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BRAND NEW EDUCATION RESOURCE PACK 2007


Created by Helen Cadbury For Paul Nicholas & David Ian Associates Ltd.

Contents
Introduction The Show The Players Song by Song Synopsis: Act One Song by Song Synopsis: Act Two Timeline of Grease Rydell High Slang Dictionary Style File Growing Up on Grease 1950s Teen Consumers 1950s American Music Dancing 1950s Style 1950s American Fashion Picture Resources 1950s American Motors Art and Design Activities Backstage Pass Whos Who The Big Hitters In Conversation with the Director and Choreographer An Actors Life Siobhan Dillon and Richard Hardwick A Stage Managers Life Sharon Hobden Wigs and Hair Marketing Worksheet: Design a Poster Technical Cues Worksheet Set Design Activity Follow Up Activities Write Your Own Teenage Love Song Music Worksheet: Those Magic Changes Write a review of Grease Further Ideas for Citizenship and Drama 2 3 3 4 5 6 7 8 8 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 22 24 25 26

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Introduction
Welcome to Rydell High where Grease is always on the curriculum! We hope this Education Resource Pack will be a useful guide to Grease. In each section there are discussion questions and activities. The Show gives you information which might be useful before your visit to see Grease. Style File includes background resources about the styles and fashions of the 1950s. Backstage Pass will enable your students to find out more about the process of creating the show. These pages are particularly suited to BTEC or Vocational GCSE Performing Arts Business modules. Follow Up Activities include Writing a Review and classroom sessions for Drama and Citizenship. Curriculum areas and Key Stages are indicated as a guide, but most activities can be differentiated to fit the needs of students from the top of Key Stage Two up to and including post 16. The Slang Dictionary page is not suitable for pupils below KS3. Images Photos are from the 1978 Paramount Film, the current production and previous productions of the stage show of Grease. Additional Resources Grease Is The Word, the original London Cast Recording and Grease, the DVD by Paramount Films are both widely available.

Enjoy the show!


This pack was created by Helen Cadbury With thanks to: Paramount Films Su Newell Michael Havard-Bilton & Madeleine Kaye Jacob Todd, Julia McInally & Sarah Seddon The cast and company of Grease over the years

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The Show
The Players

Vince Fontaine: local radio star and band leader, Vince wows the girls at the school dance. Miss Lynch: harassed Head Teacher at Rydell High, she struggles to keep order amongst the kids but is not always successful. Eugene & Patty: the school nerds, always willing to help the teachers and get everyone organised, are universally disliked by all the cool kids. Patty heads the cheerleading squad and is keen to be Sandys best friend. Cha-Cha: a great dancer with a bad reputation, she wins the school dance competition with Danny and distracts him from Sandy. The Teen Angel: a figment of Frenchies imagination, he tells her to return to high school as she is not cut out for beauty school.

Danny: the coolest kid in school, Danny is a founding member of the T-Birds. His aims in life are looking good, being surrounded by pretty girls and, above all, being cool. Sandy: new in town, she is a good girl (like Doris Day) but is desperate to fit in with the crowd and find someone to love. Kenickie: Dannys best friend and leader of the T-Birds, he lives for his car and hanging out with the gang. Rizzo: top girl in school and leader of the Pink Ladies, she does what she pleases and has a hard shell with a well hidden soft centre. The T-Birds: Roger, Sonny and Doody may not be the brightest sparks but they know enough to hang with the cool guys, learning a lot about girls along the way. The Pink Ladies: Jan, Marty and Frenchie make up the Pink Ladies and are all devoted to love and romance. Frenchie longs to be a beautician, while marriage is the ultimate goal for the others.

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The Show
Song by Song Synopsis ACT ONE

Prologue: Sandy

The summer holidays are over for the students of Rydell High School and Sandy is trying to fit in to her new school. Shes still dizzy from her summer romance with Danny Zuko, whom she met on the beach, while the cats and chicks of Rydell High are all pleased to see each other again.

G G

Grease

Danny and Sandy tell their friends about a certain summer romance, but what they dont realise is that they are about to be re-united. Summer Nights

Greased Lightnin

Despite his happy memories, Dannys all wrapped up with his friends and hes not about to lose his reputation for playing the field. So when Sandy turns up, Danny pretends not to know her. Love is in the air for all the friends: as Doody attempts to strum a tune, the guys join in, contemplating the fact that they are all growing up.

Meanwhile, Sandy wonders if she would fit in better with the cheerleaders, led by squeaky clean Patty, but Danny turns up and there is an awkward moment of history between him and Patty. Danny announces he might try out for the track team, but is it to impress Patty or Sandy?

G G

Rydell Fight Song

The friends all meet up on the football field and romance blossoms between Roger and Jan. Mooning

Those Magic Changes

The Pink Ladies, the hippest girls in school, reluctantly take Sandy under their wing and invite her to a pyjama party, although hard-nosed Rizzo remains antagonistic towards her.

Rizo and Kenickie start arguing. Sandy appears with the school nerd Eugene, and Danny once again fails to hide his feelings for her from his friends. The school dance is the hot topic of conversation, and as everyone tries to secure their date, Danny asks Rizzo out. Act One ends with a celebration of friendship.

