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O N P R O U D W I N G S

Centennial Centennial Centennial Centennial 2009 2009 2009 2009


Y2k now on its Y2k now on its Y2k now on its Y2k now on its
way to take off way to take off way to take off way to take off
Interview with Interview with Interview with Interview with
Y2K new pilot Y2K new pilot Y2K new pilot Y2K new pilot
Interview with Interview with Interview with Interview with
Y2K wingmaker Y2K wingmaker Y2K wingmaker Y2K wingmaker
New display pan- New display pan- New display pan- New display pan-
els installed and els installed and els installed and els installed and
still coming still coming still coming still coming
So, whatve we all So, whatve we all So, whatve we all So, whatve we all
been up to lately? been up to lately? been up to lately? been up to lately?
V O L U ME 3 , I S S U E 5
D E C E MB E R 2 0 0 8
I NS I DE THI S
I S S UE :
T H E C OM OX T H E C OM OX T H E C OM OX T H E C OM OX
V A L L E Y A I R V A L L E Y A I R V A L L E Y A I R V A L L E Y A I R
F O R C E F O R C E F O R C E F O R C E
M U S E U M M U S E U M M U S E U M M U S E U M
A S S OC I A T I O N A S S OC I A T I O N A S S OC I A T I O N A S S OC I A T I O N
N E WS L E T T E R N E WS L E T T E R N E WS L E T T E R N E WS L E T T E R
In 2009, Canada will celebrate the 100th
Anniversary of the first powered, heav-
ier-than-air, controlled flight in Canada
by J.A.D. McCurdy. He took off in the
Silver Dart from the frozen surface of
the Bras DOr Lakes near Baddeck,
Nova Scotia.
To honour this historic achievement,
CAPA will fly heritage aircraft, owned and re-
stored by member Museums, from Comox, BC
to Baddeck and Halifax, NS in 2009, commenc-
ing in May. Your Association is planning a
Centennial of Flight Dinner for 25 April 2009,
with VIP guests and special visiting aircraft and
crews. (for more details inside).
(Continued on page 2)
Y 2 K S P I T F I R E : Y 2 K S P I T F I R E : Y 2 K S P I T F I R E : Y 2 K S P I T F I R E : Y E A R Y E A R Y E A R Y E A R - -- - E N D U P D AT E E N D U P D AT E E N D U P D AT E E N D U P D AT E
A little less than a week ago, the Canadian
Forces Chief of Defense Staff, General Walt
Natynczyk approved the Vintage Wings of
Canada (VWC) proposal to buy the Y2K Spit-
fire for completion of the restoration to flying
status here in Comox and assume full custody
of the aircraft. VWC is a charitable organiza-
tion based in Gatineau, Quebec, with its own
state-of-the-art hangar and maintenance facility
at the Ottawa/Gatineau Airport (CYND) just 20
minutes from downtown Ottawa.
The final stages of contract negotiations
are now underway and Mike Potter, President
of VWC, is to visit Comox in January to for-
mally sign the contract docu-
ments.
Until now, it has been a
challenging year at the Y2-K
project. After 71/2 years of
steady and slow progress, sud-
denly in early spring the word
spread that a new partner may
be coming on board to help
the Spitfire completion, as per our original vi-
sion. And, now, we are there. More details of
the process follow in ensuing columns, includ-
ing interviews with the first future pilot of Y2K
(Continued on page 2)
Silver Dart, 1909 Silver Dart, 1909 Silver Dart, 1909 Silver Dart, 1909
Canadian Aviation Museum
CENTENNIAL OF
POWERED FLIGHT IN CANADA
C E N T E N N I A L O F C E N T E N N I A L O F C E N T E N N I A L O F C E N T E N N I A L O F
P O WE R E D F L I G H T P O WE R E D F L I G H T P O WE R E D F L I G H T P O WE R E D F L I G H T
1 11 1 - -- - 4 44 4
Y 2 K 2 0 0 8 U P D A T E Y 2 K 2 0 0 8 U P D A T E Y 2 K 2 0 0 8 U P D A T E Y 2 K 2 0 0 8 U P D A T E 1 11 1 - -- - 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0
P R E S I D E N T S P R E S I D E N T S P R E S I D E N T S P R E S I D E N T S 3 33 3
D I R E C T O R S D I R E C T O R S D I R E C T O R S D I R E C T O R S 4 44 4
C O L L E C T I O N S C O L L E C T I O N S C O L L E C T I O N S C O L L E C T I O N S 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0
ME MB E R S H I P ME MB E R S H I P ME MB E R S H I P ME MB E R S H I P 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0
F U N F A R E F U N F A R E F U N F A R E F U N F A R E 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Q U A R T E R Q U A R T E R Q U A R T E R Q U A R T E R - -- - B A C K B A C K B A C K B A C K 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2
C O N S T R U C T I O N . . C O N S T R U C T I O N . . C O N S T R U C T I O N . . C O N S T R U C T I O N . . 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3
U K N E WS E X T R A U K N E WS E X T R A U K N E WS E X T R A U K N E WS E X T R A 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3
C V A F MA A D MI N C V A F MA A D MI N C V A F MA A D MI N C V A F MA A D MI N 1 4 1 4 1 4 1 4
C O MI N G E V E N T S C O MI N G E V E N T S C O MI N G E V E N T S C O MI N G E V E N T S 1 5 1 5 1 5 1 5
N O T I C E S & A D S N O T I C E S & A D S N O T I C E S & A D S N O T I C E S & A D S 1 6 1 6 1 6 1 6
SPECIAL POINTS
OF INTEREST:


V O L U ME 3 , I S S U E 5
D E C E MB E R 2 0 0 8
Page 2
and the U.K. wing restoration contractor.
Meanwhile, work has been progressing
on the elevators, cockpit, seat and wind-
screen, and we have seen improvements
made to the restoration hangar in anticipation
of the new partner-
ship.





So, Cheers from the Y2-K Spitfire Team and all the very best for 2009,

Terry Chester, Mike Forbes, Bonn Svensson, Pat Murphy


(Note: See ensuing pages for interviews with Rob Erdos, VWC pilot, and Ralph Hull, President, Aero
Hull Wing-makers)
(Continued from page 1)
A substantial part of the museums contribution to
the Centennial celebrations is its present role in restoration of
the Y2K Spitfire Mark IX on-site. Very few nations in the
world owe more to flight than Canada. Aviation opened up
the country and still remains a lifeline to many remote and
northern areas.
The significance of aviation today and what it has
done for us can be compared to what the Canadian Pacific
Railway did for Canada in the years after Confederation. To-
day, aerospace activity makes up a larger component of our
industrial base than in any other nation.
Many individuals were involved in Canadas inaugu-
ral flight including, in particular, Alexander Graham Bell,
Fredrick "Casey" Baldwin and John A.D. McCurdy.

