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A House Divided

The American Civil War: 1861 to 1865


Special Living Edition Advanced Game Rules 2006 by Alan Emrich Table of Contents A. Introduction ....................................................... 21
A.1 The Rules ..............................................................21 A.2 The Playing Pieces ................................................22

Border States), you are in fact playing Advanced Game; those are the core Advanced Game rules.

A.1 The Rules


This booklet contains the A House Divided Advanced Game Rules along with its numerous Optional Rules (highlighted in yellow thus). Charts, tables, and additional player aids are provided in separate files. Game Terms: There is no glossary. When a new game term is introduced in these rules, you will find it underlined and explained nearby. To refresh your memory about a certain game term, scan through the rules booklet looking for underlined words. The following Advanced Game Optional Rule has a pro-Union effect on play balance: E. Leaders The following Advanced Game Optional Rules have a pro-Confederate effect on play balance: C.2 Containment D.4 Coastal Defenses F.3 Foreign Intervention F.4 The Confederate Navy The following Optional Rules are neutral and have little effect on play balance: D.2 Battlefield Morale D.3 Desertion & Stragglers Also note that these are Living Rules in that they have been reformatted, reorganized, and include the games latest clarifications, notes and innovations. These Living Rules have been written and edited by Alan Emrich (who has been laboring over A House Divided as both a designer and developer since its second edition in 1988). They are updated from time to time and made available for free at his web site: http://www.alanemrich.com/Games_Archive_pages/ AHD_pages/ahd.htm

B. Supply ................................................................ 22
B.1 Supply Sources......................................................22 B.2 How to Trace a Supply Line...................................22 B.3 Effects of Being Out of Supply...............................22

C. Movement .......................................................... 23
C.1 Marches & The Command Table...........................23 C.2 [Optional] Containment..........................................24

D. Combat............................................................... 25
D.1 Battles & The Command Table..............................25 D.2 [Optional] Battlefield Morale ..................................26 D.3 [Optional] Desertion...............................................28 D.4 [Optional] Coastal Defenses ..................................29

E. [Optional] Leaders ............................................ 30


E.1 Leader Movement..................................................30 E.2 Leaders in Battle....................................................30 E.3 Leaders and Desertion ..........................................31 E.4 Leaders Alone........................................................31

F. Confederate Aspirations .................................. 31


F.1 The Capture of Washington ...................................31 F.2 More Support from the Border States ....................31 F.3 [Optional] Foreign Intervention...............................32 F.4 [Optional] The Confederate Navy...........................32

G. Detailed Sequence of Play............................... 33 H. Credits................................................................ 34 I. Version 3.1 Designers Notes............................ 34


I.1 Thoughts Concerning a 4th Edition .........................34

A. Introduction
These Advanced Game Rules add new systems and considerations to the play of A House Divided. While these rules enhance the simulation value of the game (making it more realistic), they also add a degree of complexity that should not be undertaken by novice players. Like the Optional Rules in the Basic Game, players may freely pick and choose exactly which Advanced Game Rules to use they may be employed separately or in any combination as if there were simply additional Basic Game Optional Rules. When playing with all of the Advanced Game rules that are not designated as Optional (i.e., Supply, Marches/Battles and the Command Table, The Capture of Washington, and More Support from the

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A.2 The Playing Pieces


The Advanced Game of A House Divided includes: 3 Confederate Border State Militia Infantry units (one each for Missouri, Kentucky, and Maryland) 3 Leaders with stand bases (Grant, Sherman, and Lee)

When Supply is Traced: At the beginning of each Player Turn, the player whose turn it is must determine which of his units are in or out of supply. Which Units Need Supply: A unit that is alone in a box is automatically in supply. If two or more units are in a box, they must trace a Supply Line.

B.1 Supply Sources


Units that are in Aligned Recruitment Cities (i.e., ones containing a shield of their own color) are in supply if they can trace a Supply Line to any other friendly-owned Aligned Recruitment City. Units that are not in an Aligned Recruitment City are in supply if they can trace a Supply Line to any friendly-owned Aligned Recruitment City box that can, itself, trace a Supply Line to any other friendlyowned Aligned Recruitment City.

4 Foreign Intervention units (2 Veteran Infantry, 1


Crack Infantry, and 1 Crack Cavalry)

B.2 How to Trace a Supply Line


A Supply Line may be of any length; it is traced from the units needing supply, through consecutive, connected friendly-controlled boxes, to an abovelisted source within the rules listed below: Normal Supply: It may be freely traced through friendly-controlled boxes along rails and/or rivers. Road Supply: It may also be traced through boxes along roads, but only if the boxes on both ends of each length of the road transportation line being traced through are either: A) friendly-owned and of that sides color (i.e., within the original territory of that side); or B) occupied by at least one friendly unit (having forces in captured territory providing logistical support). Sea Supply: Union and Foreign Intervention units in port boxes, or that are able to trace a Supply Line to a friendly port box, are automatically in supply by sea (even if the Foreign Navy is 'off,' F.4). Exception: When using Optional Rule 4.71 (Fortress Monroe), the Union may not trace supply to either Yorktown or Norfolk if the Confederates control Fort Monroe.