Look At Me Im Sandra Dee

Kenickie has been working all summer to buy a car and although it looks like a heap of old junk, he and Danny persuade the boys it could be a babe magnet and they dream of transforming it.

We Go Together

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The Show
Song By Song Synopsis ACT TWO
Local DJ Vince Fontayne is hosting the High School Hop where everyone is strutting their stuff.

G G

Hopelessly Devoted To You

Things arent working out too well for Frenchie either, so she calls on her Teen Angel for some advice. Beauty School Dropout

G G G

Shakin At The High School Hop

Jan gets a big break singing in the talent contest, while Sandy is missing out as she is stuck at home with a head cold. Its Raining On Prom Night

Danny takes Sandy to a drive-in movie and its going well until he makes a move on her and then takes it too far. She storms off and leaves him wondering how to get it right.

Sandy

Danny and Kenickie swap dates just before the dance contest and Danny goes on to win with Cha-Cha, champion dancer. Born To Hand Jive

The atmosphere is sour when the gang all meet up at the garage. Sandy is hoping to see Danny, and Rizzo thinks she may be pregnant. The two have a row and Sandys sympathy for Rizzo is brushed off.

There Are Worse Things I Could Do

Sandy knows she has to make some changes.

Meanwhile, Sandy is all alone and facing up to the fact that she still loves Danny.

Look At Me Im Sandra Dee reprise

Everyone gets the shock of their lives at Sandys transformation.

Youre The One That I Want

Rizzos pregnancy turns out to be a false alarm, the mood is up and everyone can celebrate being young and in-love.

FINALE

Gre In 197 ase Fact: 8 You re The That I One Want s 9 wee pent ks at t he the ch arts, f top of ollowe by 7 w d eeks f or Summe r Nigh ts.

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The Show
Timeline of Grease
1970 At a cast party, Jim Jacobs and his friend Warren Casey come up with the idea of a show featuring music from the 1950s, the golden age of Rock and Roll. Jacobs decides it should be about the kids he went to high school with. Soon after, Casey is fired from his job and so with time on his hands, he sits down at his typewriter and Grease is born. 5th February 1971 Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey mount their first production of Grease in an experimental theatre in Chicago. With a non-professional cast of 18 and a budget of only $171, the four night only run plays to full houses of 120 each night, and then the run is extended again and again 14th February 1972 Grease opens in New York, off-Broadway at the Eden Theatre. It receives seven Tony nominations after the producers threaten to sue the awards committee for saying off-Broadway shows can not be nominated. The show moves onto Broadway proper and goes from strength to strength. 1971/ 1972 A national tour of Grease crosses the US and Canada with a seventeen year old called John Travolta playing Doody, the nerdy kid who idolises Danny. 1973 The first London production opens at the New London Theatre with a then unknown American actor, Richard Gere, as Danny Zuko and Stacey Gregg as Sandy, followed by Paul Nicholas and Elaine Paige in the lead roles.

1978 John Travolta hits the big time playing Danny Zuko opposite Olivia Newton John as Sandy in the smash hit film from Paramount Pictures. 1993 David Gilmore directs and Arlene Phillips choreographs the London production of Grease which opens at The Dominion Theatre, starring Craig Maclachlan as Danny Zuko. This version has played ever since in London, on tour in the UK and across the world. 1997 Grease goes on a UK tour starring Shane Richie and then Ian Kelsey as Danny. 1999 After 6 successful years, the London production of Grease closes at the Cambridge Theatre. 2007 Grease re-opens in London at The Piccadilly Theatre, starring Danny Bayne as Danny Zuko and Susan McFadden as Sandy (both winners of the ITV programme Grease Is The Word).

t: e Fac Greas ne to be e irls irst sc The f was the g ne en writt a party sce m pyja
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The Show
Rydell High Slang Dictionary
Cats and Chicks: guys and girls, but kittens are also girls, as in throw your mittens round you kittens Foam Domes: or falsies, something to make a girls bust look bigger Fongoole or fongulo: Italian-Americanised mispronunciation of the phrase "Va'a fare in culo". The nearest printable English equivalent is up yours! Hand-jive: a dance where everyone lines up and follows a sequence of hand movements in time to the music Hickey: a red mark on the skin, otherwise known as a love bite Hop: a dance or school disco Jive: Jazz slang from the 1930s and 40s. The language of swing came to mean everything that was hip, including a dance and musical style of the same name. Jocks: athletes, from the term jockstrap Neat: terrific Prom Night: a dance party or disco to mark the end of high school, now common in the UK too (possibly because of the wide influence of Grease and other American teen movies) Whos Who? Research Activity The six famous fifties icons listed below all get a mention in the script of Grease. What were they famous for? Choose one of them to research and feed your findings back to the group, or write a short piece about them for a 1950s retro magazine. Elvis Debbie Reynolds (and who was her famous daughter?) Sandra Dee Ricky Nelson Shelly Farbares Doris Day
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I play it cool And dig all jive That's the reason I stay alive.
By Poet Langston Hughes