Alexander Graham Bell (1847-
1922), who could be said to be the
"father of Canadian aviation", was
the prime mover behind the whole
event. He was born in Edinburgh,
Scotland, on March 3, 1847 to Alex-
ander and Eliza Bell. He was edu-
cated initially at the Royal High
School, Edinburgh, Scotland, but
later moved to London living with
his grandfather. It was while living
with his grandfather that young Bell developed his love of
learning. Bell returned to Edinburgh where he taught briefly
at Weston House Academy, before enrolling in the University
of Edinburgh.
In 1870, Bell and the family immigrated to Canada
eventually purchasing a small farm near Brantford, Ontario,
where he taught speech therapy to deaf persons and began his
initial experiments with voice transmission. His fascination
with acoustics started early during his life with the fact that
his mother was deaf and giving rise to his early experimenta-
tion with the sciences. A few years later he moved to Boston,
Massachusetts, and opened a school for the training of teach-
ers who would instruct the deaf. It was while in Boston that
Bell met and eventually married Mabel Hubbard. Bell in-
vented the forerunner of the modern telephone in his first suc-
cessful experiment with what he called a 'speaking wire',
when he transmitted a spoken message on March 10, 1876, to
Thomas Watson in the next room of his Boston apartment.
He also invented a device for transmitting photographs
through a beam of light, and shortly thereafter, a workable
gramophone. He also interested himself in the principles of
mechanical flight, a subject on which he gave numerous lec-
tures and published a number of scientific papers.
Bell established a summer residence at Baddeck,
Nova Scotia, on the shore of Bras d'Or in 1886. By 1889,
several other buildings had been constructed with the family
christening it Beinn Bhreagh (Gaelic for beautiful mountain)
after Bell's ancestral Scottish highlands. He began experi-
menting in 1891 with rocket-powered propellers, which can
now be identified with modem day helicopter rotors, and
graduated to designing and flying giant, man-carrying, tetra-
hedral kites. For many years he had been conducting experi-
(Continued from page 1)
(Continued on page 3)
O N P R O U D W I N G S O N P R O U D W I N G S
Y 2 K S P I T F I R E Y 2 K S P I T F I R E Y 2 K S P I T F I R E Y 2 K S P I T F I R E Y E A R Y E A R Y E A R Y E A R - -- - E N D U P D A T E E N D U P D A T E E N D U P D A T E E N D U P D A T E C O N T . . C O N T . . C O N T . . C O N T . .
New build frame installed for seat
Retired Wing Commander Stocky
Edwards talking over recent work.
2 0 0 9 2 0 0 9 2 0 0 9 2 0 0 9 - -- - C E N T E N N I A L O F P O WE R E D F L I G H T I N C A N A D A C E N T E N N I A L O F P O WE R E D F L I G H T I N C A N A D A C E N T E N N I A L O F P O WE R E D F L I G H T I N C A N A D A C E N T E N N I A L O F P O WE R E D F L I G H T I N C A N A D A
Bonn Svensson at work
on the windscreen


V O L U ME 3 , I S S U E 5
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Page 3

The advertising has started; sales are on; it must be getting close to Christmas and we have
enjoyed our annual Volunteer Recognition and Christmas party at the Officers Mess. Many of you at-
tended and, I trust, enjoyed it well.

2009 promises to be a great year for aviation in the Comox Valley and our Association will be
right in the middle of it. From organizing the premiere event, the Centennial of Flight Celebration Din-
ner, to all the flying events that will take place over the year, you can be part of it. A good place to start
is by joining one of the organizing committees for the Dinner and help to make it a huge success.

Dont forget, if you dont have your Heritage Stone yet, now is a perfect time. It makes a great
Christmas gift and you get to take advantage of the tax receipt for this year.


Best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year, Mike Hendren
THE PRESDENTS
PODIUM
Humour on the Wing Humour on the Wing Humour on the Wing Humour on the Wing
O N P R O U D W I N G S O N P R O U D W I N G S
2 0 0 9 2 0 0 9 2 0 0 9 2 0 0 9 - -- - C E N T E N N I A L O F P O WE R E D F L I G H T I N C A N A D A C E N T E N N I A L O F P O WE R E D F L I G H T I N C A N A D A C E N T E N N I A L O F P O WE R E D F L I G H T I N C A N A D A C E N T E N N I A L O F P O WE R E D F L I G H T I N C A N A D A
ments with other kite designs in an attempt to learn which
lifting surfaces were the most effective.
In 1905 he saw his kite, Frost King, successfully lift
a total of 103 kg (227 lbs) into the air. Two years later he pro-
duced an even larger kite named Cygnet 1 that was designed
to lift the weight of a man and engine. On December 6, 1907,
it was towed to a height of 50 m (168 feet), carrying Lieuten-
ant T.E. Selfridge of the United States Army as passenger/
pilot. Earlier that year, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Bell and his
wife, Mabel, formed the Aerial Experiment Association
(AEA) with two young engineers, J.A.D. McCurdy and F.W.
Baldwin. This group was later joined by Glenn Curtiss of
Hammondsport, New York, and Lt. Thomas E. Selfridge. It
was Curtiss' engine that powered the group's experimental
airplanes.
The AEA continued to experiment with Bell's kite
ideas, but soon moved their activities to Curtiss' shop at Ham-
mondsport. It was there that they built a series of four heav-
ier-than-air machines and, in March 1908, F.W. Baldwin be-
came the first Canadian to fly the first of these, the Red Wing.
It was a design conceived by Bell and so-named because it
used red silk fabric left over from his kite-building. The air-
plane took off under its own power and used skis on the ice
surface. A second flight ended in a crash and destruction of
the aircraft.
There followed flights of other Bell aircraft, the
White Wing, the June Bug, which was flown mainly by Curtiss
around the Hammondsport
area, and Silver Dart, which
first flew at Hammondsport on
December 6, 1908. The air-
craft utilized features from the
groups earlier designs, includ-
ing hinged wing-tip aileron
control which would become
standard on future aircraft de-
sign. Its bamboo frame was
covered in silver-gray rubber-impregnated silk. It featured a
three-wheeled undercarriage, tapered wings, and small wing-
tip ailerons for balance control. It also had a steerable front
landing wheel which facilitated ground positioning. The air-
craft -was powered by one of Curtiss' reliable V-8 engines.
Bell wanted the Silver Dart to fly in Canada and had
it shipped to Baddeck in January 1909. Once there, McCurdy
was selected to make the flight which became first in Canada,
(Continued from page 2)
(Continued on page 4)
AEAs June Bug, flown, 4 July 08
The student in his primary trainer was flying a solo cross-country. He lost his way and before he finally ran out of fuel he
decided to put it down on a road. With hardly any cars on the road he managed to coast his aircraft into a gas station and
said to the attendant, "Fill 'er up!"
The attendant just looked at the pilot.
"I bet you don't get too many airplanes asking for a refuel," said the pilot.
The attendant replied: "True, most pilots use that airport over there."


Page 4
on February 23, 1909.
So, a year and four months
after the AEA was formed, the Silver
Dart, piloted by Douglas McCurdy
under the watchful eyes of Bell, Bald-
win and Curtiss was brought onto the
ice at Baddeck Bay. McCurdy started
the engine and volunteers on skates
pushed it into position. The Silver
Dart glided along the ice and finally
lifted off to the astonishment of
onlookers. It rose 9 metres into the air and flew for almost a
kilometer and a half at 65 kilometres per hour. The first
flight of a flying machine in Canada and the entire British
Empire had been a huge success.
That same year the AEA was dissolved after hav-
ing reached its goal of achieving powered, manned flight.
While experimenting with airplanes, Bell applied
the dynamic principles of the airfoil to power boats and
invented the first hydrofoil craft. In 1914 he predicted, "I
have no doubt that in the future, heavier-than-air
machines of great size and of a different construction
from anything yet conceived of, will be driven over
the earth's surface at enormous velocity ... hundreds
of miles an hour, by new methods of propulsion."
The United-States Army sought his advice
in 1919, when he was 72 years of age, to outline their
policy of military aeronautics. He died on August 2,
1922, at Baddeck, Nova Scotia,
Bell received numerous academic honours
and awards during his lifetime, including being
named the second president of the National Geo-
graphic Society from 1897 to 1904. He was the re-
cipient of the Legion of Honour by the French Gov-
ernment and awarded the Albert Medal by the Royal
Society of Arts, London in 1902. The University of
Wrzburg, Bavaria conferred upon him a Ph.D.
To recognize his achievements to the science of
acoustics, the bel (B) unit of measurement was named after
Bell; however, the bel proved too large for everyday use,
and so the decibel (dB) became the more commonly used
unit for measuring sound intensity.
Here in Canada,
a number of historic sites
are maintained to com-
memorate the life of this
famed inventor, including
the Alexander Graham
Bell National Historic Site
and Museum at Baddeck,
Nova Scotia and the Bell
Homestead near Brantford, Ontario.
Alexander Graham Bells achievements have made
a lasting impact on our lives today, from the invention of the
telephone to his work with aeronautics, hydrofoils, elocution
and speech. The innovative and inventive nature of this
individual has truly helped make our world a global commu-
nity.
Centennial of Flight website; Alberta-Reynolds Museum;
CAHS Journal; CVAFMA.
(Continued from page 3)
V O L U ME 3 , I S S U E 5
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O N P R O U D W I N G S O N P R O U D W I N G S
2 0 0 9 2 0 0 9 2 0 0 9 2 0 0 9 - -- - C E N T E N N I A L O F P O WE R E D F L I G H T I N C A N A D A C E N T E N N I A L O F P O WE R E D F L I G H T I N C A N A D A C E N T E N N I A L O F P O WE R E D F L I G H T I N C A N A D A C E N T E N N I A L O F P O WE R E D F L I G H T I N C A N A D A
Silver Dart
VWCs Hawk 1 Sabre Mk V, on approach to Cold Lake for acquisi-
tion of its Golden Hawks livery marking the 100th Anniversary.
http://airforce.canadiancentennialofflight.com/main_e.htm (Centennial of Flight site)