B.3 Effects of Being Out of Supply


If a box with two or more friendly units is out of supply (i.e., cannot trace a Supply Line) at the beginning of your Player Turn, you must eliminate from that box one unit of your choice. Militia units are placed in the Recruitment Pool and other units are returned to your stock, as usual.

B. Supply
An army has to eat, and generals must take this fact into account or suffer from widespread disease and desertion.

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Recruitment: A player may not Recruit (7.0) in a city that is out of supply. Note that supply does not affect Promotions (6.0), only Recruitment.
Supply Example: On the left, the two Confederate Militia Infantry units at Evansville are in supply. That is because they are in an Aligned Recruitment City (it has a red shield) that can trace along rivers and rails back to another friendly Aligned Recruitment City (Nashville). Note that if the Confederate Control marker was not in Paducah, these units would be out of supply. That is because supply can only be traced along friendly-controlled boxes. On the right, the Confederate player burst out of Nashville during his Movement Segment with his main army and was very concious about supply considerations. With his first March, he moved the two Veteran Infantry, one Militia Cavalry, and one of his two Milita Infantry units from Nashville to Sparta and entrenched his remaining Militia Infantry unit (which he plans to Promote this turn during his Promotion Segment) in Nashville. With his second March, he activated Sparta and moved his Veteran Infantry and Militia Cavalry units as illustrated above. Note that the Militia Infantry unit in Sparta cannot entrench, as that would require two Marches in that box (since it is not a Recruitment City). As things currently stand, the Confederate Militia Cavalry unit is automatically in supply since its a lone unit. The two Confederate Veteran Infantry units in Glasgow can trace supply by road since the boxes at both ends of each length of the road are physically occupied by a friendly unit back to Nashville, which in turn can trace to Evansville.

The entrenched Union units in Bowling Green, however, will begin the Union Player Turn out of supply. Therefore, the Union player will have to eliminate one of them at that time.

C. Movement
The Advanced Game of A House Divided uses a Command Table to more realistically demonstrate each sides ability to maneuver throughout the course of the war.

C.1 Marches & The Command Table


Although both sides got off to a slow start, the South managed to seize the initiative by 1862 due largely to the fact that a majority of the best Generals joined the Confederate cause. To complicate matters for the North, Lincoln had to appoint many political hack Generals to command his troops; most of these turned out to be disasters that had to be frequently be replaced. As the war progressed, however, the Norths overall leadership situation improved. By the time the war was winding down, the Souths transportation infrastructure was becoming a shambles due to a lack of maintenance and sheer destruction by Union cavalry raids.

When using this rule, the procedure for Movement (4.0) is changed to the following:

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Procedure: In order to move, the player rolls one six-sided die and consults the Command Table. The number rolled is cross-indexed with the current Game Year (e.g., 1861), and the number of Marches for that side is located. (See the Command Table.)

is obligated to fight a battle. Initiating a containment battle by either side is strictly voluntary and must be announced during that players Combat Segment. Union Movement: Before Union units may move along a transportation line out of a port box where they are being contained (i.e., not by Sea Movement; 4.6), they must first remove the Confederate units containing them in battle. They may leave that port box by Sea Movement without penalty. Entrenchment: Both sides in a containment situation may entrench (4.3) in that port box. Each side must spend the appropriate number of Marches to entrench its own units. If one side attacks the other in a containment situation, they become unentrenched (remove their marker) and must retrench normally on a later turn. Retreating: Units that lose a containment battle must retreat normally, thus automatically ending that containment situation.

Example: It is the 05 (May) 1862 Confederate Player Turn. The Confederate player rolls a 3 and cross-indexes that die roll with the year 1862. Using the second number of the result (i.e., the Confederate value), he has 4 Marches to spend this turn.

Supply: Both sides may also trace a supply line out of a containment situation, (B.2) but not into or through such a box to other units. Control: The Union controls a contained port (re: Army Maximum Size, Confederate Recruitment).
Example: Pictured above is a typical containment situation. Charleston is Union controlled (as indicated by the presence of Union units there). The Confederate player quickly moved in a Crack Infantry unit, declared a containment situation, and then entrenched it. This situation appears to be a stalemate. Either side could reinforce Charleston and try to win a battle there. Alternately, they could leave without a fight (the Union by Sea Movement) or just let the stalemate continue indefinitely (a more likely event).

C.2 [Optional] Containment


There were many static containment situations involving Confederate troops keeping Union forces bottled up after they captured a Confederate port most lasting until the end of the war. The Unions Anaconda Plan, was to strangle the Confederate economy by an aggressive blockade of (i.e., capturing) Confederate ports.

Instead of attempting to recapture a Confederate port box under Union control, the Confederate player may attempt to contain the Union units there. Procedure: Confederate units may move into any Confederate port box (plus Fort Monroe and Pensacola) that is currently under Union control and, instead of fighting a battle there, the Confederate player may designate that he is merely containing those enemy units. Coexistence: Although stacked together, neither side
Use the second Battlefield marker as a Battle Turn marker. Slide it up and down the Battle Round boxes to indicate whether its the Attackers or Defenders part of that Battle Round. If you like, you can think of this as the way time is kept track of in a baseball game. Here you see the Battle Turn marker is at the top of the first inning...