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Style File
Growing Up on Grease: 1950s Teenage Consumers
Curriculum Links: History, Historical and Social Context for Performing Arts/Drama For Jim Jacobs the word grease seemed exactly the right title for his show about 1950s teenagers. Until 1950 the term teenagers had barely been heard of. There were children, who briefly became youths and then at eighteen were considered adults, winning the full legal responsibilities of adulthood at twenty one, by which time many were married or on the way to being married and raising a family. After the war a new range of consumer goods became available as teenagers had spending power, either because they had jobs of their own or because their parents were enjoying Americas new prosperity. Television, cinema, magazines and music were all deliberately targeted at this age group, who began to carve out an identity of their own, in stark contrast to the culture of their parents. In Grease, Jacobs and Casey created a community of teenagers which functions entirely separately from the adult world. Greasy Food: The Diner The burger palace is typical of the cheap restaurants which were popular across America in the 1950s. The diner was the predecessor of the fast food outlets we have today. Usually pre-fabricated buildings or converted railroad carriages (the original diners were not stationary, they were actually dining cars on the railway) 1950s diners often used steel panels, tiled floors and chrome trim. They served what would now be considered an unhealthy menu of burgers, fries and various milkshakes, ice creams and sundaes. Greasy Hair Oily quiffs held up with brill cream were the hairstyle of choice for greasers- the leather jacket and blue jean clad rebels of teen America. In the UK the nearest equivalent was the teddy boy who took a

similar amount of care in his appearance and competed with his mates to achieve the biggest, most luxurious quiff. For more information of whats involved in recreating the 1950s hair for Grease go to Backstage Pass: Wigs and Hair. Cool Custom Cars More grease and motor oil involved here, see Style File: 1950s American Motors for further information on icons of American motor design.

1950s American Music


a Curriculum Links: Music, Music Technology, Media Studies Level: KS3/4/5 VINCE BEFORE I WAS BORN LATE ONE NIGHT MY PAPA SAID EVRYTHINGS ALL RIGHT THE DOCTOR LAUGHED WHEN MA LAY DOWN WITH HER STOMACH BOUNCIN ALL AROUND CAUSE A BE-BOP STORK WAS BOUT TO ARRIVE AND MAMA GAVE BIRTH TO THE HAND JIVE The DJ The term was invented in America in the 1930s from the word disc (record) and jockey which was slang for someone who operated a machine. They were the kings of the airwaves through the 1940s and early 50s, when every American home had a radio. Who Invented Rock and Roll? The phrase Rock and Roll was attributed to American Radio DJ Alan Freed, but he did not actually invent it. There are examples of it being used as far back as the 1920s in song lyrics by Ella Fitzgerald, Cab Calloway and others. It was a useful term for marketing Rhythm and Blues (R&B), previously considered an African American musical style, to young white audiences. Rockabilly Rockabilly is a term that was also coined in the 1950s to describe music which was a cross between R&B and hillbilly music (the old folk music of white America).

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Doo-Wop Several songs in Grease employ DooWop or nonsense lyrics. Jacobs and Casey had fun parodying some of the excesses of this style, particularly in We Go Together. WADDA WADDA YIPPITY BOOM DE BOOM CHANG CHANG CHANGITY CHANG SHOO BOP THATS THE WAY IT SHOULD BE, WAH-OOO YEAH! An earlier example of Doo-Wop can be found in Dizzy Gillespies 1947 hit Oop Boop ShBam which was full of meaningless sounds used to mark the beats and create a vocal background. In the 1930s, sounds like boo-wop, boo-wop were used by vocal groups to imitate the horn sections of jazz bands. Activity Is Vince Fontayne typical of a 1950s DJ? Research the history of disc jockeys to the present day and see how they have evolved.

Lindy Hop: Sometimes described as the grandfather of both Rock and Roll and modern swing, the Lindy Hop was named after Colonel Lindbergh's flight across the Atlantic. It originated at the Savoy ballroom in Harlem in the 1930's. It is a partner dance which brings together improvised African dance and the eight count structure of European styles. Jitterbug: A ballroom style swing with a triple step pattern. The Twist: In repressed and segregated 50s America, white girls were not supposed to wiggle their hips, and it certainly wasnt going to be shown on prime time TV. Chubby Checkers recording of The Twist was specifically tamed down for American Bandstand, as the original version from the Swing Era had required a lot more hip action.

Dancing 1950s style


Curriculum Links: Dance, Performing Arts Thousands of American teenagers watched the hit show American Bandstand in their living rooms and learnt to copy the amateur studio dancers. New styles of dance began developing both on and off the screen, and soon high school dances across the country were moving to the steps of Rock and Roll. The Bandstand dancers called it Fast Dance as it employed a six count pattern (two tap-steps followed by a rock step). These moves were constantly being adapted throughout the 1950s. Cha Cha: The Cha Cha has a triple-step movement and is believed to have come from Cuba, as a development of the slow tempo Mambo. Jive: A six count swing dance that is open to improvisation.

