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Strategies Collection Tyler Nadeau Aquinas College December 3, 2013

2 Table of Contents Strategy #1Write Around..4 Example #1Write Around.5 Strategy #2Sequential Roundtable Alphabet6 Example #2Sequential Roundtable Alphabet...7 Strategy #3Give One Take One.8 Example #3Give One Take One9 Strategy #4Annotating Text..10 Example #4Annotating Text.11 Strategy #5Think Aloud...12 Example #5Think Aloud..13 Strategy #6Word Sort..14 Example #6Word Sort.15 Strategy #7Vocabulary Cards..16 Example #7Vocabulary Cards.17 Strategy #8Frayer Model.....18 Example #8Frayer Model.19

Strategy #9Text Rendering..20 Example #9Text Rendering.21 Strategy #10Save the Last Word for Me.22 Example #10Save the Last Word for Me23

4 Strategy #1Write Around WHY? To build a safe environment to share thinking. HOW? 1. 2. 3. 4. Find an engaging text. Have students read and annotate text. Set up groups of 4 students (two elbow partners join two other elbow partners). Explain the rules: a. No talking. b. Write the entire time allotted. Instruct writers to respond to text. Give a time limit and have students begin writing. At time, have students pass papers clockwise. Have students respond to each others writing. Repeat steps 6-8 until each group has passed their papers all the way around.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

WHERE? Kathy Vogel, Adjunct Professor of Education, Aquinas College LITERACY EVENTS readingtext writing out ideas speaking listening responding to others thoughts and opinions COMPREHENSION STRATEGIES monitoring comprehension making inferences determining important ideas

Example of Strategy #1 5

6 Strategy #2Sequential Roundtable Alphabet WHY? This strategy is a great way for students to brainstorm their prior knowledge, interact with others, and even review information at the end of a unit. HOW? 1. Give each student or group a blank copy of the Sequential Roundtable Alphabet. 2. Have students generate words that begin with each letter of the alphabet(e.g. relating to Part of the Human Body) within a designated time period. 3. Ask students or groups to share their words with the entire class. In particular, students will want to hear if other groups came up with associations for difficult letters. 4. Students should write down additional terms that they did not have originally. WHERE? Kathy Vogel, Adjunct Professor of Education, Aquinas College LITERACY EVENTS readingtext writingputting down terms speakingdiscussing with partners and class listeninghearing what others have to contribute viewinglooking at terms in grid and sorting them visually representingimages of terms in grid COMPREHENSION STRATEGIES setting a purposereason for reviewing terms determining important ideaspulling out key concepts and terms making connectionsrelating it to what is known

Example of Strategy #2
BiologyWhat Do Cells Have To Do With It?

A amyloplast adenosine triphosphate animals anaerobic aerobic anaphase

B Biology bacteria

C Cell Membrane Cell Wall Chloroplast Cytoplasm Chromosomes Chlorophyll carbon dioxide Cancer cytokinesis J

D DNA Dictiosomes Diploid Daughter cells

E Endoplasmic Reticulum Eukaryotic

F Fat Flagellum fungi

G Golgi Bodies Granum Genetics Gametes

H Heredity Haploid

I Interphase

L Lysosomes Lipids

O Organelles oxygen

P Protein Photosynthesis Plants Protists Plastids Prokaryotic Prophase W Water

R Ribosomes RNA rough endoplasmic reticulum respiration

S Sugar smooth endoplasmic reticulum stroma

M Mitochondria Mutations Macromolecules Metabolism Mitosis Meiosis Metaphase T Tubules thylakoid disks transcription translation telophase

N Nuclear Membrane Nucleolus Nucleus

V Vacuole Ventricles vesicles

8 Strategy #3Give One Take One WHY? To have students compare and contrast ideas they deemed important from a text. HOW? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Find an engaging text. Have students read and annotate text. Have students fold a piece of paper so as to create 16 squares. Have students fill in 8 squares of their own thinking and ideas from the text on their own paper. Have students walk around classroom sharing and comparing important ideas from the text. When a student receives a piece of information from another student to fill in remaining squares, the student who provided the information must sign the box that their idea was written in. 7. This is done until all boxes are filled in on a students sheet (give a time limit here so that students have to work efficiently) WHERE? Kathy Vogel, Adjunct Professor of Education, Aquinas College LITERACY EVENTS readingtext writing out ideas speaking listening responding to others thoughts and opinions COMPREHENSION STRATEGIES monitoring comprehension making inferences determining important ideas