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D. Combat
As with movement, the Advanced Game of A House Divided uses the Command Table to more realistically demonstrate each sides ability to maneuver on the field of battle.

A maximum Battlefield Command Value of eight is ever allowed in a given Battle Day. Beyond that value, Battlefield Command simply breaks down. Battlefield Reinforcements: In the Advanced Game, Rule 5.5 (Reinforcing a Battle), is changed in one way: Reinforcements moving to a battle no longer automatically arrive for free. Instead, a player must spend an Order to activate the Battlefield box as a Reinforcement Location. When so activated, apply rule 5.5 normally. Example: In a battle fought in 1862, the Union player rolls a 4 for on the Command Table; his Battlefield Command Value for that day is 3 as shown on the following Current Battlefield Command Value Track illustration. Thus, he may only issue three Orders per Battle Round that day.
Current Battlefield Command Value Track

D.1 Battles & The Command Table


Without modern radio communications, 19th Century armies seldom just charged at each other en masse. Particularly during the first half of the war, the Union armies often outnumbered the Confederate armies they faced, but lacked the leadership to effectively employ their advantage in numbers.

Measuring Time in Battle: Battles are measured in days. Four Battle Rounds equals one Battle Day. (See the Battle Day Turn Track.) Procedure: Each players Battlefield Command Value is determined at the start of each Battle Day, before the first Battle Round of that day begins (i.e., at Dawn). Both sides separately roll one die and consult the Command Table. The resulting Battlefield Command Value is denoted on the Current Battlefield Command Value Track by placing a Control marker for the appropriate side in the box of the same value. This value is the number of Orders that player may issue during each of his Battle Rounds that day. Spending one Order allows a player to attack with one friendly unit during a Battle Round. Spending one Order allows a player to receive Battlefield Reinforcements (5.5) during that Round (that is, one eligible Reinforcement unit from each adjacent, connected box). Note that these units must each receive an additional Order to also fire in that same Round. Spending two Orders allows a player to Rally one Routed unit when using Optional Rule D.2 (Battlefield Morale). Like Reinforcements, these units must each receive an additional Order to also fire in that same Round. Unspent Orders are wasted; they cannot be saved up from Round to Round. Second and Subsequent Battle Days: At the start of each subsequent Battle Day (should it last more than one day), another die is rolled by both sides on the Command Table. This value is added to one-half (rounded up) of the previous days Battlefield Command Value.

1 5

2 6

3 7

4 8

If the battle goes into a fifth Battle Round, a new day begins. The Union player would again roll on the Command Table and add the resulting Battlefield Command Value to half (rounded up) of his previous days value. If he rolled a 1 this time, he would have a total Battlefield Command Value of 4 for this second Battle Day (2 for todays roll, plus 2 carried over from the previous days value) as shown on the track below. Thus, for Battle Rounds five through eight (i.e., the second Battle Day), the Union player could issue four Orders per Battle Round that day.
Current Battlefield Command Value Track

1 5

2 6

3 7

4 8

If the battle was fought into a ninth Battle Round (i.e., a third Battle Day), then the Union player would make yet another roll on the Command Table and obtain a new Battlefield Command Value for that day. If the Union player rolled a 5 this time, he would have a total Battlefield

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Command Value of 6 for the third Battle Day (4 for todays roll, plus 2 carried over from the previous days value). Thus, for Battle Rounds nine through twelve (i.e., the third Battle Day), the Union player could issue six orders per Battle Round that day.
Current Battlefield Command Value Track

If the die roll is greater than the units Morale Value there is no effect the unit continues to participate in the battle normally (as a Reduced unit). Effects of Being Routed: Routed units are considered off the battlefield (i.e., no longer in that players Battle Line). Therefore: While Routed, a unit may neither fire nor be fired at. While Routed, a unit is considered eliminated for purposes of winning or losing the battle (5.0). So, Routed units, although alive but relocated to the battlefield box on the map, are considered eliminated for the purposes of determining a battle victory. In other words, if you Rout the last unit in my Battle Line, you win the battle. You didn't eliminate all my units in that battle (yet... there's still Desertion to be rolled for), but the fact that you Routed the last of my units off the Battle Line and I suddenly have no more units left that can fire or be fired at means that you instantly win the battle. Routed units in a defeated army that cannot retreat are eliminated.

The Battle Line


Each players Battle Line consists of those units that are currently engaged in battle i.e., those units that can fire (if ordered) and be fired upon. Units that rout (D.2) are not considered on the Battle Line. Every time it is his turn to fire during a Battle Round, the firing player chooses from among all the units present on both sides Battle Lines (that is, both his firing units as well as the defender's target units). Which units are doing the shooting and which units they're firing at is completely fluid it can change freely with every player's Battle Round. There is no battlefield "reserve" in A House Divided. No units on the Battle Line can be "screened" from enemy fire. If a unit is present in the Battle Line, it can be chosen as a target by the firing player.

1 5

2 6

3 7

4 8

D.2 [Optional] Battlefield Morale


The quality of troops not only affected their ability to inflict damage on enemy units in battle it also affected their ability to stay on the battlefield and see the fighting through. The object of a 19th Century battle was to make the other sides army leave the battlefield. This was accomplished by making it as inhospitable for the other side as possible (primarily by shooting at them). Winning a battle was often a matter of endurance. If you could get your troops to stay when all they wanted to do was run away, you could win. Unfortunately, troops, especially poor quality troops, have a mind of their own; their morale can break and they might flee the battlefield precipitously.