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Style File
1950s American Fashion
Curriculum Links: Art, Design Technology Textiles, BTEC Performing Arts/Technical Theatre/Costume. Level: KS3, KS4, BTEC a Influences The styles of 1950s fashion have their roots in the post war period. After the shortages and austerity of the Second World War, when fabric had been rationed, a lavish use of material burst onto the scene. In 1947 the French designer Christian Dior presented a collection featuring a fitted jacket with a nipped in waist and full calf length skirt, which used meters of fabric. Life magazine called it The New Look. In the film of Grease, Sandys early look of a fitted blouse under a light weight cardigan with a full skirt underneath is an adaptation of The New Look which found favour with American and European women. The fullness of the skirt could be further emphasised by large petticoats made from layers of nylon or starched paper. In America, and later in Britain, other influences began to dilute the Dior style, such as sportswear. The windcheater jackets worn by the Pink Ladies were based on mens work jackets and gym shoes were worn by young women instead of heels. After 1956, the continental chic look became popular, with short haircuts and simple lines. Influenced by stars such as Audrey Hepburn and Leslie Caron, it included simple black sweaters and slim trousers. Rizzo stands out as a truly modern girl with her short hair, tailored shirt dress and figure hugging skirt.

Men The rebel look, as worn by movie stars James Dean and Marlon Brando, consisted of denim jeans, which had made the transition from work wear to fashion only a decade earlier, and leather jackets. This contrasted with the attire of the more conventional young men who wore a jacket and shirt like their fathers or the sportswear worn by the ball playing jock. Hair During the 1950s, womens hairstyles were transformed from the simple, smooth pony tail to the ultra done look of the beehive. It was the era where hairdressers and beauty salons really took off Frenchie wasnt the only one trying to capitalise on the new found leisure spending of the American public. For more information of whats involved in recreating the 1950s hair for Grease, go to Backstage Pass: Wigs and Hair.

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Style File
Picture Resources

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Style File
1950s American Motors
Curriculum Links: Art and Design, Design Technology The 1950s saw the birth of the jet age, when advances in aeroplane design inspired normally mundane family cars to begin sprouting wings and fins and extra tail lights to imitate jet engines. New technologies enabled curves and forms which had not been possible before. The sweeping lines of body work and slick chrome detailing were replicated in designs for everyday household items such as toasters, hair dryers and coffee percolators.

This car one could be co of m ol piece ac Why hinery. this coul car d Auto be: mati S c y s Why te its G Hydr matic reas ed L omatic ightn in!
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Style File
Art and Design Activities Design Technology Activity
Research the elements of 1950s car design, for example fins, jet engine shaped rear lights and the line of the bodywork. Adapt them for your own design, showing how you would use modern methods to create a 1950s retro-look car. As part of your portfolio, collect images of modern cars which use elements of 1950s styling.

Art Activity: Greased Lightnin Pop Art


Look at the pop art painting Whaam! (Roy Lichtenstein 1963). Research into the jet inspired shapes of the 1950s and early 60s for preliminary sketches. Create your own pop art painting, with at least two frames, showing the transformation of the T- birds car, Greased Lightnin. Let you imagination run wild on how the car might turn out! Extension activity: what happens next? Can you create an extended cartoon strip featuring Greased Lightnin?

Costume Design
Design your own outfits for the Pink Ladies. Research the period details of shoes, belts, trousers or skirts. Make a scrap book of pictures, fabric swatches and colours before you create your final costume drawings. Bring Sandy up to date if she was a modern teenager, how would she be dressed when she first comes to Rydell High? How would you transform her for Youre The One That I Want? Create two contrasting costume drawings, describing what kind of fabrics you would use.

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Backstage Pass
Whos Who: The Big Hitters
Who? Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey The Job Writers The Brief Biog Jim has worked as an actor and writer, while Warren was a teacher, then an actor and songwriter. Jim and Warren co-wrote the book, music and lyrics for Grease. Together they also wrote Island Of The Lost Co-Eds, a musical satire of the B-movies of the 1950s. Jim has gone on to coauthor several plays and musicals. Sadly Warren died in 1988. David has directed more than a dozen West End shows as well as many shows in Australia. His original production of Grease ran for six years in London. He has directed musicals, straight plays, Shakespeare and comedy and he also directed Jamie Olivers performances in England and Australia. Arlene created the dance group Hot Gossip and since then her choreography has been seen in theatre, feature films, concert arenas, television, music videos and commercials. A few of her theatre choreography credits include Grease, The Sound of Music, We Will Rock You, Starlight Express, and the US touring productions of Joseph and Jesus Christ Superstar. Arlene appears as a judge on BBC1s hugely popular Strictly Come Dancing and she judged the followup series Strictly Dance Fever. In 2007, together with Bruno Tonioli from Strictly Come Dancing, they created a new BBC1 show DanceX. Terry has designed thirty seven productions in the West End. As well as his famous design for Grease, he has also designed for hundreds of musicals, pantomimes and straight plays. His most unusual job was creating a spectacular version of Arabian Nights in the desert for three thousand guests at the birthday of an Arab sheikh. Andy has created costume designs for numerous West End shows, including Les Miserables and Miss Saigon, and has also worked for many years at The Royal Shakespeare Company. Internationally her credits include New Yorks Metropolitan Opera, Miss Julie in Athens and Cameron Mackintoshs new version of Martin Guerre in the United States.