9 Example of Strategy #3

10 Strategy #4Annotating Text WHY? To have students talk back to the text while they are reading. HOW? 1. Find an engaging text. 2. Have students read and annotate text. 3. This can be done just by writing on the text or with the use of sticky notes if text must be reused. WHERE? Kathy Vogel, Adjunct Professor of Education, Aquinas College LITERACY EVENTS readingtext writing out ideas using previous knowledge to build on understanding asking questions COMPREHENSION STRATEGIES monitoring comprehension making inferences determining important ideas

11 Example of Strategy #4

12 Strategy #5Think Aloud WHY? To have students hear the teachers thinking when solving a problem. (Or students hearing each others thinking) HOW? 1. When doing something that requires multiple steps, have students listen to your [the teachers] thinking while working through an example. 2. Write out your thinking. 3. Students may do this as well with one another. WHERE? Kathy Vogel, Adjunct Professor of Education, Aquinas College LITERACY EVENTS writing out ideas speaking listening COMPREHENSION STRATEGIES putting thoughts into words understanding of steps to solve problems, write sentences, use correct grammar, etc. determining and using important ideas building on previous knowledge

13 Example of Strategy #5

Solving a math equation for x: 33x-45+12x=32-6x This is the thinking aloud that is going on and would be written down by the teacher and/or the student: I know that I have an equation because there is an equal sign. First, I must get all of the x terms on one side of the equal sign. My x terms are 33x and -6x I need to add 6x to both sides of the equation leaving 33x-45+12x+6x=32 Next, I need to get all of the constants on one of the equal sign. I know that a constant is just a number without a coefficient. My constants are -45, and 32. I will add 45 to both sides. This will give me: 33x+12x+6x=32+45 Now I have like terms on either side of the equation. Since they are like terms, I need to combine like terms. This leaves me with: 51x=77 Now, I remember that I need to solve for x, so to undo multiplication, I must do division. I must divide both sides of the equation by 51 in order to get an x on one side of the equation. This will give me: x= 51/77 Since the problem asked me to solve for x, I am done with the problem. I know that this fraction does not reduce so my final answer is: x=51/77.

14 Strategy #6Word Sort WHY? To create an engaging way for students to use, recognize, and learn vocabulary. HOW? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Give several words in an envelope to each student. These words can be all interrelated or can differ based on categories. Tell students that they are to sort the words into a distinct number of categories. Allow a few minutes for this to go on. Ask students what the categories of words were. Students could then do any number of activities with these words, from defining them to writing a pre-assessment to see what they know about each word.

WHERE? Kathy Vogel, Adjunct Professor of Education, Aquinas College LITERACY EVENTS readingwords vocabulary sounding out words speaking listening writing COMPREHENSION STRATEGIES making inferences using prior knowledge to define words categorizing words recalling/discovering definition of words

Example of Strategy #6

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16 Strategy #7Vocabulary Cards WHY? To create an engaging way for students to use, recognize, and learn vocabulary. HOW? 1. Give students several pre-printed vocabulary cards and a list of words. 2. Have students describe the word through a definition and then have them draw a picture of what the word represents. 3. Tell students that they are to study these vocab words for homework and throughout the unit when time permits. WHERE? Kathy Vogel, Adjunct Professor of Education, Aquinas College LITERACY EVENTS readingwords vocabulary sounding out words speaking listening writing drawing COMPREHENSION STRATEGIES using prior knowledge to define words creating a picture or diagram to illustrate words recalling/discovering definition of words application of word through memorization applying definition to area of study

Example of Strategy #7

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18 Strategy #8Frayer Model WHY? To create an engaging way for students to use, recognize, and learn vocabulary. HOW? 1. Give the Frayer Model worksheet to students with a word in the center oval. 2. Ask students to work in groups to try and define the word, come up with characteristics of the word and to find examples and non-examples of the word. 3. Allow a few minutes for this to go on. 4. Ask groups to share their thinking with the class. WHERE? Kathy Vogel, Adjunct Professor of Education, Aquinas College LITERACY EVENTS readingwords vocabulary sounding out words speaking listening writing COMPREHENSION STRATEGIES making inferences using prior knowledge to define words recalling/discovering definition of words being able to come up with examples and non-examples of a word being able to characterize a word

Example of Strategy #8 19
Definition Characteristics

A mathematical shape that is closed plane figure With 3 sides and 3 angles adding up to 180 degrees.