When Morale is Tested: After the enemy player has fired during a Battle Round, all newly-Reduced units must make a Morale Check. Full strength units, eliminated units, and units that were Reduced prior to the current Battle Round never make Morale Checks! Procedure: A unit makes a Morale Check by rolling a die and comparing the result to that units Morale Value. (See the Morale Table.) Subtract one from a defending units Morale Value if it is entrenched. This means that an entrenched Crack units Battlefield Morale will never break! If the die roll is less than or equal to the units Morale Value, it is Routed. Place it back on the mapboard in the battlefield box (look for the Battlefield marker), Reduced-side up, to indicate its Routed status.

Routed units automatically become unentrenched and remain so even if rallied (see below) and at the conclusion of the battle.

Morale Recovery: During a players Battle Rounds, he may expend two Orders to Rally one Routed unit. In addition, at the end of each Battle Day (i.e., at Dusk), before the Battlefield Command Value (D.1) is determined for the next day, both sides may Rally one Routed unit for free (i.e., at no cost in Orders). To indicate a units status changes from Routed to Rallied, simply return it from the battlefield box on the map and have it rejoin those units that are still actively fighting on the Battle Line.

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A House Divided version 3.1 Advanced Game Living Rules Example: It is 1862 and four Union Militia Infantry units March from Washington along the Potomac River (which is only usable by the Union, see 4.2) to attack a lone Confederate Veteran Infantry unit in Fredericksburg. The Battlefield marker is placed in Fredericksburg and the units there engaging in battle are placed off the board to one side where they can line up against each other and exchange shots (i.e., they are placed on the Battle Line). There are no reinforcements nearby and both players are determined to fight to the bitter end. Dawn: Both sides roll on the Command Table to determine their Battlefield Command Value (BCV). The Confederate player rolls a 1 for a BCV of three Orders per Round this day; the Union player rolls a 5 for BCV of four Orders per Round this day. Current Battlefield Command Value Track

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Since the Confederate player has completed all of his fire, the newly-reduced Union Militia Infantry unit must now check its morale. The Union player rolls a 1; since that result is less than or equal to its Morale Value, that unit also Routs back to the Battlefield marker in Fredericksburg. The Union player uses two of his Orders this Round to fire the two units left on his Battle Line He uses his remaining two Orders to Rally one of his Routed units back from the Fredericksburg box and he returns it, still on its reduced side, back to the Battle Line. Both Union shots miss, however, so the battle continues. Round 3: The Confederate Veteran Infantry unit fires at the reduced-strength Union Militia Infantry unit that just rallied (in hopes of finishing it off) and, again, gets a hit it with a die roll of 2. That Union Militia Infantry unit is eliminated. The Union player, once again, uses two of his Orders this Round to fire the two units left on his Battle Line He uses his remaining two Orders to Rally his remaining routed unit back from the Fredericksburg box and he returns it, still on its reduced side, back to his Battle Line. Again, both Union shots miss! The battle continues

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Morale Table
A newly Reduced unit fails its Morale Check if the die roll is less than or equal the units adjusted Morale Value:

Round 1: The Confederate Veteran Infantry unit fires at one of the Union Militia Infantry units and hits it with a die roll of 4 its chance to hit being increased by 1 during the first two Battle Rounds because it is firing at a unit that has crossed a river. The Union Militia Infantry unit is flipped to its Reduced side. Since the Confederate player has completed all of his fire, the newly-reduced Union Militia Infantry unit must now check its morale. The Union player rolls a 3; since that result is less than or equal to its Morale Value, that unit is Routed and placed back in Fredericksburg on top of the Battlefield marker there (i.e., this unit is placed off the Battle Line where it can no longer fire at, or be fired upon by, enemy units). The Union player decides to spend three Orders to fire his three remaining Union Militia Infantry at the entrenched Confederate Veteran Infantry unit, each with a chance to hit on a 1 (because it is entrenched). Only one Union unit manages to score a hit. The Confederate Veteran Infantry unit is flipped to its Reduced side. Since the Union player has completed all of his fire, the newlyreduced Confederate Veteran Infantry unit must now check its morale. The Confederate player rolls a 2; since that result is not less than or equal to its modified Morale Value (its basic Morale Value of 2 is reduced by one because that unit is entrenched), that Veteran Infantry unit remains in action on the Battle Line (at its Reduced value). Round 2: The Confederate Veteran Infantry unit again fires at one of the Union Militia Infantry units and, again, hits with a die roll of 3. The Union Militia Infantry unit is flipped to its Reduced side.

Morale Value Unit Type 1 Crack 2 Veteran 3 Militia after 1861 4 Militia in 1861 Morale Value Modifiers
Morale Checks: Failure causes that unit to Rout. -1 If that unit is entrenched. Desertion Checks: Failure eliminates that unit. +1 If that unit is on the losing / retreating side. -1 If that unit was not Routed. -1 If there is a friendly Leader unit present at that battle.