David Gilmore

Director

Arlene Phillips

Choreographer

Terry Parsons

Designer

Andreane Neofitou

Costume Designer

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Backstage Pass
In Conversation With Director David Gilmore and Choreographer Arlene Phillips

past on stage now it would be greyer and duller and smaller. What we have done is to show the past in a distorting mirror its bigger, better, livelier and funnier than the reality. Q: How have you been influenced by the film of Grease? DAVID: I saw the film once. The film re-defined the stage show for all time. You have to take that into account. ARLENE: The film is part of my life. Ive watched it many, many times with my daughter, Alana. Its a lot of fun. One is aware that Grease is now part of a cult and the audience is expecting what they know. Were hoping that this production will inspire them to keep the cult going.

Q: What makes Grease such a special show? DAVID: Its verve and energy and such toe-tapping tunes. ARLENE: This show has the hottest dancers in town and the best singer-actors with voices that everyone will wish they owned. DAVID: The casting is inspired. ARLENE: Its been fun teaching the company to dance they werent all dancers but theyve been eager to learn. DAVID: The set and costumes have been designed by Terry Parsons and Andreane Neofitou, who are two of the most talented people in the business, and theyve achieved wonders. Q: How do you create a 1950s feel for a 21st Century show? ARLENE: Weve done a lot of research into the 1950s. DAVID: What we are giving the public is what they think that they remember, because the past was not actually how people remember it now. If we put the

Q: Have you had any help from Jim Jacobs? DAVID: Jim has come over and made changes to the script to enhance what was already there weve done that together. ARLENE: There were some changes made to the script for a 21st Century audience. Q: Is there anything you would like to add? ARLENE: Ive loved working on this production. Its great to do a show with lots of dancing in it. DAVID: Grease doesnt have a message. It gives you a flavour of being a teenager in the 1950s when Rock n Roll and putting grease in your hair were the most important things in life. If people come along to the show and take it on that level then well give them a party. In fact, if you come out of the theatre feeling that youve been to the best party in town, then we know that were getting it right.

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Backstage Pass
A Day In The Life Of An Actress Siobhan Dillon
On this bright mid-November morning, after a lovely relaxing Sunday off, I start my busy week ahead with a cup of jasmine tea and a huge bowl of cinnamon porridge (very Rock n Roll!). I jump onto a very overcrowded London tube and arrive at my singing lesson. We work on Sandys songs from Grease (as I am her understudy) and also work on songs to improve my vocal versatility and range, which I believe is very important for me as I havent really given enough time to mastering the art of singing! Next location acting workshop fun! I leave my acting improvisation class filled with enthusiasm, strength and courage as well as with a spiritually clearer focus. Hungry again I stop by a salad bar for my favourite duck and cucumber salad wrap and fruit smoothie lovely! Now, off to the theatre All cast members to the stage please to commence your physical and vocal warm-up is the message for us all blasted out of every speaker throughout the theatre everyone scurries about, pulling leg warmers and dance trainers on. I grab my bottle of water and head towards the stage. Down the stairwell the atmosphere is alive and electric with echoes of giggling and gossiping friends sharing stories of their weekend activities and antics! We bounce down more flights of stairs than any of us care to think about - which are certainly easier going down than climbing back up at the end of the evening! After the curtain has gone down at the end of the show, having left the stage high on adrenalin, legs wobbling underneath me like stacks of jelly, I cant help but think how much hard work it all is, but when you take your bow in front of a huge audience full of smiling faces and when you can feel the enjoyment overflowing onto the stage where you and your team are standing, thats when it all becomes much, much more than just a job!

A Day In The Life Of An Actor Richard Hardwick


Actors are notorious for getting up late and Im no exception to the rule. Im not a morning person at all. This stems from our working hours and finishing late at night. I normally rise about 10am and straight away have a pint of water. Hydration is essential, especially if you are singing as well. Then Ill have some bran for breakfast and another pint of water. At the moment I only use a tiny amount of milk as the less dairy the better. Dairy products produce a singers worst nightmare phlegm. So cut down on the dairy. Then Ill watch some TV, usually The News and turn on the computer. I use as much of my free time as possible to pursue other interests. I write, run a Theatre & TV production company and teach in hospitals. As an actor the more creative interests you have the better. Then its off to the gym (four times a week) and into the theatre. Again, Ill have a pint of water as soon as I get into my dressing room, then head down for a 15 minute vocal and 15 minute physical warm-up. We usually have a little break at this point to catch-up with each other and visit friends in other dressing rooms, but once we get the half hour call I get ready. Shower, hair, make-up, costume, water and down to the stage before beginners call. Once the shows over I go to the pub, maybe out with friends or straight home. Im usually home by 11.30pm and go to bed by 2am. Im a night owl, but lots of actors get home and then let their body unwind for an hour or so. Pint of water by the bed and maybe a few pages of a book, then lights out.