The AVRO ARROW'S FIRST FLIGHT - Yahoo! Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_OF0v1dwYC8 (Spitfire flight under bridge)

http://www.videospider.tv/Videos/Detail/2126171602.aspx (Battle of Britain Memorial Flight Duxford )
INTERESTING WEBSITES: (Ctrl + Click) or (Copy & paste to internet)


D I R E C T O R S D I A L O G U E D I R E C T O R S D I A L O G U E D I R E C T O R S D I A L O G U E D I R E C T O R S D I A L O G U E
V O L U ME 3 , I S S U E 5
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O N P R O U D W I N G S
In this issue I would like to write about the Canadian Aeronautical Preservation Association
(CAPA) conference that I attended in October, at the Aviation Museum in Edmonton, Alberta. CAPA
exists to promote the preservation of aircraft, Canadian aviation history, and the retention in Canada of
aircraft, airframes, associated artifacts and related materials significant to Canadian aviation.
This year the conference focused on the Centennial of Flight (CoF) in Canada in 2009. Briga-
dier General Cloutier, the Air Force OPI for the CoF program, briefed us on the way ahead. He stated
that a website had been built and the brochures printed. Because this anniversary has not been funded
by the government, he challenged the conference to get the word out as this celebration will be gener-
ated more from the ground up than from the top down.
In response to this, CAPA spent a good portion of the conference organizing a Back to Baddeck series of heritage
aircraft flights. These flights will start in Comox, Saturday, 16 May 2009, and will continue across Canada until they reach
Baddeck, Nova Scotia, the site of the first powered flight in Canada, 23 February 1909. Each leg will be flown by vintage
aircraft owned by CAPA member museums. The Canadian Museum of Flight, Langley BC will fly the British Columbia legs
from Comox to Victoria to Langley and then onto Alberta where it will hand over to a museum there.
Our Museum has also responded to this challenge. Your Association is planning a Centennial of Flight Dinner for
25 April 2009. This dinner will be a Once in a Lifetime chance to see the Hawk One sabre aircraft and meet the crew along
with the 2009 Snowbird team. There will also be a VIP guest speaker. A large logo is being painted by Geoff Plant and it
will be mounted on the outside wall of the Museum building. We have talked to the Comox Valley Airport Commission
(CVAC) and we will have a display there too. The list goes on. At the conference, we also worked on a couple of other ini-
tiatives, such as an agreement to allow free admission to CAPA Museums by all their members and to bulk purchase for our
Gift Shops. Needless to say, CAPA is an excellent group of like-minded organizations and individuals. For more informa-
tion about CAPA, you can visit their website at: http://www.capa-acca.com/
Y 2 K S P I T F I R E Y E A R Y 2 K S P I T F I R E Y E A R Y 2 K S P I T F I R E Y E A R Y 2 K S P I T F I R E Y E A R - -- - E N D U P D A T E C O N T . . E N D U P D A T E C O N T . . E N D U P D A T E C O N T . . E N D U P D A T E C O N T . .
I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S ( V WC ) & T E R R Y C H E S T E I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S ( V WC ) & T E R R Y C H E S T E I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S ( V WC ) & T E R R Y C H E S T E I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S ( V WC ) & T E R R Y C H E S T E R ( C A F M) R ( C A F M) R ( C A F M) R ( C A F M)
Introduction:
The Vintage Wings Founda-
tion of Canada (VWC) has
made a proposal to the Comox
Air Force Museum (CAFM) to
take on the Y2K Spitfire Resto-
ration Project (Y2K) to com-
pletion. The Chief of Defence
Services (CDS) of the Canadian
Forces, General Walt Natync-
zyk, recently approved the sale of Y2K to VWC, a charitable
organization based in Gatineau, Quebec. Implementation of
the project is now underway.
Rob Erdos is an air dem-
onstration pilot and volunteer
with VWC and is employed by
the Canadian National Research
Council (NRC) as an experimen-
tal test pilot. A strong flying
bond exists between the NRC and
VWC in that several of its major
pilots work for both organizations
as employees and volunteers, re-
spectively. VWC employs core
administrative and technical staff
with the remaining com-
plement comprising vol-
unteer help. The Vintage
Wings of Canada mission
is to acquire, restore,
maintain and fly classic
aircraft significant to the
early history of powered
flight. A particular focus
is on aircraft of Canadian
importance. Each airplane in the
collection is restored and main-
tained to the highest standards.
They are authentically detailed
and operated within the most stringent of safety guidelines. It
is the goal to inspire and educate present and future genera-
tions on the historical significance of our aviation heritage
and to demonstrate that these aircraft are more than just
metal, fabric, and wood artifacts. VWC seeks to keep the
souls of these aircraft alive through the thundering sound of
engines, the smell of leather, glycol, oil and sweat, as well as
the laughter of their pilots as they dance with them in their
natural element in the skies over Canada.
As the Spitfire aircraft manager for VWC, Rob expects to
(Continued on page 6)
The Vintage Wings of
Canada mission is to ac-
quire, restore, maintain
and fly classic aircraft,
significant to the early
history of powered flight
with a special focus on
aircraft of Canadian im-
portance.
Rob Erdos