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D.3 [Optional] Desertion


While both armies suffered greatly from desertion, particularly after a battle lost, it was always worse among the newly formed Militia units. Seeing the carnage from this, the worlds first modern industrial war, was quite shocking to this generation.

Battle Day Sequence


When using all of the Advanced and Optional Rules, these are the steps you must follow when conducting a battle:

A. Dawn: Begin Battle Day


Each player rolls on the Command Table and adds the result to 1/2 of the previous days Battlefield Command Value (if this is the second or subsequent Battle Day), rounded up. The result is that players current Battlefield Command Value (i.e., the number of Orders he can issue per Round) for this Battle Day. Adjust the Flag markers on the Current Battlefield Command Value Track accordingly. Place Leaders on this Track in the numbered box that corresponds to their Leadership Value. They can issue that many additional Orders each Battle Round (E.2).

At the end of every battle, both sides must roll for the Desertion of units that participated in it. Who Can Desert: All reduced (red-numbered) units must make a Desertion Check (regardless of how or when they became reduced). Full-strength (whitenumbered) units never suffer desertion. Procedure: A unit makes a Desertion Check by rolling a die and comparing the result to that units Morale Value. (See the Morale Table.) Add one to a units Morale Value if it is on the losing / retreating side in that battle. Subtract one from a units Morale Value if it was not Routed (D.2). Thus, a reduced unit receives this morale benefit if it was still among those on the Battle Line when the battle ended, and not on the map routing in the battlefield box. Subtract one if a friendly Leader was present at that battle (if Optional Rule E. is being used). If the die roll is less than or equal to the units Morale Value, it is eliminated through desertion. If the die roll is greater than the units Morale Value there is no effect the unit remains in play normally retreating with any other survivors, if necessary and awaiting Recovery (5.7).
Example: The Confederate player went on to win the battle in the preceding example because the Union player retreated at the beginning of one of his Battle Rounds. The surviving Union units were one full-strength Militia Infantry unit and one Routed, reduced-strength Militia Infantry unit. The Confederates concluded the battle with one entrenched, reduced-strength Veteran Infantry unit. The full-strength unit does not check for Desertion. The Routed reduced-strength Union Militia unit has a modified Morale Value of 4 (3 for its base value, plus 1 for being on the losing side). The Union player rolls a 4, which is greater than or equal to the units modified Morale Value and that unit is eliminated (deserts) and returned to the Recruitment Pool. The reduced-strength Confederate Veteran unit has a modified Morale Value of 1 (2 for its base value, minus 1 for not being routed i.e., for being on the Battle Line and not back on the map in Fredericksburg where the Battlefield marker was). The Confederate player rolls a 3 and that unit does not desert; it remains in play entrenched and reduced in Fredericksburg.

B. Combat Rounds (4 per Battle Day)


1. Defender May Retreat: He may retreat and immediately lose the battle (beginning with the second Round on the first Battle Day and every Battle Round thereafter). 2. Defender Reinforces: He may spend an Order to add reinforcements from all available adjacent boxes (beginning with the second Round on the first Battle Day and every Battle Round thereafter). 3. Defender Rallies: He may spend two Orders per friendly unit routed at this battle to return it from the battlefield box on the map to his Battle Line. 4. Defender Fires: He may spend one Order per friendly unit in his Battle Line to enable it to fire at an enemy unit this Battle Round. Designate a (Like, 5.2) target for each firing unit before rolling any dice. Roll a separate die for each firing unit and apply the effects of any hit results. 5. Attacker Checks Morale: After all enemy fire that Battle Round, newly-reduced units must check their morale to see if they rout off the battlefield (D.2). 6. Attacking Player: Repeat steps 1-5 but with the roles reversed the Attacker gets to retreat or spend Orders to reinforce, rally, and fire, while newly-reduced defending units must check their morale. 7. Advance the Battle Turn marker one round and repeat these steps for each of the four Rounds of a Battle Day.

C. Dusk: End Battle Day


Each side may rally one routed unit (D.2). Begin a new Battle Day at Dawn and continue fighting Battle Rounds.

D. Victory, Desertion & Promotion


Once the victor of the battle is decided, all reducedstrength units (regardless of when or how they became reduced-strength) that participated in that battle must check their morale to see if they desert (D.3). Surviving units return to the map, either holding the battlefield box and receiving a battlefield promotion (for the winner) or conducting a retreat (for the loser).

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D.4 [Optional] Coastal Defenses


Conducting Naval Invasions could be very difficult. The Confederates tied up large numbers of men to garrison their ports men who were greatly needed at the front. These port garrisons often challenged the nearby landings of Union soldiers from their prepared positions.

Port Garrison Units: To reflect the presence of coastal defense artillery and other harbor defenses, each Confederate port that is also a Recruitment City should receives an intrinsic notional Port Garrison unit with a Defensive Combat Value equal to the citys Confederate Recruitment Value.

A Port Garrison unit is only employed when that port city is defending itself against a Union Naval Invasion (4.7).

New Orleans receives a built-in, imaginary Port Garrison unit with a Combat Value of 2 vs. Union Naval Invasions.