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Backstage Pass
A Day In The Life Of A Stage Manager Sharon Hobden
Today we have an understudy rehearsal. The company are rehearsing at 2:30pm so the Stage Management team are in at 2pm. Our job is to make sure that the stage is ready for the company and creative department when they arrive. We make sure that the Iron (safety curtain) is out, lights are on, the stage is swept and the rehearsal keyboard is set. We then set any props and furniture that may be required. Once the cast arrive we make sure that we have everyone required for the rehearsal. The Resident Director or Dance Captain will take the rehearsal. It is our responsibility to make sure that the show looks the same as it did on Opening Night. We therefore have to maintain the props and with the Master Carpenter and his team, the set. At 4:30pm the Lighting Department turn on the lighting rig and check that all the lights are working and are pointing in the right place. If any are not working, they will repair or replace them. At 5pm the Stage Management team begin their preset for the evening show. We have two automated pieces of scenery, the large CS (centre stage) truck which in Act I has The Bleachers on it and Act II The Burger Bar, and The Band Truck. We start by running each of these pieces to US (up stage) and DS (down stage) to make sure that they are working correctly. The two ASMs (Assistant Stage Managers) set out all the props that are needed for the show. The DSM (Deputy Stage Manager) types up the covering arrangements for the evening performance. This will include information on who is on holiday, sick or injured and who will be covering them. The DSM then distributes this information to the other backstage departments. At 5:15pm The Stage Crew arrives to begin their preset. It is their job to rearrange all of the set and furniture pieces to their starting positions for the show. On our show they have to take the burger bar

off the central truck and replace it with the bleachers seating, they then arrange the SL (stage left) and SR (stage right) wings. Finally the stage is swept and mopped and the keyboard set for the vocal warm-up. At 6:15pm The Company arrive for their physical and vocal warm-ups. It is the job of the DSM to make sure everyone is present. The warm-ups usually finish around 6:40pm. There is then time to rehearse any changes for the evenings show. Meanwhile the ASMs are doing a shout check of the wings and stage. This involves one of them reading a list of items required and the other checking that they are there. At 6:55pm (The Half Hour Call) I open the house. This means I call in the flying pieces needed to complete the pre-set, ask Lighting to put up the lights and Sound to play the pre-show music. When I am happy that all is ready I let the Front Of House Manager know that it is clear to Open the House and let the audience in. At 7:10pm The DSM calls the Quarter Hour Call. This lets everyone involved with the show know that they have 15 mins before they need to be ready. He will also announce any covering arrangements. At 7:20pm The DSM calls the 5 Minute Call. As before everyone now knows that they have 5 minutes until they have to be ready. At 7:25pm The DSM calls Beginners. This Call lets everybody who has to do something at the start of the show know that they must come to the stage or their starting positions. At 7:30pm or when the Front Of House Manager tell us that the audience are seated, we begin the show. This is always a great moment, as the band begin and we are off. During the show there is one ASM in the SR wing and one in the SL wing and they make sure that everything runs smoothly, that the cast are ready for entrances, that the crew are ready for scene changes and deal with any problems that arise. As SM I move from wing to wing making sure all is well. I am responsible for everything that happens onstage. I watch all the scene changes to make sure that nothing goes wrong. All the SM team, the
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flyman, Sound op, LX op and Followspot ops are on cans (headset communication with each other) so that if anything does go wrong we can decide what to do quickly. The DSM calls the show. He has a copy of the script which he has marked up with all the lighting, sound and stage cues. He then tells each operator when to do their cues. The Interval is a very busy time for us. We have a lot of scenery to move around in order to prepare Act II and only 20 minutes to do it in. The first time we attempted this change in the Technical Rehearsal it took 1 hour 40 minutes, now it takes us 15 minutes. It involves a lot of team work. 9:45pm The show finishes. We tidy a few things up and I write the Show Report. This includes running and playing times for the performance as well as information on who operated and understudies that were performing. I then note anything that happened that was different from what the Director wanted. This is then e-mailed. Our day is over. We will be back tomorrow to do it all again.

The wigs are constructed and coloured by outworkers, usually using Asian hair as it is the strongest. The Wigs Mistress and her assistant then cut and style the wigs, remembering to leave a little hole in the front for the microphone. All the wigs in Grease use human hair except the Beauty School girls who wear acrylic wigs. Before each show the actors pin or glue their wigs in place and the Wigs Mistress is on hand to check everything looks right. During the performance she and her assistant work backstage, keeping the wigs tidy and helping with any changes. The most hectic times are the changes for Beauty School Dropout and Sandys final transformation. After the show they need to care for and re-style the wigs ready for the next day. Fortunately the men all look after their own hair, but only after they have had lessons in quiff combing!

Backstage Pass
Wigs and Hair
Curriculum Links: BTEC Performing Arts, Technical Theatre, Performing Arts Business The Wigs Mistress has a very important role in creating the perfect 1950s look. Each wig is made to measure. To get an exact fit, clingfilm is wrapped around the actors head and their hairline is drawn on. Sticky tape is then added over the clingfilm to create a mould of their head.

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Backstage Pass
Marketing Worksheet: Design your own poster for Grease
Curriculum Links: BTEC Performing Arts, Technical Theatre, Performing Arts Business

CHECKLIST Image: does it grab peoples attention? What does it say about the show? What colour scheme suits the show? The Marketing Department for Grease often use a pink background, however you could experiment with something different. Graphics: what style do you want to use for the text? Does it fit with your image? Is it easy to read? Information: what does your poster need to tell people? Remember, your objective is to encourage people to buy tickets and come to the theatre, so think about what they need to know.