Page 6
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O N P R O U D W I N G S O N P R O U D W I N G S
I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S & T E R R Y C H E S T E R I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S & T E R R Y C H E S T E R I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S & T E R R Y C H E S T E R I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S & T E R R Y C H E S T E R
conduct the majority of the Y2K
test flights, preparing for its first
flights in Comox. Later, it will
perform ongoing demonstration
flights in Ottawa and elsewhere in
Canada along with pilots Tim Les-
lie and Mike Potter of VWC.
Terry Chester, a retired CF
Colonel and longstanding execu-
tive member of the Comox Valley
Air Force Museum Association,
has been asked by VWC to be the Project
Manager of Y2K in Comox. Terry has been
associated with the Spitfire project for some
time as a fundraiser and advisor, and will
manage the budget as well as the VWC em-
ployees on-site. With Bonns help, he will
coordinate the entire restoration process in
Comox, in conjunction with the principals at
VWC. This will include arranging sub-
contracts with other engineering and manufactur-
ing firms for the Merlin Engine overhaul, propeller build,
Wing construction etc..
Ed: Would either or both of you like to comment on how
VWC is set up and how its relationship with the DND and
the Museum will be, i.e. who will do what and how?
Rob: We want to see Vintage Wings planes continue to
be flown, over the long term. Projects like Y2K are at first
typically fuelled by the enthusiasm of dedicated individuals,
such as the skilled team in Comox that has started the pro-
ject; however, due to the amount of resources they require
such projects often
proceed in small
phases, as long as
funds become avail-
able. Restoration of
vintage aircraft com-
prises recurrent proc-
esses, typically
marked by incre-
mental successes.
For additional information on this question, we recommend
the reader goes to the VWC website:
http://www.vintagewings.ca . The VWC vision drives our
objective, which is to preserve our regional aviation history.
Terry: As the VWC representative in Comox, I will
also be releasing information on the project process and pro-
gress to the local media organizations, including our newslet-
ter, local, regional and national media. From a DND per-
spective, this is essentially a museum-sponsored project at 19
Wing, Comox. Therefore we need the Comox Museum to be
the centre of the projects business and our prime link to
DND. This is really a combined DND and VWC process.
We need to go down the road to-
gether, since we are all committed to
seeing Y2K flown. The Air Force has
asked VWC to assist in the comple-
tion of this project, which does not
abrogate the CFs responsibility as
regards the preservation of this price-
less artifact.
Let me give you just a little
background. We moved into this new
phase from a position of the project
threatening to collapse due to the
inability to fund it within our ex-
pected timelines, despite the massive
strength of support the public and we
have given it so far. The project even-
tually became, to use a military anal-
ogy, a bridge too far, owing to its
expense. There were few other op-
tions open to us besides just shutting
the doors and closing the work.
We openly advertised the opportunity
and there were no takers other than for a
previous bid to buy the Spitfire project as is. That bid was
an unsolicited offer to pay a sum of money to literally take
away the carcass and build it elsewhere. This was rejected
almost immediately since, from day-one, we have promised
ourselves and our supporters that Y2K will fly again in Co-
mox. From the proceeds of donations, open houses, begging
and borrowing we had come this far but were coming up to
two critical milestones, i.e. the wings and the engine. The
wings, we realized, are the beginning of the end-game and, at
over $100K for parts alone, it was something that could no
longer be done piece-meal. Also, at that rate of funding, we
figured it would take at least 29 years to complete and, by
then, who would still be around to commission it!? This was
a critical juncture.
So, a decision paper was written and submitted to DND
explaining the rationale and laying all the cards on the table
in a fully open process. We explained that we did not have
an end game, i.e. what were we going to do with her when
she was finished? The WComd in Comox was presented
with an option paper for
his consideration that de-
lineated several ways
ahead. On other business
in OW in the spring of
2008, I chanced upon Tim
Leslie of VWC and we
talked about the Spitfire
project. VWC has a MK
XVI Spitfire and the idea
of consolidating its fleet
with the Y2K Mark IX
was very interesting to
Tim. He decided to drop
(Continued from page 5)
A Bridge too Far?
We moved into this new phase
from a position of the project
threatening to collapse due to
the inability to fund it within
our expected timelines,.. from
day-one, we have promised our-
selves and our supporters that
Y2K will fly again in Comox.
Terry Chester
VWC Hangar
Terry Chester & Bonn Svensson


V O L U ME 3 , I S S U E 5
D E C E MB E R 2 0 0 8
Page 7
O N P R O U D W I N G S
in to Comox to have a look for himself in March, 2008. Once
he saw her here he was, like the rest of us, hooked, and we
began discussions in earnest on whether or not this concept
was feasible.
VWC proposed a contract to DND wherein they would
fund the remainder of the restoration in Comox, test-fly and
show the aircraft here, and then move her to the VWC collec-
tion for display to more Canadians. Such an unbelievably
complex process crosses many lines of CF and DND budget-
ary processes and is apparently the first time that something
of this nature has been tried. Consequently, it has taken a
long time to move it through the bureaucracy and ensure that
it did not founder. For CAFM, we needed to satisfy all our
local supporters with their getting to see Y2K in the air, at
last! We have an extensive public relations campaign
planned that will ensure that all those who have contributed to
this great venture are fully and completely recognized.
Rob: I would like to reinforce what Terry says. We
want to maintain our close relationship with Air Force per-
sonnel in the Canadian Forces and feel that this is a match
made in heaven. Our objectives are hand in glove. VWC can
put up many aeroplanes and sees itself as the Canadian
equivalent to the official UK Battle of Britain Memorial
Flight.

Ed: Rob, we would be interested in your words on VWCs
staff and aircraft as well as your experiences of flying these
vintage aircraft.
Rob: First of all, within VWC, many of our staff and
volunteers are ex-Air Force. For example, Tim Leslie and I,
who will both be intimately involved with this project, are ex-
442 Squadron pilots. The VWC Mustang Mk IV is painted in
period markings of the Royal Canadian Air Forces 442
Squadron, which flew the last Allied operational fighter mis-
sion of the entire European theatre of the Second World War.
It was flying fighter cover for naval operations near the Chan-
nel Islands the day after VE Day; hence, our decision to paint
this aircraft in the same colors.
As for flying our aircraft, thats one of the things in
which I and my colleagues take a lot of pleasure and pride.
Its a completely different skill set from flying modern aero-
planes. We have aircraft designed and built as far back as
1929 to, more recently, the Sabre of the 1950s. The skills are
not so much about the accumulated number of hours in a
flight log as the pilots overall adaptability. We have recre-
ated the experiences of flying in many different special air-
craft and we try to represent the evolution of flying through
a time scale.
Because the context of flying them is different in this day
and age, i.e. we are not actually flying them under combat
conditions, we fly them with much more care. Their present
value is very high. We put in a lot more effort than was given
the aircraft in WWII when up to 23,000 aircraft were in the
pipeline while quite a number of aircraft were being written
off in a week. At that time, apart from the possibility of
plants being bombed, there appeared to be no reason why the
factories could not have just kept producing and flying them
indefinitely. As for putting them through their paces, these
planes are strong and we can certainly show them off.
The most characteristic part of flying a Spitfire is the
challenge of the controls. It is analogous to having the pro-
verbial angel on one shoulder and the devil on the other.
When on the ground the devil is right there. The aeroplane is
nose-heavy, blind, prone to overheating and doesnt let you
forget it. When you are airborne, the angel takes over. It is
that different.
While on the ground and preparing to takeoff:
Your field of view is very limited. You cannot see the
strip ahead unless you tilt your head sideways with the
canopy open to see past the long nose. Taxiing must be
kept to an absolute minimum, as the Merlin engine is
relatively uncooled during slow travel speeds. As a re-
sult, WWII pilots would often just take off straight across
the grass.
Nowadays, overheating can pre-
sent quite a problem when, for
example, we take such aircraft to
large civil airports like Montreal
Trudeau (Dorval). The engine
will easily overheat in 3 - 4 min-
utes, even with the effects of two
outboard radiators.
The plane is extremely nose
heavy. The only way of holding
the tail down is to keep the stick
fully back, avoiding the use of
brakes, avoiding too much power
and being particularly cautious
when taxiing along rough ground.
Open the throttle too much on the ground, and she can go
over on her nose, and you run the risk of losing your prop
blades. It is all about a critical balancing act of a high
center of gravity.