-closed -plane figure -3 angles with a sum of 180 degrees -made of line segments

Triangle
Examples 3-4-5 triangle Obtuse triangle Acute triangle Right Triangle Non-examples square circle cylinder cube

20 Strategy #9Text Rendering WHY? Help students summarize a text into a word, phrase, and sentence. HOW? 1. Students read an engaging piece of text. 2. Students individually summarize a portion of the text into a sentence. 3. Students individually summarize that same portion of text into a phrase. 4. Students individually summarize that same portion of text into a word. 5. Students share their ideas within their groups of 4. 6. Students create one sentence, one phrase, and one word to summarize the groups summation of sentences, phrases, and words. 7. WHERE? Kathy Vogel, Adjunct Professor of Education, Aquinas College LITERACY EVENTS readingwords vocabulary speaking listening discussion writing summarizing COMPREHENSION STRATEGIES summarizing the text recalling/discovering definition of words understanding main points of text what was most meaningful to me multiple viewpoints of the text pull out main idea

21 Example of Strategy #9 Students are asked to read an article called The Tutor as they prepare to become tutors of younger students in the elementary school. Each student will read the article on their own, annotating the text as they read. Each student will then decide on a sentence, phrase, and word to summarize what is most important to them in the text. For example, after reading the article, my sentence was: Emphasize that reading a text is an integral part of learning for everyone. My phrase was: Encouraging and positive about a students efforts My word was: Model After the students come up with their own sentence, phrase, and word, they share their ideas with their group. They then work as a group to come up with one sentence, one phrase, and one word to summarize all of the sentences, phrases, and words that each student presented. For example, my group came up with the sentence: Many young people with reading difficulties simply havent had enough experience using words to express their ideas and points of view. Our phrase was: Encouraging and positive about a students efforts Our word was: Confidence

22 Strategy #10Save the Last Word for Me WHY? To allow students the opportunity to form opinions and defend their opinions about a text. HOW? 1. 2. 3. 4. Have students read an engaging text and take notes on areas that interest them. Students get into groups of 4. The first person in the group responds first by saying a one sentence opinion of the text. The process goes around the table and the other students respond to what the person prior to them said as well as share their own opinion. Allow a few minutes for this to go on. 5. Have this process go around the table a few more times. 6. Ask groups to share their thinking with the class. WHERE? Kathy Vogel, Adjunct Professor of Education, Aquinas College LITERACY EVENTS readingwords annotating the text/taking notes speaking listening forming opinions COMPREHENSION STRATEGIES making inferences using prior knowledge to defend opinions recalling information previously stated by peer being able to come up with examples to support opinion being able to accept others opinions and continue conversation based on what has previously been stated by peers

23 Example of Strategy #10 Students are asked to read an article about the horrible effect fast food restaurants are having on childhood obesity. Person #1 in the group may say: I agree completely that fast food restaurants are the sole cause of childhood obesity because they promote such unhealthy food options and are attracting young people to eat at their restaurants. Person #2 in the group may say: I would have to agree with you, it seems that the food is getting of lesser quality and that the restaurants are not providing enough healthy alternatives. Person #3 in the group may say: I disagree with both of you, I feel that it is someones choice whether or not they eat at a fast food restaurant and the total blame of childhood obesity should not just be at the expense of fast food restaurants. Person #4 in the group may say: I agree with all of you on certain issues, I do agree that fast food restaurants are catering to the young people by offering toys and play areas, but at the same time they are putting apples and milk into meals rather than pop and French fries, it is up to the person what they want to eat, we just need to make better choices about where we eat. The conversation would then return to Person #1 in the group where his or her opinion may have been changed or now they have the opportunity to defend their opinion and argue why they believe they are right in what they are saying. The conversation would then continue around the table again until everyone has had the chance to defend and/or change their opinion about what was said.