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Backstage Pass
Technical Cues Worksheet
Curriculum Links: BTEC/GCSE Performing Arts/Drama Technical Theatre

The lighting operator will have a list of numbered lighting cues to work from. They take their cues from the DSM (Deputy Stage Manager) who is on the book, i.e. following the script in the wings. In the extract below they take their cues from the Musical Director to ensure the lights change exactly on the right beat. Most lighting cues will be preprogrammed into the computerised lighting board. Using the key below, write out in full the bold lines to describe what the DSM is instructing.

DSM: SBY LX Q110 to 114, SPOTS, PYROS AND FLY Q12 Each operator should then acknowledge the SBY so that the DSM knows that everyone is ready to carry out their Q. Music: Dancing interlude Chorus: Lightnin Lightnin Lightnin LX Q110 (on MD downbeat) LX Q111 (on MD downbeat) LX Q112 (on MD downbeat) LXQ113 (on MD upbeat at end of line)

Kenickie: Anybody want a ride?

Chorus: Lightnin (actors hold long final note as car drives off SL and music plays) LX Q114, SPOTS, PYROS AND FLY Q12 (on MD cut off) The last cue is for the change between scenes. This is what happens when each of these cues happen. LX Q114 goes to DBO, SPOTS go off, PYROS go off DS, FLY Q12 brings in mid-stage sky cloth for next scene.

Key DSM LX Q SPOTS PYRO FLY MD Downbeat Upbeat SL Cut off DBO DS

Deputy Stage Manager Lighting Cue Followspot Big indoor fireworks Item of scenery suspended above the stage Musical Director When the MD moves his conducting baton vertically down to show the first beat in a bar When the MD moves his conducting baton vertically up to show the beat before the first beat in a bar Stage Left When the MD signals in one gesture for the musicians to stop playing at the same time Dead Black Out Down Stage
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Backstage Pass
Set Design Activity
Curriculum Links: Art and Design, BTEC Performing Arts/Technical Theatre/Set Design. Level: KS3, KS4, BTEC

Gather research about the look of the 1950s from books, the internet or resources supplied by your teacher and start to make a scrapbook of shapes, colours and items of set (e.g. cars, furniture, decorations for the school dance). Think about the size and shape of the stage you will use, for example if it is the school stage, measure it so that your drawings are to scale. Theatre models are normally done on a scale of 1:25. Choose a particular scene from Grease and create a drawing which is a birds eye view, showing the shape of the stage and where items of set are placed. Now think about the background - how will you design a backdrop that will suit the other visual elements on stage? Create you own model box by turning a shoe box on its side and painting or lining it in black. Then make a scaled down set to fit inside, using the same shapes and colours you would choose if it were full scale.

Doodle pad for set design ideas

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Follow Up Activities
Write Your Own Teenage Love Song even if youre not a musician
Curriculum Links: GCSE/GNVQ/BTEC Music, Performing Arts Where to begin Start by listening to love songs that you like - what is it about them that rings true? What is the structure of the story they tell? Grease is like a long extended love song; boy meets girl but then boy messes it up by trying to be cool, girls heart is almost broken but in the end girl makes boy see that shes worth it, and they fall in love all over again. There is a happy beginning, a middle where it all goes wrong and a happy ending. Of course your song might not have a happy ending - thats up to you. What do you want to tell the world about how it feels to be a teenager in love? The Title Some song writers begin with the title or a phrase that sticks in their mind and demands to be written about. Start keeping a notebook: all good writers, whether they are lyricists, poets, novelists or playwrights, keep a notebook and pen with them at all times. In the back of your book write down any interesting phrases you hear or see, look in the newspapers and listen to people on the bus. Look through your list and see if there is one that stands out. Ask yourself some questions about your title - the answers will be the lines of your verses. Heres an example: Youre the one that I want Why? Cause I need a man How do you feel about that? I got chills theyre multiplyin If your song is a duet like this one, then you need to think about the conversation the two people are

having it wont be full of the usual padding we put into real life conversations as they havent got time for that in a four line verse. The Structure This will vary, but an average pop song of three to four minutes in length will follow a form something like this: verse/chorus/verse/chorus/bridge/verse/ chorus or intro/verse/chorus/verse/chorus/bridge/ instrumental/outro. From the 1950s onwards the structure of popular songs went through many changes as rules were broken, however listeners today still have certain expectations, so make sure you understand the building blocks. Remember that in musical theatre the instrumental section and chorus may be longer to allow for dance routines.

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Pitfalls If you are not a musician and would like someone else to set your lyrics to music, be careful that you dont get hung too up on writing verse with a perfect rhythm and rhyme structure. It is often more satisfying for the listener if you can come up with some unexpected rhymes, like the example below which uses irony in the lyrics as well. BABY, DONT SWEAT IT YOURE NOT CUT OUT TO HOLD A JOB BETTER FORGET IT WHO WANTS HER HAIR DONE BY A SLOB? NOW YOUR BANGS ARE CURLED, YOUR LASHES TWIRLED, BUT STILL THE WORLD IS CRUEL WIPE OFF THAT ANGEL FACE AND GO BACK TO HIGH SCHOOL Try writing the lyrics to fit an existing tune so that your structure and rhythm will sound right! Then take the tune away and give the words to your friendly musician to compose a tune to fit. Dont, under any circumstances, tell him or her what your starting tune was, as that will have too much influence. Stand back and see what she or he comes up with and you should be amazed by the end result. On the next page is a worksheet to start you off, featuring the song Those Magic Changes from the show.