For the good news, when the devil sleeps as you become
airborne, the angel awakes. The Spitfire is the very Stradivar-
ius of planes. It deserves its reputation and handles beauti-
fully.
When landing:
To keep it stable, you generally make a curving ap-
proach, at about 85 kts, in order to keep the runway in
sight for as long as possible. You keep flying the curving
The most charac-
teristic part of flying
a Spitfire is the chal-
lenge of the con-
trols... analogous to
having the prover-
bial angel on your
one shoulder and a
devil on the other.
Rob Erdos
I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S & T E R R Y C H E S T E R I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S & T E R R Y C H E S T E R I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S & T E R R Y C H E S T E R I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S & T E R R Y C H E S T E R
VWC Hurricane, Mustang & Spitfire
Frederic Kogut


Page 8
V O L U ME 3 , I S S U E 5
D E C E MB E R 2 0 0 8
O N P R O U D W I N G S O N P R O U D W I N G S
I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S & T E R R Y C H E S T E R I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S & T E R R Y C H E S T E R I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S & T E R R Y C H E S T E R I N T E R V I E W: R O B E R D O S & T E R R Y C H E S T E R
approach until you flare. But, if you roll out before flar-
ing, the ground may disappear from sight and cause you
to risk an undershoot.
Every thing about the plane wants to turn to the left. The
prop torque, the down-going blade and the helix of
thrusted air hitting the side of rudder all forces in the
same direction. Lift the tail up too much and the gyro-
scopic affect of the engine will also try to twist the aero-
plane left.
Back on the ground, you need to be fully alert, as the
devil then takes over again:
The aircraft is fairly easily brought in by a slight hold off
and touching down in a 3-point attitude;
You have to be positive and quick with rudder inputs as,
with no steerable tail wheel and no slipstream over the
tail (throttle closed), you have to dance on the rudder a bit
to keep her straight.
With the narrow track undercarriage, swinging sideways
must be prevented or it could quickly develop into a
ground loop. A crosswind makes this manoeuvre very
interesting.
Braking to help directional control is possible but can be
dangerous as the brakes fade when they get hot and you
could go nose in. Taxiing back is fairly simple, but you
must watch the radiator temps as the landing flaps restrict
air flow through the radiators.

After all is said and done, you can then relax and appreci-
ate the great experience of having flown the Spitfire. It is an
added relief to know you have actually brought it down with-
out bending it!
The Spitfire has adapted well to modifications, over its
life. The newer Marks, with superior armaments, required
changes in wing design and, by the time they got to the Marks
VI and VII, the rudder had to be upgraded because it did not
give enough rudder authority. But, it is a great testament to
the brilliance of the Mitchell design in that it could undergo so
many modifications on the same basic air frame.

Ed: You also mentioned that VWC is in the process of
restoring a P-40.
Rob: Yes, you raise a good point. One of our projects is
the rebuild of a Curtiss P-40 Kittyhawk Mk IV to be painted
in the markings of Canadian ace and Comox resident James
Stocky Edwards. Those colours, of course, become a part
of the plane. We have recently hosted Stockey in Ottawa and
he has regaled us with his stories and discussions of his ex-
perience in North Africa, on flying the P-40.
This Kittyhawk Mk IV, RAAF s/n A29-414, c/n 28589, is
not yet in the hangar in Gatineau, but undergoing restoration
with Pioneer Aero in New Zealand. Dave Hadfield visited
Pioneer Aero last January to inspect the progress achieved and
he commented The fuselage is generally complete, the em-
pennage is attached and the instrument panel is in. The en-
gine is hung, though the connections are not yet run. The
wings are making
steady progress in the
jigs, being built one
piece at a time. They
are the 5-spar wings
which explain the air-
craft's Second World
War ruggedness. All the parts are there, or are being fabri-
cated. Once the wings are finished, it's really just a matter of
assembly and control runs. It is expected that the airframe
will be painted at Pioneer in April or May 2009 with an ex-
pected arrival at Vintage Wings in August or September. Had-
field continues, The test pilot will be John Lamont, of
Wanaka, NZ. Pioneer is a very good operation and this will be
their 9th or 10th P-40. The staff and management really know
their stuff. Believe me, I asked a lot of questions!
Y 2 K S P I T F I R E Y 2 K S P I T F I R E Y 2 K S P I T F I R E Y 2 K S P I T F I R E Y E A R Y E A R Y E A R Y E A R - -- - E N D U P D A T E E N D U P D A T E E N D U P D A T E E N D U P D A T E C O N T . . C O N T . . C O N T . . C O N T . .
I N T E R V I E W: R A L P H H U L I N T E R V I E W: R A L P H H U L I N T E R V I E W: R A L P H H U L I N T E R V I E W: R A L P H H U L L , A E R O H U L L , U K L , A E R O H U L L , U K L , A E R O H U L L , U K L , A E R O H U L L , U K ( WI N G MA K E R ) ( WI N G MA K E R ) ( WI N G MA K E R ) ( WI N G MA K E R )
Introduction: Ralph has spent a varied career in aeronau-
tical engineering... I interviewed him in his ex-Cold War
hardened A-10 Hangar #17at RAF
Bentwaters, complete with 90 ton
anti-backdraft doors.

Ed: Ralph, how did you first get in-
volved with the Y2K restoration
work?
Ralph: Joel Clarkson, Mike Spooner
and Harlin Price invited me to Vancouver to assess with them
whether a restoration of the Y2K wreckage would be feasible.
I was last in Vancouver with CPA, finishing my time with
them over a 10 year period and, so it was interesting to be
back in this new capacity. However, I was between a rock
and a hard place as expectations were high, the pile of bits
looked forbidding but here might be a very viable opportunity
for the museum. A lot depended on my decision. So, after a
week of calculating what would and might be involved, and
looking over the bits many times, I figured out that it would be
worth it.
The deal was that there was an immediate need was for
jigs for the fuselage, empennage (tailplane) and the engine. It
was felt that the fuselage and empennage could be completed
in Comox, or at least in North America; however, the next job
would be the production of a set of wings, using what original
and serviceable pieces that are left. No one in Canada was
found to have the expertise for the work. I agreed to take the
job on. The costing was deliberately low in order to see this
go ahead and be completed; more for altruism than profit.
Curtiss P-40 Kittyhawk 112 Sqn RAF,