The intrinsic Port Garrison unit is never destroyed. If the Confederates regain control of a captured port box, the full strength Port Garrison unit again becomes available. Confederate controlled Union (blue box) ports, including Baltimore, never receive Port Garrison units. Movement: A Port Garrison unit may never move or retreat; it always stays in its city and fights to the death, even if other Confederate units retreat (5.4). Battles: A Port Garrison unit functions thus in battles: It is always at full strength at the start of a battle. It is always considered entrenched (5.31). Other Confederate units in that port city have to entrench there normally by expending a March. Its morale is never checked (D.2 and D.3). Like an actual unit, it costs an Order for it to fire in a Battle Round and it must be hit twice during a battle in order to destroy it. A Battle initiated against a Port Garrison unit can be reinforced (5.5). Any Union units attempting a Naval Invasion must destroy the intrinsic Port Garrison unit, in addition to dealing with any other enemy units

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that are present defending that invaded Confederate port, in order to win the battle there. Recovery: A Port Garrison unit automatically recovers (5.7) after a battle for free (if Optional Rule 5.71, Resting the Army, is being used) while that port is controlled by the Confederates. Promotions: A Port Garrison unit cannot receive a Promotion (6.0). The Union player receives no Promotion for defeating only a Port Garrison unit in battle. He does receive a Promotion if the battle also involved fighting regular Confederate units.

When Marching with other units, the Leader can be included in their Jump Move (4.4, 4.5), Sea Move (4.6) or Naval Invasion (4.7). Leaders move like Cavalry (4.0), but cannot make a Cavalry Jump Move unless actually moving with a Cavalry unit. A Leader unit may move together with any unit in its box when it is activated by a March. This includes riding with that units Jump Move (4.4, 4.5), Sea Move (4.6), or Naval Invasion (4.7). Tagging along with another unit thus is a free move for the Leader. Moving Independently: A Leader unit may also move independently of the other units it is stacked with for free (i.e., at no March cost). A Leader unit may conduct up to two free Marches each Player Turn. (Like other units, two Marches is also a Leaders Speed Limit per Movement Segment.) Leader units move like Cavalry units, but cannot make a Cavalry Jump Move (4.4) unless actually moving along with a Cavalry unit. Reinforcing a Battle: A Leader unit may move together with any unit in its box when it reinforces a Battle (5.5). Alternately, a Leader unit may also reinforce a Battle by moving alone. Leaders do not affect the movement of other units.

E. [Optional] Leaders
Great generals are a product of good fortune. You must not only be the right person with the right skills, but you must also be in the right place at the right time and have the right political connections. Many generals could have been represented but, for the grand strategic scale of A House Divided, the number of Leader units for each side, and their ratings, fit very well into the combatants capabilities at various times throughout the Civil War.

The Leader Units: Three stand-up Leader units are provided in the Advanced Game of A House Divided: Lee, Grant, and Sherman. The white numbers on each Leader unit show its Leadership Value. The top date listed on a Leader unit indicates the Game Turn it enters play. When initially placed on the map during its owners Movement Segment of that Game Turn, Leaders are placed by their owner on any box that contains a friendly unit. The bottom date is when its Leadership Value changes use the applicable current value.
The status change for a Leader represents different things. For Lee, it represents the loss of his right arm, General Stonewall Jackson. For Grant and Sherman, it represents their promotions to larger, more independent commands.

E.2 Leaders in Battle


When Leaders are present at a battle, they may issue a number of Orders each Battle Round equal to their current Leadership Value. This is in addition to their sides normal Battlefield Command Value (D.1). Procedure: When a Leader unit is at a battle, place it in the box on the Current Battlefield Command Value Track that corresponds to its Leadership Value. Do not add its Leadership Value to that sides Command Value and increase the position of the Flag marker! This is important during multi-day battles when adding half of the previous days Command Value to the new Command roll; Leaders dont contribute to the Command Value they just issue additional Orders each Battle Round. The maximum number of Orders that either side can give during a single Battle Round is still eight (although you will reach that value faster and more often with a Leader present on your side). Leaders who reinforce a battle (5.5) may not add their Leadership Value on the Round of their arrival, but may do so on all subsequent Rounds.

E.1 Leader Movement


A Leader, like other units, can make a maximum of two Marches. These Marches can be independent of other units, at no March cost, or with other units.

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When Grant and Sherman are at the same battle, the Union player may combine their Leadership Values and both issue Orders each Battle Round.

F.2 More Support from the Border States


Both sides anticipated more support for the Confederacy from the Border States (Missouri, Kentucky, and Maryland) than were provided historically. Confederate incursions into these States were principally aimed at rallying them to the Confederate banner and enlisting their complete support for the Southern war effort.

E.3 Leaders and Desertion


Units making a Desertion Check (D.3) may subtract one from their Morale Value if a friendly Leader was present at that battle. Grant and Sherman may not combine to subtract two.

E.4 Leaders Alone


Leader units alone in a box do not alter its current control status (8.0). That is, Leaders units by themselves cannot capture or recapture a box. Leader units that find themselves alone in a box with enemy units are not destroyed. They are simply placed back on the map again (see above) at the end their owners next Player Turn. There is no Recruitment cost; Leaders are replaced for free.