The Tempo Pop songs are usually written in 4/4 time; one, two, three, four. As a lyricist you need to be aware of that, but dont get hung up about it. Set the tempo according to the mood of the song - fast if its energetic or angry, mid tempo for a good solid pop song or slow for a sad song or a ballad. Definitions Verse: The verses all have the same melody but different lyrics. The verse lyrics give us information about the situation, emotions or people in the song. Chorus: The chorus is the section in which both melody and lyrics are repeated. In the chorus you will usually find the hook of the song - this is the melody which will buzz around in peoples heads for days after they have heard it. The title may well be the words that go with the hook. The title of the song almost always appears in the chorus section and may be repeated two or more times. Bridge: Also known as the middle eight. The bridge has a different melody, lyrics and chord progression from the verse or chorus. It provides a break from the repetition of verse and chorus and is sometimes an emotional turning point.

Inspiration To Get You Started: 5 Top Love Songs Through The Ages All these songs have different structures. See if you can work out what they are. Love Me Tender Lets Get it On Teenage Kicks I Will Always Love You Breathe Can you name the year and artist of these songs? What are your top five love songs?

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Follow Up Activities
Music Worksheet: Those Magic Changes
Curriculum Links: GCSE music Doody is getting to grips with the ingredients of a good love song as he struggles to work out what chords to play at the opening of Those Magic

Changes listen to it on the original cast recording and look at this extract, which shows the opening verse before the magic change. 1. Write your own lyric to this short section of melody. 2. In pairs, compose a new section of music to fit your lyrics. 3. Advanced composers can try to work out what comes next. Can you continue the melody line? When youve had a stab at it, listen again to the cast recording and see if you had a similar idea or did you create something entirely new?

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Follow Up Activities
Writing A Review Of Grease
Curriculum Links: GCSE/GNVQ level Drama/Performing Arts To write a review, watch the show carefully and write notes during the interval or after the play we ask that you do not write notes during the performance. What do you see and hear on the stage and in the audience when you are waiting for the play to begin? To work out what effects are being created in the production, ask yourself these practical questions and think about why these choices have been made: The Set what is your first impression of what you see? what shapes, levels and colours are being used? how does the set hide or reveal the actors? how are the different locations and scenes in the show demonstrated?

The Performers how does each actor create their character through the way they move? how effective is the transition from speech to song can you give an example of a point in the show where this happens? how do the performers use the set? how do the performers relate to the audience and when does this change? which performances do you find the most convincing? Why? Which performances do you find less convincing? Why? how do the dances affect the mood of the show? And lastly how does Grease make you feel? Grease doesnt have a messageit gives a flavour of being a teenager in the 1950s when Rock n Roll and putting grease in your hair were the most important things in life.. David Gilmore, Director Do you agree or disagree? What are the differences and similarities for teenagers today? If you wrote a musical about your lives, what would it celebrate?

Costume what colours and styles are being used, and what do they tell us about the historical period of the show? compare different costumes, for example Sandys look at the beginning and her transformation for Youre The One That I Want or the difference between Kenickie and Eugenes costumes. How does costume help define a character? Lighting what colours and shades are being used to create time of day or location or mood? what levels of brightness are being used? think about angles of light - who is well lit and who is in shadow? when do the lights change? what atmosphere and emotions are suggested by the lighting?

Write notes here

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Follow Up Activities
Further Ideas for Citizenship and Drama
Bridge the Gap (Citizenship extended project) Interview people you know - grandparents, family friends or local residents who were teenagers in the 1950s. What do they remember of the hair and fashions of the time? Find out where, in your local area, did dances takes place. Re-create a 1950s dance in your school and ask local residents to help you choose the music. Invite them to the hop and alternate the playlist between 1950s and modern dance music. See what you can learn from each others dance styles. Follow The Story (Drama three sessions) What do you think happens next to the characters of Grease? 1. In small groups choose four or five characters and create a scene which shows them ten years on. Plan and rehearse.

2. 3.

4.

Polish and perform your scenes to the group. Follow the performance with a spontaneous improvisation where everyone meets up for a ten year reunion, dancing to the hits of their teens and talking about their lives. Depending on the size and ability of the group, this could be managed as a whole class improvisation. Extension activity to explore how to create characters of different ages: a whole class improvisation as in (3) but at a signal from the teacher everyone travels forward in time ten years. Let each period play for a minute or so, then flash forward again until you reach the present day (average age of characters is now sixty six).

Grease Day Why not have a Grease Day as a charity fundraiser? Everyone pays a pound to come as their favourite character from the show. The teachers can join in too! Decorate the school hall to resemble Rydell High and even the tannoy announcements could be authentic. Raise additional funds from sponsored Rock n Roll dances and tallest beehive and best kept quiff competitions. The possibilities are endless and theres a lot of fun to be had for your schools chosen good cause.

The End

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