommodations for Lighting instruments to accommodate student lighting exercises  
• Central office area dedicated to media/equipment storage that opens to a   large computer work 
area and a larger wood and machine shop (ventilation, power requirements, safety margins) 
• Proximity to the theater is helpful 
• Presentation room for finished products 
• Seated audience area for viewing films 
• Sufficient Storage for long‐term projects 
• White board for generating ideas/brainstorming 
• Specialized space for electronics and for dealing with repair and maintenance of electronics 
 
Career and Technical Education 
• Family and Consumer Science (FACS) room needs gutted or placed in a new facility. 
• Ideal floor plan would include 3 rooms.  
• One room would house 4 regular kitchens and one commercial kitchen. 
• The second room would be a classroom with a textiles area for sewing, ironing and cutting. 
• In addition to this a separate area should be set up for 5 modular stations that kids can rotate into. 
• The third area would be located between the two classrooms. Half of it would serve as a storage 
room and laundry room with washer and dryer. 
• The other half would be a dining room/restaurant area with buffet for serving faculty and other 
groups. Can double as a conference room or possible future child care facility. 
• Equipment:  4 regular kitchens with stoves, refrigerators, garbage disposals, dish washers, 
microwaves and deep sinks. 
• 1 commercial kitchen to meet the competencies for the culinary 1 course 
• Washing machine and dryer 
• Utility sink 
• Modular computers and work tables 
 
Alternative Education 
If considering a move of Alternative Education from off campus to on campus, a facility that could be: 
• Private, yet not isolated, self‐contained classrooms 
• Able to utilize all GM resources (library, PE, Science, labs, cafeteria) 
 
Appendix E ‐ 27 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document – Middle School 

• Storage for all course books and other materials, more than a regular classroom 
• Duplicate the domestic characteristics (food, refrigerator, microwave, stove, etc.) of Gage House 
• Separate meeting room for 2‐3 people, visitors, social workers, probation officers, counselors, etc. 
• Separate small parking area (students, visitors) 
 
Counseling 
• A suite for all counselors (guidance, student services, college/career, IB Coordinator) with a 
conference room which would be equipped with a smart board and a permanent LCD projector. 
• A file room in the suite that is large enough to accommodate for all the files and ample workspace 
while reviewing files, copying, faxing, etc. place the older files closer to the counseling office 
• A Career Center large enough to accommodate an entire class and equipped with a smart board. 
• Up‐to‐date wiring for wireless laptop use for all counselors at all meetings. 
 
Student Resources   
• A designated study hall room with computer access.  
• A courtyard area where students can go out during lunch in nice weather.  
• School store/vending machine (school supplies) 
• Computer lab available to students all the time 
• Uniform‐sized lockers large enough to hold coats, book bags 
• More hallway space 
• Taller ceilings 
• Skylights, more natural light 
 
Dining/Food Services 
• Cafeteria should have a more retail feel like Starbucks or LaMadeline’s than institutional 
environment. Student food line should be more food station oriented like a food court with 
warmers, Food bins etc. TV monitors in the café to stream important school or world 
events/information.  
• Food service should also have a food delivery truck for catering events.   
• Foodservice Directors office that has heat. 
• Upgraded electrical system that doesn’t trip the breakers  
• Cameras that monitor the café seating area 
• A second or a larger cafeteria to cut down on food lines and crowding.  
• Café large enough to hold half of the student body 
• Larger cafeteria so that lunch schedule doesn’t drive the schedule!  
• Teacher dining room 
• Outdoor dining area that can be used by all students 
• A water cooler/expand the salad bar for more vegetables 
• Larger cafeteria so fewer lunches, perhaps a food court 
• Teacher dining room 
• Rectangular tables 
 
Gymnasium 
• We should have a high school gym that is as nice as the one at MEH so that high school students can 
play their games at the high school.   
• Teacher dedicated locker room (Men and Women separate) 
 
Appendix E ‐ 28 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E ‐ Planning Document – High School 

• Fitness/weight room for teachers 
• Large enough to hold home sports events (no need to go to MEH) 
• Faculty exercise room 
• A workout room for faculty   
• Bigger gym/more modern 
• Indoor track 
• Weight room 
• Space available for students during free blocks 
• Swimming pool 
• Racquetball court 
• More athletic fields 
• Cross‐country course  
 
Library Services 
• The cable system throughout the building is antiquated and needs to be updated.  Teachers need 
the ability to access and record from their own rooms.  The cable box system in the library AV room 
needs to modernized. 
• The library classroom needs to be brought up to date with new furniture as well as additional 
computers to make it into a library teaching lab for   the 21st century.  This rearrangement would 
require more computer drops and furniture that can be used for all types of research training.  The 
room should also have either some sort of smart board or advanced iPanel that really works. 
• The library classroom lights need to have the switches set so that the front lights can go off when 
projecting to the front screen.  Currently all lights need to be turned off to fully see what is being 
projected. 
• The main floor of the library is in desperate need of new tables, chairs, and study carrels as well as a 
new center table for computers and readers.  All items requested except the center table were 
purchased during the 1970’s renovation.  The center table is at least 16 years old, probably older.   
• New chairs are needed in the library lab.  Chairs need to be of the correct height for the computer 
counters. 
• New table and chairs for the library magazine room. 
• It would be good to have another library classroom or meeting room for students to do group work. 
Satellite dish to get foreign TV programs 
• Special section created in library with books of all genres written by authors from other nations; 
books translated and in original language 
• More computers 
 