The Confederate player checks for Border State Support at the beginning of each Confederate Player Turn in which the Confederates control every Recruitment City in either Missouri (St. Joseph, Springfield, and St. Louis), Kentucky (Bowling Green and Louisville), or Maryland (Baltimore). Procedure: Roll a die for each of the abovecontrolled Border States on the Border States Support Table; use every Support Value modifier that applies. Result: If the die roll is greater than that States modified Support Value, it moves politically closer to the Confederacy with this sole game effect: That States Confederate Militia Infantry unit is added to the Recruitment Pool and functions thus: It remains in play for the rest of the game. It functions exactly like the other Confederate Militia Infantry units. It can be recruited in any friendly Confederate Recruitment City, not just those in its own State. That States boxes do not magically change color nor are there any other effects. No further Border State Support checks are made for this State. This event can only occur once per Border State per game. If the die roll is less than or equal to that States modified Support Value, it remains uncommitted and can be rolled for again on qualifying future turns.

E.5 Leader Redeployment


A Leader can be removed from the map at any time and relocated to any box with a friendly unit at the end the next Player Turn.

F. Confederate Aspirations
In hindsight, many people have subscribed to the Lost Cause theory of Southern defeat (see the films Birth of a Nation or Gone with the Wind for examples). To the wars participants, however, things looked very different. These historical expectations representing Confederate aspirations are simulated by the following rules.

F.1 The Capture of Washington


It is not necessarily true that the Confederate capture of Washington would have ended the war. Under this rule, capturing Washington will often win the war unless the South is losing badly in other areas. Even if the South doesnt win the war, Washingtons loss will have a permanent effect on the Unions overall morale.

The Confederacy does not automatically win if Washington is captured. Procedure: Instead roll one die and subtract that amount from the Union Army Maximum Size value. If a 1 is rolled, subtract two. If the Union recaptures Washington, add only its Recruitment Value (of one) to the Union Army Maximum Size.

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Border States Support Table


Roll for each Border State if every Recruitment City in it is Confederate controlled. If the result is greater than that States modified Support Value, add its Militia Infantry unit to the Recruitment Pool.

Confederate player may not perform River Jump Moves (4.5), use the Potomac River (4.2), or conduct Naval Invasions (4.7). The Confederate player receives the four Foreign Intervention units. They are placed in Europe (i.e., off to the side of the mapboard in an imaginary friendly port box). Foreign Intervention Units: Foreign Intervention units function under the following rules: They do not count against the Confederate Army Maximum Size. They must be brought over to the United States from Europe by using Confederate Sea Movement (at the usual rate of one March per unit). They cannot receive Promotions (6.0). If destroyed, they can be replaced during the Confederate Recruitment Segment. However, each Foreign Intervention unit costs two Recruitment Points to replace. These units are recruited back in Europe and, once again, require Confederate Sea Movement to get back onto the game board on a future Confederate Player Turn.

Support Border Value State 4 Maryland Kentucky 3 2 Missouri Support Value Modifiers:
Pro Confederate: -1 if the Confederate Maximum Army Size is within 5 of the Union Maximum Army Size. -1 if it is 1861. -2 if Washington is Confederate controlled. Pro Union: +1 If it is 1864 or 1865. +1 if the Union Maximum Army Size is 10 or more greater than the Confederate Maximum Army Size. +1 if Richmond is Union controlled.

F.3 [Optional] Foreign Intervention


The South was pinning its hopes (and the Union its fears) on a long shot hoping for foreign recognition and intervention from a European great power (Great Britain in particular). The South never achieved the impressive military victories that would have triggered this event. With this rule, you can recreate this historical possibility.

F.4 [Optional] The Confederate Navy


Just as the Union player may make Naval Invasions when he rolls a 6 for Marches that game turn (4.7), now the Confederate player may similarly make a naval decision.

Triggering Foreign Intervention: Foreign Intervention is triggered by the South only if all of the following conditions exist at the beginning of any Confederate Player Turn: The Confederate Army Maximum Size is within 3 of the Union Army Maximum Size. The Confederates control at least one Union Recruitment City with a Recruitment Value of 2 or more, plus Washington DC. Either no Confederate Recruitment City (i.e., one with a red shield in it) with a Recruitment Value of 2 or more is Union controlled or, for each one that is, another Union Recruitment City with a value of 2 or more is Confederate controlled. Effects of Foreign Intervention: If Foreign Intervention is triggered, it has the following effects: The Confederate player may also perform Sea Movement (4.6), just like the Union. The

If, during the Confederate Movement Segment, the Confederate player rolls a 6 for Marches that turn, he may commit one of his three Naval Resources. It costs the Confederate player four Marches to commit a Naval Resource. To indicate Confederate commitment of that Naval Resource, place a Confederate Control (Flag) marker in the corresponding box on the Confederate Naval Display. Effects: While the Confederate Flag marker resides in that box, its corresponding special rule is in effect: Confederate Domestic Naval Resources Ocean Raiders: One is added to the Confederate Maximum Army Size. Riverine Ironclads: The Union player is prohibited from making River Jump Moves (4.5).