V O L U ME 3 , I S S U E 5
D E C E MB E R 2 0 0 8
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O N P R O U D W I N G S
Ed: What is it that you can bring to the project that oth-
ers cannot?
Ralph: Well, really, it is the belt and braces approach
of the 1930s technology that we have been specializing in
now for many years. Although there were quite a few groups
in the U.K. doing similar work at that time, there are now only
one or two of us left here. We have a number of other similar
jobs at the moment but are interested in seeing this one
through because of its importance and value.
At that time CAFM was looking for investors in the pro-
ject and a number of large corporations responded; but, not
with enough speed and substance to finish the project. So,
CAFM was back to the garage sales and cake sales level for
acquiring funds, a hand-to-mouth process and we thought that
the opportunity to complete the restoration was not going to
be met.
So, I was pleasantly surprised when Terry Chester visited
me this year to talk about the wing restoration and later re-
turned with Bonn Svensson, spending a few days at our plant
here in RAF Bentwaters. Despite the amount of other work
we have, we are interested in helping with this project and
look forward to the being involved in it.
Ed: In your experience, have you ever come across such
similar difficulties as these?
Ralph: Not directly, but a very similar situation was
encountered in Southampton during the restoration of the last
flying Short Sunderland Flying Boat when the 1987 hurricane
had caused so much damage to it. The continued restoration
looked to be over and done with, through a lack of funds to
complete the job, and the plane just lay in Southampton wa-
ter in its damaged state for many years
Appeals went out and then, in February of 1993, Kermit
Weeks purchased the Sunderland from Edward Hulton for
$100,000 to complete its restoration to flying condition and
take to his Fantasy of Flight Museum < http://
www.fantasyofflight.com/ >. Work on the Sunderland con-
tinued in England for the next 5 months. In July, Kermit and
a crew of five flew the Sunderland across the Atlantic mak-
ing stops in Ireland, Iceland and Canada. The Sunderland
was flown directly to the 1993 Oshkosh Fly-In in Wisconsin
and was left there for another year while the seaplane ramp
was being constructed at Kermit Weeks Fantasy of Flight
museum in Florida. The Sunderland arrived in Florida in Au-
gust of 1994.
Ed: Back to the Spitfire wings, if given the green light,
what is involved and what would be your expected schedule?
Ralph: Mike Potter of Vintage Wings Canada (VWC)
has expressed a very strong interest in acquiring Y2K and he
is asking for a set of wing completed in two years. We can do
it in the time, but it will be tight.
Spitfire wing construction is a significant task and, in-
deed, nearly sunk the original project before it got off the
ground back in the 1930s.
We will build the wings in this building Ralph said, as
we walked through the 90 ton reverse-blast protection doors,
which was used to hangar two A-10s of the USAF 81st
Fighter Wing that occupied this station in the cold war pe-
riod. We have made a start on the Y2K wings with the ac-
quisition of the leading edge parts, in anticipation of this con-
tract. We build Spitfire wings using the same 1930s belt and
braces technology that Super-
marine used, when plenty of
coach carpenters were around.
That means every rib is hand
made, using traditional wooden
technology construction methods,
i.e. no pressed steel except for the
pressed rib No. 21 at the wing
tip. Otherwise would it be resto-
ration? US aircraft manufacturers
made each rib for their aircraft in
one pressing with two flanges and
any lightening holes that they
wanted. This, of course, saved
them much time and weight.
As for the overall design of
the Spitfire wings and their con-
struction, there are some unique
features; for example, the external
profiles do not have a straight line on them anywhere. They
must be built within heavy steel jigs. When the D-boxes are
finished, they come out of their assembly jigs and go into the
main build jigs for the rest of the ribs.
The wing superstructure and any ser-
viceable parts from the original wing
are first assembled in the jig with all
appendages positioned to allow support
of the wing at its salient points and
along the trailing edge. In the jig, the
basic wing structure is completed in an
unstressed condition and the skinning is
completed in that jig. The tensioning of
skin placement provides rigidity and
final profiles.
The initial metal components for the Y2K leading edges
are already acquired and have recently been hand-wheeled.
After cold-working, the metal goes out for hardening and then
final testing for the certification, prior to assembly. In Y2K,
the ammunition bays will, of course, be left empty. In Co-
mox, Bonn will put in welded aluminium tanks in the bays for
carrying fuel.
Ed: What parts of
the original wing will
you be using?
Ralph: The Y2K
wing is being restored
from scratch. Bonn
and Mike Forbes are
stripping existing wing
parts out, avoiding
I N T E R V I E W: R A L P H H U L I N T E R V I E W: R A L P H H U L I N T E R V I E W: R A L P H H U L I N T E R V I E W: R A L P H H U L L , A E R O H U L L , U K L , A E R O H U L L , U K L , A E R O H U L L , U K L , A E R O H U L L , U K ( WI N G MA K E R ) ( WI N G MA K E R ) ( WI N G MA K E R ) ( WI N G MA K E R )
..it is the belt and
braces approach with
1930s technology that
we have been specializ-
ing in now for many
years. Ralph Hull


V O L U ME 3 , I S S U E 5
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Page 10
O N P R O U D W I N G S O N P R O U D W I N G S
ME MB E R S H I P
A BIG WELCOME TO OUR NEW MEMBERS:
Dan Salmon

Elizabeth Smith and Robert Smith
Sulaika Levasseur
Jon Jekabson
Some advantages of membership to the Association are: Some advantages of membership to the Association are: Some advantages of membership to the Association are: Some advantages of membership to the Association are:
Being part of a community-focused organization
Broadening your network of contacts and making new
friends
Learning first hand about Canadas role in military aviation
An opportunity to develop new skills
Involvement in a wide range of museum activities
A voting member of the Comox Valley Air Force Museum
Association (CVAFMA)
Opportunity to become one of the Association Directors
Enjoyment of membership activities and social functions
Receive a discount at the Air Force Museum Gift Shop.
damaged and corroded items. They will then be cleaned and trans-
ported here for integration into the construction. As many of the origi-
nal serviceable parts as possible will be incorporated into the restora-
tion.
Ed: In your store up stairs, I see a lot of wooden patterns and
frame; are they integral to building wings?
Ralph: They are pattern bending blocks that are used for cold-
rolling many of the Spitfire components. These blocks have been accumulated over the past 25
years of work on Spitfires. The larger wooden blocks are profile boards only for use on the wings.
I N T E R V I E W: R A L P H H U L I N T E R V I E W: R A L P H H U L I N T E R V I E W: R A L P H H U L I N T E R V I E W: R A L P H H U L L , A E R O H U L L , U K L , A E R O H U L L , U K L , A E R O H U L L , U K L , A E R O H U L L , U K ( WI N G MA K E R ) ( WI N G MA K E R ) ( WI N G MA K E R ) ( WI N G MA K E R )
The library of the Comox Air Force Museum has
grown from a few hundred initial donations to the Air Force
Indoctrination School (AFIS), into almost 8000 hardcover
volumes and nearly 20,000 magazines. In 1994 the Estate of
Geoffrey Rowe donated an astounding 2500 hardcover books
and over 5000 magazines. From that point on we have con-
tinually grown into a well-known research library on topics
relating to aircraft, air force, and west coast aviation.
Though we havent completed the second-half of
2008, our donations are well over 600 books and magazines.
These donors include: John Butler, Arthur Callow, Colin
Campbell, Marian Carmichael, Peter Henderson, Roger King,
Vera Jones, Phil Leonard, Linda Leslie on behalf of Gus
Youngson, Douglas Millar, Scott Pickett, Gary Ralph, P.A.
Roberts, Brian Shakleton, Fred Thatcher,
and Mark Whittington.
Besides books and magazines, we
have also received a number of logbooks:
Chernaski, Deakin, Fuller, Knapik,
McRae, Murray, Swan, and Thatcher.
Although we are a research only library and do not
lend out our books, we have many visitors each week search-
ing for family information. In most cases we are able to find
pieces of history on their family and give them the address
needed to contact Personnel Records in Ottawa where copies
of military records are kept.
Allison
C O L L E C T I O N C O R N E R C O L L E C T I O N C O R N E R C O L L E C T I O N C O R N E R C O L L E C T I O N C O R N E R
Allison Hetman
Membership Dues for 2008/09.
We would like to remind all association members that the annual dues should now be paid. We rely very much on having a
strong membership, so please continue to give us your support. The annual fee remains at $10, but we have discontinued the
family membership. As always, we are grateful for any donations, and tax receipts are issued for amounts over $10.


. . . .