Teacher and Professional Development Resources   
• Access to Fairfax County’s professional development speakers. (I don’t think this is a facility issue, 
but it was a suggestion) 
• A large classroom/lecture space that could accommodate two or three classes if we would like to 
have a speaker. 
• Exercise room with showers for teachers.  
• Daycare facility (could be used for early childhood development classes) 
• Larger meeting space 
• Multimedia center + presentation space that can accommodate several classes at once for 
interdisciplinary presentations 
 
Appendix E ‐ 29 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E – Planning Document – Middle School 

 
Extra and Co‐curricular Activities 
• A room with supplies such as paper, markers, etc that students and teacher sponsors could use.  
• Lockers for team sports with lockers large enough to hold equipment (tennis racquets, lacrosse 
sticks, etc.) 
• Club meeting rooms (large meeting spaces for at least 50 kids) with technology (projector, 
computer) 
• Club storage facilities by club/team  
• Trophy case for extra‐curricular activities 
• Publishing space for newspaper and yearbook 
• Display space for student artwork 
• Plan for student artwork/ murals on walls 
• Space for student groups to meet and work 
 
Clinic  
• An area for private conversations or telephone calls. 
 
Building in General  
• Full spectrum lighting that mimics sunlight. Sound buffering material for hallways. Building is very 
loud during change of lunches.  
• More faculty bathrooms 
• Multiple copy rooms/teacher workrooms 
• Individual room thermostats for classrooms 
• Limit number of exits and entrances 
• Double sets of doors to limit cold and/or warm air 
• Electronic sign in front of the school 
• Enhance relationship w/ grad center for extra classroom space instead of using trailers 
• We think that students should be surveyed as well to see what they would want in a new or 
improved facility 
 
Main Office Area 
• Need an area to receive UPS/Federal Express & DHL deliveries 
• Need a work area with several long tables to assemble packets for interims, report cards, end‐of‐
year mailout, August mailout and the beginning of year folders 
• Keep principal and secretary offices together 
• Keep at least 2 desk in outer office (opposite sides of office)—1 for attendance secretary and  1 for 
assistant principle’s secretary 
• Keep discipline secretary in office to herself—confidential records 

 
Appendix E ‐ 30 
Falls Church City Public Schools 
Facility Master Plan 
 
Appendix E ‐ Planning Document – High School 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This page intentionally left blank 

 
Appendix E ‐ 31 
 

   

Appendix F 

MASTER PLAN  
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
Appendix F – Baseline Architectural Program - High School

Elementary Program Analysis - Current PK-1 - 430 students exp


Number Pupil/Teacher Total Area each Total
Space Name Classrooms Ratio Students Room Area Remarks

Classrooms: includes addtl in class storage


Pre-K 5 15 75 1055 5,275 w/ toilet
Kindergarten 8 22 176 1055 8,440 w/ toilet
First Grade 8 22 176 1055 8,440 w/ toilet
Total Classrooms 21
Total Pupils 427
22,155
Special Education:
Self Contained 2 8 800 1,600
Resource 4 8 400 1,600 may want less, but larger
OT/PT 1 500 500 w/storage & bathroom
3,700
Art:
Art & Related Spaces 1 1200 1,200 w/storage & kiln, drying racks
1,200
Music:
Music & Related Spaces 1 1000 1,000
1,000
Physical Education:
Gym & related spaces 1 6000 6,000 2 teacher stations
6,000
Technology:
Learning Lab 2 1055 2,110 w/bathroom if needed for clsrm
Computer Tech 1 200 200
Distribution Center 1 500 500
Data closets 3 250 750
3,560
Support Services: speech, tutoring, ESL, etc.
Various resources 8 200 1,600 spread adj to students
Family Literacy clsrm 1 800 800 adult clsrm in admin area
Teacher meeting room 3 300 900 each g.l. work/lounge/books
3,300
Media Center:
Reading Room 1 1730 1,730 750 + 2X capacity @ 200/gl
Conference 1 200 200
Office / Workroom 1 350 350
2,280
Guidance:
Couselor's Office 1 500 500
Conference 1 200 200
700

continued next page

Appendix F - 1
Falls Church City Public Schools
Facility Master Plan
Appendix F – Baseline Architectural Program – High School

Administration:
Reception 1 250 250
General Office 1 500 500
Principal 1 200 200
Asst Princ/Other Lead 1 150 150
Attendance Clerk 1 50 50
Bookkeeper 1 50 50
Workroom 1 300 300
Conference/Team 2 250 500
Parent Resource 1 1025 1,025 also used for fam lit adult prog
Clinic 1 500 500
Toilet 2 70 140
Misc/Storage