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Coastal Ironclads: All Confederate Coastal Defense (D.4) values are increased by one. (E.g., Charlestons notional Port Garrison unit would have a value of 3). This also means that a Confederate port which is not a Recruitment City (e.g., Norfolk) is considered to have an intrinsic notional Port Garrison unit with a Defensive Combat Value of 1. Foreign Navy: This Box functions differently than the above-listed domestic Confederate Navy boxes. When Foreign Intervention is triggered, place a Confederate Flag marker in this Box to remind players that its effect is on and that the Confederate player may conduct Sea Movement (4.6) just like the Union Player. He may not perform River Jump Moves (4.5), use the Potomac River (4.2), or conduct Naval Invasions (4.7). Union Naval Response: During any Union Movement Segment, the USA player may counter a Confederate Naval Resource. This is indicated by flipping the Confederate Flag marker in any one CSA Naval Resource box (including the Foreign Navy box) over to its Union Flag side. It costs the Union player two Marches to counter a Confederate Naval Resource. Effect: A Union Flag marker in a Confederate Naval Resource box indicates that its corresponding special rule is no longer in effect. In the three Domestic Confederate Naval Resource boxes (Ocean Raiders, Riverine Ironclads, and Coastal Ironclads), a Union Flag marker also indicates that the Confederate player may no longer employ that Naval Resource. That is, the Confederate commitment of each of their three domestic Naval Resources is a once-per-game event. The War at Sea: Unlike the three domestic Confederate Navy boxes, the Confederate player can flip the Flag marker in the Foreign Navy Box back to its Confederate side. He does this at a cost of one Recruitment Point during his Recruitment Segment.

G. Detailed Sequence of Play


The A House Divided Advanced Game extends the Sequence of Play a bit. Here is what the Segments of each Player Turn would look like with every Advanced and Optional Rule included: 1. Preparation Supply (B.) Confederate Border State Support (F.2) Foreign Intervention (F.3) 2. Movement (C.) 6 = Union Invasions / Confederate Navy Marches can refit reduced-strength units 3. Combat (D.) Dawn: Establish BCV (# of Orders / Round) Also Leaders Orders (cant exceed 8 total) 4 Battle Rounds per Battle Day 1 Order to fire 1 Order to reinforce 2 Orders to rally Dusk: Rally one routed unit Withdraw / Reinforce beginning 2nd Round Morale Checks for newly-reduced units (D.2) Post Battle Desertions (D.3) Control marker adjustments 4. Promotions One among victorious survivors at each Battle One additional from anywhere Confederate Replacement Training roll 5. Recruitment Recruitment can refit reduced-strength units Replacing Foreign Intervention units costs two (F.3) Confederate Reactivation of Foreign Navy (F.4) 6. Leader Replacement Leaders lost on the previous Game Turn are returned to play at this time (E.4)

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H. Credits
Game Design (1st Edition: 1981): Frank Chadwick Redesign (2nd Edition: 1989; 3rd Edition: 2004): Alan Emrich Developers: John Harshman, Alan Emrich, and Marc W. Miller Playtesters: Tim Brown, John Astell, Dave Emigh, Tom Harris, Greg Novak, Ben Knight, David MacDonald, Kathy Zeidenstein, Keith Poulter, Gary E. Smith, and Vince DeNardo. Graphics: Franz Vohwinkel Production: Michael Bruinsma, Ulrich Blennemann Proofreading and Additional Suggestions (v3.1): Steve Best, Joe Schweninger, William Woodhill

I.1 Thoughts Concerning a 4th Edition


Should a 4th Edition of A House Divided be published, I would create the following units and make the map corrections suggested below: Units A complete sheet of these proposed additional pieces is included in a separate file for those who want to make their own set and start using them. Below are some samples:

Front

Back

Type
Union BCV / Orders marker Rebel BCV / Orders marker

I. Version 3.1 Designers Notes


When Phalanx Games reprinted A House Divided, although it was dubbed a 3rd Edition, the rules where essentially unchanged from the 2nd Edition I wrote back in the late 1980s. Over the years, however, I had managed to accumulate a bit of errata, plus some corrections and variants for the game that I had longed to incorporate in it. After continuously receiving emails over the years from dedicated players, I have finally decided to make a thorough job of it and have created what I call these Version 3.1 rules booklets. There are only two booklets now, and each has its Optional Rules built in with a shaded background. Matters of phrasing, timing, and examples have greatly improved the games clarity (admittedly, at a cost in weight, going from 20 pages to over 30). Some matters have been made more historically accurate across both rules booklets, such as the 1861 and 1864 Scenario setups, Kentucky Neutrality, Refitting the Army, spending an Order to call in Reinforcements or two Orders to Rally units during a battle, and committing Confederate Naval Resources. Many little things have been subtly simplified, and Leaders in battle are much easier to employ now. In addition to the rules, Ive created player aids to flank the game board which should help keep everything organized.

'Flat' Leader

Rebel Naval Resource

Rebel Port Garrison Entrenchment markers (6) Control markers (8)

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Map Corrections There are four discrepancies between the 3rd Edition map and the earlier versions. I believe that the earlier versions should stand as correct.These are:

Petersburg: the river to Yorktown should flow out of the top of this box. Selma: the railroad to Jacksonville should run through the top of this box.

Louisville: the river to Evansville should flow out of the bottom of this box. Nashville: the river to Fts. Henry & Donelson should flow out of the top of this box.

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