In his response to the last quiz, Photo 1, Geoff tells me, was an
Avia B. 534. 19351944 Czechoslovakian Fighter in 42 Sqn, 4th
Air Regiment. I knew some, but thats more information than I had,
so who am I to disagree!? Photo 2 was the top right side of the
park bench seat outside our front door. It was not found, so Im
afraid, no prizewinner for the last issue. But, keep trying folks!
With that, this issues two quiz photos are:
F U N F A R E F U N F A R E F U N F A R E F U N F A R E
Humour on the Wing Humour on the Wing Humour on the Wing Humour on the Wing
V O L U ME 3 , I S S U E 5
D E C E MB E R 2 0 0 8
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O N P R O U D W I N G S
Spotters QUIZ
1. 1. 1. 1. What would a WWII RCAF pilot have meant if he What would a WWII RCAF pilot have meant if he What would a WWII RCAF pilot have meant if he What would a WWII RCAF pilot have meant if he
said he was going gardening? said he was going gardening? said he was going gardening? said he was going gardening?
2. 2. 2. 2. Whats a Borex ? Whats a Borex ? Whats a Borex ? Whats a Borex ?
3. 3. 3. 3. What is a slang term for the time between when an What is a slang term for the time between when an What is a slang term for the time between when an What is a slang term for the time between when an
aircrew member last drinks alcohol and is legally aircrew member last drinks alcohol and is legally aircrew member last drinks alcohol and is legally aircrew member last drinks alcohol and is legally
able to fly again as crew? able to fly again as crew? able to fly again as crew? able to fly again as crew?
4. 4. 4. 4. If you are a Brit, are you generally pleased to go to If you are a Brit, are you generally pleased to go to If you are a Brit, are you generally pleased to go to If you are a Brit, are you generally pleased to go to
the Jankers? the Jankers? the Jankers? the Jankers?
5. 5. 5. 5. To a navigator, why do To a navigator, why do To a navigator, why do To a navigator, why do T TT True rue rue rue V VV Virgins irgins irgins irgins M MM Make ake ake ake D DD Dull ull ull ull
C CC Company? ompany? ompany? ompany?
6. 6. 6. 6. What does RECSPEC mean? What does RECSPEC mean? What does RECSPEC mean? What does RECSPEC mean?
7. 7. 7. 7. Where is Little Norway? Where is Little Norway? Where is Little Norway? Where is Little Norway?
2. 2. 2. 2.
Geoff Plant
For this issue, please send your answers, on or before 31st March 09, to
rhj@interbaun.com or phone Rodney at 250-650-0166.
$10 of hard-earned CVAFMA funds will be given for the most accurate
identification of both images.
A tie will be settled by pulling the winning entry from a hat.
Clue:
With it being winter and
all an the snow at 2 ft
deep, Photo 2 is from one
of the museums inside
displays.
1. 1. 1. 1.
2. 2. 2. 2.
Questions via the radio should not always be an-
swered exactly.
Tower: Aircraft in holding pattern, say fuelstate?
Aircraft: Fuelstate
Tower: Say again?
Aircraft: Again....
After this the tower controller switches off his
radio and climbs down the stairs to drink coffee
the rest of the afternoon.
ATC to Flight 123: "Slow to 300 knots please." After several
moments, it was apparent the crew had not complied with the
first speed reduction and was overtaking the inbound plane
ahead of them.
ATC to Flight 123: "Slow to 280 knots." This was soon fol-
lowed by a request for 250 knots from ATC when the crew
still had not slowed the airplane.
Finally, the now-frustrated controller ordered, "Gentlemen,
the number is 250. Either slow to it or turn to it!"


Q U A R T E R Q U A R T E R Q U A R T E R Q U A R T E R - -- - B A C K B A C K B A C K B A C K R E V I E W R E V I E W R E V I E W R E V I E W ( T H E P A S T T H R E E MO N T H S )
V O L U ME 3 , I S S U E 5
S E P T E MB E R 2 0 0 8
Page 12
C H R I S T MA S P A R T Y C H R I S T MA S P A R T Y C H R I S T MA S P A R T Y C H R I S T MA S P A R T Y
O N P R O U D W I N G S O N P R O U D W I N G S
SKUNKWORKS INC.
CONGRATULATIONS MEL
NICE WORK JON, YOU KEPT US ON OUR TOES
RETIRED TRUCKS?
...MORE !?
HMMM..
WELL OPEN REALLY SOON..
THANKS FOR THE GOOD JOB
WELL DONE, BOARD
The Comox Air Force Museum has recently completed a
series of new exhibit
panels. The new
graphic panels contain
a wide range of images
and interpretations con-
tinuing the same level
of presentation as the
new First World War exhibit panels installed in late 2007.
The new panels cover a wide range of themes including
the period between the First and Second
World Wars and the growth of the Royal
Canadian Air force, and the British Com-
monwealth Air training Plan, with a spe-
cial emphasis on British Columbias con-
tribution. Two new panels related to the
Pacific Coast War have also been in-
stalled. These panels focus on the war in
the Aleutian Islands, the threat from Ja-
pan from the very large I-400 subma-
rines, and S/L Ken Boomer who became
the first RCAF fighter pilot to destroy enemy aircraft belong-
ing to all three Axis powers (Germany, Italy and Japan).
A special exhibit has been added on the contribution of
the Bell-Irving Family of O. H. Bell-Irving who had six sons
and a daughter serve overseas during the First World War.
This exhibit also includes information on British Columbia
aces Raymond Collishaw and Joseph Fall. Special mention
is made of the expanded role played by women in non-
traditional roles such as aircraft manufacturing.
With the recent visit of exhibit planner
Don Smith, the work on the develop-
ment of new exhibits continues with the
growth of RCAF Station Comox, a new
exhibit that covers the transition of the
RCAF from piston-engine fighters into
the jet age, the Korean War and the role
of the RCAF in peace-keeping opera-
tions around the world with the United
Nations.
Don Smith
N E W E X H I B I T S N E W E X H I B I T S N E W E X H I B I T S N E W E X H I B I T S


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O N P R O U D W I N G S O N P R O U D W I N G S
C O N S T R U C T I O N & R E S T O C O N S T R U C T I O N & R E S T O C O N S T R U C T I O N & R E S T O C O N S T R U C T I O N & R E S T O R A T I O N R A T I O N R A T I O N R A T I O N
F I X I N G S T O R A G E P R O B L F I X I N G S T O R A G E P R O B L F I X I N G S T O R A G E P R O B L F I X I N G S T O R A G E P R O B L E MS ! ? E MS ! ? E MS ! ? E MS ! ?
DOING ..DOING
DONE !!
FROM CHAOS FROM CHAOS FROM CHAOS FROM CHAOS TO ORDER TO ORDER TO ORDER TO ORDER
IN THE BEGINNING...
S K U N K WO R K S H A P P E N I N G S K U N K WO R K S H A P P E N I N G S K U N K WO R K S H A P P E N I N G S K U N K WO R K S H A P P E N I N G S I N T 3 S I N T 3 S I N T 3 S I N T 3
H A N G A R H A N G A R H A N G A R H A N G A R
The Comox Radar tow-truck is now coming along very nicely.
Broadsword to Danny Boy, how do you read?
Bryan (VE7FH) checks the T3 loft for salvaged WWII
radio gear, from who knows where.
U . K . N E WS E X C E R P T S U . K . N E WS E X C E R P T S U . K . N E WS E X C E R P T S U . K . N E WS E X C E R P T S - -- - F E E D B A C K F E E D B A C K F E E D B A C K F E E D B A C K
Until the deaths of Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan,
probably almost no one outside their home country had been
aware that Canadian troops are deployed in the region...
..And as always, Canada will bury its dead, just as the rest of
the world, as always will forget its sacrifice, just as it always
forgets nearly everything Canada ever does. It seems
that Canada's historic mission is to come to the selfless aid
both of its friends and of complete strangers, and then, once
the crisis is over, to be well and truly ignored....
..Yet it's purely voluntary contribution to the cause of free-
dom in two world wars was perhaps the greatest of any de-
mocracy. Almost 10% of Canada's entire population of
seven million people served in the armed forces during the
First World War, and nearly 60,000 died. The great Allied
victories of 1918 were spearheaded by Canadian troops,
perhaps the most capable soldiers in the entire British order
of battle...
..So who today in the United States knows about the stoic
and selfless friendship its northern neighbour has given it
in Afghanistan? Lest we forget... Daily Telegraph

Please contact me for a copy of the complete text. Editor
Sunday Telegraph Article from this October's UK wires: Salute to a brave and modest nation - Kevin Myers, The Sun-
day Telegraph, London.
Amazingly a British newspaper salutes Canada. The complete article is a very good read. And, it is
odd how it took someone in England to put it into words. Here are some excerpts from the article:
FROM CHAOS.TO ORDER


CVAFMA Executive 2008 CVAFMA Executive 2008 CVAFMA Executive 2008 CVAFMA Executive 2008
President President President President Mike Hendren
Vice President Vice President Vice President Vice President Frank Steven
Secretary Secretary Secretary Secretary David Stinson
Treasurer Treasurer Treasurer Treasurer Mike Spooner
Membership Membership Membership Membership Bill Cuell
Director at Large * Director at Large * Director at Large * Director at Large * Don Manley
Bingo Coordinator Bingo Coordinator Bingo Coordinator Bingo Coordinator Herb Lightfoot
Fund Raising Fund Raising Fund Raising Fund Raising Terry Chester
Ex Ex Ex Ex- -- -Officio Officio Officio Officio John Low
Ex Ex Ex Ex- -- -Officio Officio Officio Officio Jon Ambler
Newsletter Publisher/Editor Newsletter Publisher/Editor Newsletter Publisher/Editor Newsletter Publisher/Editor Rodney Jones
Museum Director Museum Director Museum Director Museum Director John Low, Capt. 19 Wing Heritage Officer
Program Manager & Volunteer Coordinator Program Manager & Volunteer Coordinator Program Manager & Volunteer Coordinator Program Manager & Volunteer Coordinator Jon Ambler
Gift Shop Manager Gift Shop Manager Gift Shop Manager Gift Shop Manager Noreen Purdy
Contact Information Contact Information Contact Information Contact Information
COLLABORATIVE OPPORTUNITIES
As always, thanks to those who contribute articles and other material to the newsletter. There must be many members out
there who have something to submit of interest to the rest of us, whether a photo, story, or something relevant to what we
do and who we are. If so, please have no second thoughts about sending it to us.
Contact us at info@comoxairforcemuseum.ca or leave a message at the Museum. Visit www.comoxairforcemuseum.ca or
drop by the museum to find out more about current activities.
To join our Association, download the application on our website under Volunteer, leave a phone message at the
Museum, or drop by and fill out an application. For only $10 annually, some of the benefits you receive include our
newsletter, discounts in the gift shop, and a voice in the organization.
If you are currently receiving this newsletter by mail, please forward your email address to receive a high quality
issue via the Internet.

Ed.
Phone/Fax Phone/Fax Phone/Fax Phone/Fax: 250-339-8162
E EE E- -- -mail mail mail mail: info@comoxairforcemuseum.ca info@comoxairforcemuseum.ca info@comoxairforcemuseum.ca info@comoxairforcemuseum.ca
Website Website Website Website: www.comoxairforcemuseum.ca www.comoxairforcemuseum.ca www.comoxairforcemuseum.ca www.comoxairforcemuseum.ca
Spitfire/Y2K Project Website Spitfire/Y2K Project Website Spitfire/Y2K Project Website Spitfire/Y2K Project Website: www.y2kspitfire.com www.y2kspitfire.com www.y2kspitfire.com www.y2kspitfire.com
OPENING TIMES: OPENING TIMES: OPENING TIMES: OPENING TIMES: Museum, Library and Gift Shop 10am - 4pm daily
Spitfire Hangar Saturdays 10am-3pm
Heritage Airpark May-September - 10am - 4pm
Comox Air Force Museum Comox Air Force Museum Comox Air Force Museum Comox Air Force Museum
19 Wing Comox, Lazo BC V0R 2K0 (Vancouver Island)
Assistant Editor Assistant Editor Assistant Editor Assistant Editor Sulaika (Suki) M. Levasseur
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O N P R O U D W I N G S O N P R O U D W I N G S


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C O MI N G E V E N T S C O MI N G E V E N T S C O MI N G E V E N T S C O MI N G E V E N T S
Date Date Date Date Event Event Event Event
19 Dec 08 Christmas Luncheon Christmas Luncheon Christmas Luncheon Christmas Luncheon at Museum at Museum at Museum at Museum, 11:30am. Bring a plate of goodies for the table.
2009 Centennial Centennial Centennial Centennial of Powered Flight in Canada
Jan Jun Bingo
TBD Jan 09 (Sat)
DW Mall Volunteer Fair Volunteers required to set up, take down and man our table and display.
(Theme: 100 Years of Powered Flight in Canada)
TBD Feb 09 Cumberland Heritage Fair Cumberland Heritage Fair Cumberland Heritage Fair Cumberland Heritage Fair (Theme: 100 Years of Powered Flight in Canada)
TBD April 09 Canadian Forces Snowbirds Canadian Forces Snowbirds Canadian Forces Snowbirds Canadian Forces Snowbirds final practices and display
TBD Apr 09 100 Years of Powered Flight in Canada - Snowbird Autograph Session at Museum Snowbird Autograph Session at Museum Snowbird Autograph Session at Museum Snowbird Autograph Session at Museum
17-18 Apr 09 School District 71 Comox Valley Heritage Fair - CAFM and 19 Wing Recreation Centre
25 Apr 09 Centennial of Flight Dinner (Fundraiser for Museum Association and Museum)
TBD Apr 09 CVAFMA Annual General Meeting CVAFMA Annual General Meeting CVAFMA Annual General Meeting CVAFMA Annual General Meeting 7 PM at the Comox Air Force Museum in the theatre
16 May 09 Back to Baddeck Back to Baddeck Back to Baddeck Back to Baddeck (Centennial) flights begin in Comox
18 May 09 CAFM participation in Cumberland Parade Cumberland Parade Cumberland Parade Cumberland Parade with Heritage Vehicles.
TBD May 09 Garage Sale (9 AM to 2 PM) (set up at 8 AM)
07 Jun 09 Canadian Forces Day. Canadian Forces Day. Canadian Forces Day. Canadian Forces Day.
07 Jun 09 Heritage Stones Dedication Ceremony. Dedication Ceremony. Dedication Ceremony. Dedication Ceremony.
TBD Jun 09 RC Aircraft Event, 8 AM to 4 PM both days, enter via Tee Pee Park/Air Force Beach gate
1 Jul 09 CAFM participates in Courtenay Canada Day Parade Courtenay Canada Day Parade Courtenay Canada Day Parade Courtenay Canada Day Parade with heritage vehicles.
TBD Aug 09 CAFM participates in Comox Nautical Days Parade Comox Nautical Days Parade Comox Nautical Days Parade Comox Nautical Days Parade with heritage vehicles.
TBD Sep 09 Recreation Exposition (REXPO)
TBD Sep 09 Battle of Britain display in Museum
TBD Sep 09
Battle of Britain Ceremonies Battle of Britain Ceremonies Battle of Britain Ceremonies Battle of Britain Ceremonies at Heritage Air Park


Answers: 1. Flying a heavy bomber to lay mines in the ocean. 2. A boring activity. 3. Bottle to Throt-
tle. 4. Not much, its a military jail. 5. True heading (+/-) Variation (gives you)
Magnetic heading (+/-) Deviation (gives you) Compass heading. 6. A CF airman
trained to conduct physical education and training. 7. Circa 1941-45, Royal Norwe-
gian Air Force-in-exile training bases in Toronto and in Ontarios Muskoka country.
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The Griffin Pub The Griffin Pub The Griffin Pub The Griffin Pub
& Liquor & Liquor & Liquor & Liquor
Store Store Store Store
Pub Open 11 am Liquor Store open 9 am
1185 Kilmorley Rd, Comox 250-339-4466
Fri night: Live Band
Sat night: Name that Tune
Sun: Brunch
Large Sunny Patio Large Sunny Patio Large Sunny Patio Large Sunny Patio
Lunch & Dinner Specials Lunch & Dinner Specials Lunch & Dinner Specials Lunch & Dinner Specials
O N P R O U D W I N G S O N P R O U D W I N G S
Heritage
Stones
For Sale
$155.00 ea, with tax receipt
Apply on http://www.comoxairforcemuseum.ca/heritagestones.html or visit museum gift shop